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IPD - System Center 2012 - Operations Manager

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					Microsoft® System Center 2012 -
Operations Manager




Infrastructure Planning and Design
Published: November 2012
What Is IPD?
Guidance that clarifies and streamlines the planning and
design process for Microsoft infrastructure technologies


IPD:
• Defines decision flow
• Describes decisions to be made
• Relates decisions and options for the business
• Frames additional questions for business understanding

IPD guides are available at www.microsoft.com/ipd
Getting Started
Microsoft System Center 2012 -
Operations Manager
Purpose and Overview



Purpose
• To provide design guidance for Microsoft System Center 2012 -
  Operations Manager (Operations Manager)

Overview
• Operations Manager overview
• Operations Manager architecture design process
What Is Microsoft System Center 2012 -
Operations Manager?

Operations Manager provides:
• Infrastructure monitoring that is flexible and cost-effective
• Predictable performance and availability of vital applications
• Comprehensive monitoring for your data center and cloud,
  both private and public
• Ability to scale to thousands of servers, clients, and applications
• Reduced complexity and improved time-to-value
What’s New in Microsoft System Center 2012 -
Operations Manager

New enhancements that may affect the
infrastructure choices and design include:
• RMS removal and the new RMS emulator
• Data warehouse
• Resource pools
Operations Manager Decision Flow




        MAP              SCM   ITA
        w/ CAL Tracker
Operations Manager Architecture Example




                   SCM   ITA
Step 1: Define the Project Scope and
Requirements

• Task 1: Determine Business Requirements
 • Identify business services in scope for monitoring
   • Are they dependent on any subservices, applications, devices, or
     servers?
   • If so, what are they?

 • Is long-term data collection a requirement?
 • What are the availability requirements for the monitoring
   infrastructure?
 • Are there regulatory compliance or internal audit requirements?
Step 1: Define the Project Scope and
Requirements (Continued)

• Task 2: Determine Technical Requirements
 • Will Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager be used
   in this environment, with reporting enabled?
 • What management packs and integration packs will this
   infrastructure require?
   •   Microsoft management packs
   •   Third-party management packs
   •   Custom management packs
   •   Orchestrator runbooks
Step 1: Define the Project Scope and
Requirements (Continued)
• Capacity Requirements
 • What is the approximate number of each of the following, and
   where are they located?
   • Agent-monitored computers
   • Agentless Exception Monitoring (AEM) computers
   • Agentless-managed computers
     A computer can be monitored without an agent by using either
     agentless monitoring, AEM, or both. Use agentless-monitoring of
     computers when it is not possible or desirable to install an agent
     on a computer.
   • UNIX or Linux computers
   • Network devices
   • .NET applications monitored via Application Performance
     Monitoring (APM)
Step 2: Determine the Number of Management
Groups
• Task 1: Determine the Number of Management
  Groups
 • Begin with one management group, then use additional
   management groups as needed for the following:
   •   Scaling
   •   Agents across WAN-speed network links
   •   Political, administrative, or security requirements
   •   To view topology across multiple AD DS forests
   •   Dedicated management group for auditing purposes
   •   Disaster recovery
   •   Consolidated views of connected management groups
   •   Operations Manager integration with the VMM console
Step 3: Design the Operations Manager
Management Server Infrastructure
• Task 1: Determine the Number of Management
  Servers Required for Scaling
 • Begin with a single management server, then use additional
   servers as needed for:
   •   Scaling limits
   •   Agentless Exception Monitoring
   •   Audit Collection Services
   •   Network monitoring

• Task 2: Determine Placement of Web Console
  Role
 • Will web console feature be used?
 • If so, on a dedicated server or existing management server?
Step 3: Design the Operations Manager
Management Server Infrastructure
(Continued)
• Task 3: Determine the Need for Gateway Servers
 • Implement to:
   • Reduce administrative overhead
   • Minimize security concerns
   • Reduce network bandwidth use

 • If gateway servers are required, which management servers
   will they connect to?

• Task 4: Determine Resource Requirements for the
  AEM File Share
 • If AEM file share is needed, determine storage requirements
Step 3: Design the Operations Manager
Management Server Infrastructure
(Continued)
• Task 5: Apply the Fault-Tolerance Requirements
 • Regular management servers: Add servers to the All
   Management Servers resource pool
 • Other resource pools for network monitoring or other specific
   purposes: Add additional servers to those pools
 • Specialized gateway servers: Add second server and configure
   agents to use second as a failover gateway
 • Web console server role: Use Network Load Balancing or
   hardware load balancers
 • AEM file share: Use a file server that is in a failover cluster
Step 3: Design the Operations Manager
Management Server Infrastructure
(Continued)

• Task 6: Determine the Hardware Configuration
 • The servers can be virtual or physical
 • Use Operations Manager Sizing Helper tool to determine
   hardware requirements
 • The minimum configuration in the Sizing Helper has:
   • 2 management servers managing up to 500 agents
   • A second server for fault tolerance
   • 4 disks in RAID 10, 8 GB RAM, 4 processor cores
Step 4: Design the Operational Database

• Task 1: Determine Resource Requirements for
  Operational Database Server
 • Database size and load based on:
   • Rate of data collection. Varies by the number of monitored devices
     and the management packs deployed
   • Rate of instance space change. The rate of change for the data
     maintained to describe all the monitored computers, services, and
     applications in the management group

 • The Sizing Helper tool can estimate the size of the database
   based on:
   •   Number   of   days for data retention
   •   Number   of   server computers
   •   Number   of   network devices
   •   Number   of   APM-enabled computers
Step 4: Design the Operational Database
(Continued)

• Task 2: Apply the Fault-Tolerance Requirements
 • Clustering
 • SQL Server log shipping

• Task 3: Determine the Hardware Configuration
 • Minimum configuration in the Sizing Helper has the operational
   database, data warehouse, web console server,
   and SSRS server co-located, with:
   •   8 disks in RAID 10 (Data) (300 GB)
   •   2 disks in RAID 1 (Log)
   •   16 GB RAM
   •   4 processor cores
Step 5: Design the Data Warehouse and
Reporting Server

• Task 1: Determine the Data Consolidation
  Strategy Across Management Groups
 • Is reporting is required across management groups?
 • If so, across which groups?

• Task 2: Determine Data-Retention Requirements
 • How far into the past is data of interest to business units and to
   IT?
 • Are there regulatory requirements that dictate how long data
   must be stored?
Step 5: Design the Data Warehouse and
Reporting Server (Continued)

• Task 3: Determine Resource Requirements
 • Sizing Helper tool can estimate database size based on:
   •   Number   of   days for data retention
   •   Number   of   server computers
   •   Number   of   network devices
   •   Number   of   APM-enabled computers

• Task 4: Apply the Fault-Tolerance Requirements
 • The options are:
   • The data warehouse database must be clustered
   • SSRS must be in a network load-balanced configuration
Step 5: Design the Data Warehouse and
Reporting Server (Continued)

• Task 5: Determine Hardware Configuration
 • Determine the following:
   • How many reporting users will be on the system concurrently
   • Whether reports will be run on demand during peak hours or
     automatically published during off-peak hours

 • Can be physical or virtual machines
Step 6: Design the ACS Database Server



• Task 1: Determine Scaling
 • Scaling is based on:
   • Number of events that the audit policy generates
   • Role of the computers that the ACS forwarders monitor (such as
     domain controller versus member server)
   • Level of activities on the computer
   • Hardware on which the ACS collector and ACS database run
Step 6: Design the ACS Database Server
(Continued)

• Task 2: Determine Resource Requirements for
  ACS Database
 • Based on the number of events per second generated on the
   computers on which ACS is enabled
 • And the number of days data will be retained

• Task 3: Apply the Fault-Tolerance Requirements
  for ACS Database
 • Clustering
 • SQL Server log shipping
Step 6: Design the ACS Database Server
(Continued)

• Task 4: Determine the Hardware Configuration
  for the ACS Database Servers
 • ACS collector:




 • ACS database:
Step 6: Design the ACS Database Server
(Continued)

• Task 5: Determine the SSRS Location
 • ACS reporting can be installed in:
   • An SSRS instance with Operations Manager Reporting already
     installed
   • An SSRS instance without Operations Manager Reporting installed

 • If installed in same SSRS instance :
   • The same role-based security applies to all reports
   • ACS reporting users must be assigned to the Operations Manager
     Report Operator Role to access ACS reports
   • ACS reporting users must be assigned a db_datareader role on the
     ACS database to run ACS reports

 • If installed independently from Operations Manager Reporting:
   • SSRS security can be used to secure the reports
Step 7: Design the Notification System


• Task 1: Determine the Required Notification
  Channels
 • Email
 • Instant message
 • Short Message Service (SMS)
 • Command prompt (such as to run scripts)
Step 7: Design the Notification System
(Continued)

• Task 2: Determine the Fault-Tolerance Strategy
  in Notifications
 • Provide redundancy in the link from the management servers
   to the notification channel
 • Provide redundancy within the notification channel
 • Use multiple notification channels
Step 8: Design the Network Connections


• Task 1: Determine Where Additional Bandwidth
  Is Required
 • Compare the required bandwidth against the available
   bandwidth

• Task 2: Determine Network Port Requirements
 • May need firewall exceptions
Summary and Conclusion


• Carefully consider infrastructure requirements
  and server placement for Microsoft System
  Center 2012 - Operations Manager
• Planning is key
• Provide feedback to ipdfdbk@microsoft.com
Find More Information


• Download the full document and other IPD guides:
  www.microsoft.com/ipd
• Contact the IPD team:
  ipdfdbk@microsoft.com
• Access the Microsoft Solution Accelerators website:
  www.microsoft.com/technet/SolutionAccelerators
Questions?
Addenda


• Benefits of Using the Microsoft System Center 2012 -
  Operations Manager Guide
• IPD in Microsoft Operations Framework 4.0
• System Center 2012 - Operations Manager in Microsoft
  Infrastructure Optimization
Benefits of Using the Microsoft System Center
2012 - Operations Manager Guide

• Benefits for Business Stakeholders/Decision Makers
 • Most cost-effective design solution for implementation
 • Alignment between the business and IT from the beginning of the design
   process to the end

• Benefits for Infrastructure Stakeholders/Decision Makers
 • Authoritative guidance
 • Business validation questions ensuring solution meets requirements of
   business and infrastructure stakeholders
 • High-integrity design criteria that includes product limitations
 • Fault-tolerant infrastructure
 • Infrastructure that’s sized appropriately for business requirements
Benefits of Using the Microsoft System Center
2012 - Operations Manager Guide (Continued)

• Benefits for Consultants or Partners
 • Rapid readiness for consulting engagements
 • Planning and design template to standardize design and peer reviews
 • A “leave-behind” for pre- and post-sales visits to customer sites
 • General classroom instruction/preparation

• Benefits for the Entire Organization
 • Using the guide should result in a design that will be sized, configured, and
   appropriately placed to deliver a solution for achieving stated business
   requirements
IPD in Microsoft Operations Framework 4.0

Use MOF with IPD guides to ensure that people and process
considerations are addressed when changes to an organization’s
IT services are being planned
System Center 2012 - Operations Manager in
Microsoft Infrastructure Optimization

				
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