Chemical Properties of Seawater by hcj

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 26

									        Learning Objectives
 Understand water’s structure and unique properties
 Define solutions and their properties
 Determine what properties change when a solute is 
  added to a solvent
 Define and explain colligative properties and 
  interactions of a solution
  Describe seawater’s properties and chemical 
  composition
 Discuss the environmental issues associated with 
  seawater’s chemical properties.
Water’s Chemical Structure
 Chemical Structure:
  1- Oxygen and Hydrogen bonds-hydrogen shares one pair of electron with 
  oxygen. 
  2- Two unpaired electron pairs are unbonded
  3- Electrons shared with oxygen are strongly attracted towards the oxygen atom. 
  (this is called electronegativity)
  4- The unequal sharing of electrons create a charge difference. Hydrogen has 
  slight positive charge and oxygen has a slight negative charge.
  5- The structure formed is a bent polar molecular structure. Also called a Dipole 
  molecule.




          105° Angle, 2 bonded pairs and 2 unshared pairs. H2O
Lab
 1- Draw a Bohr’s model for each of elements listed below: 
 Hydrogen, Oxygen, Sodium, Chloride, Calcium, 
 Magnesium, Potassium, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Carbon 
 and Fluoride.
 2- Using the molecular model kits build a model of water 
 and other chemical compounds. 
        Include these compounds:
        Carbon dioxide
        Sodium Chloride
        Bicarbonate
 Use the following website to help you:
 http://www.stolaf.edu/depts/chemistry/mo/struc/explore.
 htm
Water Properties
 Due to the hydrogen 
  bonds in water, 
  water’s freezing and 
  boiling points are 
  much higher than 
  other substances.
 Water has a high heat 
  capacity, which means 
  it takes a great deal of 
  energy to change the 
  state of water.
 This is an important 
  factor when discussing 
  ocean currents and 
  atmospheric 
  conditions.
Heat Capacity of Water
Properties of Solutions
 Solution- a homogenous mixture of two or more 
  substances in a single physical state.
       very small
       evenly distributed-uniformly
       will not separate no matter how long it is allowed to stand
 Solute-substance that is dissolved
  Solvent-substance that does the 
  dissolving
  Example: Salt Water- Salt-Solute, 
  Water-Solvent
Properties of Solutions
 Soluble- a substance that dissolves in 
  another substance. Example: Salt and 
  Water
 Insoluble-a substance that does not 
  dissolve in another
       Example: Oil and Water
 Polar solutes tend to dissolve in polar       Free-StockPhotos.com
  solvents. Example: Water is the universal 
  solvent due to its polar molecule. Salt 
  Water.                                             Time Warp:
 Grease  or oil do not dissolve in water            Oil in Water
  because both are nonpolar molecule.          http://dsc.discovery.co
  (Insoluble)                                   m/videos/time-warp-
 Ionic compounds do dissolve in water           oil-and-water.html
  because they have charges which make                       
  them polar compounds
Ocean Connection




                   Photo from website
Temperature and Pressure
 solutions of gases in liquids are greatly affected by changes 
  in temperature: Soda
 As temperature increases the solubility of a gas in a liquid 
  decreases.
 The effect of temperature changes on the solubility of 
  solids in liquids is very different from that of gases. 
  Solubility of solid solute increases, as temperature 
  increases.
 solubility of a gas in a liquid is strongly influenced by 
  pressure
 The solubility of a gas in a solvent is increased, when the 
  pressure is increased
Lab
1-Gas Simulation Lab
 Learning goal:  To understand the properties and behavior of gases under 
   certain conditions, particularly under changing temperature, pressure and 
   volume. 
 Use the website below to answer all questions:
           http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Gas_Properties

2- Complete the Investigating How Temperature Affects Gas Solubility Lab
       Colligative Properties and
              Interactions
 Depends on the concentration of solute particles and 
  their chemical identity
 Includes vapor pressure reduction, boiling point 
  elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic 
  pressure. 
 Colligative interactions-surface tension, viscosity, 
  cohesion and density
Seawater Properties
 Seawater is considered a solution
                                           Click for Animation
 Water dissolves salt (NaCl) an ionic 
  compound by breaking the bonds 
  of between ions .
Salinity: the total amount of dissolved 
  salt. Units: parts per thousands (ppt)
Example: Seawater 35 ppt. which 
  translates to 0.26 gallons (1kg) of 
  seawater contains about 1.13 ounces 
  (35 g) of dissolved salts
coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/.../tempscales.html




   Physical Properties
     Seawater demonstrates colligative properties:
      Salt (solute) lowers the freezing point of water  
      and raises the boiling the pt of water. 
     The freezing and boiling point will depend on 
      the salinity of the seawater. 
     An example of boiling point elevation can be 
      seen near the hydrothermal vents at the mid-
      ocean ridges.
     Density- is controlled by salinity, pressure and 
      temperature. Greater than pure water because         http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.ed
      of dissolved salts.  Also depends on                 u/cosmic_classroom/cosmic_refe
                                                           rence/tempscales.html
      temperature- example cooling surface water 
      with less salt content will increase in density 
      and sink.
Colligative Interactions
 Salt added to water increases the 
  surface tension
 Salt added to water increases the 
  viscosity of water, however by a 
  small amount.
       Surface water at the equator 
       is warmer, decreasing the 
       viscosity of seawater.
 Temperature effects both 
  interactions                         Click to the photo to view 
                                          Teacher Tube Video
Lab:
 Students should be able to understand the differences 
  between water and seawater: (Lab is from “Life on an 
  Ocean Planet: Activity #1 Chapter 6. Teachers can 
  substitute a Lab of their choice)
       Complete “Water, More than just Wet, it’s unique” Lab
       Start with Station 2 “Study of Cohesion”
       Make sure you repeating the steps for each station with salt 
        water solution (prepared by teacher)
       Complete all diagrams and label all information
Conclusion:
 Explain the differences between salt water and pure 
 water?
Composition
 Trace elements are present in small 
  concentration-parts per billion
 Major constituents are listed in the 
  table and appear in seawater in 
  minute quantities.
 The ionic composition of open-
  ocean water remains the same. A 
  constant proportion is maintained 
  (Marcet and Forchhammer).
 Give the chemical symbol, atomic 
  mass, atomic number and what 
  group they appear in on the periodic 
  table.
                                          Table from An introduction 
                                          to the World’s Oceans
Sources of Salt
 Chemical weathering of rocks on the continents 
 Earth’s interior- volcanic eruptions- water vapor and other 
  gases-outgassing
 Salinity remains constant through time



                                       NOAA Website
Gases
 Most gases are 
  obtained from the 
  atmosphere and 
  distributed 
  through depths by 
  mixing processes.
 Nitrogen, Oxygen 
  and Carbon 
  Dioxide are the 
  most abundant        Information taken from Introduction to the World’s Oceans


  dissolved gases.
Dissolved Gases
 Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide play important roles in the ocean 
  for biological activities.
 Concentrations of Oxygen are high on surface waters, while 
  Carbon Dioxide concentrations are low.
 As depth increases, oxygen levels decrease and carbon dioxide 
  increases.
 Both are influenced by the biology. Photosynthesis takes place 
  at the surface, as depth increases respiration increases and 
  oxygen decreases.
 Carbon dioxide is added to deep waters, these deep waters can 
  hold high concentrations of CO2 due to low temperatures and 
  high pressure.
 Carbon dioxide in seawater reacts with water to form carbonic 
  acid (H2CO3)
Seawater pH
 Water is amphoteric-it can act as an acid or base
 As an Acid water gives up H+ to become OH-
 As a base water accepts an H+ to become an 
    H3O+
   In pure water- H3O+ and OH- ions are found at a 
    concentration of 1.0 x 10-7 M- pH 7- neutral
   Acidity or alkalinity of solutions are measured 
    using the pH scale.
   Seawater is slightly alkaline with a pH between 
    7.5 and 8.5. 
   Buffering-is a substance that prevents sudden 
    changes in acidity or alkalinity of a solution.
   Carbon dioxide acts as a buffer, controlling the 
    pH of seawater.


                                    Click the pH scale to view a parcel of water 
                                    as its pH changes from acidic to alkaline
Carbon dioxide and Carbonic Acid
           Chemistry
CO2 + H2O         H2CO3         HCO3 -  +  H+ or  CO32-  +  2H+   

CO2 combines with the water form carbonic acid. Carbonic acid 
dissociates into bicarbonate, hydrogen ion and 2 hydrogen ions.


  •This helps to maintain a constant pH
  •pH of seawater depends on the concentration of CO2
  •Higher concentrations of CO2more acidic seawater becomes
  •Warm water at the surface has a high pH 8.5
  •Cold deep water is more acidic due to high concentrations of CO 2
    Environmental
    Concern
 Oxygen-deprived zones- 
  - caused by sluggish circulation and
   oxygen-poor waters can reduce oxygen 
  concentrations at intermediate depths.
  - these can occur from natural 
  occurrences, such as cold water rising            Click for Flash Animation
  from depths bringing nutrients especially 
  nitrogen to the surface. 
  Plankton and nekton growth occurs, when these organisms die, bacteria takes 
  over and deplete the water of oxygen.
  - Currently fertilizer runoff from farms and lawns is fueling oxygen-deprived 
  zones.
  - Climate change can also increase the occurrences of oxygen-deprived zones. 
  - These zones do not sustain fish and will cause ecological and economic 
  problems.
Environmental Concern
 Ocean Acidity-
         - one-third of carbon dioxide released by burning fossil fuels end up in the oceans
         - evidence shows the ocean’s natural ability to process carbon dioxide is being 
         overwhelmed
         -since the industrial revolution there has been a 30% surge in acidity
         -continued emission of CO2 indicate ocean chemistry will change 
         drastically, this hasn’t happened for million of years.
         -this will threaten a variety of calcite-secreting organisms. 




                                                                                   Image 
                                                                                   from: 
                                                                                   http://ww
                                                                                   w.atmos.u
                                                                                   md.edu/~
                                                                                   rjs/oco/
Sources
 "Chemical detectives follow nitrogen's elusive and essential trail in the 
  ocean: the 'isotope effect' offers a new way to track nitrogen." 
  Oceanus, Dec 2008 v47 i1 p33(2). Science Resource Center. Gale. 13 July 
  2009 
  <http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/SciRC?ste=1&docNum=A192258
  578> 
 "Ocean acidification: the biggest threat to our oceans?(Washington 
  Watch)." BioScience, Nov 2007 v57 i10 p822(1). Science Resource
  Center. Gale. 13 July 2009 
  <http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/SciRC?ste=1&docNum=A171887
  003> 
 "Deep-ocean life where oxygen is scarce: oxygen-deprived zones are 
  common and might become more so with climate change. Here life 
  hangs on, with some unusual adaptations." American Scientist, Sept-
  Oct 2002 v90 i5 p436(9). Science Resource Center. Gale. 13 July 2009 
  <http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/SciRC?ste=1&docNum=A90570
  698> 
Sources
 LeMay, B. R. (2002). Chemistry "Connections to Our Changing
  World". Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
 Sverdrup, A. &. (2008). An Introduction to the World's Oceans. 
  New York, New York: McGraw Hill.
 Lutgens, T. &. (2009). Earth Science. Upper Saddle River, New 
  Jersey: Prentice Hall.
 NOAA. (2008, March 25). Retrieved July 13, 2009, from 
  Monitoring Estuaries: 
  http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/estuaries/estuaries
  10_monitoring.html
 Maryland, U. o. (2009, March 1). Orbiting Carbon Observatory. 
  Retrieved July 13, 2009, from Orbiting Carbon Observatory: 
  http://www.atmos.umd.edu/~rjs/oco/

								
To top