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					City of Bay Village, Ohio
Minutes of a Meeting Town Hall Meeting Held May 8, 2008 Present: Brian C. Cruse, President of Council Mark Barbour, Councilman-at-large James R. Scott, Councilman-at-large David L. Tadych, Councilman, Ward 1 Paul A. Koomar, Councilman, Ward 2 Scott Pohlkamp, Councilman, Ward 3 Michael Young, Councilman, Ward 4 Gary Ebert, Director of Law Also Present: Finance Director Steve Presley Community Services Director Debbie Bock Recreation Director Dan Enovitch Fire Chief James Sammon Operations Manager Don Landers Audience: Susan Zisko, Joe and Rita Hochman, Tim Maloney, William Clements, John Suter, Jeff Gallatin, Ted and Virginia Ward, Carolyn Steigman, Roger Svehla, Mike Gore, Dave Sima, Bill Baran, Matt & Naomi Rottari, Ted Vovos, Nancy Trainer, Steven and Pat Smik, Chester and Mary Lou Monty, Joe Wallenhorst, Carolyn Mercer, Ellen Oakley, Ron and Ruth Dwyer, Jerrie Barnett, Helen and Michael Georgeff, Al Wier, Pam Dietz, Cynthia Ottelin, Jennie & Marty Mace, Lois Huffman, Lucille Zabawski, J. Brown, Lawrence Kuh, Sue and Tom Roehl, Crystal Scott, Frank and Marge Heldt, Helen Solomon, John Solomon, Terry Cariglio, Jacquie McGowan, Marie Fox, Joe TePas, Gerry Schreibman, Mike O‟Boyle, Raymond C. Biltz, David Baldanza, Ethel Hansen Mr. Cruse opened the meeting at 7:30 p.m. with the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Cruse welcomed everyone to tonight‟s meeting and thanked Councilman-at-large Jim Scott, Ward 3 Councilman Scott Pohlkamp and Clerk of Council Joan Kemper for their efforts in putting this meeting together. Mr. Cruse advised that Mayor Sutherland planned to join Council this evening but could not attend due to the necessity of being in Columbus, Ohio to be part of a group testifying for the House on House Bill 521. House Bill 521 is an important piece of legislation that would establish a state level commission on local government reform and collaboration. They would form this commission to develop recommendations on reforming and restructuring local government in this state to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of local government operations and to achieve cost savings for tax payers. The commission

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would study and make recommendations, not limited to but including, the consolidation and elimination of local government offices to achieve efficiencies and cost savings for taxpayers, the consolidation of local government authorities that are authorized by the state to levy taxes of any kind in the local government units including schools and libraries and, the reduction, elimination and/or reorganization of services or functions of local government to receive cost savings. Mr. Cruse noted that the early read on this is that one of their objectives at the end of the day is to have all tax revenue be collected and distributed by the state on whatever formula the state government comes up with. House Bill 521 is something to keep an eye on as things progress forward. In the Mayor‟s absence tonight, Law Director Gary Ebert will try to cover some of the topics Mayor Sutherland was going to cover. Mr. Cruse stated that it has been about a year since the last town hall meeting, and what we try to do with these get togethers is provide an opportunity, in a different setting, to give residents information and updates on what is going on in the city and where things stand. Mr. Cruse stated that this past year has been very interesting and the biggest realization he has come away with is that you can‟t please everyone. We operate as a Council from a certain starting point knowing that a certain percentage of our neighbors are going to think we are wrong, no matter what we decide. This group has a common goal in mind and that is what is best for Bay Village. It gets interesting because at any given point in time you could have seven different opinions on how to get to that common end. Mr. Cruse continued that Council works together, shares thoughts and ideas and tries to develop solutions that come out somewhere in the middle and when you mix in some luck along with that, hopefully, at the end of the day, continue to keep Bay on the forefront and a place where we all want to live. Mr. Cruse stated that it also has been interesting that you come to a point where you understand and respect the opinions of those that disagree with you, and you quickly realize that your goal of 100% satisfaction with your customer base is probably going to be unachievable. This paradigm was never more evident than what we went through with this year‟s budget process. Mr. Cruse pointed out the recent Plain Dealer article that talked about local government finance issues and indicated that problems and challenges faced by Bay Village this year are also occurring in other cities on the east side, west side, south side, and everywhere in between. How that applied specifically to Bay Village is that we set out with a goal for this year to operate 2008 with a balanced budget. From where we started and with a lot of hard work from the Council and the administration and directors, that goal was achieved. There were flat revenues and in some areas even shrinking revenues, increased expenses, some predicted and others beyond what was predicted and planned for. Fifteen million dollars was put in the bank this year, at the end of 2007, yet all of us will be paying a $12.00 per quarter trash fee. Mr. Cruse explained that the $15 million while the estate was open was giving the city a revenue stream of 8% interest on that money guaranteed by state law. Once that estate settled and they paid what they owed, which was the $15 million, we have to invest that privately and nobody guarantees us an 8% return. Interest rates have dropped and we have lost a significant amount of revenue there. Property taxes are set on a three year cycle. We are in the middle of that cycle so that revenue source was flat, and yet every year, expenses don‟t wait three years

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to go up. We saw a 25% increase in our refuse collection expense. Fuel costs have gone up and everything you face at home we face a lot of the same things as a government. Mix all that together and it becomes a real balancing act looking at providing the quality services that we have enjoyed here for years and years without risking or mortgaging the future. A lot of the cities took different approaches, including tapping into what they call their reserve funds, which is the $15 million for Bay Village. Some cities such as Lakewood were forced to lay off employees because they were out of dipping into their savings. This Council in Bay Village made a conscious effort to not spend our future like that and decided to look as hard as they could to do other things besides tapping that savings so we can generate as big a revenue stream as possible from that money. And, number two, we do have a safety net for things that may come up in the future that we haven‟t seen yet. We deferred some hiring, we reduced and deferred purchases, we cut general operating expenses where we felt we could, we changed some positions to part time, we raised fees for some programs, and instituted the refuse fee. This group came away with a game plan that we signed off on, and it is fair to say that although not totally sold on the final result, it was an effort of a lot of hard work and a lot of team work and as we go through and as the administration manages that budget and we watch what is occurring, we are going to find a way to make it work. Law Director Gary Ebert Law Director Gary Ebert stated that one of the issues the Mayor wanted to cover this evening is the issue concerning the fire department. Some people have received petitions that are being circulated to put the issue on the ballot, and others have received post cards and flyers. This is an issue concerning the staffing of our fire department. The city has taken the position that this is part of the labor contract, and is part of management rights as far as the staffing of the fire department. The city is contemplating filing a fair labor practice. The issue concerning safety of the residents is not going to be compromised. The issue of the minimum five man staffing is done in other cities in the west shore. There are different ways to look at this, and one of the issues that the Mayor has brought up is the hiring of a floater. Mr. Ebert stated that he has had a conversation with some of the officials of the city of Westlake concerning whether this is something that regionalization should look at, as far as a floater to help all cities with staffing when one person calls in sick or is on vacation. It is an overtime issue insofar as cost and is a major issue concerning the budget crunch that hits the City of Bay Village and other cities in the west shore. From that standpoint that is being looked at and safety is not going to be compromised by the City of Bay Village. It is being monitored very closely by the Fire Chief and the city. Another issue that Mr. Ebert was asked to talk about is the police station litigation that is going on. After the police station was built and the issue concerning the landfill that was there, remediation costs to remove the landfill, the delayed cost as a result of the landfill, and certain other construction costs, it was decided to file a law suit against the architects. That litigation is currently pending in the Court of Common Pleas, with no trail date set. Recently there was a mediation day and that process is still going on.

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The last issue Mr. Ebert discussed is the railroad quiet zone. He related that in 1998 the City of Bay Village led the way, with the City of Rocky River, and Lakewood, on limiting the trains that were proposed by CSX-Norfolk and Southern merger. We were going to go from 14 to 39 trains per day. The geographical situation of Bay Village on the lakeshore would cause a real safety concern because the only throughway we could have would be the railroad track overpass on Clague Road. We took action initially and we are fortunate enough to have the only agreement in the country that was signed concerning the limiting of the number of trains. The City Council gets monthly reports on the number of trains, and the average has been less than 3 trains per day that go through the city of Bay Village. Mr. Ebert stated that he made a presentation to the National Transportation Board in Washington, D.C. when the agreement was signed. There were many comments about why Bay Village gets the only agreement in the country concerning the amount of trains that go through their community. To this date that agreement is being honored by Norfolk and Southern. As part of that, the quiet zone issue has evolved, concerning the amount of horns being sounded that you hear when trains go through. Safety is a concern, and various standards have been created to insure safety for highly populated areas. Those standards have been modified, and because of those modifications the amount of costs that would be incurred to limit the number of horns sounded has been reduced. A letter has been drafted this week to Norfolk and Southern asking for the consideration of a quiet zone at our various intersections. This will be considered as part of the new quiet zone legislation that the Rail Commission is entertaining. Initially some communities filed for quiet zones immediately. But back then it would cost upwards of $200,000 per intersection to comply with the quiet zone regulations. That is no longer the case. Based on the number of trains and the safety equipment that is necessary the cost has diminished substantially. The railroad quiet zone is an issue that will be coming forward in the next several months to which Council will have to give consideration. Councilman David L. Tadych, Ward 1 Chairman, Planning, Zoning, Public Grounds & Buildings Committee Mr. Tadych thanked everyone for their presence this evening and stated that each of the Council members is pleased with the interest shown by being here. Mr. Tadych commented that as a campaign promise he stated Ward 1 meetings in the spring of 2002, they were immediately successful and well attended and were the forerunner of tonight‟s town hall meeting. Mr. Tadych addressed the number one Ward 1 question asked which is the dirt mounds of Forestview School. He advised that when the high school football field‟s artificial turf installation began, the school board found itself with lots of high quality topsoil that had to be removed from the site. The city, residents, and even landscapers removed some but much remained. Forestview School was demolished in 2004 leaving a large 5-acre site with uneven ground. The thinking was that the remaining dirt might be used to level the ground and correct the problem. The dirt was dumped and the mounds of Forestview came to be. The Ohio Environmental Agency put a hold on the spreading of the mounds

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and recently the school district received the go ahead to spread the dirt. However, the EPA mandates seeding occur within 14 days of leveling. Unfortunately, the field is still too wet for heavy equipment and the dry days of summer are fast approaching. With summer‟s heat and watering not an option, new seed would certainly perish. The seeding will probably not occur until late summer. As things stand today, the school district will pay for the cost of a bulldozer rental and pay for the cost of the seed and the application of the seed. Together, the school district and the city will provide a staff to complete the improvement. If an elevation change to any existing storm sewer is required, the district and the city will share costs and labors. The school district will maintain the improved park-like setting, by continuing to cut the 5-acre moundless property. The second item of interest in Ward 1 is the growing enthusiasm for drainage and road improvements in the Sunset area. Interest in a project improvement plan last showed resident enthusiasm in 2003. Studies done at that time were never brought to fulfillment. Mr. Tadych stated that he is ready to work with residents to begin the full process to improve this area. It is worth remembering that the current preservation effort of the cliff and park area must be completed before actual work could begin. Mr. Tadych noted that he personally feels an improvement plan for proper drainage and better roads would be of value to all the residents of the Sunset area. During the next months he will offer to work with interested residents and the area‟s beach association to determine the project‟s feasibility and the residents‟ enthusiasm for a plan. Mr. Tadych advised that he chairs the Council‟s Planning, Zoning, Public Grounds and Buildings Committee. Councilmen Barbour and Pohlkamp are the other members of the committee, and Mr. Tadych also serves as Council‟s representative on the City‟s Planning Commission. For the past several years different committees and commissions have examined and recommended changes to many of Bay‟s zoning code chapters. This review is for the most part completed, and this week, the Planning and Zoning Committee forwarded three ordinances to the Law Department in preparation for legislation. These chapter sections are: Chapter 1127, which addresses the Board of Zoning Appeals‟ powers, duties and make-up; Chapter 1128, which addresses the Architectural Board of Review‟s powers, duties and make-up; Chapter 1129, which addresses the approval process for commercial and business structures, cluster development, attached housing, and conditional uses. Together these three chapters, when passed by Council simplify the application process for certain construction projects or expansion within our city. Mr. Tadych continued that additionally his committee has been asked to review and make recommendations for possible changes to Chapter 1158, Attached Residence District zoning. Key considerations are minimum acreage size, maximum number of units per acre, possible locations with the city for this type of zoning, building height, and density. Although many recommendations have been received from various committees, studies and residents, the work is ongoing. The goal is to present findings to City Council before

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summer recess. The next meeting of the Planning, Zoning, Public Buildings and Grounds Committee will be May 13 at 5:30 p.m. in the Bay Village City Hall conference room. Comments may be expressed at the meeting or emailed to Jkemper@cityofbayvillage.com. It is important to remember that any zoning change request is protected by the city charter and must be approved by a vote of the residents in both the ward involved and citywide. Mr. Tadych announced that he will begin holding clustered home meetings. Residents can arrange to meet with Mr. Tadych and their invited guests in their homes. A presentation followed by a question and answer session will offer attendees an opportunity to express ideas and make suggestions. It is hoped that these Ward 1 Clustered Home Meetings will become productive, popular events. Mr. Tadych stated that he values every comment and concern he receives from residents. He apologized for losing track of one call last month and advised that if the resident still has not had his seeding request completed to give him another call. In closing, Mr. Tadych thanked everyone for their participation this evening. Councilman Paul Koomar, Ward 2 Chairman, Finance Committee Mr. Koomar stated that Mr. Cruse has covered some of the financial issues this evening, but he would like to talk about the budget process for 2009. This year with the changing scene in revenues and expenses it was very difficult to work through the budget. Mr. Koomar stated that serving on the Finance Committee with him are Mark Barbour, Councilman-at-large, and Mike Young, Councilman of Ward 4. The committee invested significant time in this process. One of the frustrations at their end was that they received the budget in January of 2008, for the tax year 2008. Having had some discussions with President of Council Brian Cruse, Mayor Sutherland, and Finance Director Steve Presley, they have all agreed that this can be done much better and want to move that process up significantly, watching the current status of our financial affairs, looking at the revenue streams and be very proactive in this process moving forward. One item agreed upon is the need for a more formal document, a budget book. The Service Department has developed a very good template for a budget book. The Mayor has been out looking at other cities to design a booklet that has a lot of detailed documentation to tie in to the account level to provide the support that we will need to make good decisions for the city. Mr. Koomar stated that Mr. Presley will give all of Council a review of each months activities of expenses and revenue. As we move into the budget process in the fall, this will serve as an education for the team and improve everyone‟s understanding of the current situation of the resources of the city. By law, the city must submit a tax budget to the county by July. The time can be extended but it is our hope that it will be completed in July. This document will be

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presented to City Council by the end of May and the Finance Committee and Council will review that in June. Because of the structure of the city, certain things come out of issued debt and certain things come out of the revenue side of income tax revenues and property tax revenues, and estate tax revenues. To do this budget properly, the entire picture most be reviewed. The two components to be looked at at the end of May and in June are the vehicle replacement schedule and other capital expenditures so we can look at the entire population of how we are going to fund these different expenditures. In talking with the Mayor and Mr. Presley, during the summer months they will work on the budget booklet with the department heads, providing detail by program and other documentation they consider necessary to support their different programs. As Council comes back from recess in September, they would like to finalize any capital projects and vehicle replacements. This will be in conjunction with the monthly review to make adjustments as needed so that we are living within our resources. As we get into midOctober all of the departmental budgets will be turned into the Finance Committee, and the entire Council. One of the things that Mr. Cruse has been a strong supporter of is meeting directly with the directors of each area to get their direct input and have that completed by the beginning of November. By mid-November there will be general discussions by the whole committee and all of Council and come to a final resolution on the budget process. All of this is designed to have all of the leg work behind us so that when we get to December what we can do is put the budget on three readings. The month of December would be used just for that process to solicit additional input and then to pass the budget on December 22. We will be very proactive in the process, and from a director‟s standpoint, knowing those numbers prior to the beginning of the year will allow them to plan accordingly for their year in 2009. This will support the directors in their work and for the things you see around the city which are attributable to them. The documentation of the budget booklets will provide a much more transparent view of the city and the questions from residents will be answered in that process. Councilman Scott Pohlkamp, Ward 3 Chair, Services Utilities and Equipment Committee Mr. Scott Pohlkamp stated that he also serves as the council representative on the Community Services Advisory Board and would like to start his presentation this evening with a brief report on the Community Services Advisory Board which oversees the operations of the Dwyer Memorial Center and the senior services. Recently, a long time employee, Ann Gilmore Orin, retired from the Community Services Department. Ann was very dedicated to her job and provided excellent service to the community. Mr. Pohlkamp introduced Community Services Director Debbie Bock, to present a very qualified, highly respected and recognized new employee to replace Ann Gilmore Orin. Community Services Director Bock introduced Pamela Deitz, who has accepted the position of Senior Program Coordinator within the Community Services Department. Ms. Dietz comes to the city with a wonderful background and is truly prepared for this

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line of work. Ms. Dietz possesses a Masters of Education in Community Health, a Bachelors degree in Management and Human Resources, and has a background in professional human resources. For the last four years Ms Dietz has worked with west side senior centers, recreation centers, hospitals, assisted living facilities, etc., on designing and teaching wellness programs as a wellness instructor and health educator through Lakewood Hospital. She has implemented a variety of wellness programs and is a published author for a national fitness magazine on the ability of seniors and caretakers to meet challenges with humor, positive attitude, and fortitude. Ms. Dietz has a solid track record of successfully managing programs, policy, benefits, performance, management, and coaching. She holds several national certifications in the field of health, wellness, longevity and exercise. Ms. Dietz was welcomed to her employment with the City of Bay Village. Mr. Pohlkamp thanked Ms. Bock and noted that she does a great job here in the city and the hiring of this quality employee testifies to the work that Ms. Bock does and the attractiveness of employment with the City of Bay Village. Mr. Pohlkamp continued that he is the Ward 3 representative and the most pressing issue in Ward 3, especially in the last year and a half has been the flooding issue, not only in Ward 3 but also in all parts of the city. We are going to have a significant improvement in flooding issues in Ward 3 with the sanitary sewer improvement project, which will cover Brackenway, Osborn, Wolf, Dwight and Lincoln. Mr. Scott is the chair of the Public Improvements committee and will give further details on that project. The Services, Utilities and Equipment Replacement Committee interacts with the public utilities. There recently was the opportunity to meet with our First Energy Corp. representative, Karen Goodson. Living here in Bay Village, we all at one time have had at least a lot of power outages. A reason for that is the many beautiful trees we have here in Bay Village whose branches fall on a frequent basis. Over the last couple of years, First Energy Corp. has put well over $1 million into upgrading the infrastructure of the system. In Ward 4 there is a section that is powered by a feeder known as Five Crestwood, which powers Bay Village from the railroad tracks on Bradley Road all the way through the west side of Bay and into Avon Lake. This was one of the most problematic sections of First Energy Corp. in all of northeastern Ohio, in fact it may have been the worst. They have spent a good amount of money in improving that and recently, a new technology called sectionalizers, which allows them to isolate an issue, has been installed. In the past, if a tree would fall on a line in that section of Ward 4 it would take out the entire system. Now they are able to isolate that issue down to a small area so it doesn‟t bring down the entire system. This is a positive upgrade for the city. Mr. Pohlkamp noted that it is not perfect in Bay Village but the $1 million that First Energy Corp. spent in upgrading our infrastructure says a lot about the relationship they have with our community. Mr. Pohlkamp advised residents that if they have a power outage please report it to First Energy Corp. so they can track that. Information about minimizing energy use and electric bills can be found at the First Energy Corp website, firstenergycorp.com.

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Mr. Pohlkamp announced that we are soon to have another cable provider here in Bay Village. We currently have Time Warner, AT&T, who has recently rolled out their services city wide, and in the coming year we will also have services from WOW! Cable. WOW! Cable not only provides cable television service, but like AT&T and Time Warner also provides high speed internet service and telephone service. The good news is for Bay Village residents at a time when we are paying entirely too much for fuel and other resources, we are going to have real competition here for phone, cable and internet access and it will be a significant cost savings to residents. The Vice President and System Manager for WOW! Cable is Kirk Zerkle, who is a resident in Ward 4 of Bay Village and he is very committed to providing the city with a high quality service and at the same time even supporting the schools. WOW! Cable‟s build out will be starting soon. They intend on building out the east side of the city first, going down Dover Center Road and extending into the east side of the city. That should be built out by June of 2008. The west side of the city will begin at Dover Center Road next January and should be done by the middle of 2009. WOW! Cable has five different Internet packages and a multitude of high speed packages. They have a discounted package for seniors which allows seniors to take advantage of a bundled service of basic cable and phone for $59.99 per month. Mr. Pohlkamp expressed appreciation to the audience and stated that he was glad to be able to present good news to residents this evening for potential cost savings. Councilman Michael Young, Ward 4 Chair, Environment, Safety and Community Services Committee Mr. Michael Young stated that the Environment, Safety and Community Services Committee has been working on riparian corridor legislation for more than a year and a half. Riparian area is the land area that is next to a stream, creek, or river. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had mandated that for a water quality standpoint, cities somehow maintain the integrity of that eco system in order to reduce pollution and storm water runoff. The council had legislation on second reading which was pulled back and switched directions to go with a company called Chagrin Valley Engineering. Council felt they could better serve the community by trying to adopt legislation that was specifically unique to Bay Village instead of a generalized program that any city could adopt. That will allow the city to have a riparian area of 25 feet from the high water mark, instead of 75 feet. For property owners in Bay Village who have a home that abuts or is within 25 feet of a creek or a stream, the riparian area will be of concern as to what you can build in that area or what mitigation process they will need to do to mitigate damage from any projects within that riparian area. In adopting that unique legislation, the riparian area will be reduced from 75 feet to 25 feet. There was a recent meeting of the committee that looked at the first draft of the legislation itself. The definition of an “ordinary high water mark” was discussed at that meeting and further information will be requested for this and other questions from Chagrin Valley Engineering. The committee perceives having the final draft of the legislation before the legal department and building department so it can be acted upon as soon as possible. Mr. Young noted that the committee would like to fulfill the EPA mandate insofar as

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protecting the riparian area, but at the same time try to protect the property rights and limit the impact that such legislation would have on individual property owners within Bay Village. Mr. Young stated that also this spring the council approved legislation creating an ambulance reimbursement fee. This fee is projected to accrue to the city $125,000 by year-end. Insurance companies will be charged to recoup the cost of ambulance runs. The legislation was drafted in such a way that only the insurance company will be charged and charge will only be made if a resident‟s deductible has already been met. None of the costs would be handled or covered by an individual resident. There will be no charge directly to residents but it will be a way to recoup some of the costs for what is a critical cost in the City of Bay Village. Regarding the fire department and some critical issues, Mr. Young advised that three months ago, by executive order, the Mayor changed the overtime policy of the fire department. The policy was that when staffing at the fire department was less than six firefighters or paramedics, another firefighter was called in and paid overtime. The Mayor changed that policy to a five-person minimum before someone was called in on overtime. What we normally have is eight firefighters per shift. However with vacations, injuries, and/or sick time, we normally have just six firemen report everyday per shift. This policy was enacted to reduce overtime, but also was done, as the administration would say to change requirements based on adopting the new central dispatch center in Westlake. Under the old system, one of our firefighters worked as a dispatcher, but now with the dispatch center in Westlake that is no longer necessary. However, as anyone on the safety committee would attest, how safe is such a policy, and how often does this policy mean we only have five fighters on duty and how safe is that. Mr. Ebert has commented that other cities do that, and have done that, but is there a policy that has three firefighters attend an ambulance run on every call. In an instance when you have only five men on a shift, there can be times when there can be two ambulance calls at one time. One of those ambulances would go out with only two firefighters. Over the last three months this has occurred six times as a recent report from the fire chief has indicated. The debate is centered on how safe is this and will this staffing change continue, and is it prudent to reduce overtime and does this do it in a way that does not compromise safety. Each of us on Council takes that responsibility very seriously; we do not want to play with the lives of the residents of Bay Village. Mr. Young stated that it is his view that there is another proposed solution. That proposal is to hire a swing shift firefighter to cover such openings. It would cost as much in salary, but would not cost as much as overtime. Mr. Young stated he supports that proposal. In regard to cost and safety, there are two other things that must be addressed. One is that we participate in what is supposed to be mutual aid with other surrounding cities. If there is a fire call or ambulance call and we are too busy and another city cannot take the call, one of us by mutual aid supports the other city. It has not always been mutually advantageous to each city. For example, over the last three months, Bay Village firefighters have responded 18 times on ambulance runs, while the surrounding communities have only twice come to the City of Bay Village. That is not mutually

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sharing costs and safety of the communities. This is another issue that the city must consider, debate, and be aware of when we are talking about safety and cost issues. Mr. Young continued that we have also been dealing with the central dispatch center and its recent cost increases. The City of North Ridgeville has just been added to the number of cities that use the dispatch center. Although it did not increase the staffing of the facility, the cost went up dramatically. Once again we are adding costs but not adding safety. Until Mr. Young actually sees reports that can justify cost increases, he is wary and concerned about reducing costs and increasing safety. Councilman-at-large Mark Barbour Chair, Recreation and Parks Improvement Committee Mr. Barbour thanked all for coming this evening and stated that it has been his privilege to serve as Councilman-at-large since January 1, 2006. Mr. Barbour stated that the Recreation and Parks Improvement Committee is known as the committee of rest, relaxation, fun, and fitness, and since he is knowledgeable in three of those four areas he is the logical choice for heading up the committee. Mr. Barbour stated that we have all had the occasion to say that we live in Bay Village and have been met with the remark of what a beautiful community it is and what great parks we have, specifically Cahoon Memorial Park. We are truly lucky to have so much green space available to us for the purpose of both organized and spontaneous activity such as running, biking, walking. We are a city of walkers and it is important that we maintain our parks for their usefulness and attractiveness. That obviously affects the desirability of our community. In the past couple of years we have installed a bocce ball court adjacent to the senior center, new walking paths in Cahoon Memorial Park, refinished the tennis courts in Reese Park and the basketball courts in Cahoon Memorial Park, small ball fields in Bradley Park were put in, the parking lot at Bradley was paved, the parking lot at Cahoon Memorial Park near the soccer fields was paved and striped, improvements were made to the sledding hill, and we added a new park on Walker Road in partnership with Avon Lake. The park is about 60 acres and has a large wilderness component and you can walk back through the wetlands. It is a very beautiful park, which the Cities of Bay Village and Avon Lake own together and any decisions as to what is going to be done with it are made in conjunction with our partners in Avon Lake. There is a small pavilion that has been installed there as well. The small Columbia Road Park has an overlook over the waterfall. We would like to encourage our dog owner friends who use that beach to clean up after their pets. The Forestview School property will become a de facto park. It is the school district‟s property but we will use that when the grading is completed in the summer and fall as a passive park. It will be more green space that people can use. It is important to maintain our parks. Some of the playground equipment will need to be replaced. The tennis courts by city hall will eventually need to be resurfaced and the lighting will need to be replaced. These items are on the agenda down the road.

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Over 55,000 patrons used the pool in 2007. We sold 4,081 pool passes and had an average daily attendance of about 740 people. One thousand two hundred and ninety kids learned how to swim last year. We had 875 kids partake in summer programs, beyond the learn-to-swim classes. Over 170 adults took part in the summer programs. We had over 500 kids play basketball over the winter, in grades 1 through 8. We have partnered with our friends at the school district for a number of years for our recreation programs at the middle school. We use the middle school gym and we use the community gym that we share with the school. We have a very good relationship with them in that regard, and it has been very useful for both the school district and for the city. Almost all of our winter programs take place there, including, for the adults, cardio kickboxing, yoga, volleyball, basketball, and all those things. We also partnered with the school district in using their fields because we don‟t have enough field space for all of the recreation programs that we have: flag football, tackle football, and those types of programs plus the other groups that are integral to Bay Village, e.g., the soccer club. Over 1100 children play soccer in Bay Village. They need fields and we do the best we can with that but we need the school district‟s help in that regard because we don‟t have enough space. Bay Men‟s Club has a wonderful baseball program that we are very lucky to have and they use our fields and the school district‟s fields as well. We have a growing softball program and both baseball and softball programs have travel programs as well. The fastest growing sport in the United States is Lacrosse, which many people are not familiar with, but we now have a high school team, a seventh and eighth grade club team, they are starting a fifth and sixth grade team, and then they are going to start girls‟ teams. Bay Village has a long history of being an active community and we should be very happy that we are able to support those kinds of clubs. Mr. Barbour acknowledged Dan Enovitch as the Recreation Director and his assistant Clare Casey, noting that they do a great job in managing all of these things. Mr. Barbour also acknowledged Jim Sears, Service Director, and commented that our service department does a beautiful job in maintaining our parks. The most recent thing that Council has done in the area of Parks and Recreation is to enter into an agreement with the school district for the use of the turf field at the high school stadium. In the last sixteen months, a group of private citizens raised over $736,000 to pay for the cost of that field. The city was approached to participate in that and elected to do so by entering into a written agreement very similar to the agreement we have with the school district for the use of the community gym. For a period of ten years, the city will pay $10,000 per year and we have a schedule of times that we are able to use that all-weather, all-season turf field for the purpose of our recreation programs and the recreation programs of the soccer club and Lacrosse club. Councilman-at-large Jim Scott Chair, Public Improvements, Streets, Sewers and Drainage Committee Mr. Jim Scott thanked all of the residents for being present this evening and thanked his wife Crystal Scott, and Clerk of Council Joan Kemper for setting up the refreshments in the back, as well as the Council wives who helped make the refreshments this evening.

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Mr. Scott stated that he will cover four topics this evening: the pavement resurfacing for 2008, sanitary sewer replacement project at Wolf, Osborn, Dwight and Brackenway, development of a long term plan for city sewer maintenance, and historical building preservation. In regard to the 2008 pavement resurfacing project, the budget for this year is $600,000 and is divided among three projects: the Bruce/Russell/Douglas area, East Oviatt, Dover to Glen Park, Glen Park from Wolf to Knickerbocker, and Upland, from Wolf to Electric. These streets will all be resurfaced this summer. Estimated cost for the project is $435,000 and the actual cost is a little over $398,000, about $37,000 under the estimate. The second resurfacing project is actually the finishing of the Bassett Road project which will be about $50,000 to finish the whole project including planting the trees. There is a miscellaneous paving project with the location to be determined at a later date based on an as needed basis. The sanitary sewer replacement project at Wolf, Osborn, Dwight and Brackenway is a major sewer improvement project which should significantly improve the sanitary sewer system in that area and also alleviate some of the basement flooding in that part of the city. The estimated cost for construction was $364,000. A favorable bid was received for $318,000, which is about $46,000 under the estimated price. There is also approximately $48,000 in engineering services with this project and the total cost is $366,000. There is a meeting with residents on Thursday, May 29, at 6:30 p.m. at the police station community room to give information to residents about this sewer improvement. The development of a long term plan for city sewer maintenance developed out of a series of conversations that Mr. Scott had with Service Director Jim Sears about some of the flooding problems that happened late last summer when during the period of two weeks we had some very heavy downpours that led to a lot of flooding in the city. On January 23, 2008, a Public Improvements Committee meeting was held in which we formally decided to move forward in the development of a long-term plan for sewer maintenance. Since then, we have been hard at work and we are making progress. The plan is not yet complete, but some of the things we are looking at are: 1) accelerating the sewer lining program to reduce the amount of water infiltration into the sanitary sewers; 2) Consulting with an engineer to advise the city on infrastructure and capacity issues; 3) pass legislation to expand the city‟s responsibility to include lateral sewer lines in the public right-of-way; 4) pass legislation to give residents financial credit for certain kinds of improvements to keep storm water out of their sanitary laterals; 5) develop an information packet for residents to provide guidance on how they can do some things to reduce their basement flooding, and 6) post helpful information on this issue on the city‟s web site. The committee will continue to discuss these and other ideas in future committee meetings. It is hoped to have a plan in place by June and the committee will then present the plan to City Council for discussion and consideration. The last topic is historical building preservation. This was placed in the Public Improvements Committee last year as an assignment to this committee because the

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Planning and Zoning Committee was overwhelmed with other topics. Mr. Scott stated that his committee has not yet had a chance to discuss this item this year due to the urgency of developing a sewer maintenance plan. The item will be taken up in the near future when we can give it the time it deserves. Question and Answer Session Mr. Cruse stated that there were several questions received by email prior to this evening‟s meeting and reviewed those questions and comments. Regarding the email of Mr. William C. Ferry, and his question as to whether the Council of Bay Village will be willing to look at every single area of government with the same eye, Mr. Cruse stated that the answer is “yes.” “Must Bay be part of the ever expanding bureaucratic leviathan?” Mr. Cruse‟s answer is “no.” “Will the Council be willing to find non-government, non-tax ways to achieve the quality of life we enjoy in Bay Village?” Mr. Cruse stated that the note he put to himself was “yes” but then it struck him that if Council is finding these ways it is probably by definition not non-government. “Or, has the doctrine of creeping socialism so snuck into our thinking that we view government as the sole provider of all good things?” Mr. Cruse stated that the sense he gets is that he agrees with the comment and if you really look around at this community, e.g., senior programs, the relay-for-life that is going to occur May 9, one of the things that has always struck him about Bay Village is how involved people are. Mr. Cruse added that he doesn‟t know if he totally agrees with Mr. Ferry‟s statement. Mr. Coughlin on Bassett Road inquired about the tree planting to finish off the Bassett Road project. Mr. Cruse thanked the residents on Bassett Road for their patience and understanding in the two-year project. Mr. Cruse responded that the tree planting has already started. They began at the north end and are working their way down the street. Heidi Cullinan asked about the plans to improve Reese Park. Mr. Cruse stated that he had an opportunity to talk with Service Director Sears who could not be present this evening because he is enjoying a previously scheduled vacation with his family. Mr. Cruse continued that the service department is working on the replacement of some of the equipment that is at Reese Park. Ms. Cullinan asked if the mailbox will be returned to Reese Park and Mr. Cruse stated that that is a postal service decision and Mr. Sears has advised that the postal service wants to put that mailbox back and it should be back soon. Ms. Cullinan also stated that it would be nice if a green newspaper recycling bin was placed on the east side of Bay Village. Mr. Cruse stated that the thought from the service department experts is that the one centralized location works better all around. Mr. Steve Clarke (Tuttle Drive) sent an email stating that he is no hard-core environmentalist but it does bother him that we throw out so many plastic items because Bay only accepts plastic for recycling with numbers 1 and 2. “Are there any plans in the works to include other plastics?” Mr. Cruse stated that he learned from this question. The answer to that is “no” and this is pretty much a standard in all recycling programs. He was advised that there is no source for recycling other plastics besides 1 and 2.

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The last email questions from Mr. and Mrs. Rehor were in regard to some of the graffiti that has recently appeared at Bay Square. Mr. Cruse stated that as of the end of April the building department was working with the owners of Bay Square to get that cleaned up. They were given 30 days by ordinance to have it removed and those will be reinspected June 4 for compliance. Mr. and Mrs. Rehor went on to ask about the administration taking a look at negative youth activity in the parks and at Bay Square, patrolling in the Metroparks, agreements between the Bay Village Police and the Metroparks, and the resolution of the city‟s ability to patrol the Metroparks. The response was that we do run undercover operations in all our parks, including the Metroparks. The Mayor responded be email directly to this question stating that unfortunately she cannot provide more detail regarding these investigations but the concern is noted and there are discussions and actions going on. Mr. and Mrs. Rehor asked if there are realistic thoughts about coordinating with the school system to cut down on drugs, alcohol, and other negative behaviors and if there has been any formal discussion on this topic. The answer was that the city and schools have worked proactively for years to cut down on negative behaviors and reinforce positive ones. Programs for kids include Safety Town, the DARE program, Bay Family Services, the Juvenile Diversion Program, and the Youth Center provide somewhat of a safety net for our kids that most communities do not have. We work closely to provide special seminars for both parents and kids by accomplished police officers and detectives dealing with relative issues. One of our detectives is specifically designated as the juvenile detective and works very closely with the high school and middle school. Discussions to improve our work are continually on going. Mr. and Mrs. Rehor stated that with so many city and school officials having children in the Bay School System, we as well as many other parents are attending and wonder why they do not see the President at a lot of these parent information nights. Mr. Cruse responded that he would like to be everywhere but unfortunately the school schedules a lot of those meetings on Monday nights and Council has their meetings on Monday nights. The Mayor responded to Mr. Rehor‟s email that these programs are joint partnerships that reflect the financial support of City Council and the School Board, and the administrative support of the Superintendent of Schools and the Mayor. Without that supportive partnership, the parent information nights would not exist. The Mayor‟s staff is present with her full encouragement and support. In addition, Detective Krolkosky communicates with the Mayor on a regular basis as to trends, issues and incidents so that the Mayor is well informed regarding our teen activities and any measures that are taken on the part of the city with our Bay Schools partner. Mr. Cruse added that we always look for ways we can improve things that we can do differently and there is no question that it is an ongoing battle. Jerrie Barnett, 316 Bayview Road, asked if Finance Director Presley would speak about the sewer bills and the due date for those bills, which is up next week and why those bills are up $10.00 more than normally. Finance Director Presley stated that the bills also include a refuse collection fee, which is $12.00. The new bill is $52.50 plus the $12.00. If the bill is late, or any portion is not paid, there is by ordinance a $10.00 late fee on the sewer payment that is not made, and if

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the sewer payment is made and the refuse bill goes unpaid there is a $10.00 late fee on that. Regarding the due date, the bills were printed back in April, however, they were not mailed until just last Friday awaiting the paper work and the envelopes to put them all together. Even though the due date is printed as May 15, the actual due date has been extended until May 30, 2008. This message will be posted on the outdoor bulletin boards in front of city hall and on the corner of Cahoon Road and Wolf Road. No late fees will be applied until Monday, June 1. A resident asked if the refuse collection fee will be long term, and asked for an explanation of the difference between a tax and a fee. Mr. Presley responded that the refuse collection fee does have a sunset clause by ordinance of December 31, 2008. Unless Council should amend that ordinance, as of January 1, 2009 there is no authority to send out a bill that would include a refuse collection fee. Mr. Presley stated that a fee by its nature is not deductible as taxes. A tax is based on a rate of something else. The resident stated that he did send these questions by email and they were not addressed this evening. Mr. Cruse stated that there was an email sent to him to which he responded by email but would be happy to read it tonight if the resident brought a copy with him. Mr. Cruse stated that the email stated that word has it that a $12.00 charge is being added to the water bill, to all property owners in Bay Village to alleviate a $1.2 million shortfall in the city‟s budget. “This appears to be an unvoted upon tax to the property owner; is this legal? What happens if a property owner refuses to pay the $12.00? Once I receive my water bill I plan on calling my Council person to protest this tax. Has the city looked at ways to cut the budget? Summer help comes to mind. My understanding is that the people who benefit most are city employees that get summer jobs for relative or friends. My understanding is that this is not required work and could easily be deleted or shifted to our permanent employees.” Mr. Cruse stated that this email did come in unsigned, and he did responded as follows: “Dear Resident, Please excuse the informality of the greeting but either your name did not come through when your email was forwarded to me or you did not include it. Either way it makes it impossible for me to address you properly and for that I apologize. As to the substance of your email, no, there is no $1.2 million shortfall. In fact our budget for 2008 is balanced. This balancing did, however, mean that some changes had to be made. It was not as simple as adding a $12.00 per quarter refuse collection fee. That charge was instituted to help offset a 25% increase in our refuse collection contract. That hike is a reflection of increased fuel costs (if misery loves company many other communities have been charging for refuse collection for a lot longer and at a higher rate). It is not a tax; it is a charge for the service akin to the sewer rental fee paid quarterly. I believe if it is not paid eventually it would be certified as delinquent, added to your real estate property tax bill with interest, and eventually collected. Yes, we spent a lot of time cutting in the

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budget. In round numbers we cut at least $300,000 out, raised other fees for programs, deferred hiring, and some purchases, all in an effort to reach a balanced budget. Other factors that necessitated these actions included increases in insurance expenses, cut backs and or revisions of state funds, and flat forecasting on some of our major revenue components like property and income taxes. In the end, Council and the administration developed a budget that we think minimizes the impact to everyone‟s wallet. Your question about summer help is a good one but your assumptions are not totally correct. Summer help does not take work away from full time employees. The bulk of the force staff summer recreation programs (increased fee area) and our pool. Others work with our full time employees to augment that work for us to complete the projects that need doing while the weather cooperates. I realize this is a „cliff note‟ version in answer to your questions but I hope you can gain a sense of everything we dealt with in formulating this year‟s budget and starting to make projections for next year and beyond. If you still have questions please feel free to give me a call, or your council representative a call.” Laura Keane, 26523 Knickerbocker, stated that it is her understanding that the intersection of Bradley and Nagle will need to be modified due to the plan for the I-90 interchange in Avon. Ms. Keane asked what modifications are being talked about, how much it is going to cost, and who is going to be paying for the cost. Councilman Michael Young, Ward 4, responded that a study has to be done and will be funded by the Cleveland Clinic. Mr. Young stated that he has been attending meetings relative to the proposed interchange for the past four years. The clinic will pay for the study for that intersection. The cost of updating the intersection will be paid by a large number of cities, but most specifically the City of Avon, as opposed to us. The cost to the City of Bay Village should be minimal. The study itself will dictate what has to be done. Ethel Hansen, 30401 Ednil Drive, stated that she received a letter from the Mayor in the mail with her sewer bill. Under the heading “Finance” it says that the city received $56 million in 2007 as revenue. Mrs. Hansen asked if the $15 million is included in that. She was informed that it is included. Mrs. Hansen continued that the Mayor‟s letter states that out of that $25 million were the expenditures, so when you subtract the $25 million and the $15 million from the $56 million, there are $16 million accounted for. Mr. Presley stated that it is not unaccounted for. At the end of the year in fund balances, available cash, $15.4 million of that which is the estate taxes is still remaining, in addition to the remaining fund balances in the various other funds that we legally have to maintain. Mr. Presley stated that the other part of that is that in the revenue side you have the sale and repayment of bonds, the transfer of the $15.4 million from the general fund is now also an expense in the general fund when you transfer it to the general reserve fund. Mr. Dan Rehor expressed appreciation for all the time in responding to his email. He stated that there is a group of parents who had specific questions when they attended the high school meetings and when they asked these questions they were told that the city administration is the best to answer the questions. The Mayor did send Detective

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Krolkosky to the meetings, but on many occasions the answer is that someone in the administration is better to answer those questions. The collective thought is that if someone from the administration could attend those to answer generic questions from the audience. Mr. Rehor stated that at several of these meetings the detective did bring up the inability in their minds to effectively police and cover the Metroparks because of the existing relationships. Several times it was brought up in these meetings that there was an agreement back in the 1970‟s that they are looking for right now, that many parents are asking about. Mr. Rehor asked the status of that agreement and what can the Metroparks and the city do, and who specifically is negotiating with the Metroparks to help increase Bay Village‟s ability to police and function in the park, especially in the summer months. The Metroparks is a jewel in the middle of Bay Village, but unfortunately things change from June to August. Mr. Ebert responded stated that there has always been an issue concerning the jurisdiction of the Metroparks. The cooperation has been better in the last five or six years, but the jurisdiction of the Metroparks falls upon the county, not the City of Bay Village. The issue has been discussed as recently as two weeks ago, regarding the rangers patrolling. Mr. Ebert stated that he would be happy to look into it but the short answer is that the City of Bay Village does not have jurisdiction over the Metroparks, per se, the county does. We work in concert with the rangers. It is limited what the city can do in the Metroparks. The alternative would be to have a meeting of the minds with the county and the City of Bay Village. Mr. Rehor asked if the city is willing to commit to start those discussions. Mr. Ebert stated that the city will commit to start those discussions. Mr. Rehor stated that what they are hearing at the high school meetings is that the police enforcement is viewing that as a needed step and they are not quite sure as a group why that voice is not coming up to the administration as a needed step. Mr. Ebert stated he would personally take a look at it and get back to Mr. Rehor. Al Wier, Glen Park Drive, asked about the Police Department topic of the Mayor‟s letter which stated that “the detective bureau is involved in several investigations extending outside the jurisdiction resulting in the recovery of valuable property and stolen money. Many of the arrests and successful prosecutions result in the case of internet crime, i.d. theft, a large scale fencing operation, and financial fraud.” Mr. Wier asked if anything can be added to that. Mr. Ebert stated that the city works very closely with the Westshore Enforcement Bureau (WEB) and this may be specifically what the Mayor is talking about in her letter. Detective Kevin Krolkosky was addressed by Mr. Cruse who stated that the investigation of internet crime was something that specifically helps some of our citizens that may have fallen prey to the latest rage of internet crimes. Detective Krolkosky explained that if we have a victim in Bay whose credit card account is compromised the crime can be

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tracked down via computer and followed through to retrieve the property purchased illegally. A resident addressed Mr. Young and asked if anyone has ever looked into privatizing paramedic units. Mr. Young stated that he cannot answer that question because neither he nor his committee has looked into that issue. Mr. Young stated that one of the good things about having a full time fire department is they act not only as a full time fire department but also as a paramedic unit at the same time. Mr. Young stated that one of the things we need to be looking at is not just Bay Village, but regionally. Our mutual aid at this point is not really mutual; we are helping other cities and they are not helping us. It would be better to work as a series of communities in more efficient ways that benefit us just as much. Fire Chief Sammon stated that as a point of interest when you think about that remember that your paramedics, the firefighters you have now, were recently recognized as number one in the county for resuscitation rates in cardiac arrests. Nancy Brown, Wolf Road, asked if consideration has been given to a traffic study at Wolf and Cahoon Roads. Ms. Brown and other residents have noticed an increase of traffic and asked if some thought has possibly been given to adding an arrow to that intersection. It also seems that there is an increase of traffic accidents as well. Mr. Cruse responded that between himself and Mr. Young‟s committee they will follow up on that question. Martin Mace asked Law Director Ebert about his comment that the administration‟s position is that fire department manning is a labor management issue. Mr. Mace asked Mr. Ebert if he is implying that public safety is not a matter for the public. Law Director Ebert responded that he did not imply that all. The issue concerning the methodology that is being perceived right now, or procedure being handed out, as far as referendum petitions, we believe the staffing is a management right, bottom line, management right whether it is Council dictating or the administration dictating, it is a management right. We have labor contracts with the fire department. It is our belief, from a legal standpoint, that staffing is part of the labor contract, and that is why the city is contemplating filing a fair labor practice. We are not trying to compromise safety. Mr. Ebert stated that in his personal opinion that is an easy sell to the residents when we start talking safety. Everyone wants safety; we are not going to compromise safety for dollars. That‟s not the issue. Mr. Cruse stated that it is fair to say in a larger sense that this is something that everyone on Council is paying very, very close attention to and looking at alternatives for solutions. We all understand that passions run very high on both sides of this issue, there is no question about that. Mr. Cruse stated he does not want to minimize the issue or seem like he is brushing it under the table. It is not an issue that is going to be resolved here tonight at this meeting. Every comment that we get on this topic is taken very

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seriously and this is a matter that is still fleshing out and the final chapter has not been written on this at all. Jerrie Barnett asked about the petition last year that was to get the Law Director elected in Bay Village. Mrs. Barnett stated that she would like to know how much money was spent by the city hiring outside law firms to prevent this issue from being placed on the ballot. Mr. Ebert responded that the city has paid to date $65,000. The bills that came in for outside legal were from two law firms, one firm in Cleveland, one firm in Columbus. Their bills actually exceeded that amount. We have been trying to negotiate and compromise the invoices. Joseph Hochman, 304 Glen Park Drive, stated that he lives in Ward 2 on Wischmeyer Creek and has a health and safety issue. The issue is in two parts; one is that Wischmeyer Creek from Knickerbocker to Wolf Road has sanitary lines underneath the Wischmeyer Creek beds. These have been there for sixty years and he would like the city to remove them and put them somewhere else where it is not going to be a health threat. The second part is that he has a floodwall control structure on his property and he is trying to get the city to address replacing it. There is a control structure on his neighbor‟s property and his is the last one left and it is ready to fall down. It is a safety problem and he believes the city has an obligation to step up and take care of it. Councilman Barbour stated that he was the chairman of the Public Improvements Committee last year and the Wischmeyer Creek sanitary sewer issue was on the committee‟s discussion list. Currently, engineering has been done to reline that sewer that Mr. Hochman is talking about because the relining was approximately $500,000. The cost to more the sewer line from underneath that creek where it has been for sixty years was well in excess of $1 million. The current engineering plan is to reline the sewer. The issue of Mr. Hochman‟s retaining wall has been pending with the city since 1990 and multiple Public Improvement Committee members have looked at it and various different make-ups of Council have looked at it and there have been a number of discussions. At this point the city is not in a position to help with Mr. Hochman‟s situation as discussed on multiple times. Ms. Brown addressed Councilman Scott and asked when Council was advised of the budget shortfall and why he believes that shortfall came about. Mr. Scott stated that it was in December and Council was all rather shocked. Council was told the city was facing a shortfall of about $1 million. A couple of months later the Finance Committee meetings were made meetings of the Committee of the Whole and that‟s when all Council members had to roll up their sleeves and get involved. Jerry Kilbane, Cliff Drive, commented regarding the firefighters petitions that are circulating, and stated that the Mayor‟s representative stated that the Mayor is considering charging them with unfair labor practices. Mr. Kilbane stated that circulating

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a petition to put something up to a vote of the people is a very democratic way to come to a decision on that. Mr. Kilbane asked what laws they have broken. Mr. Ebert responded that everyone has a right to circulate a petition as far as the First Amendment. The issue concerning staffing of the fire department we believe is covered under the labor contract that we entered into a year ago with the fire department. That‟s the position that the city has taken and that is the position that will be decided in Columbus. We are considering filing an unfair labor practice; we are doing research on that now. Mr. Kilbane asked if that would be made public if that is done and Mr. Ebert responded affirmatively. Rita Hochman, 304 Glen Park, asked where the Mayor‟s communications to the people who send in their email address to the city hall can be found on the City of Bay Village website. Mr. Cruse stated that he does not know the answer to that but he will ask and get back to Mrs. Hochman. Mr. Pohlkamp noted that there is supposed to be a major overhaul to the city‟s website which hopefully will include more menu items. Mrs. Hochman noted that she is very protective of her email because when she had AOL her email address was hijacked and viruses were sent out with her email. She will not put her new email on a broadcast list, even to her family. Mrs. Hochman stated that it would be really transparent if all the communications coming were sent out as blind carbon copies. Mrs. Hochman asked if the communications from the Mayor could be put on the web site like the agendas and the minutes of the meetings. Mr. Young addressed Mrs. Hochman that as a city council we would include all the addresses when we sent out an email; now it is all blind. The Mayor‟s newsletter that is sent out on the city‟s web site is sent out blind. Mrs. Hochman stated that this is reassuring but she would rather not divulge her email address and would rather go to the library or the web site and read the letters. Mr. Cruse stated that he would find out the answer and get back to Mrs. Hochman. Jennie Mace, 434 Elmwood, addressed Mr. Koomar and asked if he would consider clustered home meetings, as mentioned by Mr. Tadych, for Ward 2. Mr. Koomar stated that is something that always can be considered but quite frankly he has a very full day job and with city commitments right now those are tough to work in on an on-going basis. Mr. Tadych is retired and has a little more free time. Mr. Koomar stated that the approach he has taken over the past is rather than generic open sessions he is very accessible, answers all the emails and looks at topic related issues. In the Bruce and Russell areas there are a lot of flooding issues and some concerned residents because that has been one of the big areas in Bay Village that has had flooding issues. Mr. Koomar will meet with those residents on that particular issue so his answer would be that his are more topic related based on the feedback from the residents in Ward 2, and based on his availability.

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Jim Walts, from the Firefighters Association, addressed Mr. Young and stated that Mr. Young talked about the dispatch duties and said that the Central Dispatch Center came in and the five person minimum didn‟t change anything. Mr. Walts stated that we have talked about this before but some of the people here may not know that the dispatcher at the station actually did go out and participate in calls. Mr. Walts stated that all the comments were directed to EMS activities and second squad runs and there are firefighter safety issues that are involved and while he doesn‟t think that anyone here doesn‟t care about that there may be some information education needed. Mr. Young stated that what he tried to do with the five and six man minimum discussions, is re-tell what he thinks the administration‟s position is and tried to convey it as he thought the administration had proposed it. Mr. Young stated that as far as firefighter minimums he does understand to some degree the NFPA standards and if someone works in industry as well. Mr. Young stated that he does not discount that but at the same from his experience teaching electrical classes and using NFPA standards, the standard itself does not necessarily mean you have to apply it every time. There is some grace as to how you actually apply those NFPA standards, electrically, and as far as fire fighting as well. Mr. Young noted that this is his personal opinion. Mr. Scott Carras, 387 Lake Forest, stated that we have the best Fire Department in the whole State of Ohio and cannot relate how many times they have saved his life. He is an asthmatic and has a father who is not well due to diabetes and has had several strokes. Mr. Carras stated that he understands what this is all about and what is happening and hopes someday soon this will all be resolved. Mr. Carras thanked the firefighters for being there for his parents, but also for him and for taking them to the hospital several times. Mr. Carras noted that they do an outstanding job and he cannot say enough about them and our police department as well. Meeting adjourned at 9:30 p.m. and refreshments were served. Mr. Cruse sincerely thanked everyone for their presence and participation.

__________________________ Brian Cruse, President of Council

_____________________________ Joan Kemper, Clerk of Council


				
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