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FORM A - Ning Powered By Docstoc
					Monica Alvarez
Jeffrey Dodd
Karen Goldberg
Marie Spiegeland
Curr 509.01: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning
Dr. Schwarzer, Instructor
October 10, 2011




                   COMMUNITY STUDY GROUP REPORT: HOBOKEN
The Community


       Our target community is Hoboken, NJ. It is located in Hudson County, right on the

waterfront overlooking Manhattan. It is considered part of the New York Metropolitan area.

According to the 2000 census, Hoboken has a population of 38,577.


       The statistics that we uncovered for our target community revealed that the diversity of

the community is questionable. In general the population does not seem very diverse, being

predominantly white. However, when comparing the statistics, it is slightly more diverse in some

areas than the national average. In particular, there are greater numbers of Asians, individuals

that are from ‘some other race’, two or more races, and Hispanic/Latino (of any race). Hoboken

is comprised mostly of young educated white individuals who prefer to or have been forced to

rent. It’s a good sized community with a decent Hispanic representation. Spanish is probably the

most common foreign language spoken at home. There seem to be two extremes in the economic

status of its inhabitants, those that live above the average and others that are below the poverty

level. This information is detailed below.


       The median age of the Hoboken resident is 30.4, which reflects a pretty young crowd that

may include single individuals, couples and/or starter families. The Hoboken population mostly

rents the places they live in, which is more than double the US average. Also, the number of

individuals that rent is almost 3 times the amount of those that own their own place. This shows

that most of the habitants of Hoboken either cannot afford to buy in Hoboken or they may not

expect to stay there forever. Considering the date of the statistics, NJ was undergoing a real

estate bubble, where many people were priced out of purchasing. On the other hand, this could




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also be considered a commuter town because of its proximity to New York City and flexibility

with transportation.


       The racial makeup of Hoboken is predominantly white, slightly above the US average

(80.8% vs. 75.1%). The next highest is considered ‘some other race’, which is also slightly

higher than the US average (7.6% vs. 5.5%). It accounts for almost 10%. Either these individuals

consider themselves as part of a race that was not an option or they prefer to not reveal their race.

The Hispanic population is higher than the average in the country (20.2% vs. 12.5%). In

Hoboken, it is higher than the sum of all the other races following the white race. Of course, this

may be the case because there could be Hispanics across any one of these races. We question if

any of the individuals that said they belonged to ‘some other race’ did so because they consider

‘hispanic’ a race and didn’t find it under the race category. Also, higher than the US average are

the number of foreign born residents and those that speak a foreign language at home. It is

possible that most of these residents represent the Hispanic population and that the predominant

foreign language is Spanish.


       Hoboken is a fairly educated community compared to that of the US with 60% having a

Bachelor’s degree or higher. Perhaps, the educated community accounts for professionals that

work in New York City. The median household income and per capita income are higher than

that of the US average, but there are slightly more families below poverty level than in the

country. This shows a discrepancy in income, highlighting a greater gap, at least when compared

nationally. There are the families that do very well and others who are struggling. Hoboken is

becoming an affluent demographic but there are still plenty of individuals trying to succeed.

Because of its proximity to New York City, one of the world’s most promising cities, Hoboken

attracts younger wealthier individuals. According to Money Magazine (2008) Hoboken is

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compared to the best 100 places to live. In 2009, city-data reported that 10.9% of Hoboken's

residents were living below the poverty level compared to state's average of 9.4%, with the

average family income at $82,401 ( " B e s t p l a c e s t o , " 2 0 0 8 ) showing a full spectrum of

wealth.


          Public or private schools exist for all ages in Hoboken, but it is not as simple as making a

choice. The students that come from the affluent families will have the best education that money

can purchase, but the student that cannot afford the private schools will have to attend the public

schools. Currently the quality of the public schools compared to that of the private is unknown.

Speculation suggests that the grouping of poorer students in the public schools leads to less

overall education quality, which many debates may suggest a multitude of reasons for. The

quality of the individual teachers plays an enormous impact into affecting the students’ interest

in subject matter. It can be deduced that the better teachers will apply and accept jobs at the

better schools. The better schools are going to be looking for the best since they will have first

choice of the teachers. The public schools are then left with second-rate teachers and the slippery

slope continues.


          When looking throughout the city of Hoboken similar tendencies appear. The wealthier

individuals live closer to the center of town and the Hudson River. The poorer individuals live

further away. So when going to visit Hoboken much is missed because the center street,

“Washington St.” is where everyone goes to visit. As you move away from the views of the

Hudson River and Washington St. the individuals get poorer. We found it interesting that the

demographic characteristics of the population are not represented in the schools. The

demographics show the majority of the population is young, white, educated and rents their



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housing. Because of the median age, we can speculate a few reasons that the white demographic

is not attending school. First, it could be that much of the population is childless. Second, it

could be that families move out of the district before their children reach school age, or third, as

mentioned above, they can afford private school. When we started looking at our individual

schools, it is clear that there is a Hispanic majority in the school population and that there is a

large percentage of students who are receiving free or reduced priced lunched. We find it

interesting that there are two extreme demographics in Hoboken, those who are wealthy and

those who are poor.


History of the Community


       The original inhabitants of the area were the Lenni Lenape Indians. These Native

Americans were not permanent residents; instead they camped on the site during the summer

months. In 1609, Henry Hudson’s ship, the Half-Moon, was the first to voyage up the Hudson

and view the land now known as Hoboken. 50 years later, in 1658, the then Dutch Governor of

Manhattan, Peter Stuyvesant, purchased all the land between Hackensack and the Hudson River.

The land was sold again in late 1700’s this time to Colonel John Stevens. Stevens gave Hoboken

its name and developed the area (564 square miles) into a resort community. Stevens’s expertise

with the steam locomotive engine was the stepping stone to development of the area into a major

transportation center. By the early 20th century, and due to its waterfront location, Hoboken was

transformed into a major trans-Atlantic port with subway and rail service to Manhattan.

Hoboken became a gateway to America for immigrants from Germany, Ireland, Italy, East Asia

and Latin America.




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Colonel John Stevens purchased the land for approximately the equivalent of $100,000, today.

As the city of Hoboken grew, Stevens managed the cities development through the creation of

Hoboken Land and Improvement Company. Hoboken’s success as a port of entry was

diminished in the late 20th century due to the use of containers for cargo and freight. Hoboken’s

lack of open spaces could not accommodate these large containers and the city suffered severe

economic decline.


       As stated previously, Hoboken residents are overwhelmingly white and account for 80%

of the population. The next largest ethnic group, Hispanics, account for 20%. As opposed to a

large influx of minority residents, in the 1950’s-1970’s many Hoboken residents moved to the

suburbs. By the 1960’s the Hoboken port had become obsolete and Hoboken suffered economic

hardship. The 1980’s saw a gentrification of the area. During this period, many artists and

musicians relocated to Hoboken. Section 8, which provided subsidies for the improvement of

tenement housing, enticed many residents away from the high rents of Manhattan, to a lower cost

of living in Hoboken. A bohemian culture emerged as artists moved in. In addition, residential

properties changed from blighted tenement buildings into newly constructed condominiums

occupied by yuppies.


The Students—A Look Across Schools


       Looking at these four schools in aggregate, one immediately notices that the largest

population in each of these schools is Hispanic. The number of black students varies from

school to school, but comprises on average 20% of the student population. White students on

average make up 15% of the school population. All other races have meager representation in all

four schools. Only one school has a white student population that exceeds 20%, and


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coincidentally, this school also has the lowest percent of students eligible for free or reduced

price lunch. Overall, the poverty indicator of subsidized or free lunch, corresponds directly to

the percentage of black and Hispanic students in the schools. The school with the highest

minority representation also has the highest number of subsidized lunch.


       As a whole all these schools share the commonality of disproportionately large Hispanic

populations, as compared to the state average. Conversely, the white population in each of these

schools is underrepresented as compared to the state average. The black population varies from

school to school and in some cases is directly reflective of the state average. All other races are

underrepresented as compared to the state, but this variance is minimal as compared to the

differences between the state and Hoboken schools with respect to the Hispanic and white

populations.


       In general, Hoboken High School scored the highest in the language arts assessment.

Wallace No. 6 Elementary scored the lowest on its NJASK 4. When comparing high schools,

Hoboken High students that were proficient or above were double those of A.J. Demarest

Alternative School. This is interesting because there are about 81 students enrolled at A.J.

Demarest, compared to 530 at Hoboken High (based on 2010 data). However, there are more

students at Hoboken High (75%) that primarily speak English at home vs. 68% at A.J. Demarest.

This may contribute to the discrepancy in scores. Between the two elementary/middle schools,

Wallace No. 6 Elementary outperformed Thomas G. Connors Elementary in language arts on all

assessments except for the NJASK 4, although these were very close. A.J. Demarest also serves

grades 7 and 8, but Wallace outperformed them as well in the NJASK 8. Again, there were a

greater number of students in the school that performed better. Wallace had 750 students

enrolled in 2010, while Thomas had 350 and A.J. Demarest had 81. Also Wallace has more

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students (82%) that primarily speak English at home compared to 74% by Thomas and 68% by

A.J. Demarest.


       In line with the number of students at each school the student/faculty ratio at Thomas

(8.5%) was lower than at Wallace (9.7%). Same is true for Hoboken High (9.1%) and A.J.

Demarest (4.2%). This shows that lower student/teacher ratios are not always indicators of

greater academic achievement. Perhaps the bigger schools have more resources or programs

available to assist students with their subject areas.


       Overall, the lowest assessment in math was at Thomas G. Connors (NJASK 8), and the

highest assessment was also at Thomas (NJASK 3). Between elementary schools Wallace scored

better in NJASK 4 and 5, while both schools performed considerably worse than the state

average. The math scores seem to decline drastically every year at Thomas. However, the scores

at Wallace declined in 4th grade, but then slightly increased thereafter. Wallace seems to have

done something right to improve the scores. It would benefit Thomas to collaborate with Wallace

on this subject. Between high schools, this time A.J. Demarest slightly outperformed Hoboken

High, although both performed drastically lower than the state average. Hoboken High students

did perform better in 2010 compared to the year before (81% vs. 77%). Both high schools need

to focus on this subject to discover what can be done better.


       There was a clear indication that Math scores were far below proficiency compared to the

numbers of the state. These results are consistent among each school that we looked at in the

district. There are some factors that we feel could contribute to these findings. Like Villegas &

Lucas argue in our readings, it is possible that in the area of Mathematics, there is a transmission

practice of teaching in which students do not feel engaged in the subject or aren’t relating the


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material to their lives. If so many of the students are failing at Math, there is neither a precedent

for success, nor a large sample of successful role models. The numbers indicate that students

aren’t learning basic math skills in middle school. As time goes on, they will fall farther behind.

This indicates that there is lack of recognition and support to correct problems in the lower

grades leading to a vast majority of students not being proficient in Math when they get into

High School. There are inadequate statistics for ELLs in the lower grades, which mean that it’s

possible that the needs of ELLs are not being met. Because there are high numbers of students

that are eligible for free or reduced priced lunches, there could be a link between poverty and low

Math scores. This is not a reason for low Math scores, but an indication that the needs of poor

students are not being met.


       The assessment results for students in the district are not consistent with students in the

DFG. In fact, students in the DFG are testing higher than the rest of the state. According to the

State of New Jersey, Department of Education, DFG groups provides a ranking of school

districts by socioeconomic status. DFG groups are also a means for identify district for special

funding provisions. There are two reasons that the DFG is working against Hoboken. First, if

Hoboken’s scores are lower than that of other scores of the DFG, and the DFG scores are high,

compared to the rest of the state, it doesn’t look like Hoboken’s DFG is need of funding. Second,

the DFG model is created using a “composite statistical index” of the population, which is

gathered from the census data. These factors are: percent of population with no high school

diploma, percent with some college, occupation, population density, income and unemployment

and poverty. Because the demographic of the town of Hoboken are not consistent with the

demographics of the school, the data used to assess socioeconomic status of the students is




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flawed. For these two reasons it’s possible and because the scores are so drastically different

from the DFG, it is clear that the needs of Hoboken students are not being met.


       Overall the average of the students in the Hoboken District placed below that of the state.

There are a multitude of factors why students do not perform well. One of the possible reasons,

based on our research, is that the most educated individuals in Hoboken don't have children, and

the ones that do don't stay in Hoboken very long. Therefore, these children usually don't

contribute to the student population at these schools. There is also a significant Hispanic

community in where Spanish may be the predominant language spoken at home. This could

account for lower performances in both math and language arts. In addition, the personal lives of

the individual student must be considered. Are parents available at home to help with

homework? What is their education status? Are the teachers in the public schools good teachers

or bad teachers, happy or unhappy with the politics of their particular school? The list of outside

factors that play a role in the education of the individual student is long but we do believe that a

majority of the children in the public school system in Hoboken are at the lower end of the

economic spectrum and therefore most likely facing many challenges that the majority of NJ

students are not.


       In conclusion, the public school system in Hoboken is made up of primarily poor

Hispanic families. Although economic data suggests that this community has a higher median

household income, all of the schools we researched, had the majority of students enrolled in

subsidized lunch programs. In addition, the demographics of the community are not similarly

represented in the public schools. Where a large white community lives in the city, a large

Hispanic population attends public school. We discussed many reasons why this might be. Our

thoughts ranged from young families moving out of the city with school age children, to white

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parents sending their children to private schools. In the end, what was evident to us was that the

public schools in Hoboken, in general, were not as successful as other schools in NJ and that

demographically, the schools did not represent the community.




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                                       FORM A
             (Completed one for the group and submit it with the Group Report)
                        Community Demographic Characteristics


Characteristics                               Target Community            U.S.
                                               (n)         %               %
Total population                                 38,577    ---            ----
                                       Age
Median age                                        30.4        ----               35.3
                                       Race
White                                            31,178       80.8         75.10%
Black or African American                         1,644        4.3         12.30%
American Indian/Alaska Native                         60       0.2          0.90%
Asian                                             1,661        4.3          3.60%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander                      21       0.1          0.10%
Some other race                                   2,942        7.6          5.50%
Two or more races                                 1,071        2.8          2.40%
                                Hispanic Representation
Hispanic/Latino (of any race)                     7,783       20.2         12.50%
                               Housing Units (Occupied)
Owner-occupied                                    4,396       22.6         66.20%
Renter-occupied                                  15,022       77.4         33.80%
                            Selected Social Characteristics
High school graduate or higher                   23,842       83.3         80.40%
(population 25 years and over)
Bachelor’s degree or higher (population          17,007       59.4         24.40%
25 years and over)
Foreign-born                                      5,588       14.5         11.10%
Speaks a language other than English at          10,738       28.7         17.90%
home (population 5 years and older)
                          Selected Economic Characteristics
Median household income                          62,550        ---          41,994
Per capita income                                43,195        ---          21,587
Families below poverty level                        699       10.0          9.20%
Individuals below poverty level                   4,124       11.0         12.40%




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                                            FORM B

                                     Student Information



Your Name:     Karen Goldberg

Target District:    Hoboken, NJ

Target School: Thomas G. Connors Elementary



1. Selected Characteristics of the Student Population

                       Student Race/Ethnicity (Report Percentages)

                                                  School             New Jersey
             African American                      28%                 17.4

                   Hispanic                        64%                      19.4

                    White                           6%                      54.9

                    Asian                           2%                      8.1

             Native American                        --                      0.2

                    Other                           --                       --

              Other Relevant Student Characteristics (Report Percentages)

                                                  School             New Jersey
 Percentage of students eligible for free          84%                 26.5
  or reduced-price lunch (Indicator of
                poverty)
   Percentage of students of Limited               N/A                      N/A
       English proficiency (LEP)

 Percentage of students with disabilities         11.4%                     N/A
                 (IEP)

           Student mobility rate                  14.6%                 10.5%




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2. Assessment Results: In the appropriate space below, indicate the percentage of students
performing at proficient level or above for the applicable assessments, by unit (school, district,
DFG, state). To determine the percentage of students performing at proficient or above,
add the percentages shown in the Report Card for the “proficient” and “advanced”
categories. NOTE: The NJASK assessments apply only to elementary/middle schools, while
the HSPT assessments apply only to high schools.



                               Percentages of Students Performing at

                         Proficiency Level or Above in the Target School

      Type of Assessment             School         District         DFG            State

                                          NJASK 3
    Language Arts Literacy           34.8%          50.3%           66.2%          59.8%
        Mathematics                  69.5%          67.8%           83.6%          78.3%
                                          NJASK 4
    Language Arts Literacy           35.5%          35.2%           65.6%          59.7%
        Mathematics                  55.6%          55.3%           81.9%          77.2%
                                          NJASK 6
    Language Arts Literacy           44.5%          53.6%           71.4%          65.5%
        Mathematics                  41.7%          55.4%           76.9%          72.1%
                                          NJASK 8
    Language Arts Literacy            62%           75.2%           88.4%          82.9%
        Mathematics                  24.1%          52.2%           72.5%           69%
                                          HSPT 11
    Language Arts Literacy             --              --             --              --
        Mathematics                    --              --             --              --


a. How do students in the target school compare to New Jersey students in general?

   The students in Thomas G. Connors Elementary consistently scored lower than the state
   average for proficient and advanced proficient in both areas. The language arts scores
   increased over time, similar to the way the state scores increased, as the child advanced from
   3rd to 8th grade. The math scores, however, seemed to worsen at a far greater rate than the
   state scores. Where the state math scores decreased 9% from 3rd to 8th grade, this school’s
   math scores worsened by 45% in that same period.

b. What story do the assessment results summarized above tell you about the students in the
   target school? (Your response should address all three subject areas tested.)



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In this school, it appears that as students’ progressed through the grades from 3rd through
8th, their proficiency in language arts improved with respect to the state average. Although
language arts proficiency is consistently below the state average, as the child grew their
language arts skills improved from being half of the state proficient average to 3/4 of the
state proficient average. Conversely, it appeared that as a student in this school progressed
from the 3rd to the 8th grade their skill in math declined. Given the large Hispanic population
in this school, I think the improvement in language arts may be a function of increased
exposure to the English language. As far as the deterioration of the students’ math skills, I
am not quite sure what to attribute that to.




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                                            FORM B

                                     Student Information



Your Name:     Monica Alvarez

Target District: Hoboken, NJ

Target School: Wallace No 6 Elementary School



1. Selected Characteristics of the Student Population

                      Student Race/Ethnicity (Report Percentages)

                                                 School               New Jersey
   African American (denominated as               10%                   17.4%
                Black)

                Hispanic                          58%                   19.4%

                 White                            28%                   54.9%

  Asian (denominated as Asian/Pacific                4%                     8.1%
              Islander)

             Native American                         --                     0.2%

   Other (denominated as unspecified)                --                      --

              Other Relevant Student Characteristics (Report Percentages)

                                                 School               New Jersey
 Percentage of students eligible for free         55%                   26.5%
  or reduced-price lunch (Indicator of
                poverty)
   Percentage of students of Limited              4.3%
       English proficiency (LEP)

 Percentage of students with disabilities        13.1%
                 (IEP)

          Student mobility rate                   9.6%


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2. Assessment Results: In the appropriate space below, indicate the percentage of students
performing at proficient level or above for the applicable assessments, by unit (school, district,
DFG, state). To determine the percentage of students performing at proficient or above,
add the percentages shown in the Report Card for the “proficient” and “advanced”
categories. NOTE: The NJASK assessments apply only to elementary/middle schools, while
the HSPT assessments apply only to high schools.



                               Percentages of Students Performing at

                         Proficiency Level or Above in the Target School

      Type of Assessment             School         District         DFG            State

                                         NJASK 3
    Language Arts Literacy           56.3%          50.3%           66.2%          59.8%
        Mathematics                  62.1%          67.8%           83.6%          78.6%
                                         NJASK 4
    Language Arts Literacy           32.7%          35.2%           65.6%          59.7%
        Mathematics                  51.6%          55.3%           81.9%           77.2
                                         NJASK 6
    Language Arts Literacy           51.8%          53.6%           71.4%          65.5%
        Mathematics                  53.5%          55.4%           76.9%          72.1%
                                         NJASK 8
    Language Arts Literacy            78%           75.2%           88.4%          82.9%
        Mathematics                  55.9%          52.2%           72.5%           69%
                                         HSPT 11
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics

a. How do students in the target school compare to New Jersey students in general?

   In every grade being tested for both language arts and mathematics, the students at Wallace
   perform lower than the state average. The biggest discrepancy can be seen with the NJASK 4
   test. However, the numbers start improving again for language arts where they are very close
   to the state average in the NJASK 8. There is a difference with the math assessment as well.
   Although the scores decrease across the state in math, the scores for this school dip much
   lower all the way through NJASK 8. As the students move up in grade, the scores for both
   math and language arts follow the state trend. The scores in language arts improve every year
   and the math scores decline.

b. What story do the assessment results summarized above tell you about the students in the
   target school? (Your response should address all three subject areas tested.)


                                                                                         17 | P a g e
The assessments summarized in this table tell me the following about Wallace No. 6
Elementary:

       It follows the same direction of improvement or decline in proficiency as the state, as
        students move across grade levels.
       They perform much worse with the mathematics content than with language arts.
       The students’ language arts skills improve with time.
       There is an improvement in performance between 4th and 6th grades.
       Students are adequately prepared to enter high school when comparing to the state
        average in both subject areas.
       The lowest scores are seen in the NJASK 4.


The possible reasons for these statistics could be:

       Based on the demographics of Hoboken, there may be students that are ELLs that are
        not getting the support they need in their content area of math.
       The students may have a lack of highly educated math teachers at this school that
        know how to engage them and tie the lesson plans to something they can relate to
        (although about half of the staff has a master’s degree).
       There is a gap in some grades with what is being taught in the classroom and what
        appears on the test.
       Between 4th and 6th grades, students either work harder and/or there are changes in
        the way the curriculum is taught to prepare for the test
       There could be a greater focus on teaching to the test in the higher grades, so that the
        students can move on to high school.
       The scores are directly related to the students themselves and their backgrounds
        during that year.




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                                            FORM B

                                     Student Information



Your Name:    Marie Spiegeland

Target District: Hoboken City

Target School: Hoboken High



1. Selected Characteristics of the Student Population



                     Student Race/Ethnicity (Report Percentages)

                                                 School              New Jersey
             African American                      17                  17.4

                 Hispanic                            65.                    19.4

                  White                              17                     54.9

                  Asian                              1                      8.1

             Native American                         --                     0.2

                  Other                              --                      --

              Other Relevant Student Characteristics (Report Percentages)

                                                 School              New Jersey
 Percentage of students eligible for free         67%                  26.5%
  or reduced-price lunch (Indicator of
                poverty)
   Percentage of students of Limited              2.3%
       English proficiency (LEP)

 Percentage of students with disabilities        16.6%
                 (IEP)

          Student mobility rate                   12.6                      9.7


                                                                                   19 | P a g e
2. Assessment Results: In the appropriate space below, indicate the percentage of students
performing at proficient level or above for the applicable assessments, by unit (school, district,
DFG, state). To determine the percentage of students performing at proficient or above,
add the percentages shown in the Report Card for the “proficient” and “advanced”
categories. NOTE: The NJASK assessments apply only to elementary/middle schools, while
the HSPT assessments apply only to high schools.



                               Percentages of Students Performing at

                         Proficiency Level or Above in the Target School

      Type of Assessment             School         District         DFG            State

                                          NJASK 3
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                          NJASK 4
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                          NJASK 6
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                          NJASK 8
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                         HSPT 11
    Language Arts Literacy            81.1       75.4                92.1            88
        Mathematics                   42.1       36.2                77.9            75


a. How do students in the target school compare to New Jersey students in general?

   In general, the demographics of students from Hoboken High differs from the state of New
   Jersey. The percentage of African Americans is consistent with the rest of the state of New
   Jersey, though unlike the rest of the state, they share the same percentage of the student
   population as the White demographic (both 17%.) The majority of students (65%) are
   Hispanic, which is much higher than the New Jersey average of 20%. There are very few
   Asian students, who normally make up 8% of the students population in New Jersey.

b. What story do the assessment results summarized above tell you about the students in the
   target school? (Your response should address all three subject areas tested.)



                                                                                          20 | P a g e
The assessment results tell us that students are doing much better in Language Arts
Literacy than Mathematics. At a proficiency rate of 81.1%, the school LAL scores are 6
points below the state average, though are a slightly higher than the district scores. The
numbers in Math are much more troubling. Where the state proficiency rate is 75%, 42.1%
of students at Hoboken High students are proficient in Math. These scores show that is an
improvement over the district and DFG proficiency rates. These number indicate a
troubling district wide problems with Math scores.




                                                                               21 | P a g e
                                            FORM B

                                     Student Information



Your Name: Jeffrey Dodd

Target District: Hoboken School District

Target School: A. J. Demarest Alternative School



1. Selected Characteristics of the Student Population



                     Student Race/Ethnicity (Report Percentages)

                                                   School           New Jersey
           African American                          27               17.4

                Hispanic                             61                    19.4

                 White                               11                    54.9

                  Asian                              1                     8.1

            Native American                                                0.2

                Unknown

             Other Relevant Student Characteristics (Report Percentages)

                                                 School             New Jersey
 Percentage of students eligible for free       Free: 75              26.5
  or reduced-price lunch (Indicator of        Reduced: 11
                poverty)                     Hoboken avg: 61
   Percentage of students of Limited               --
       English proficiency (LEP)

 Percentage of students with disabilities           19.8
                 (IEP)

          Student mobility rate                     35.8                   9.7


                                                                                  22 | P a g e
2. Assessment Results: In the appropriate space below, indicate the percentage of students
performing at proficient level or above for the applicable assessments, by unit (school, district,
DFG, state). To determine the percentage of students performing at proficient or above,
add the percentages shown in the Report Card for the “proficient” and “advanced”
categories. NOTE: The NJASK assessments apply only to elementary/middle schools, while
the HSPT assessments apply only to high schools.

                               Percentages of Students Performing at

                         Proficiency Level or Above in the Target School

      Type of Assessment             School           District       DFG            State

                                            NJASK 3
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                            NJASK 4
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                            NJASK 6
    Language Arts Literacy
        Mathematics
                                            NJASK 8
    Language Arts Literacy             42               86                           74
        Mathematics                    29               76                           69
          Science                      31               64                           83
                                            HSPA 11
    Language Arts Literacy             40              75.4          92.1            88
        Mathematics                   46.2             51.1          77.9            75


a. How do students in the target school compare to New Jersey students in general?

   According to the Percentages reported on the NJ ASK 8 exam only 42% of students were
   proficiency in Language arts, outrageously only 29% passed the mathematics section and
   31% passed the sciences. These are horrendous compare to the district average of 86%, 76%,
   and 64%, respectively. The numbers for the HSPA are analogous to the NJ ASK
   percentages. These numbers show that the students in A. J. Demarest Alternative School are
   well below acceptable ranges compared to the rest of the district.

b. What story do the assessment results summarized above tell you about the students in the
    target school? (Your response should address all three-subject areas tested.)

   The assessments can only tell me that the students did not perform up to standards. The
   results do not tell me why, which leads to another topic of discussion. There are a multitude

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of reasons why students do not perform well, family, friends, themselves and teachers.
Students may have family issues at home and are required to possibly help out with bills or to
support themselves. Friends may be getting them into trouble, which affects their thought
processes in school. The individual may not be able to pay attention during class because of a
medical condition such as ADD and if the teacher is an inefficient or monotonous teacher,
that does not help the individual student either.




                                                                                  24 | P a g e
                                             FORM E

                                         Internet Searches



Name: Karen, Monica, Marie, Jeff



List all the websites you personally researched as part of this project. Include searchers you
personally conducted both for the individual and group reports.

http://www.bgchc.org/programs/index.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/hoboken

http://www.hobokennj.org/visit/history

http://www.hobokenmuseum.org/abridged_history

http://education.state.nj.us/rc/rc10/dataselect.php?datasection%5B0%5D=environment&datasecti
on%5B1%5D=information&datasection%5B2%5D=performance&datasection%5B3%5D=staff
&datasection%5B4%5D=financial&c=17&d=2210&s=011&lt=CD&st=CD

http://www.greatschools.org/survey/results.page?id=4526&level=h&state=NJ

http://www.greatschools.org/new-jersey/hoboken/Hoboken-School-District/schools/

http://www.homefacts.com/schools/New-Jersey/Hudson-County/Hoboken/A-J-Demarest-Alt-
Sch.html

http://www.greatschools.org/new-jersey/hoboken/4526-A.J.-Demarest-Alternative-
School/?start=0&compareSchools=NJ4526#nearbySchoolsMap

http://www.schooldigger.com/go/NJ/schools/0735000808/school.aspx?entity=47&grade=11

http://citationmachine.net/index2.php?lastName%5B1%5D=Last&firstName%5B1%5D=Initials
&yearPublished=2008&monthPublished=August&dayPublished=&titleWork=Best+Places+to+
LIve&url=http%3A%2F%2Fmoney.cnn.com%2Fmagazines%2Fmoneymag%2Fbplive%2F2008
%2Fsnapshots%2FPL3432250.html&reqstyleid=2&mode=form&minimode=citation&nameCnt
=1&more=yes&reqsrcid=APAWebPage




                                                                                       25 | P a g e
 "Best Places to Live 2008 - City Details: Hoboken, NJ - from MONEY Magazine." CNNMoney
- Business, Financial and Personal Finance News. Cable News Network, 2011. Web. 10 Oct.
2011. <http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2008/snapshots/PL3432250.html>.

"NJ Department of Education District Factor Groups (DFG) for School Districts." The Official
Web Site for The State of New Jersey. 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2011.
<http://www.nj.gov/education/finance/sf/dfgdesc.shtml>.




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