Docstoc

Presentation_ISEE2012_resource_efficiency_jlw

Document Sample
Presentation_ISEE2012_resource_efficiency_jlw Powered By Docstoc
					International Society for Ecological Economics 
ISEE Conference 16-19 June 2012, Rio de Janeiro

ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS AND RIO+20: 
CONTRIBUTIONS AND CHALLENGES FOR A GREEN ECONOMY 

GUANABARA I 
Models of Green Growth
Chair: Helen Suich / Roxana Juliá
[952] 
RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND DECOUPLING GDP GROWTH FROM NATURAL 
RESOURCE USE: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC AND ECOSYSTEM APPROACHES
Jean-Louis Weber, Jock Martin,
European Environment Agency, Copenhagen - Denmark
• “resource efficiency” means doing the same thing or 
  more with less resource and less damages resulting from 
  resource use. 
• The first aspect is generally referred as decoupling (of 
  GDP from resource use).
• The second aspect is by analogy named “second” 
  decoupling (of GDP from environmental impacts). 
“first decoupling” 

• First decoupling indicators measure resource efficiency 
  from the point of view of the economy, with the 
  assumption that alleviation of pressures results in 
  improvement of the environmental conditions. 
• Such indicators are compiled by OECD as outcomes of 
  MFA (material flows analysis) and measurements of 
  green growth
• the EU has chosen the indicator 
   Direct Material Consumption/GDP 
   as headline indicator of the “flagship initiative” for a 
   resource efficient Europe by 2020.
limitations of “first decoupling” indicators

• A first and well known limitation of “first decoupling” is 
  that the relative improvement of the ratio GDP/resource 
  use can be upset by a faster increase of GDP and result 
  finally in an increased burden on the environment. 
• Even in the case of a reduction of resource use (absolute 
  decoupling is a difficult target considering economic 
  development and population growth), degradation may 
  continue if thresholds have been bypassed as it is the 
  case in several fisheries around the World. 
• There are in addition issues with the format of indicators 
  based on “economy wide” material flows accounts.
A stylised map of materials of particular importance for accounting




Source : Steurer A. and Radermacher, W., 1996
materials are not equivalent regarding uses and impacts
• First remark: the land resource is excluded because it has no weight
• Second remark: the water resource is excluded because “the flows
  of water would be so large that data on all other materials would
  be of negligible size”
• In the middle of the oval the materials which make 99% of the total 
  flow coexist such as fossil fuels and carbon, biomass products and 
  sand and gravel. In fact, the consumption of fossil fuels and 
  biomass product results ultimately in combustion (and CO2) when 
  sand and gravel are moved from one place (e.g. quarry) to be 
  incorporated into durable infrastructures (e.g. buildings). Fossil 
  fuels and biomass products are internationally traded when sand 
  and gravel are mostly of local use. 
• Sand and gravel (often named “non-metallic minerals”) represent 
  in Europe more than 40% of the domestic material flow.
• The addition of carbon material with san and gravel in one single 
  aggregate can lead to ambiguities and mis-interpretations. 
An additional issue with the use of the GDP/DMI indicator

• DMI = Domestic Extraction Used (DEU) + Imports – Exports 
• or DMI = DMI – Exports

DMI is a consumption indicators and should be compared to Final 
Demand, not to GDP

DMI (the Direct Material Input = DEU + Imports) is more relevant for 
comparisons with GDP. 

(Ideally, DMI should be adjusted for those products which are only
imported for re-sale, without transformation in the country and the
embedded consumptions in the exporting countries)
Illustration…




In the case of Norway which GDP is to a large extent made of exports of oil and gas,  the 
GDP/DMI indicator which excludes exports gives a wrong picture of resource efficiency. 
GDP/DMI would be a more correct measurement.
  Measuring the ‘second decoupling’ with ecosystem capital accounts
• Ecosystem capital accounts are developed as a second volume of the UN SEEA. 
• Pilot accounts are implemented in Europe by the European Environment 
  Agency
• Ecosystem capital accounts measure the degradation of all ecosystems 
  resulting from economic activities. They measure the resource which is 
  accessible without degradation and compare it to economic sectors’ use.
• The ecosystem capital degradation virtually embedded into international trade 
  of commodities is added to the ‘territorial’ degradation in order to calculate 
  the ‘total consumption of ecosystem capital’
• The measurement unit is a single currency which reflects the intensity of use 
  of accessible biomass, water and landscapes and the qualitative direct and 
  indirect impacts (contamination, losses of biodiversity…). This currency is 
  named ECU for ‘Ecosystem Capability Unit’. It is used to adjust the 
  biomass/carbon account from direct and indirect degradations.
• The ‘total consumption of ecosystem capital’ measured in ECU can be used to 
  measure the ‘second decoupling’ (of GDP growth from ecosystem impacts)
Integrating ‘first’ and ‘second’ decoupling

• The total carbon balance can be the pivot account of 
  economic material flow accounts as well as ecosystem 
  accounts.
• It is sufficiently general to work as surrogate of the whole 
  economy-ecosystem relation: fossil energy and biofuels 
  extraction and use, food and fiber materials, GHGs 
  emissions, ecosystem carbon pools…
                                                   Import-Export
                                                                                                                                 TEC 
                                                                                                          Atmosphere/ Climate
                                          DMI           Fossil                    CO2                                             Air




                                                                                                                                        Total Ecosystem Capacity in ECU
                                          Carbon       energy

                       Conventional DMI
                                                     Biomass/ 
Total Material Input
                                                                         Biomass/carbon acccounts 
                                                        Carbon
                                                                             (agriculture, forestry, …)     Biomass/ 
                                          DMI           Metal                                                Carbon
                                          other        Chemicals


                                          DMI                                                                                    TEC 
                                                                                                            Landscapes/ 
                                          Sand/     Sand, gravel                                                                Land
                                                                                                            Biodiversity
                                          gravel

                                          DMI                                                                  Water
                                                                      Water accounts
                                                      Water
                                          Water

                                                                        Decoupling (2)                                           TEC
                             Decoupling (1)                                                                      Sea
                                                                             from                                                Sea
                                  from                                  environmental 
                             material/energy                               impacts
                                 inputs                                                                         Resource efficiency:
                                                                                                                 « 1 »: DMI-Carbon 
                                                     GDP                                                  « 2 »: Total Ecosystem Capacity
Thank you!

Jean-Louis Weber
jlweber45@gmail.com

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:6/21/2013
language:
pages:12