Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

critchfield

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 11

									       Third Party Financing
Lessons Learned from Solar Water Heating

               James Critchfield
          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

        at Northeast Biomass Heating Expo 2013
      Innovations in Finance of Biomass Heating Systems
                    Agenda

• Brief History...
• Benefits of 3rd party financing structures
• Overview of financing models
• The solar water heating model
•                                           gy
  Common Contractual Elements of Energy Purchase 
  Agreements
• Critical factors for thermal applications
• Opportunities for industry focus
        g
• Background information
History of PPAs and 3rd party financing
• Historically, PPAs were a vehicle for utilities to purchase energy (electricity) 
  from one another 
• Later, the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (1978) stipulated that utilities 
  had to purchase from Qualifying Facilities (QFs)
• This opened the door for utility PPAs with independent generators (owners
  This opened the door for utility PPAs with independent generators (owners 
  of QFs)
    – Recent FERC orders have since diminished this approach in practice
  In 2006, the PPA model was tested in the deployment of distributed 
• In 2006 the PPA model was tested in the deployment of distributed
  renewable generation (e.g. solar PV)
    – The model addressed several critical market barriers (e.g. upfront cost, risk 
          )
      etc.)
    – Today an estimated 90% of solar PV capacity is done through 3rd party 
      financing
                        g        y                             p
• The solar water heating industry took notice and several companies have 
  developed business models using similar 3rd party financing structures
Benefits of 3rd party financing structures
• Third party financing structures address specific technology 
  adoption barriers:
  adoption barriers:

   –   Capital intensity and access requirements
   –   Performance and operational risk
   –   Investment risk
   –   Transaction costs
   –   Institutional barriers


  Financing structures place risk on stakeholders who are 
• Financing structures place risk on stakeholders who are
  uniquely qualified to assume the risk
Overview of 3rd Party Financing Structures
 •   Energy Purchase Agreement (PPA) Model
      – Focuses on creditworthy commercial customers;  success hinges on accurate load 
        assessment and metering of system output; can be difficult to compete against natural 
        gas in today’s market;  10 to 20 year contract terms are typical and often include buyout 
        options
      – Projects often leverage asset‐based bank, 3rd party investor, low‐cost public or internal 
           ojects o te e e age asset based ba , 3 pa ty esto , o cost pub c o te a
        financing to make projects work; rate setting is a primary challenge and involves fixed, 
        fixed plus an escalator, and price‐indexed energy cost approaches
 •   ESCO Model
           j d l                        fb d          f li f “           i ” i ii
      – Project development as part of broader portfolio of “energy saving” activities
      – Project viability is determined by quick returns on investment; many renewable heating 
        projects require bundling with other energy improvements to pass ROI thresholds
 •   Leasing Model (relatively unproven in solar thermal world)
     Leasing Model (relatively unproven in solar thermal world)
      – Creditworthy customers can develop projects with little or no upfront investment;  
        banking partner sees less risk because the lease approach focuses on equipment and 
        does not rely on the bankability of long term off‐take agreement
        Involves a set monthly fee (lease payment) with escalator; long contract terms (10‐20 
      – I   l        t      thl f (l               t) ith     l t l         t tt       (10 20
        years) with buyout;  some limitations for non‐taxable hosts; requires some scale to be 
        profitable for investors
Solar Water Heating Model
      Common Contractual Elements of 
        Energy Purchase Agreements
        Energy Purchase Agreements
•   Rate (D)                               •   System Access (S)
•   C t tT         (D)
    Contract Term (D)                      •   Damage to System/Insurance (S)
                                               D        t S t /I                (S)
•   System Components (D)                  •   Credit Requirements (D)
•   Configuration (D)                      •   Default (S)
•             g( )
    Permitting (S)                         •         g         ( )
                                               Change in Law (S)
•   System Construction & Testing (Both)   •   Force Majeure (S)
•   Measurement & Monitoring (S)           •   Succession and Assignment (S)
•   Purchase of All Energy Produced or     •   Intra‐term Purchase Options (D)
    Consumed (S)
    Consumed (S)                           •   End of Contract Options (D)
                                               End‐of Contract Options (D)
•   Invoicing (S)                          •   Site Real Estate Rights (S)
•   Minimum System Performance (D)         •   Real Estate Mortgage Liens (S)
•   Environmental Attributes (D)           •   Other Standard Language (e.g. 
•         ( )
    Taxes (S)                                                 bl
                                               notice, severability, entirety, 
•   Operations & Maintenance (S)               confidentiality, dispute resolution, 
                                               indemnification, warranties, 
                                               applicable law) (S)

           (D) – Dynamic  (S) ‐ Static
                Critical Factors for 
            Thermal Project Applications
            Thermal Project Applications
•   Creditworthy counterparties
•   Bankable cash flows 
     – long‐term contracts, monetization of environmental benefits
•   Project size 
     – right sized to load, minimum investor requirements, aggregation opportunities, etc.
•   Competitiveness with alternative fuels 
     – natural gas, propane, etc.
•   Uncertainties 
     – policies, feed stock, etc.
•   Contract terms 
     – rates, end of contract options, etc.
•   Energy Load 
     – time of day and seasonal variations
•   Metering 
                    ifi bilit t d d t
     – accuracy, verifiability, standards, etc.
•   Monitoring 
     – anticipate performance problems, reduce performance and operational risk
     Opportunities for Industry Focus

    pp               p
• Support  the development of a U.S. Heat Meter Standard
   – ASTM E44.25 Subcommittee on Heat Metering
• Develop an industry annotated Energy Purchase Agreement –
  f            t        d th i l
  for your customers and their lawyers
• Develop industry‐level project portfolio that speaks to the 
                             gy     p j
  investor need for technology and project risk evaluation
• Explore project aggregation models that leverage various 
  third‐party investment structures – particularly to scale 
       ll     j            i             i
  smaller projects to meet investor requirements
• Improve recognition of “renewable heating and cooling” as a 
  consolidated sector for policy makers; coordinate with other 
  consolidated sector for policy makers; coordinate with other
  technologies on shared challenges
                      Background Info




Source:
 SEPA

                                 Source:
          https://epa.connectsolutions.com/thirdpartycontracts/
           ttps //epa co ectso ut o s co /t dpa tyco t acts/                Source:
                                                     https://epa.connectsolutions.com/shcfinancingslides/


                      For additional info on EPA Resources contact, critchfield.james@epa.gov
             James Critchfield
             Director, Renewable Energy Technologies Market Development
             U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
             critchfield.james@epa.gov
             202-343-9442

             Chair, ASTM E44.25 Heat Metering Subcommittee
             www.astm.org/COMMITTEE/E44.htm



Thank you

QUESTIONS?

								
To top