West Lancashire - North West Public Health Observatory by tangshuming

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									         Key summary points and local profile for West Lancashire
Comprehensive data on road traffic collisions and casualties is now available in Road traffic
collisions and casualties in the North West of England, produced by the North West Public Health
Observatory. The report is intended to support local decision-making and inform the development
of local plans to reduce the risk of injury and death from road traffic collisions and protect the health
of people who travel in the North West.
For the first time, the report brings together data from five sources: (STATS19 [police incident
information], the North West Ambulance Service, accident and emergency attendances, hospital
admissions and mortality data) to describe the current picture of road traffic collisions and
casualties arising from these incidents across the North West and within local areas, for people of
all ages and where possible for children.

 •   The North West has the highest rates of all age and child road casualties in England.
 •   Over the last thirty years, the number of road traffic casualties in the North West has fallen
     by around a fifth.
 •   269 people were killed, 3,055 were seriously injured and 26,137 were slightly injured in road
     traffic collisions in the North West in 2008.
 •   Rates of road traffic casualties in the North West vary considerably between local authority
     areas.
 •   Young people are most at risk of becoming a casualty of a road traffic collision, although
     older people are more likely to be killed or seriously injured if they become a casualty.
 •   Of all road traffic casualties in the region in 2008, 67.2% were car users, 13.3% were
     pedestrians, 7.0% were motorcyclists and 6.3% were pedal cyclists.
 •   The severity of injuries from road traffic collisions increases in rural areas.
 •   In 2008, 3,348 casualties in the North West were infants and children (0-15 years), with
     more males injured in road traffic collisions than females. Eleven-year-olds are significantly
     more likely than ten-year-olds to be injured.
 •   Children are most likely to be killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions in the months
     of June and October, on Fridays, and between 3.00 and 3.59 pm.
 •   Over four-fifths of all child casualties occur on roads that have a speed limit of 30 mph.
 •   A modelling exercise indicates that 140 killed or seriously injured child casualties could have
     been prevented each year between 2004 and 2008 if 20 mph traffic speed zones had been
     introduced in residential areas (other than main roads) across the North West.
                The full report is available for download at www.nwpho.org.uk
                                   Focus on West Lancashire


•     Between 2006 and 2008, on average 617 people per year were injured in a road traffic collision
      in West Lancashire, a directly standardised rate of 594.56 per 100,000 population. This is
      significantly worse than the North West average of 469.36.

•     Of these 617 casualties, on average 106 were killed or seriously injured (KSI). This equates to a
      directly standardised KSI rate of 100.48 per 100,000 population, which is significantly worse
      than the regional average (50.89).

•     There were 40 pedestrian casualties per year (2006-08 average) in West Lancashire. This gives
      a directly standardised pedestrian casualty rate of 37.53 per 100,000 population, significantly
      better than the North West average of 61.84.

•     Casualties were injured in a total of 382 collisions per year (2006-08 average) in West
      Lancashire. This equates to a crude rate of 348.29 collisions per 100,000 population, which is
      significantly worse than the North West average (320.40).

•     A total of 63 children aged 0-15 years were injured in road traffic collisions in West Lancashire
      per year (2006-08), and of these casualties, 11 were killed or seriously injured. West
      Lancashire’s child casualty rate was 301.49 per 100,000 (crude rate), not significantly different
      to the regional average (281.48), while the child KSI rate was 52.64 per 100,000, not
      significantly different to the North West rate (36.45).

•     There were 373 ambulance call outs to road traffic incidents in West Lancashire, a rate of
      340.12 per 100,000 population, not significantly different to the North West rate (325.75).

•     There were 146 hospital admissions of West Lancashire residents per year (2006/07-2008/09
      average) as a result of a road traffic collision. The hospital admission rate is 139.36 per 100,000
      population, significantly worse than the regional average of 123.05. Of these admissions, 32
      were for children aged 0-15 years, equating to a crude rate of admission of 154.73 per 100,000
      population aged 0-15 years, not significantly different to the regional average (148.18).

•     On average per year (2006-08), 6 people from West Lancashire died as a result of a land
      transport accident, equating to a directly standardised mortality rate of 5.09 per 100,000
      population, not significantly different to the regional average (4.34). In total, 17.92 years of life
      per 10,000 population under 75 years are lost in West Lancashire as a result of land transport
      accidents, not significantly different to the regional average (16.82).

The report presents compelling evidence for                     physical activity, reducing obesity through
continuing action to reduce road traffic                        walking and cycling promotion, and
collisions and casualties in the North West.                    encouraging community cohesion. The
However, interventions to reduce road traffic                   challenge is to reduce road traffic danger
collisions and casualties should be                             while improving population health and
considered alongside other health                               wellbeing.
improvement activity, such as increasing

    For further information
    Lynn Deacon, North West Local Specialist – Child and Maternal Health Observatory,
    North West Public Health Observatory; l.k.deacon@ljmu.ac.uk, 0151 231 4346
    January 2011

								
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