Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs by pp00pp

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									  CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING FIRST CYCLE
       (BACHELOR) ENGINEERING PROGRAMS




                                                  MÜDEK
                   Association for Evaluation and Accreditation of Engineering Programs
                                 ARI Teknokent ARI 2 Binası A Blok 7. Kat
                                          İTÜ Ayazağa Yerleşkesi
                                       Maslak 34469 İstanbul, Turkey
                                         Tel: +90-212-276-7560/73
                                          Fax: +90-212-276-7580
                                        E-mail: infos@mudek.org.tr
                                     Web site: http://www.mudek.org.tr/


English Translation of MÜDEK – Mühendislik Lisans Programları Değerlendirme Ölçütleri (Sürüm 2.0 – 26.12.2008)   Version 2.0.1–06.10.2009
                                                                 MÜDEK
     Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs
                                                               CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS........................................................................................... 1
   Definitions...................................................................................................................................... 1
I.    GENERAL CRITERIA................................................................................................................ 2
      Criterion 1. Students..................................................................................................................... 2
      Criterion 2. Program Educational Objectives............................................................................ 2
      Criterion 3. Program Outcomes .................................................................................................. 3
      Criterion 4. Continuous Improvement ....................................................................................... 4
      Criterion 5. Curriculum ............................................................................................................... 4
      Criterion 6. Faculty Members ..................................................................................................... 4
      Criterion 7. Facilities .................................................................................................................... 5
      Criterion 8. Institutional Support and Financial Resources..................................................... 5
      Criterion 9. Organization and Decision-Making Processes ...................................................... 5
      Criterion 10. Discipline-Specific Criteria ................................................................................... 5
II. DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CRITERIA ........................................................................................ 6
      Bioengineering............................................................................................................................... 6
      Environmental Engineering......................................................................................................... 6
      Electrical and Computer Engineering ........................................................................................ 6
      Industrial Engineering ................................................................................................................. 7
      Physics Engineering ...................................................................................................................... 7
      Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering ............................................................................ 7
      Food Engineering .......................................................................................................................... 7
      Aerospace Engineering................................................................................................................. 8
      Civil Engineering .......................................................................................................................... 8
      Geodesy and Photogrammetry Engineering .............................................................................. 8
      Geological, Hydrogeological, and Geophysical Engineering .................................................... 8
      Chemical Engineering .................................................................................................................. 9
      Mining Engineering ...................................................................................................................... 9
      Mechanical Engineering............................................................................................................... 9
      Metallurgical and Materials Engineering................................................................................. 10
      Nuclear Engineering ................................................................................................................... 10
      Petroleum Engineering............................................................................................................... 10
      Textile Engineering..................................................................................................................... 10
      Manufacturing Engineering....................................................................................................... 11
      Software Engineering ................................................................................................................. 11




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                                                    MÜDEK
 Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS
These criteria aim to ensure the quality of engineering programs at the First Cycle (Bachelor) level,
consisting of a minimum of eight semesters or its equivalent (240 ECTS credits) following
secondary education, and to support the continuous improvement of such programs in order to meet
the expectations of all constituencies in a dynamic and competitive environment. It is the
responsibility of the institution seeking accreditation for an engineering program to demonstrate
clearly that the program meets the criteria specified in this document.

Definitions
Even though the institutions may use their own, different terminology, the evaluations based on
MÜDEK’s criteria must consistently use the following basic definitions given in the Directives on
Evaluation and Accreditation Principles, Article 7(a).
i. Program Educational Objectives: General statements defining the career goals and professional
accomplishments that graduates are expected to achieve in the years following graduation.
ii. Program Outcomes: Statements defining the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students must
have acquired by the time they graduate.
iii. Assessment: The process of defining, collecting, and arranging data and evidence through
various methods in order to determine the achievement levels of the program educational objectives
and program outcomes.
iv. Evaluation: The process of interpreting the data and evidence obtained from assessments through
various methods. The evaluation process should yield the achievement levels of the program
educational objectives and program outcomes; it should be used for decisions and actions aimed at
improving the program.
v. Credit: A credit is equivalent to an educational load of a one-hour (50-minute) theoretical class
taught regularly every week during a semester, or a two- to three-hour-long applied, practical or
laboratory class.
vi. ECTS Credit: Credit defined by the European Credit Transfer System.
vi. Complex Problem: A comprehensive problem that requires for its solution some or all of the
following: in-depth engineering knowledge, abstract thinking, creative use of basic engineering
principles, and the development of a new model or method.
vii. Complex System, Process, Device, or Product: A system, process, device, or product that
contains multiple components and various sub-systems and/or may relate to more than one
discipline; and whose analysis and design poses a complex problem.




MÜDEK – Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs (Version 2.0.1 - 06.10.2009)   Page 1
I.    GENERAL CRITERIA
Criterion 1. Students
The quality, development, and accomplishments of students are important factors in the evaluation
of an engineering program. Therefore,
1.1   students admitted to the program must have the required background to achieve the program
      outcomes (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) within the planned period. The indicators used in
      admitting students must be monitored, and their variation over the years must be evaluated.
1.2   policies concerning the admission of students through vertical or horizontal transfer, double
      major, minor, student exchange, and the evaluation of courses taken at and credits awarded by
      other institutions and/or programs must be defined in detail and enforced.
1.3   the institution and/or program must take measures to encourage and ensure student mobility,
      in the form of agreements and partnerships with other institutions.
1.4 advisory services that guide students in their course and career planning must be provided.
1.5   student performance in all courses and other activities within the scope of the program must
      be assessed and evaluated based on transparent, fair, and consistent methods.
1.6   in order to determine whether students may graduate, reliable methods to determine the
      fulfillment of all conditions required by the program must be developed and enforced.

Criterion 2. Program Educational Objectives
2.1   For every engineering program to be evaluated, there must exist program educational
      objectives, consisting of general statements defining the career goals and professional
      accomplishments that graduates are expected to achieve in the years following graduation.
2.2   These objectives must be
       (a) consistent with the missions of the institution, faculty, and department;
       (b) determined based on the needs of the program’s internal and external constituencies;
       (c) published in a way to allow easy access; and
       (d) frequently updated, based on the needs of the program’s internal and external
           constituencies.
2.3 There must be an ongoing assessment and evaluation process in place in order to periodically
    determine and document in how far program educational objectives are being achieved.
    Engineering programs should demonstrate that the program educational objectives are being
    achieved.




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      Criterion 3. Program Outcomes
3.1 Program outcomes are statements defining the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students
    must have acquired by the time of their graduation. These statements must cover all
    knowledge, skills, and attitude components necessary to accomplish program educational
    objectives, and they must include the MÜDEK Outcomes listed in Table 3.1. Programs may
    define additional outcomes specific to their needs, provided that they are consistent with their
    educational objectives.


     Table 3.1         MÜDEK Outcomes
        i.    Adequate knowledge in mathematics, science and engineering subjects pertaining to the
              relevant discipline; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to
              model and solve engineering problems.
       ii.    Ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems; ability to select
              and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose.
       iii.   Ability to design a complex system, process, device or product under realistic
              constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply
              modern design methods for this purpose. (Realistic constraints and conditions may
              include factors such as economic and environmental issues, sustainability,
              manufacturability, ethics, health, safety issues, and social and political issues, according
              to the nature of the design.)
       iv.    Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for engineering
              practice; ability to employ information technologies effectively.
       v.     Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for
              investigating engineering problems.
       vi.    Ability to work efficiently in intra-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to
              work individually.
       vii.   Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of
              a minimum of one foreign language.
      viii.   Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow
              developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself.
       ix.    Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility.
       x.     Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management,
              and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable
              development.
       xi.    Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering
              practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of
              engineering solutions.


3.2 There must be an ongoing assessment and evaluation process in place in order to periodically
    determine and document in how far program outcomes are being achieved.
3.3 Engineering programs should demonstrate that students have achieved the program outcomes
    by the time they graduate.



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Criterion 4. Continuous Improvement
Programs should provide evidence that they use the results obtained through their assessment and
evaluation system for their continuous improvement. These improvement efforts must rest on solid
data gathered systematically in all areas in need of development, primarily as related to Criteria 2
and 3.

Criterion 5. Curriculum
5.1 Each program must have a curriculum that supports its program educational objectives and
    program outcomes. The curriculum must contain components common to all programs, as
    described below under this criterion, as well as the discipline-specific components given under
    Criterion 10.
5.2. Educational methods used in the implementation of the curriculum should guarantee that the
     students in fact acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes.
5.3. A management system that guarantees the implementation of the curriculum as stipulated and
     that ensures its continuous improvement must be in place.
5.4   The curriculum must contain the following components:
       (a)    A minimum of one year or 32 credits or 60 ECTS credits of mathematics and basic
              sciences. Basic sciences education must be relevant to the specific discipline and
              supported by experimental studies.
       (b)    A minimum of one-and-a-half years or 48 credits or 90 ECTS credits of basic
              engineering sciences and engineering topics relevant to the specific discipline.
       (c)    A general education that is consistent with the program objectives, complementing the
              technical content of the curriculum and ensuring familiarity with project management
              and business administration.
5.5   The curriculum must prepare students for engineering practice, through a major design
      experience, based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work and
      incorporating engineering standards and realistic constraints/conditions (such as economic,
      environmental, ethical, social, and political issues, sustainability, manufacturability, health
      and safety, and so on).

Criterion 6. Faculty Members
Faculty members are the principal component of any educational program. Therefore,
6.1   the number of faculty members must be adequate. This number must
       (a) ensure an adequate level of student-faculty interaction, student advising and counseling,
           service to the university, professional development, and interaction with industrial and
           professional organizations, as well as employers; and
       (b) be distributed so as to cover all curricular areas of the program.
6.2   Faculty members must have appropriate qualifications and ensure the efficient execution,
      evaluation, and improvement of the program. The overall competence of the faculty may be
      judged based on factors such as their education, diversity of backgrounds, engineering
      experience, teaching skills and experience, ability to communicate, enthusiasm for developing
      more effective programs, level of scholarship, research experience, and participation in
      professional societies.
6.3   The criteria for appointing and promoting faculty members must be determined and applied in


MÜDEK – Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs (Version 2.0.1 - 06.10.2009)   Page 4
      a way to satisfy and develop the points listed above.

Criterion 7. Facilities
7.1 Classrooms, laboratories, and associated equipment must be adequate to accomplish the
    program objectives and program outcomes and to provide an atmosphere conducive to
    learning.
7.2 There must be adequate facilities to allow students to participate in extra-curricular activities,
    to meet students’ social and cultural needs, to foster faculty-student interaction, and to create a
    climate that encourages professional development and professional activities.
7.3 Programs must provide opportunities for students to learn the use of modern engineering
    tools. Computing and information facilities must be adequate for the scientific and educational
    activities of students and faculty members to support the program educational objectives.
7.4 The library services provided to students must be adequate to accomplish the program
    educational objectives and program outcomes.
7.5 Necessary safety measures must be in place in the teaching environment and in student
    laboratories. Facilities for disabled persons must be available.

Criterion 8. Institutional Support and Financial Resources
8.1 Institutional support, constructive leadership, financial resources, and the strategy for the
    distribution of resources must be adequate to ensure program quality and its continuity.
8.2 Resources must be sufficient to attract, retain, and provide for the continuous professional
    development of qualified faculty members.
8.3 Resources must be sufficient to acquire, maintain, and operate the facilities necessary for the
    program.
8.4 Support personnel and institutional services must be adequate to meet program needs.
    Technical and administrative staff must be of adequate number and quality to support the
    achievement of program outcomes.

Criterion 9. Organization and Decision-Making Processes
The organization of the university and all decision-making processes of the president’s office, the
faculty, the department and, if any, other sub-units, within themselves and with each other, must be
organized in a way so as to support the achievement of program educational objectives and program
outcomes.

Criterion 10. Discipline-Specific Criteria
Discipline-specific criteria define additional criteria for the curriculum in a given engineering
discipline.
10.1 Each program must satisfy the relevant discipline-specific criteria defined in Part II.
10.2 If a program, by virtue of its title, becomes subject to two or more sets of discipline-specific
     criteria, then that program must satisfy each set of these criteria; however, overlapping
     requirements need to be satisfied only once.




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II. DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CRITERIA

       BIOENGINEERING AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to "bioengineering," “biomedical engineering” or other engineering
programs with similar modifiers in their title.
The structure of the curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of
engineering topics implied by the title of the program.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: understanding of biology and physiology, and
capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science,
and engineering to solve the problems at the interface of engineering and biology; ability to make
measurements on and interpret data from living systems, addressing the problems associated with
the interaction between living and non-living materials and systems.

       ENVIRONMENTAL AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "environmental" or similar modifiers in
their titles.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: proficiency in mathematics through differential
equations, probability and statistics, calculus-based physics, general chemistry, an earth science
(e.g., geology, meteorology, soil science) as relevant to the program of study, a biological science
(e.g., microbiology, aquatic biology, toxicology) as relevant to the program of study, and fluid
mechanics as relevant to the program of study; introductory-level knowledge of environmental
issues associated with air, land, and water systems and associated environmental health impacts;
ability to conduct laboratory experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data in more than
one of the major focus areas of environmental engineering (e.g., air, water, land, environmental
health); ability to perform engineering design by means of design experiences integrated throughout
the professional component of the curriculum; proficiency in advanced principles and practice as
relevant to the program objectives; and an understanding of the concepts of professional practice
and the roles and responsibilities of public institutions and private organizations pertaining to
environmental engineering.

 ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "electrical," "electronic," "computer,"
"telecommunications," or similar modifiers in their title.
The structure of the curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of
engineering topics implied by the title of the program.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: knowledge of probability and statistics,
including applications appropriate to the program name and objectives; and knowledge of
mathematics through differential and integral calculus, basic sciences, computer science, and
engineering sciences necessary to analyze and design complex electrical and electronic devices,
software, and systems containing hardware and software components, as relevant to the program
objectives.
Programs containing the modifier "electrical" and/or "electronics" in the title must also demonstrate
that graduates have knowledge of advanced mathematics, typically including differential equations,
linear algebra, complex variables, and discrete mathematics.
Programs containing the modifier “computer” in their title must also demonstrate that graduates
have knowledge of discrete mathematics.


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           INDUSTRIAL AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "industrial" or similar modifiers in their
title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have the ability to design, develop, implement and
improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment, and energy.
The program must include in-depth instruction to accomplish the integration of systems using
appropriate analytical, computational and experimental practices.

   PHYSICS ENGINEERING AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "physics" or similar modifiers in their
title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: knowledge of advanced differential and
integral calculus; proficiency in and ability to apply differential equations, linear algebra, complex
analysis and probability; the proficiency, computational skills and ability to conduct experiments in
mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum physics and statistical thermodynamics; and ability to apply
these, along with numerical analysis methods, to physical engineering problems. In addition,
graduates must demonstrate the knowledge and the ability necessary for the solution of engineering
problems and design in at least one of following areas: new and renewable energy resources,
materials physics and nanotechnology, semiconductor physics, medical physics, imaging physics,
optical engineering, optoelectronics, communications systems, quantum engineering, metrology,
spectral analysis systems, numerical analysis-modeling and simulation techniques, thin film
technology, nuclear sciences and technology, environmental pollution, plasma physics, accelerator
physics, experimental particle physics, quality control systems, super conductivity, and biophysics.

     NAVAL ARCHITECTURE, MARINE ENGINEERING AND SIMILARLY NAMED
                       ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "naval architecture," "marine
engineering" or similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: ability to apply probability and statistical
methods to naval architecture and marine engineering problems; basic knowledge of fluid
mechanics, dynamics, structural mechanics, materials properties, hydrostatics, and
energy/propulsion systems in the context of marine vehicles; and familiarity with instrumentation
appropriate to naval architecture and/or marine engineering.

                FOOD AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "food" or similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have competency in: mathematics including
differential equations; organic and physical chemistry; and biological sciences. In addition,
graduates must have acquired expertise in biological kinetics, biological materials, heat and mass
transfer, information systems, process control, and food processing systems.




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           AEROSPACE AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "aerospace," "aeronautical,"
"astronautical," and similar modifiers in their title.
Aeronautical engineering programs must demonstrate that graduates have knowledge of
aerodynamics, aerospace materials, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics, and stability and
control.
Astronautical engineering programs must demonstrate that graduates have knowledge of orbital
mechanics, space environment, attitude determination and control, telecommunications, space
structures, and rocket propulsion.
Aerospace engineering programs must demonstrate that graduates have knowledge covering one of
the areas described above and, in addition, knowledge of some topics from the area not emphasized.
Programs must also demonstrate that graduates have design competence that includes integration of
aeronautical or astronautical topics.

                CIVIL AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "civil" or similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: proficiency in mathematics through differential
equations, probability and statistics, calculus-based physics, and general chemistry; proficiency in a
minimum of four recognized major areas of civil engineering; ability to conduct laboratory
experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data in at least two of the recognized major civil
engineering areas; ability to perform civil engineering design by means of design experiences
integrated throughout the professional component of the curriculum; and understanding of
professional practice issues, such as procurement of work, bidding versus quality-based selection
processes, how design professionals and construction professionals interact to complete a project;
and the importance of competency and continuing education.

      GEODESY, PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING
                            PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "geodesy," "photogrammetry," and
similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have competency in at least one of following areas:
boundary and/or land surveying, geographic and/or land information systems, photogrammetry,
mapping, geodesy, remote sensing, and other related areas.



  GEOLOGICAL, HYDROGEOLOGICAL, GEOPHYSICAL AND SIMILARLY NAMED
                     ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "geological," "hydrogeological,"
"geophysical," and similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: proficiency in mathematics including
differential equations, calculus-based physics, and general chemistry; knowledge of probability and
statistics for related engineering applications; proficiency in geological science topics related to the
understanding of geological principles and processes, identification of minerals and rocks, and
understanding of geophysics and field geology; ability to visualize and solve geological problems in
three dimensions; proficiency in engineering sciences (including statics, properties/strength of


MÜDEK – Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs (Version 2.0.1 - 06.10.2009)   Page 8
materials, and geo-mechanics); engineering knowledge to design solutions to engineering problems
that include one or more of the following considerations: distribution of physical and chemical
properties of earth materials (including hydrogeology); effects of surface and near-surface natural
processes; impacts of construction projects, exploration and utilization of natural resources, disposal
of waste, and other activities related to these materials and processes.
Programs with the modifier "geophysics" in their title must also demonstrate that their graduates
have the proficiency to solve ground- and environment-related problems as well as problems related
to searching for natural resources and archeological remains by using principal geophysical
methods such as gravity, magnetic, electrical, electromagnetic, seismic, and seismological methods
and well logs; sufficient knowledge in numerical analysis, signal analysis and modeling; and skills
in integrating this knowledge during the collecting and processing of geophysical data, in using
geophysics software, and in designing geophysical investigations.

            CHEMICAL AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "chemical" and similar modifiers in
their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: thorough grounding in chemistry and working
knowledge of advanced chemistry (organic, inorganic, physical, analytical, materials chemistry, or
biochemistry) selected as appropriate to the goals of the program; working knowledge, including
safety and environmental aspects, of material and energy balances applied to chemical processes;
thermodynamics of physical and chemical equilibria; heat, mass, and momentum transfer; chemical
reaction engineering; continuous and stage-wise separation operations; process dynamics and
control; process design; and appropriate modern experimental and computing techniques.

               MINING AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "mining" and similar modifiers in their
title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: ability to apply mathematics through
differential equations, probability and statistics, calculus-based physics, and general chemistry as
relevant to mining engineering applications; fundamental knowledge in the geological sciences,
including the characterization of mineral deposits, physical geology, structural or engineering
geology, and mineral and rock identification and properties; proficiency in statics, dynamics,
strength of materials, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits; proficiency in
engineering topics related to both surface and underground mining, including mining methods,
planning and design, ground control and rock mechanics, health and safety, environmental issues,
and ventilation; proficiency in additional engineering topics such as rock fragmentation, materials
handling, mineral or coal processing, mine surveying, and valuation and resource/reserve estimation
as appropriate to the program objectives.
The laboratory experience must lead to proficiency in geologic concepts, rock mechanics, mine
ventilation, and other topics relevant to the program objectives.

          MECHANICAL AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "mechanical" or similar modifiers in
their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: knowledge of chemistry and calculus-based
physics with depth in at least one of these; ability to apply advanced mathematics through
multivariate calculus and differential equations; familiarity with statistics and linear algebra; and


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ability to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems areas, including the design
and realization of such systems.

      METALLURGICAL, MATERIALS AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING
                             PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "materials," "metallurgical," "ceramic,"
and similar modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: ability to apply advanced science (such as
chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems; an integrated understanding
of the scientific and engineering principles underlying the four major elements of the field
(structure, properties, processing, and performance) as related to material systems appropriate to the
field; ability to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to
solve materials selection and design problems; and ability to utilize experimental, statistical and
computational methods consistent with the program educational objectives. The faculty expertise
must encompass the four major elements of the field.

             NUCLEAR AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "nuclear" or similar modifiers in their
title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: ability to apply advanced mathematics, science
and engineering science, including atomic and nuclear physics, and the transport and interaction of
radiation with matter, to nuclear systems and processes; ability to measure nuclear and radiation
processes; and ability to work professionally in one or more of the fields of specialization identified
by the program.



           PETROLEUM AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "petroleum," "natural gas," and similar
modifiers in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have competency in: mathematics through
differential equations, probability and statistics, fluid mechanics, strength of materials, and
thermodynamics; design and analysis of well systems and procedures for drilling and completing
wells; characterization and evaluation of subsurface geological formations and their resources;
design and analysis of systems for producing, injecting, and handling fluids; application of reservoir
engineering principles and practices for optimizing resource development and management; and the
use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and decision making under
conditions of risk and uncertainty.

              TEXTILE AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "textile" and similar modifiers in their
title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have proficiency in mathematics, physics, chemistry
and statistics; ability to apply advanced mathematics through multivariate analysis, differential
equations or linear algebra; basic engineering knowledge in the areas of mechanics, strength of
materials, materials science and thermodynamics; ability to design and develop a product, process
or system in the area of textile materials and technologies; ability to measure, control and


MÜDEK – Criteria for Evaluating First Cycle (Bachelor) Engineering Programs (Version 2.0.1 - 06.10.2009)   Page 10
technically analyze the properties of textile materials and variables in their production processes;
ability to identify changes during production and to evaluate the effects of these changes on
material behavior; and ability to conduct applications in at least one of the basic technological areas
(such as fiber, yarn, fabric, finishing, or apparel).

       MANUFACTURING AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "manufacturing" and similar modifiers
in their title.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have proficiency in materials and manufacturing
processes (an understanding of the behavior and properties of materials as they are altered and
influenced by processing in manufacturing); process, assembly and product engineering (an
understanding of the design of products and the equipment, tooling, and environment necessary for
their manufacture); manufacturing competitiveness (an understanding of the creation of competitive
advantage through manufacturing planning, strategy, and control); manufacturing systems design
(an understanding of the analysis, synthesis, and control of manufacturing operations with the help
of statistical and calculus-based methods, simulation and information technology); and laboratory
experience (graduates must be able to measure manufacturing process variables in a manufacturing
laboratory and make technical inferences about the process).



            SOFTWARE AND SIMILARLY NAMED ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
These program criteria apply to engineering programs with "software" or similar modifiers in their
title.
The curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of engineering and computer
science topics implied by the title of the program.
The program must demonstrate that graduates have: ability to analyze, design, verify, validate,
implement, apply, and maintain software systems; ability to appropriately apply discrete
mathematics, probability and statistics, and relevant topics in computer science and supporting
disciplines to complex software systems; and ability to work in one or more significant application
domains.




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