PLACE-BASED STATISTICS EDUCATION by pptfiles

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									PLACE-BASED
STATISTICS
EDUCATION
HARVESTING DATA IN
OUR BACKYARD

Daniel Showalter,
Ohio University
Place-Based Mathematics
Education
 Place-based   mathematics education
 (PBME) is instruction that “considers the
 unique history, geography, culture, and
 community of a place to be valuable
 resources for enhancing, and being
 enhanced by, students’ learning of
 mathematics.”

                        (Showalter, 2012)
Brief History of PB(M)E Research
   Term introduced in 1990s
   Increase student quality of life (Haas & Nachtigal, 1998)
   Place vs. standards (Kannapel, 2000)
   100 days of PBE (Lewicki, 2000)
   Cultural investigations, environmental education,
    solving local issues, economic studies, and public policy
    involvement (Smith, 2002)
   Critical pedagogy (Gruenewald, 2003)
   Call for research on PBME (Bush, 2005)
   Teacher-student from hierarchical to collaborative
    (Smith, 2007)
   Five years of community values (Takano et al., 2009)
   Seven site study on PBME (Howley et al., 2011)
   From PhD to practice (Showalter, 2012)
Water Quality Testing
 Boat   of Knowledge

 High   school – university collaboration

 Interdisciplinary




                                      (books.ohio.edu)
Local Social Justice Issues
 Tostudy economic disparities in the
 region, math methods teacher collected
 data with students.

 Mathematical  modeling; choosing a
 model to tell a story.



                                (Showalter, 2012)
Local Needs
 College   statistics

    Class met with a local festival committee
    to discuss what data would prove helpful
    for local businesses.

 The   class then designed a study based on
    surveys and interviews in order to gather
    the desired data.
                                     (Showalter, 2012)
Community Cash Flow Analysis
 South   Dakota town

 High school seniors used statistical surveys
  to analyze community cash flow.

 Theirsubsequent reports led to an
  estimated infusion of $6 million into the
  local economy.
                          (Long, Bush, & Theobald, 2003)
Incorporation Issues
 How  does a focus on the local place
  affect acceptance/learning about other
  cultures?
 What about students who are not from
  the area?
 Can this work at the post-secondary
  level?
 Whose interests should you gear lessons
  towards?
References
   Haas, T., & Nachtigal, P. (1998). Place value: An educator’s guide to literature on
    rural lifeways, environments, and purposes of education. Charleston, WV: Eric
    Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools.
   Howley, A., Showalter, D., Howley, M. D., Howley, C. B., Klein, R., & Johnson, J. (2011).
    Challenges for place-based mathematics pedagogy in rural schools and
    communities in the United States. Children, Youth and Environments, 21(1), 101–127.
   Kannapel, P. J. (2000). Standards-based reform and rural school improvement:
    Finding the middle ground. Journal of Research in Rural Education, 16, 202–208.
   Lewicki, J. (2000). 100 days of learning in place. Westby, WI: Author.
   Long, V. M., Bush, W. S., & Theobald, P. (2003). “Place” value: The rural perspective.
    Athens, OH: Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and
    Instruction in Mathematics.
   Smith, G. A. (2002) Learning to be where we are, Kappan, 83, April, 548–594.
   Smith, G. A. (2007). Place-based education: Breaking through the constraining
    regularities of public school. Environmental Education Research 13(2):189–207
   Takano, T., Higgins, P., & McLaughlin, P. (2009). Connecting with place: Implications
    of integrating cultural values into the school curriculum in Alaska. Environmental
    Education Research, 15, 343–370.

								
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