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Children's Mental Health Plan Overview(1)

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					      The Children’s Plan:  
Improving the Social and Emotional Well Being 
  of  New York’s Children and Their Families 
Presentation to the Interagency 
    Coordinating Council
       January 14, 2010


       Susan Thaler, OMH
     Myla Harrison, DOHMH
     Brian Lombrowski, OMH
                Role Models            Divorce
   Ga ngs

                           School Drop Outs
Peer Pressure
                               ent
                        mploym
                   Une
               al 
            on          High 
          rs e
         e c                  Stake
       rp len
      e o                           s Tes
    nt i
   I V                                    ts

                College
       A Unified Call to Action
• “The Children’s Plan” was submitted to 
  Legislature under the signature of ALL 
  child-serving state agency Commissioners

• Each of the nine (9) child-serving agencies 
  made a commitment to The Plan and 22 
  joint initiatives to be addressed within the 
  first year
                            Council of Children
  Office of Mental Health     and Families


  Office of Children                              State Education
 and Family Services                                Department

                    The Children’s Plan
                        For All New York’s Children
                             and Their Families     Commission of Quality of
 Office of Alcoholism and
Substance Abuse Services                             Care and Advocacy for
                                                    Persons with Disabilities

 Office of Mental Retardation                Department of Health
and Developmental Disabilities

                        Division of Probation and
                        Correctional Alternatives
                     Plan Themes
•   Social and emotional development and learning form a 
    foundation for success in school, work and in life.  

•   Every action should strengthen our capacity to engage and 
    support families in raising their children with emotional 
    health and resilience.  

•   The right service is available at the right time in the right 
    amount.

•   One family-one plan.

•   An adequately sized workforce that is culturally competent 
    and steeped in a new paradigm of integrated, family–
    driven care must be developed and sustained. 
NYC Children's Plan Implementation

Roundtable Discussion   
  Opportunity to bring together youth, 
  families, city and local state representatives 
  to address needs of two populations:


     • Transition Age Youth: 16-25 years old
     • Young Children: Birth-5 years old
NYC Youth 16 to 25 Transitioning Out of
    the Children’s Service System
• 200,000 youth 16-24 disconnected from school & work
• ONLY 4% of youth classified as ED on their IEPs 
  graduate with a regular diploma
• > 3,500 youth return from detention  
  – extreme difficulty re-engaging with education and 
    employment
• 1,200 youth age out of NYC’s foster care system 
  yearly
  – challenges finding housing and maintaining independence
• Adolescents transitioning to adulthood with serious 
  mental illness:
  – are 3X more likely to be involved in criminal activity
  – have higher rates of substance abuse than any other age 
    groups with mental illness.  
 Young Children Birth to 5 Years Old
• Prevalence rates of mental health problems: 
   – 21% overall; 9% for serious mental health problems 
• Early secure attachments contribute to the growth of a broad range of 
  competencies including love of learning, sense of one-self, positive 
  social skills, and relationships. 
• Serious long- term social and emotional consequences result when 
  children and youth are exposed to repeated early traumatic 
  experiences- including: language development problems, difficulty 
  forming trusting relationships and problems with both emotional and 
  behavioral regulation. This leads to greater school failure; increased 
  substance abuse, joblessness and homelessness.  
• Maternal depression afflicts 25% of mothers and mothers-to-be, and 
  as many as 60% of those who live in poverty, and can severely 
  damage the relationship between mother and child-especially during 
  infancy. 
• For many children, academic achievement in their first few years of 
  schooling is built on a firm foundation of children's emotional and 
  social skills.  
     The Children’s Plan: 
The NYC Roundtable Discussion


      December 11, 2009
           Who Participated?
• NYC Agencies
  – DYCD, DOE, ACS, DJJ, DOC, DOP, HRA, 
    DHS, DOHMH, HHC and Mayor’s Office 
• NYS Agencies (local representatives)
  – OMH, OCFS, SED, DOH, OASAS, 
    OMRDD, DOPCA, CCF
• Families 
• Youth 
Participants were asked to identify 
             concerns
1. From your agency’s perspective what 
  critical issue for transition age youth and 
  children under 5 would benefit from 
  city/state collaboration and cross-system 
  support?

2. In a year, what collaborative cross-system 
  practices/services can be achieved to 
  improve the system for these populations?
       Principles to guide priorities
•   Efforts must add value to existing endeavors and 
    are not repetitive of work on the ground

•   Issues of focus must require cross-system efforts 
    to address needs

•   Benefits will accrue from a city/state collaboration 
    under the framework of The Children’s Plan

•   Initiatives will fill gaps in existing system that can 
    be accomplished in a year and will lay the 
    groundwork for future initiatives
Priority Issues from the Roundtable 
Transition Age Youth
•   Need for a collaborative approach to enable 
    transition age youth to access appropriate 
    housing and develop skills for independent 
    functioning. 
•   Need for youth service plans to be youth-guided 
    and coordinated across all agencies with shared 
    accountability for outcomes. 
Early Childhood
•   Need to enhance support for traumatized 
    children.
Initiatives: Transition Age Youth 
Collaborative approach - access appropriate
housing and develop skills for independent
                functioning.
• Each child serving agency contributes to defining 
  the skill set for transition age youth and 
  collaborates to develop cross system training.
• Provide youth/families easy access to 
  information/expert consultation on services for 
  transition age youth – housing, employment, 
  benefits, health, etc. (e.g., a youth empowerment 
  day at a drop in center) 
• Review housing regulations to increase flexibility 
  and incorporate supportive services 
• Specify a commitment to funding and prioritizing 
  youth for housing programs.
      Youth service plans - youth-guided,
    coordinated across all agencies, shared
                accountability
• Engage youth by creating or building on existing 
  borough-based assistance centers through the 
  reallocation of existing resources/services. 
• Create/build upon electronic portal detailing services 
  and information to enable youth, families and 
  providers easy access to available services.  
• Develop a cross training collaborative focused on 
  youth development including skills building, 
  transition planning and navigating service systems. 
• Develop a cross-system youth forum where youth 
  advocates can network and provide feedback to 
  agencies.
Initiatives: Early Childhood
       Need to enhance support for
          traumatized children
• Zero tolerance for pre-school expulsion.
• Protocol to use peer review to help agencies improve 
  awareness and sensitivity to trauma. 
• Cross systems consensus on the definition and 
  levels of trauma.
• Educational campaign and materials to enhance 
  understanding of trauma.
• Protocol for uniform screening and early detection of 
  trauma; training staff in providing trauma informed 
  care; and educating family members in dealing with 
  trauma. 
      Need to enhance support for
    traumatized children (continued)
• Cross-system training about services available to 
  young children for parents and pediatricians.
• Train parent advocates to educate parents on an 
  evidence based treatment model on the relational 
  aspects of the developing child. 
• Develop the workforce capacity to provide 
  appropriate treatment for children 0-5 years old. 
• Agencies involved with domestic violence (ACS, 
  Mayor’s Office, HRA) develop strategies for 
  supporting families and young children in domestic 
  violence situations.
 Existing Cross-System Structures

• Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC)
• CCSI: Coordinated Children’s Services 
  Initiative 
  – Citywide Oversight Committee (COC) 
  – Borough Based Councils (BBCs)

• Federation’s Early Childhood Workgroup 
                Opportunities 

• Unite under one plan. 
• Strengthen cross system collaboration to 
  address cross-agency priority issues. 
• Build on successful efforts, existing resources 
  and strong leadership to improve services and 
  systems for NYC’s most vulnerable. 
• Pool resources, blend funding, work more 
  efficiently
• Foster and utilize family and youth involvement. 
Youth Involvement Efforts in New York 


 • Youth involvement is NOT a new 
   concept.
 • It exists in multiple venues in New 
   York City.
       Examples of Agencies and
      Organizations that Have Youth
        Involvement Groups in NY
    Youth Justice Board         Bronx Family Resource Center
    YouthACTION NYC               Brooklyn Family Resource 
   Youth Communication                     Center – ICL
 Make the Road New York           Brooklyn Family Resource 
Brothas and Sistas Untied of              Center - JCCA
        the NW Bronx              Family Resource Center of 
     Youth on the Move                       Queens
    Future of Tomorrow          Staten Island Family Resource 
Desis Rising Up and Moving                   Center
     Youth in Progress                     The Door
Youth Advisory Board - ACS                 The Point
Manhattan Family Resource           The Youth Experience
            Center              Albert's Leaders of Tomorrow
         The Youth Experience

   Started in May 2008 as part of the Building 
    Bridges Initiative
   Original members apply for Dare to Dream 
    Initiative Grant
   Organized Youth Forum & Speak Out in 
    January 2009
   Currently meets monthly
   Using The Children’s Plan to
   Integrate Youth Involvement

• Partnership developed between The Youth 
  Experience and youth involvement 
  activities at the Family Resource Centers 
  and the Family Support Liaison Center
• Developed Youth Advocate Basic Training 
  to prepare Youth Advocates for their roles
               Our Vision

• Youth involvement wherever policy 
  decisions about young people are made.
• Introducing youth advocates to decision 
  making venues where planning and policy 
  issues are discussed (i.e., Children’s Plan 
  Roundtable) and preparing them to 
  effectively participate in those venues.
          How We Can Help

• Collaboration on a City-Wide Youth 
  Conference to bring all the Youth 
  Involvement groups together to network and 
  learn from each other.
• Provide ongoing training and support for any 
  young person in the city interested in youth 
  advocacy and youth involvement through 
  The Youth Experience, and the leadership 
  activities of YOUTH POWER!’s Regional 
  Youth Partner.
Contact Information
       Susan Thaler
       OMH
       212 330-1668
       oncysct@omh.state.ny.us

       Myla Harrison
       DOHMH
       212 219-5389
       mharriso@health.nyc.org

       Brian Lombrowski
       OMH
       212 330-1675
       oncfbml@omh.state.ny.us

				
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Jun Wang Jun Wang Dr
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