Docstoc

Knowledge in Agriculture The role of innovation in agri

Document Sample
Knowledge in Agriculture The role of innovation in agri Powered By Docstoc
					THE ECONOMIC AND
ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACTS OF GM
CANOLA
Peter W.B. Phillips, Ph.D.
Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
Co-Lead and PI, VALGEN
Co-Editor, AgBioForum
Vice-Chair, AgWestBio Inc.
Former member, CBAC and NAFTA Chapter 13 Panel on GM Maize 
in Mexico
                    Outline
• Introduction
• Adoption history
• Methodology
• Economic benefits
• Environmental benefits
• Changes in herbicide-use
• The KEY to the innovation 
  system
• Concluding message
                     Introduction
• Both 00 rape (canola) and HT 
  canola mostly Canadian invention
• GM canola tested the regulatory 
  system
  – One of first GM food crops
  – Fastest adoption
  – Have 1st (HT), 2nd (novel oil) and 3rd 
    (PMP) generation crops coexisting
  – Have IPPM and segregation systems
  – Have had effective product recalls
• Competitive market with 3 main 
  suppliers
                 Mid to late 1990s
• First GM canola varieties:
   – Developed in partnerships; approved in 1995
   – IPPM seed multiplication program 
     of 30,000 acres in 1995 and 240,000 
     in 1996
• IPPM system ended in 1997: 25% of market
• Canola changed cropping practices
   – High level of summerfallow practiced in W. Canada in mid
     -90s
   – GM canola triggered changes in farm management 
     practices and rapid increase in conservation tillage
   – NOTE: even before GM varieties, most seed purchased
     GM Canola: The first decade

• From 2003 onward,          Market Share 2006-10
  adoption ranged from 
  92% - 98%
• Total acreage rose from 
  9M acres in 2002 to 16M 
  acres in 2008
• Acreage in 2011 about 
  18.5 M acres
                             Source: Authors calculations; Canola Council of Canada data: 
                             http://www.canolacouncil.org/ht_conventional_estimates.aspx
       Methodology for 2007 study
• Farm data collected by mail in western Canada—the 
  key growing region for canola
• Mailed 40,000 surveys to 
  farmers in Western Canada
   – Each survey was 4 pages long, 
     consisting of 80 questions
   – Time to complete was estimated at 
     45 minutes
   – Response rate of 1.7%, but 
     ultimately higher
   – Confidence interval of 95%           Western Canada:
                                           AB, SK, MB
                 Economic benefits
• Costs flat to down:
   – Seeds & chemicals packages priced competitively
   – Tillage and weed control (multiyear effects)
• Benefits significant and widespread:
   – Farmers: yields up due to earlier seeding and lower dockage
   – Prices lower: adopters, innovators and consumers win
   – Environmental gains

Distribution of the total economic benefits of HT canola
                       Producers Innovators      Processors & consumers
   2000                  29%        57%                   14%
Source: Phillips 2003.
                  Tillage      (Gusta et al, 2011)

• Min-till and zero-till land management strategies 
  increased greatly
   – In 1999, conservation tillage was 11% of canola 
     production
   – Now accounts for 65%
• Tillage costs related to canola production dropped
   – In 1999 estimated to be $214M
   – In 2006 estimated at $60M (-72%)
           Weed control         (Gusta et al, 2011)



• 95% of farmers report that weed control has 
  improved or is the same following GM canola
• 76% of farmers report that the management of 
  herbicide resistance in weeds is not major issue
• Control of volunteer canola has not changed from pre
  -GM 
• 74% of producers report that control of volunteer 
  canola is the same as prior to GM canola or easier—
  in short—NO SUPERWEEDS SO FAR!
               Spill-overs      (Gusta et al, 2011)



• Phillips (2003) identified direct benefits at C$11/acre
• Survey found bi-modal benefit distribution, with an 
  average of C$15/acre 




• Herbicide costs for second year crop drop by 53%
       Economic Impact: 2005-07 C$M
Year         Direct          Spill-    Spill-   Reduced    Volunteer    Total    Total
                              over     over      tillage    Control     (Low)   (High)
                             (Low)    (High)                 Cost

2005          141             63      103        153          14        343     383

2006          143             64      105        153          14        346     387

2007          165             73      121        153          17        374     422

Ave.          150             67      110        153          15        354     397

Source: Gusta et al, 2011.
     Aggregate Economic Benefits
                      (Gusta et al, 2011)


• Total direct and indirect benefits in 2005-07 worth 
  C$1.1 – 1.2 billion, or C$350-400M/year
• Benefits higher for the year following canola
  production than the direct crop
• Control of volunteer canola and 
  the management of herbicide 
  resistance in weed populations 
  not an issue
• Possibly under-valued the move 
  to conservation tillage practices
   Environmental Benefits                       (Smyth et al, 2011a)


• Key is movement to conservation tillage
   –   65% of the canola uses minimum or zero tillage
   –   83% of producers reported higher soil moisture
   –   86% report lower soil erosion
   –   41% are seeding canola onto erodible land
• Result is better carbon management:
   – Less released and more sequestered
   – In total, nearly 1 million tonnes of carbon is sequestered or 
     no longer released, possibly worth $5 million (at $5/tonne)
  Changes in herbicide use                    (Smyth et al, 2011b)


• Chemicals always used on canola
   – GM canola uses new chemicals with lower toxicity 
   – GM canola uses less chemicals per acre
• Environmental impact quotient (EIQ) measures effect 
  of pesticides and herbicides on farm workers, 
  consumers and ecology; values updated annually
• Other studies:
   – EI estimates for canola range from declines of 22% to 42%
   – decline in herbicide use in canola to be 12% to 30%
Environmental impacts 1995 v 2006
Comparison                    1995     2006     Change
EI (total)/ha                 13,898   6,467    -53%
EI (farmers)/ha               8,176    3,575    -56%

EI (consumers)/ha             3,783    2,199    -42%

EI (ecology)/ha               29,798   13,659   -54%
g active ingredient/ha         648      401     -38%
Total: M kg active ingr.       3.4      2.1      -1.3
Source: Smyth et al, 2011b.
    Overall Environmental Impact
                      (Smyth et al 2011b)


• In 2007, 2.6 million kg of herbicide active ingredient 
  applied to canola fields
• If GM canola had not been developed, we estimate 
  that the previous canola varieties would have required 
  4.1 million kg
• Welfare effect of reduced 
  herbicide-use estimated to be 
  $23 million
The Triple Helix Innovation System                        (



                    Regulators


   MNEs


  Public Labs


                          Sources: Phillips & Khachatourians 
                          2001 and Phillips 2007.
    Partnerships are the key
MNEs
                          Regulators




Public Labs


                          Sources: Phillips & Khachatourians 
                          2001 and Phillips 2007.
                  Conclusions
• GM crops can and do offer a wide range of socio-
  economic and environmental benefits
• While there are always risks, they can and must be 
  managed
• GM canola in Canada has been a win-win for 
  producers, consumers, the economy and the 
  environment
• HT canola may be the MOST environmentally 
  friendly and sustainable crop option currently in use 
  in Canada today (possibly including organics)
                            Key references
•   Gusta, M, S. Smyth, K Belcher, P. Phillips, and D. Castle. 2011. Economic Benefits of 
    Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant Canola for Producers. AgBioForum 14(1): 1-13.
•   Phillips, P. 2007. Governing transformative technological innovation: Who’s in charge? 
    Oxford: Edward Elgar, pp. 306.
•   Phillips, P. 2003. The economic impact of herbicide tolerant canola in Canada. In N. 
    Kalaitzanondakes (ed) The economic and environmental impacts of agbiotech: A global 
    perspective. Kluwer, pp. 119-140.
•   Phillips, P. and G.G. Khachatourians. 2001. The Biotechnology Revolution in Global
    Agriculture: Invention, Innovation and Investment in the Canola Sector. CABI, pp. 360.
•   Smyth, S., M. Gusta, K. Belcher, P. Phillips and D. Castle. 2011a. Environmental Impacts from 
    Herbicide Tolerant Canola Production in Western Canada. Agricultural Systems 104: 403-410.
•   Smyth, S. M Gusta, K Belcher, P Phillips and D Castle. 2011b. Changes in Herbicide Use 
    Following the Adoption of HT Canola in Western Canada. Weed Technology In Press. 
    Accessed at http://www.wssajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1614/WT-D-10-00164.1.

I gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Canola Council of
   Canada, Genome Canada, NSERC, SSHRC and AgWestBio.
THE ECONOMIC AND
ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACTS OF GM
CANOLA
Peter W.B. Phillips, Ph.D.
Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
Co-Lead and PI, VALGEN
Co-Editor, AgBioForum
Vice-Chair, AgWestBio Inc.
Former member, CBAC and NAFTA Chapter 13 Panel on GM Maize 
in Mexico

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:6/17/2013
language:
pages:21