Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Get this document free

Money_ Credit and Finance - University of Ottawa

VIEWS: 13 PAGES: 38

									Money, Credit and Finance
  Endogenous Money
         Marc Lavoie
     University of Ottawa
                      Outline
• 1. The main claims of the post-Keynesian views on 
  money, credit and finance
• 2. New developments in monetary policy implementation
• 3. Implications for public finance theory and for open-
  economy monetary economics
• 4. The integration of PK monetary economics into PK 
  macroeconomics: the stock-flow coherent approach 
  (SFC)
    Part I

The main claims
i
                             Ms                    Ms


                Ms




                  M
    Horizontalists        Monetarists    Structuralists
    (+ New Consensus)     IS/LM          (+ New Paradigm)
                          Verticalists




                      A simplified overview
                      of endogenous money
Endogenous money supply: A PK claim now 
       accepted by many schools
• Post-Keynesians
• Neo-Austrians
• New Keynesians 
  – (New consensus authors), Woodford, Taylor, Roemer, 
    Meyer
  – (New Paradigm Keynesians, focus on credit) Stiglitz, 
    Greenwald, Bernanke 
• Real business cycle theorists
  – Barro, McCallum
• Goodhart
     Main features in monetary economics
Features               PK school              Neoclassical

Money                  Has counterpart       Falls from an 
                       entries               helicopter
Money is tied to       Production            Exchange

The supply of money    Endogenous            Exogenous
is
Main concern with      Debts, credits        Assets, money

Causality              Reversed: credits     Free reserves lead to 
                       make deposits         money creation
Credit rationing due to Lack of confidence   Asymetric information
     Main features, interest rates
Features               PK School                   Neoclassical


Interest rates         Are distribution            Arise from market 
                       variables                   laws
Liquidity preference   Determines the              Determines the 
                       differential relative to    interest rate
                       base rate
Base rates             Are set by the central      Are influenced by 
                       bank                        market forces
The natural rate       Takes multiple values  Is unique, based on 
                       or does not exist      thrift and productivity
  Main features, macro implications
Features                PK School               Neoclassical


A restrictive monetary  Has negative effects    Has negative effects 
policy                  in short and long run   only in the short run
Schumpeter’s            Monetary analysis      Real analysis 
distinction             (monetized production  (money neutrality,
                        economy)               inessential veil)
Macro causality         Investment              Saving determines 
                        determines saving       investment
Inflation               The growth in money     Price inflation is  
                        stock aggregates is     caused by an excess 
                        caused by the growth    supply of money
                        in output and prices
   Two kinds of financial systems, 
     according to Hicks 1974
• The overdraft financial      • The auto or asset-based 
  system                         financial system
• Firms are in debt towards    • Firms finance investment 
  commercial banks               with retained earnings
• Commercial banks are in      • Commercial banks have 
  debt towards the central       large amounts of T-bills in 
  bank                           assets
    Overdraft vs Asset-based systems
• Overdraft systems                   • Asset-based systems
•   90% or more of the world          •   Only in some anglo-saxon 
    financial systems (including          countries
    the pre-euro Bundesbank)          •   Described by mainstream 
•   Ignored by textbooks                  textbooks
•   No control on HPM, except         •   Based on open-market 
    through credit control                operations; is said to be 
•   Clarifies how the monetary            efficient in controlling the 
    system functions                      money stock
•   In a sense, all systems are of    •   Puts a veil on the operating 
    the overdraft type: no central        procedures of monetary 
    bank controls directly the            systems
    supply of money
   Simplified neoclassical view
           Central bank balance sheet

Assets                  Liabilities

Foreign reserves        Banknotes

Domestic T-bills        Reserves of commercial 
                        banks
           Simplified PK view
            Central bank balance sheet

Assets                     Liabilities

Foreign reserves           Banknotes

Domestic T-bills           Reserves of commercial 
(and repos)                banks (deposit facilities)
Loans to domestic          Government deposits
banks (lending facilities)
                           (Central bank bills)
Credit rationing when there is a reduction in bank confidence
(Credit-worthy demand: demand with appropriate collateral:
Cf. De Soto, and Heinsohn and Steiger)

     Interest rate

                                Notional
                   Credit-      demand
                   worthy
                   demand
              i2
             i1                     A B
                                   · ·


                                           Loans
       Part II

 Historical perspective
And new developments
             Cambridge proverbs 
•   The Cambridgian hare: « Economic ideas move in circles: stand in 
    one place long enough, and you will see discarded ideas come 
    round again. » (A.B. Cramp 1970)
•   Most of modern monetary controversies can be brought back to the 
    1844 Currency school (Ricardo) and Banking school (Thomas 
    Tooke) debates.
•   The Radcliffe commission view (1959), endorsed by Kaldor and 
    Kahn, which was considered dépassé in the 1970s and 1980s, is 
    now back into fashion.
    – « There still do exist in England men whose minds were formed in 1939, 
      and who haven’t changed a thought since that time, and who … say 
      money doesn’t matter. They have embalmed their views in the Radcliffe 
      Committee, one of the most sterile operations of all time»  Samuelson
      1969
        New operationg procedures and 
                horizontalism
• Central banks have new operating procedures, although 
  they are not that much different from what they used to 
  be. They bring central banks closer to the « overdraft 
  economy», and further away from the «asset-based 
  econonomy» as defined by Hicks.
• The procedures of some central banks are more 
  transparent (than they were and than those of other 
  central banks), so the horizontalist story is more obvious: 
  Canada, Australia, Sweden
• The procedures of other central banks are less 
  transparent; but when interpreted in light of 
  horizontalism, we can see that their operational logic is 
  identical to that of the more transparent central banks 
  (like the Fed). 
The new operating procedures put in place in Canada
and other such countries are fully compatible with the
                PK monetary theory
• Central banks set a target overnight rate, and a band 
  around it
• Commercial banks can borrow as much as they can at 
  the discount rate
• There are no compulsory reserves and no free reserves 
  (zero net settlement balances)
• The target rate is (nearly) achieved every day
• Central banks only pursue defensive operations, trying to 
  achieve zero net balances.
• When there are tensions, as during the recent subprime 
  financial crisis, they try their best to supply the extra 
  amount of balances demanded by direct clearers (mainly 
  banks) 
      The Bank of Canada channel 
                system


              Overnight rate


 Bank rate = TR+25pts

      Target rate TR

  Rate on positive
balances = TR-25pts

                                                         Settlement
                         - (overdraft) 0   + (surplus)    balances
   Two different justifications for the 
   current interest rate procedures ?

• Post-Keynesians            • New Consensus
• Based on a                 • Based on the 1970 
  microeconomic                Poole article
  justification              • A macroeconomic 
• Tied to the inner            justification
  functioning of the         • If the IS curve is the 
  clearing and settlement      most unstable, use 
  system                       monetary targeting
• Linked to the day-by-      • If the LM curve is 
  day, hour-per-hour,          unstable (money 
  operations of central        demand is unstable), 
  banks                        use interest rate targets 
The microeconomic justification for 
      interest rate targeting
• Central bank interventions are essentially « defensive ». 
  Their purpose is to compensate the flows of payments 
  between the central bank and the banking sector. 
• These flows arise from: a) collected taxes and 
  government expenditures; b) interventions on foreign 
  exchange markets; c) purchases or sales of government 
  securities, or repurchase of securities arrriving at 
  maturity; d) provision of banknotes to private banks by 
  the central bank. 
• Without these defensive interventions, bank reserves or 
  clearing balances would fluctuate enormously from day 
  to day, or even within an hour. The overnight rate would 
  fluctuate wildly. 
      Authors who support the 
     microeconomic explanation

• Several central bank economists 
  – Bindseil 2004 ECB, Clinton 1991 BofC, 
    Lombra 1974 and Whitesell 2003 Fed
• Some post-Keynesian authors
  –  Eichner 1985, Mosler 1997-98, Wray 1998 
    and neo-chartalists in general
• Institutionalists 
  –  Fullwiler 2003 et 2006
The Fed never tried to constaint reserves !



• “The primary objective of the Desk’s open 
  market operations has never been to 
  ‘increase/decrease reserves to provide for 
  expansion/contraction of the money supply’ 
  but rather to maintain the integrity of the 
  payments system through provision of 
  sufficient quantities of Fed balances such 
  that the targeted funds rate is achieved”. 
  Fullwiler (2003)
  This was understood a long time ago by 
           some PK economists
• “The Fed’s purchases or sales of government 
  securities are intended primarily to offset the 
  flows into or out of the domestic monetary-
  financial system” (Eichner, 1987, p. 849). 
• “Fed actions with regards to quantities of 
  reserves are necessarily defensive. The only 
  discretion the Fed has is in interest rate 
  determination” Wray (1998, p. 115). 
   There is no relationship between open 
   market operations and bank reserves

• “No matter what additional variables were 
  included in the estimated equation, or how the 
  equation was specified (e.g., first differences, 
  growth rates, etc.), it proved impossible to obtain 
  an R2 greater than zero when regressing the 
  change in the commercial banking system’s 
  nonborrowed reserves against the change in the 
  Federal Reserve System’s holdings of 
  government securities ....”(Eichner, 1985, pp. 
  100, 111).
          Part III
         Implications for:
    Public finance theory and 
Open-economy monetary economics
 Government deficits lead to lower 
    overnight interest rates !
• This is a consequence of the payment and clearing 
  system.
• When the government pays for its expenditure through 
  its account at the central bank, settlement balances 
  (reserves) are added to the clearing system.
• This tends to reduce the overnight rate (the fed funds 
  rate) (cf. Mosler 1994)
• Keeping the rate at its target level requires a defensive 
  intervention of the central bank
• Might as well let the overnight rate fall to zero, its 
  “natural” level, say some neo-chartalists !
      Open economies: Are interest rates 
               exogenous?
• My position and that of Godley (The PK horizontalist 
  position ?) is that interest rates are exogenous both in 
  flexible and in fixed exchange rate regimes.
• Any increase in foreign reserves will be compensated
  by a decrease in another asset of the central bank, or 
  will be compensated by an increase in some liability of 
  the central bank.
• This is the compensation thesis, or the thesis of 
  endogenous sterilization (Godley and Lavoie 2005-06), 
  first emphasized by Banque of France officials (1960s).
     The compensation thesis
           Central bank balance sheet

Assets                  Liabilities

Foreign reserves        Banknotes

Domestic T-bills        Reserves of commercial 
                        banks
Loans to domestic       Government deposits
banks
                        (Central bank bills)
 Historical example of the compensation 
  thesis: The Bundesbank 1992-1993
            31 August    30 Sept.     15 July 
              1992        1992         1993

 Foreign      104          181         108
reserves
Domestic      237          144         236
 credit
  Total       341          325         344
 assets
            Part IV

  The integration of PK monetary 
economics into PK macroeconomics 
    and the stock-flow coherent 
          approach (SFC) 
        The stock-flow consistent approach
•   The Holy Grail of PKE has always been the full integration of 
    monetary and real macroeconomic analysis, i.e., provide a true 
    “Monetary” analysis in the Schumpeter sense.
•   Until recently, this seemed like a rather impossible task.
•   Godley (1996, 1999) has now done it, under the name of SFC. 
    [Other authors, around Willi Semmler and Peter Flaschel, also 
    achieve something nearly similar]
•   Portfolio and liquidity preference issues, along with banking and 
    financial stocks of assets and liabilities, are now tied with flows of 
    production, income, and expenditures. Deflated and monetary 
    variables can also be carefully distinguished.
•   The method is presented in the Godley and Lavoie book (2007).
•   In my view, the method is particularly appropriate to model the 
    interaction between (Minsky) financial crises and real crises, or to 
    deal with financialisation issues. 
•   At an aggregate level, it makes use of the fundamental identity, 
    underlined by Godley in the 1970s:
      (S – I) = (G – T) + (X – IM + NFY) 
    1.1 Keynesian and modern (Barro 
         DGSE) macroeconomics
•   Y = C+I+G = W+P
•   There is no room or no role for banks
•   What about the central bank, where does it fit?
•   Individuals and firms are often netted out (representative 
    agent)
•   Where does personal saving go?
•   What are the liability counterparts of this saving?
•   What sector provides the counterparty to the 
    transaction?
•   How are government deficits financed?
•   What role play financial stocks?
1.2 National accounting and flow of 
    funds analysis 1940s-1950s
• Macroeconomics is based on the system of national 
  accounts of the UN 1953 (Richard Stone) (flow national 
  income and product accounts)
• This system left out flow-of-funds and balance sheets
• French and Dutch national accountants bitterly 
  complained then (Denizet: irony) 
• “When total purchases of our national product increase, 
  where does the money come from to finance them? 
  When purchases of our national product decline, what 
  becomes of the money that is not spent?” (Copeland 
  1949)
• The 1968 new System of National Accounts (SNA)
  remedies to all this (and again in SNA 1993). But to no 
  avail, despite the introduction of Social Accounting 
  Matrices (SAM).
             2.1 No black holes
•  “The fact that money stocks and flows must satisfy 
  accounting identities in individual budgets and in an 
  economy as a whole provides a fundamental law of 
  macroeconomics analogous to the principle of 
  conservation of energy in physics”. (Godley and Cripps 
  1983)
• Everything must add up.
• The simplest way to make sure that nothing has been 
  forgotten is to construct matrices.
• This consistency requirement is particularly important 
  and useful in the case of portfolio choice with several 
  assets, where any change in the demand for an asset, 
  for a given amount of expected or end-of-period wealth, 
  must be reflected in an overall change in the value of the 
  remaining assets which is of equal size but opposite sign 
  (cf. Tobin)
        2.2 The quadruple entry 
               principle
• This principle is attributed to Copeland (1949).
• Any change in the sources of funds of a sector must be 
  compensated by at least one change in the uses of funds 
  of the same sector.
• But any transaction must have a counterparty. Therefore 
  the above two changes must be accompanied by at least 
  two changes in the uses and sources of funds of another 
  sector.
• « Because moneyflows transactions involve two 
  transactors, the social accounting approach to moneyflows 
  rests not on a double-entry system but on a quadruple-
  entry system » (Copeland, 1949)
2.2A The quadruple entry principle




  Sources of funds: + sign; Uses of funds: minus sign 
2.2B The quadruple entry principle

								
To top