The Indian Environmental General Assistance Program Region 10 by wp00p89

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									Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians • Native Village of Afognak • Agdaagux Tribe of King Cove • Akiachak Native Community • Akiak Na­
tive Community • Native Village of Akutan • Village of Alakanuk • Alaska Inter-Tribal Council • Alatna Village • Native Village of Aleknagik
• Aleut Community of St. Paul Island • Aleutian Pribilof Island Association • Algaaciq Native Village • Allakaket Village • Native Village of
                                                                                         EPA • Anvik Village • Asa’carsarmiut Tribe •
Ambler • Aniak Traditional Council • Village of Anaktuvuk Pass • Aniak Traditional Council910-B-09-003 | July 2009 | www.epa.govAssocia-
tion of Village Council Presidents • Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments • Native Village of Atka • Atmautluak Traditional Council •
Native Village of Atqasuk • Beaver Village Council • Native Village of Belkofski • Native Village of Bill Moore’s Slough • Native Village of
Brevig Mission • Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation • Bristol Bay Native Association • Native Village of Buckland • Burns-Paiute Tribe • Na­
tive Village of Cantwell • Chalkyitsik Village Council • Cheesh-Na Tribal Council • Village of Chefornak • Native Village of Chenega • Chevak
Native Village • Chickaloon Native Village • Chignik Bay Tribal Council • Native Village of Chignik Lagoon • Chignik Lake Village-Tradition­
al Council • Chilkat Indian Village of Klukwan • Chilkoot Indian Association • Chinik Eskimo Community • Native Village of Chuathbaluk •
Chugach Regional Resources Commission • Chuloonawick Native Village • Clarks Point Village Council • Coeur d’Alene Tribe • Columbia
River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission • Colville Confederated Tribes • Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua & Siuslaw • Coquille Indian
Tribe • Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians • Cowlitz Indian Tribe • Craig Community Association • Village of Crooked Creek • Curyung
Tribal Council • Native Village of Deering • Village of Dot Lake • Douglas Indian Association • Native Village of Eagle • Eek Traditional Coun­
cil • Native Village of Eklutna • Native Village of Ekuk • Ekwok Village Council • Evansville Village • Native Village of Eyak • Fort Yukon
Native Village • Native Village of Gakona • Galena Village • Native Village of Georgetown • Native Village of Goodnews Bay • Confederated
Tribes of Grand Ronde • Gulkana Village • Hoh Indian Tribe • Holy Cross Village • Native Village of Hooper Bay • Hughes Village • Huslia
Tribal Council • Hydaburg Cooperative Association • Igiugig Village Council • Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope • Iqurmuit Traditional
Council • Ivanof Bay Village • Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe • Organized Village of Kake • Kalispel Indian Community • Village of Kalskag •
                                                The Indian Environmental
Kaltag Tribal Council • Organized Village of Kasaan • Kasigluk Traditional Elders Council • Kenaitze Indian Tribe • Ketchikan Indian Com­
munity • Native Village of Kiana • King Salmon Village Council • Native Village of Kivalina • Klamath Tribes • Klawock Cooperative Associa-

                                                General Assistance Program
tion • Knik Tribe • Kobuk Traditional Council • Kokhanok Village • Native Village of Kongiganak • Kootenai Tribe • Kotlik Traditional Council
• Kotzebue Native Village • Native Village of Koyuk • Koyukuk Native Village • Kuskokwim Native Association • Native Village of Kwigillin-
gok • Native Village of Kwinhagak • Native Village of Larsen Bay • Leisnoi Village • Levelock Village Council • Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe •
                                                Region 10: Success Stories from 2008
Village of Lower Kalskag • Lummi Indian Nation • Makah Indian Tribe • Maniilaq Association Inc. • Manokotak Village Council • Native Vil-
lage of Marshall • McGrath Native Village • Native Village of Mekoryuk • Native Village of Minto • Mount Sanford Tribal Consortium • Muck­
leshoot Tribe • Naknek Native Village • Native Village of Nanwalek • Native Village of Napaimute • Native Village of Napakiak • Native Village
of Napaskiak • New Koliganek Village Council • New Stuyahok Village • Newhalen Village • Newtok Traditional Council • Nez Perce Tribe •
Nightmute Traditional Council • Native Village of Nikolski • Ninilchik Traditional Council • Nisqually Indian Tribe • Noatak Native Village •
Nome Eskimo Community • Nondalton Village • Nooksack Indian Tribe • Noorvik Native Community • Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
• Norton Sound Health Corporation • Nulato Village • Native Village of Nikolski • Noatak Native Village • Nulato Village • Nunakauyarmiut
Tribe • Native Village of Nunapitchuk • Village of Ohogamiut • Village of Old Harbor • Orutsararmuit Native Village • Native Village of Ouz­
inkie • Native Village of Paimiut • Pauloff Harbor Tribe • Pedro Bay Village • Native Village of Perryville • Petersburg Indian Association • Pilot
Point Tribal Council • Pilot Station Traditional Council • Native Village of Point Hope • Native Village of Point Lay • Port Gamble Indian Com­
munity • Port Graham Village Council • Native Village of Port Heiden • Native Village of Port Lions • Portage Creek Village Council • Puyallup
Tribe • Qagan Tayagungin Tribe of Sand Point • Quileute Indian Tribe • Quinault Indian Nation • Ruby Tribal Council • Saint George Island •
Native Village of Saint Michael • Samish Indian Nation • Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe • Native Village of Scammon Bay • Native Village of Se­
lawik • Seldovia Village Tribe • Native Village of Shaktoolik • Native Village of Shishmaref • Shoalwater Bay Tribe • Shoshone-Bannock Tribes
• Native Village of Shungnak • Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians • Sitka Tribe • Skagway Village • Skokomish Indian Tribe • Village of
Sleetmute • Snoqualmie Tribe • South Naknek Village Council • South Puget Sound Inter-Tribal Housing Authority • Spokane Tribe • Squaxin
Island Tribe • Stebbins Community Association • Stillaguamish Tribe • Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak • Suquamish Tribe • Swinomish Indian Tribal
Community • Takotna Village • Native Village of Tanacross • Tanana Tribal Council • Native Village of Tatitlek • Native Village of Tetlin •
Telida Native Village Council • Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Tribes • Traditional Council of Togiak • Tribal Solid Waste Advisory
Network • Tulalip Tribes • Tuluksak Native Community • Tuntutuliak Traditional Council • Native Village of Tununak • Twin Hills Village •
Native Village of Tyonek • Ugashik Native Village • Confederated Tribes of Umatilla • Native Village of Umkumiut • Native Village of Unalak­
leet • Native Village of Unga • Upper Skagit Indian Tribe • Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government • Wainwright Traditional Council •
Native Village of Wales • Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs • Native Village of White Mountain • Yakama Nation • Yakutat Tlingit Tribe •
Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council • Yupiit of Andreafski • Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians • Native Village of Afognak • Ag­
daagux Tribe of King Cove • Akiachak Native Community • Akiak Native Community • Native Village of Akutan • Village of Alakanuk •
Alaska Inter-Tribal Council • Alatna Village • Native Village of Aleknagik • Aleut Community of St. Paul Island • Aleutian Pribilof Island As­
sociation • Algaaciq Native Village • Allakaket Village • Native Village of Ambler • Aniak Traditional Council • Village of Anaktuvuk Pass •
Aniak Traditional Council • Anvik Village • Asa’carsarmiut Tribe • Association of Village Council Presidents • Council of Athabascan Tribal
Governments • Native Village of Atka • Atmautluak Traditional Council • Native Village of Atqasuk • Beaver Village Council • Native Village
of Belkofski • Native Village of Bill Moore’s Slough • Native Village of Brevig Mission • Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation • Bristol Bay
Native Association • Native Village of Buckland • Burns-Paiute Tribe • Native Village of Cantwell • Chalkyitsik Village Council • Cheesh-Na
Tribal Council • Village of Chefornak • Native Village of Chenega • Chevak Native Village • Chickaloon Native Village • Chignik Bay Tribal
Council • Native Village of Chignik Lagoon • Chignik Lake Village-Traditional Council • Chilkat Indian Village of Klukwan • Chilkoot Indian
Association • Chinik Eskimo Community • Native Village of Chuathbaluk • Chugach Regional Resources Commission • Chuloonawick Native
Village • Clarks Point Village Council • Coeur d’Alene Tribe • Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission • Colville Confederated Tribes •
Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua & Siuslaw • Coquille Indian Tribe • Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians • Cowlitz Indian Tribe
• Craig Community Association • Village of Crooked Creek • Curyung Tribal Council • Native Village of Deering • Village of Dot Lake • Doug­
las Indian Association • Native Village of Eagle • Eek Traditional Council • Native Village of Eklutna • Native Village of Ekuk • Ekwok Village
Council • Evansville Village • Native Village of Eyak • Fort Yukon Native Village • Native Village of Gakona • Galena Village • Native Village
of Georgetown • Native Village of Goodnews Bay • Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde • Gulkana Village • Hoh Indian Tribe • Holy Cross
Village • Native Village of Hooper Bay • Hughes Village • Huslia Tribal Council • Hydaburg Cooperative Association • Igiugig Village Council
• Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope • Iqurmuit Traditional Council • Ivanof Bay Village • Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe • Organized Village
of Kake • Kalispel Indian Community • Village of Kalskag • Kaltag Tribal Council • Organized Village of Kasaan • Kasigluk Traditional Elders
Council • Kenaitze Indian Tribe • Ketchikan Indian Community • Native Village of Kiana • King Salmon Village Council • Native Village of
Kivalina • Klamath Tribes • Klawock Cooperative Association • Knik Tribe • Kobuk Traditional Council • Kokhanok Village • Native Village of
Kongiganak • Kootenai Tribe • Kotlik Traditional Council • Kotzebue Native Village • Native Village of Koyuk • Koyukuk Native Village •
Kuskokwim Native Association • Native Village of Kwigillingok • Native Village of Kwinhagak • Native Village of Larsen Bay • Leisnoi Village
• Levelock Village Council • Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe • Village of Lower Kalskag • Lummi Indian Nation • Makah Indian Tribe • Maniilaq
Association Inc. • Manokotak Village Council • Native Village of Marshall • McGrath Native Village • Native Village of Mekoryuk • Native
Village of Minto • Mount Sanford Tribal Consortium • Muckleshoot Tribe • Naknek Native Village • Native Village of Nanwalek • Native Village
of Napaimute • Native Village of Napakiak • Native Village of Napaskiak • New Koliganek Village Council • New Stuyahok Village • Newhalen
Village • Newtok Traditional Council • Nez Perce Tribe • Nightmute Traditional Council • Native Village of Nikolski • Ninilchik Traditional
                Office of Ecosystems, Native Village • Nome Eskimo
Council • Nisqually Indian Tribe • NoatakTribal, and Public Affairs Community • Nondalton Village • Nooksack Indian Tribe • Noorvik
                United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region Health Corporation • Nulato Village • Native Village of Nikolski
Native Community • Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission • Norton Sound10
• Noatak Native Village • Nulato Village • Nunakauyarmiut Tribe • Native Village of Nunapitchuk • Village of Ohogamiut • Village of Old Har
Region 10 States: Alaska, Washington, Oregon and Idaho
This map shows the relative size of Alaska compared to the continental states in Region 10. Alaska has more ocean coastline than all of
the contiguous United States combined. The green dots represent the 271 federally recognized Tribes in Region 10. Of these, 231 had
IGAP grants in 2008. The Tribes that are named are featured in this booklet.
Region 10’s Indian General Assistance Program: Success Stories from 2008
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        These stories illustrate the diversity of environmental accomplishments Region 10 Tribes have
        achieved with funding from the Indian General Assistance Program (IGAP). EPA’s Tribal Trust and
        Assistance Unit, in the Office of Ecosystems, Tribal & Public Affairs, awarded nearly $25 million
        in grants to 231 Tribes and Tribal Consortia in 2008. In administering these grants, the Tribal Unit
        has developed a relationship with each Tribal government to help them build the capacity to man­
        age their environmental programs.

        The United States has a unique relationship and trust responsibility to federally recognized Tribes.
        As trustees, the U.S. government provides financial and technical assistance to ensure that Tribal
        land and natural resources are restored and protected.

        In accordance with the 1984 landmark EPA Indian Policy, the Tribal Trust and Assistance Unit
        practices these principles:

        	 •	 Uphold	the	federal	government’s	trust	responsibility	to	consider	and	protect	Tribal	interests.	
        	 •	 Respect	and	promote	Tribal	sovereignty	and	self-determination.	
        	 •	 Work	with	Tribes	on	a	government-to-government	basis.

        Of the 562 federally recognized Tribes nationwide, 271 (48%) live in Region 10:

        	   •	   Alaska	        229
        	   •	   Idaho	           4
        	   •	   Oregon	          9
        	   •	   Washington	     29

        Although just a few of the many Tribal success stories are presented here, they are representa­
        tive	of	the	environmental	stewardship	shared	by	all	IGAP	grantees.	Whether	it	is	protecting	valued	
        subsistence resources or educating the next generation of stewards, these stories reflect the
        spiritual and cultural connection Tribes have with the land, the air and the water.
 “I am very pleased to share these tribal environmental success stories with
 you. These stories are especially fitting as the EPA and Tribes celebrate years
 of partnership on environmental protection and restoration. Region 10’s In­
 dian General Assistance Program is a key to protecting human health and the
 environment in Indian Country, and is an important component in upholding our
 Tribal Trust responsibilities. Please continue sending us your success stories in
 the coming year.”

                                                              Michelle Pirzadeh
                                                R10 Acting Regional Administrator


 “This is such a great time to be a part of R10’s Tribal Program. IGAP is solidly
 established - with amazing and diverse outcomes from so many individual Tribal
 Environmental Programs. As I continue to learn about what each Tribe is doing
 with their IGAP funding, I am inspired and continuously reminded of the differ­
 ence that a few can make through dedication to protecting our environment. I
 look forward to strengthening and growing our partnerships.”

                                                                   Sally Thomas
                                      Manager, R10 Tribal Trust & Assistance Unit


 “The tribes today face many challenges to human health, sustainable resources
 and the natural environment. Tribes today are, and always will be, entrusted
 with the great responsibility of stewardship. It is that responsibility that drives
 Native communities to advance their environmental programs and build needed
 capacity to protect what was left to them by generations past. Here we have a
 great display of responsible stewardship, drive and assurances for the future of
 our children to come.”

                                                                     Jim Woods
                                                  R10 Senior Tribal Policy Advisor




Background information on the featured Tribes is from individual Tribal Web sites
and Alaska’s Division of Community and Regional Affairs Web page. We also wish
to thank the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission for its contributions to this
publication.
Nightmute Traditional Council, Alaska
Nightmute is located on Nelson Island at the southwestern coast of Alaska, 105 miles west of Bethel. Historically, Yup’ik Eskimos occupied
this area for over 2,000 years and are known as “Qaluyaarmiut” (Dip net People). Nelson Island provides habitats for a variety of fish and
wildlife that many surrounding villages share for fishing, hunting, and subsistence gathering. Here, the Native Village of Nightmute and
IGAP staff showcase three community accomplishments.

Story and photos by John George and David Tulik

Nightmute was very fortunate to have an IGAP grant when
environmental disaster almost hit our most valued subsis­
tence river. IGAP staff quickly moved to educate the com­
munity about the 65 tons of solid waste bound to fall into the
river. In 2003, the ice wasn’t thick enough for heavy equip­
ment to cross the river to push the trash inland as usual. So
people worked together and tackled the problem. No grants
were applied for, there was no time to seek funds, it was a
crisis.	With	little	funds,	the	community	of	Nightmute	prevent­
ed this near-disaster. A valuable lesson was learned that with
or without funds, we can accomplish a lot if people put their
minds together.




2007 Before: Ongoing solid waste issues continue to be a serious
community concern
                                                                      In 2007 and 2008 we have contained, a total of 772 sup­
                                                                      ersacks, collected 1,982 pounds of recyclable cans, 8,145
                                                                      pounds of lead acid batteries, 3,000 pounds of electronic
                                                                      wastes, 551 pounds of fluorescent lights including regular
                                                                      bulbs, 30 gallons of PCB ballasts and 15 gallon Non-PCB
                                                                      ballasts.	We	stockpiled	scrap	metals,	separated	bulky	items	
                                                                      and created a 285 ft x 386 ft berm using Supersacks, which
                                                                      moved	the	trash	127	feet	from	the	river	bank.	We	commend	
                                                                      our seven member clean up crew for their part in these
                                                                      accomplishments. No heavy equipment was used on any
                                                                      of these projects. The only motorized vehicle was an ATV
                                                                      Honda for hauling supersack to the berm. The majority of the
                                                                      work was human power.

2008 After: Goals were developed within the community to facilitate                                        Native Village of Nightmute
solid waste removal                                                                                              Phone: (907) 647-6216
                                                                                                                   Fax: (907) 647-6217
                                                                                                E-mail Address: nme_igap@yahoo.com
In 2005, we were still facing serious solid waste issues.
Project goals were developed to: Store the cleanup trash
a safe distance away from the riverbank, Reduce animal
interaction, Eliminate blowing trash and Contain the dump-
site trash through the creation of berm and balefill. IGAP
staff researched grants and received an award in 2007 from
Denali Commission. The project was managed and oper­
ated at the local level. NTC IGAP staff partnered with Zender
Environmental for guidance and direction. This is a good
project for all villages on moving their landfills back from the
eroding river.



                                                                 Page 1
Tulalip Tribes, Washington
The Tulalip Tribes of Washington is a federally recognized Indian Tribe and the successors in interest to the Snohomish, Snoqualmie,
Skykomish and other allied Tribes and bands who were signatory to the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855. The 22,000-acre Tulalip Indian
Reservation is located north of Everett and the Snohomish River, and west of Marysville, Washington.




Tulalip Bay. Photo by Derek Hann.


By Julia Gold, Environmental Planner                                  ond item, the “Tulalip Bay Low Impact Development Study”,
                                                                      illustrates how to integrate low impact stormwater design
On a clear bright day, each of Tulalip’s soft waves will reflect      solutions in retrofitting existing developments as well as in
back the sunlight. Tulalip Bay is a civic and cultural center         planning and designing future projects.
and a place many in the community call home. The Bay is a
sheltered saltwater estuary on Possession Sound, four miles           The consultant began with an assessment of existing site
northwest of the mouth of the Snohomish River. More impor­            conditions to determine the feasibility of different low impact
tantly, it is a place where Tribal Members fish, oysters grow         techniques in the 78-acre study area. A stakeholder meet­
and hatchery-released salmon adjust to saltwater.                     ing of all Tribal facilities representatives provided information
                                                                      about existing drainage facilities and future development
I find it hard to believe that underneath all that beauty, pol­       plans.
lution is lurking. Documented bacterial pollution mixes with
suspicions of polluted run-off. The gentle slopes around the          The study determined that much of Tulalip Bay’s lower
Bay draw the rainwater down roofs, roads and parking areas.           watershed is underlain by hardpan soils that limit infiltration
Hurried by the pavement, drains and pipes, the stormwa­               and to some extent, our use of LID. However, we discov­
ter reaches the Bay all at once and is more polluted after a          ered some LID techniques, such as constructed wetlands,
storm event.                                                          rain gardens, grassy swales, and amended soils that could
                                                                      be used. The consultant produced a conceptual map show­
We	learned	that	there	is	a	way	to	intercept	that	water,	to	           ing where and how LID techniques could be used based on
clean it and slow it down before it reaches our Bay and af­           effectiveness, space requirements, maintenance, aesthetics
fects our people, salmon, oysters, and seabirds. Referred to          and environmental impact.
as “low impact development” (LID), this approach to manag­
ing rainwater more closely mimics the hydrologic cycle. By            The results of this study serve as a guide for Tulalip Bay
using different LID techniques the rainwater is allowed to            projects as well as projects elsewhere on the Reservation. I
soak into the ground closer to where it falls, which helps to         am happy to report that we are working on the design phase
replenish groundwater, remove pollutants and provide water            of our first LID Demonstration Project at Tulalip Bay.
to streams and wetlands.
                                                                                                                           Tulalip Tribes
Through	EPA’s	IGAP	(and	Clean	Water	Act	319	Program)	                                                             6700 Totem Beach Rd.
work is under way on 1) a Tulalip Bay watershed plan, 2)                                                              Tulalip, WA 98271
finding opportunities to use LID techniques around the Bay,                                                               (360) 651-4000
and 3) construction of LID demonstration projects. The sec-                                                  jgold@tulaliptribes-nsn.org
                                                                                                               www.tulaliptribes-nsn.gov




                                                                 Page 2
Native Village of Eyak, Alaska
The Native Village of Eyak is in Southcentral Alaska, and lies within the city limits of Cordova on the Prince William Sound. Our traditional
use area encompasses the rich and diverse habitats of the Prince William Sound and the Copper River Delta. Winter temperatures
range from 17 to 28 degrees; summer temperatures from 49 to 63. Average annual precipitation includes 66 inches of rain and 80 inches
of snowfall. Eyak is a federally recognized Tribe with approximately 580 enrolled members, comprising approximately 25% of the total
population of the Cordova community.




2008 Summer Interns prepare over 6,000 lbs of electronics for shipment. Photo by Autumn Bryson

By Autumn Bryson, Environmental Coordinator                             mental agencies, becoming an integral part of the region’s
                                                                        environmental policy making. The environmental program
The Tribal Council first addressed the need for an envi­                has expanded to include emergency response oversight,
ronmental program in 1995, citing concerns regarding the                subsistence resource monitoring, environmental regulatory
effects of external rules and regulations concerning the                enhancement, water quality assessment and monitoring, and
environment on the Tribe, Native fishing rights, education on           natural resource and environmental planning.
subsistence, knowledge of regulations surrounding marine
mammals, a need for communication with outside Tribes and               The Native Village of Eyak implemented an electronics recy­
Tribal organizations and other environmental issues. These              cling program in 2007. Electronics contain hazardous materi­
concerns led to the development of a core environmental                 als	such	as	lead	and	mercury.	When	dumped	in	the	landfill	
program through IGAP funding beginning in October 1997.                 these toxic metals contaminate the soil and water. Proper
                                                                        recycling of electronics prevents contamination and reuses
The Native Village of Eyak has been fortunate to continue               the valuable materials. Since the inception of the e-cycling
receiving IGAP funding since its 1997 inception. This funding           program, we have collected over 7 tons of electronics and
has allowed the Native Village of Eyak to develop consider­             prevented	them	from	being	disposed	of	at	the	landfill.	We	
able strength in environmental programs. As active stewards             look forward to continuing the success of these and other
of the land and water, Eyak has built strong ties with govern­          programs that benefit our environment.
                                                                                                                      Native Village of Eyak
                                                                                                                              P.O. Box 1388
                                                                                                                        Cordova, AK 99574
                                                                                                                     Phone: 	 (907) 424-7738
                                                                                                                       Fax: (907) 424-7739
                                                                   Page 3
Lummi Nation, Washington
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The Lummi Indian Reservation is located in northwest Washington at the mouth of the Nooksack River and along the western border of
Whatcom County. Our reservation includes approximately 12,500 upland acres, 7,000 acres of tidelands and 38 miles of marine shoreline.




Lummi Nation Natural Resources Department and Lummi Police Department staff members deploy a containment boom during an oil spill
response drill, which is part of tribal efforts to improve its capacity to protect cultural and natural resources from potential contamination.
Photo courtesy the Lummi Nation

By Jeremy Freimund, Water Resources Manager                              boundary, and roads and rail lines to the north and east of
                                                                         the Reservation carry hazardous materials. A Commodities
The reservation waters and the usual and accustomed                      Flow	Study	conducted	by	Washington	State	University	in	
fishing grounds and stations of the Lummi Nation contain                 2005 found that “the risks to property, human and ecological
economically and culturally significant resources includ­                health in case of a hazardous materials spill are substantial”
ing salmon, Dungeness crab, herring, oysters and clams.                  for the Lummi Nation.
Because these water resources are vital for economic
stability, growth and the cultural and spiritual life of the com­        To protect natural resources and the Lummi people, we have
munity, the potential contamination of our surface waters                used IGAP funding to develop our spill response capabil­
has a direct, serious and substantial effect on the health and           ity. The goals of this effort are to ensure protection of tribal
welfare of the Lummi Nation, our members, and all persons                cultural and natural resources during large spill events and
present on the reservation. The likelihood of contamination              to provide assistance to tribal members for smaller spills
from oil and hazardous substances is high because of the                 (for example, by responding to a spill from a sinking vessel).
close proximity of the reservation to many industrial facilities         The Lummi Nation Natural Resources Department has writ­
including two petroleum oil refineries, an aluminum smelter              ten a Spill Prevention and Response Plan, compiled a spill
and a co-generation plant.                                               response binder or handbook, researched and purchased
                                                                         response equipment and conducted many trainings and
Additionally, three pipelines carrying natural gas, gasoline             drills.	Without	the	IGAP	program,	this	preparation	would	not	
and crude oil run just north of the northern reservation                 have been possible.
                                                                                                                               Lummi Nation
                                                                                                                             2616 Kwina Rd.
                                                                                                                      Bellingham, WA 98226
                                                                                                                              (360) 384-1489
                                                                                                                        www.lummi-nsn.org




                                                                    Page 4
Coeur D’Alene Tribe, Idaho
The Coeur d’Alene Reservation covers 345,000 acres in north Idaho, spanning the Palouse farm country and the western edge of the
northern Rocky Mountains. It includes a 6,000 acre farm, the Coeur d’Alene and St. Joe Rivers, and Lake Coeur d’Alene itself.

“Coeur d’Alene Lake is the source of all life for our people. We have always been committed to protecting it for future generations.”
                                                                                              — Coeur d’Alene Tribe Chairman Chief Allan




The Enviro-Wheel in action at the 2008 Westside Rendezvous on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation
Photo by Rock’n the Rez, a Coeur d’Alene Tribal youth group

By Tiffany Allgood                                                   	 •	 Integrated	Solid	Waste	Management	Plan,
                                                                     	 •	 Clean	up	of	the	DeSmet	illegal	dumpsite	and	clean-up	
The U.S. EPA’s Indian General Assistance Program (IGAP)                   and closure of the Agency Road rural dumpster site,
is fundamental to the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s Environmental            	 •	 Drinking	Water	Protection	Plan	and	Emergency	Re­
Programs Office in the Natural Resource Department of the                 sponse	Plans	for	the	Tribal	and	Casino	Drinking	Water	
Coeur d’Alene Tribe. The IGAP grant means that the Tribe                  Systems,
has base funding to manage the Environmental Programs                	 •	 Participation	in	the	Reservation’s	Westside	Rendez­
Office, look for other sources of support to reach the Tribe’s            vous	carnival	where	we	conducted	an	Enviro-Wheel	
environmental goals, participate with Reservation and re­                 educational activity with environmental prizes
gional efforts to promote environmental awareness, commu­            	 •	 Participation	in	the	Idaho	Environmental	Summits	in	
nicate and cooperate with many agencies and other entities                2006, 2007 and 2008,
to improve environmental conditions and to conduct other             	 •	 Ability	to	comment	on	external	and	internal	proposed	
environmental work.                                                       projects, plans, laws, rules and policies that may affect
                                                                          Tribal environmental resources, and
To pull one year out of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s IGAP his­          	 •	 Ability	to	develop	new	analytical	tools	to	anticipate	
tory does not demonstrate the value of the program to the                 potential environmental impacts of proposed projects.
Tribe. The IGAP is unique and extremely valuable to the
Tribe. First, it is multi-media and is intended to build over­       All other Coeur d’Alene Tribal programs that are devoted
all environmental capacity in each tribe that utilizes it. The       to aspects of environmental protection have very specific
IGAP funding has been reliable funding and that is extremely         categories that they address such as: Fisheries, Forest,
important for a Tribal program. For the Coeur d’Alene Tribe          Wildlife,	etc.		The	IGAP	allows	tribes	the	ability	to	look	at	the	
over the years, it has been the backbone of the creation of          big picture, conduct long-range planning, develop environ­
the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s environmental work, including:             mental protection processes, strategies and tools that work
                                                                     across disciplines, conduct project development in areas that
	 •	 Environmental	Action	Plan	(EAP)	Assessment	of	En­               do not necessarily have a niche in Tribal government yet and
     vironmental Concerns on and near the Coeur d’Alene              address gaps in existing Tribal programs. IGAP is a success
     Reservation report,                                             in the eyes of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe.
	 •	 Integrated	Resource	Management	Plan	(in	draft),	
	 •	 Two	Solid	Waste	Assessment	reports	(Phase	I	and	                                                              Coeur d’Alene Tribe
     Phase II),                                                                                                          P.O. Box 408
                                                                                                                Plummer, Idaho 83851
                                                                                                                       (208) 686-1800
                                                                                                                www.cdatribe-nsn.gov
                                                                Page 5
New Stuyahok Traditional Council, Alaska
The Village of New Stuyahok is on the Nushagak River, 52 miles northeast of Dillingham. Winter temperatures range from 4 to 30 degrees;
summer temperatures from 37 to 66 degrees. New Stuyahok is a federally recognized Tribe with a population of 550. There are no
connecting roads to nearby villages. Travel is by air, boat, all-terrain vehicles and snow machines. Fuel, freight and large bulk items are
shipped from Dillingham to New Stuyahok by airline and barge. The community’s subsistence way of life is vital to Tribal members who
depend on fish, big game, waterfowl and other wildlife for the majority of their diet. Stuyahok means “going downriver place.”




IGAP-funded staff learn about packaging fluorescent light bulbs        The Traditional Council’s new burn box arrives by barge.
safely for recycling.
Photos by Peter Gumlickpuk

We	spoke	with	Peter	Gumlickpuk,	who	has	been	the	Tribe’s	              	 •	 At	one	of	these	workshops	Peter	heard	about	“Total	
Environmental Coordinator for the past three years, about                   Reclaim” and the opportunity to have 1,000 pounds of
how the New Stuyahok Traditional Council has used IGAP                      electronics recycled for free. IGAP staff learned about
within their community:                                                     researching barge schedules and deadlines, proper
                                                                            packaging and labeling, freight fees, and how to time
	 •	 IGAP	funds	pay	the	salaries	for	the	Tribe’s	three	envi­                shipments so no storage fees would accrue. Because
     ronmental workers: the Environmental Coordinator, the                  of New Stuyahok’s isolated location, several transports
     Environmental	Assistant,	and	the	Solid	Waste	Operator.                 were involved before the Tribe’s electronics were even­
                                                                            tually shipped to Seattle.
	 •	 The	New	Stuyahok’s	IGAP	staff	has	been	able	to	col­
     laborate with the Bristol Bay Native Association for rural        	 •	 The	Traditional	Council	has	also	used	IGAP	funds	to	
     community meetings and workshops, such as the Rural                    purchase a new scale for recycling aluminum cans and
     Alaska Landfill Operators (RALO) training and Hazard­                  household batteries, and a burn box to improve landfill
     ous	Waste	Operations	&	Emergency	Response	(HAZ­                        conditions.
     WOPER)	trainings.	
                                                                       	 •	 IGAP	staff	recently	received	training	on	recycling	
	 •	 Peter	says	being	able	to	attend	workshops,	especially	                 fluorescent light bulbs. They will be educating the New
     the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and Alaska                  Stuyahok community on safety and proper packaging
     Forum on the Environment, has helped him set envi­                     of the lights in the coming months.
     ronmental goals with the community and learn about
     potential new sources of funding – such as Brownfields                                           New Stuyahok Traditional Council
     grants. “The contacts are invaluable,” he says.                                                                       P.O. Box 49
                                                                                                             New Stuyahok, AK 99636
                                                                                                                       (907) 693-3242
                                                                                                               NSIGAP@starband.net




                                                                  Page 6
Quileute Nation, Washington
�
The 640-acre reservation of the Quileute Nation lies at the mouth of the Quillayute River on the shores of the Pacific Ocean in Western
Washington.




Before treatment: Knotweed has grown 10 feet tall along the            After: A Quileute Nation natural resources staff member assesses
Dickey River.                                                          a treated area one year later.
Photos by Debbie Preston, NWIFC

By Katie Krueger, Environmental Policy Analyst                         Quileute uses GPS/GIS mapping to record locations of knot-
                                                                       weed outbreaks and areas of control. After a site is treated
In our remote area, fishable rivers are of utmost importance           for knotweed, it needs to be revisited for several years. It can
for tribal subsistence. IGAP has helped fund costly tools and          be difficult to find the site again, especially when the land­
new skills that help us maintain these rivers. The Quileute            scape	changes.	When	streams	move,	knotweed	can	estab­
Nation has used IGAP funds to staff a grant writer, provide            lish itself in new areas. GPS coordinates enable the tribe to
equipment and training, and to develop water quality moni­             follow up on treated areas as well as detect new outbreaks.
toring programs.
                                                                       So far, we have controlled more than 9.5 river miles of infes­
We	used	IGAP	funding	to	hire	an	in-house	trainer	in	Global	            tation on the Dickey River, covering more than 30 acres of
Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information                    riparian	area.	We	also	have	controlled	more	than	10	miles	of	
System (GIS) technology. GPS/GIS mapping is an essential               riparian area along the banks of Calawah River and assisted
part of our efforts to eradicate noxious knotweed in our treaty        Clallam County in controlling more than 40 miles of riparian
area.                                                                  habitat along the Sol Duc River.

Knotweed impairs riparian zones by replacing native trees              Last season, we initiated control efforts covering approxi­
and plants that provide cooling shade and otherwise con­               mately 9 miles of riparian habitat along the Bogachiel and 5
tribute to stream, fish and wildlife health. It likely contributes     miles along the Quillayute River. In all, close to 70 miles of ri­
to the influx of sediments into the water after winter storms,         parian habitat has seen at least an initial treatment within the
because it is less stabilizing than native plants. Knotweed            Quillayute watershed with the Dickey, Calawah, and Sol Duc
leaf litter is lower in nutrient value than native plants, which       systems expected to be virtually knotweed free this year.
degrades the stream food chain.
                                                                                                                       Quileute Nation
                                                                                                                           P.O. Box 279
                                                                                                                    LaPush, WA 98350
                                                                                                                         (360) 374-6163
                                                                                                                 www.quileutenation.org
                                                                  Page 7
Native Village of Gakona, Alaska
�
The Native Village of Gakona is at the confluence of the Copper and Gakona Rivers in Alaska. It is located in the continental climate zone,
with long cold winters and relatively warm summers. Temperature extremes have ranged from -62 to 91 degrees. Snowfall averages 61
inches per year.




Photo by Vic Bruss

By Clair Scribner, Environmental Coordinator                           Mornings were filled with indoor and outdoor activities or­
                                                                       ganized by various presenters. Hands-on activities helped
The Native Village of Gakona hosted the first annual Youth             relay concepts of stewardship. One afternoon included an
Environmental Summit to help students learn why to use the             interpretive hike, narrated for three different age groups, to
three R’s (reduce, reuse and recycle), what a special place            a local fish wheel. The next afternoon involved a trip to the
we live in, and what it means to preserve our natural environ­         Copper Basin Sanitation Service Company landfill and Recy­
ment. The theme of the 2008 summit was “YES To Preserva­               cling Our Area’s Resources regional collection site.
tion!” Approximately 40 kindergarteners through eighth grad­
ers from the Copper Valley participated in the two-day event.          Whole	food,	local	produce	and	bread	were	served	to	the	
                                                                       participants for snacks and lunch. Meals were prepared with
There were many activities to teach the students about their           moose meat and salmon donations from local families. In or­
surrounding natural environment and reasons to preserve it.            der to produce less waste from the event, participants were
The summit started with students working together to create            asked to bring their own mess kit (plate, spoon, fork and cup)
their sustainable community with clay, paints, pipe cleaners           for the meals.
and cardboard. Students decorated canvas grocery bags
with fish prints after a talk about salmon. Total Reclaim,             Johana McMahan, Gakona’s IGAP-funded Environmental
an environmental services company that recycles e-waste                Coordinator, coordinated the event and recruited many part­
in Anchorage, provided a demonstration then allowed the                ners to help bring the summit to fruition. Partners included
kids to experiment with various activities that helped relay           the	National	Park	Service,	W.I.S.E.,	Gulkana	Village	Council,	
the	concept	of	e-waste.		Wrangell	Institute	for	Environment	           Cheesh’na Tribal Council, Natural Resources Conservation
(W.I.S.E.)	orchestrated	a	puppet	show	with	student	partici­            Service – RC&D, UAF Cooperative Extension, AVV, and Mt.
pants – a big hit with the younger students. Advocates of              Sanford Tribal Consortium. There were also sponsors who
Victims of Violence (AVV) organized a scavenger hunt. An               provided financial and in-kind contributions.
Elder shared traditional knowledge both days of the event.
                                                                                                Village Council - Gakona Village Council
                                                                                                                            P.O. Box 102
                                                                                                                Copper Center, AK 99586
                                                                                                                    Phone 907-822-5777
                                                                                                                       Fax 907-822-5997
                                                                                                     E-mail gakonaadmin@cvinternet.net




                                                                  Page 8
Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Washington
�
The Jamestown Reservation is located on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, along the southern shores of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It is
approximately 70 miles northwest of Seattle. The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe received federal recognition in 1981.




Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe marine ecologist Aleta Erickson (left) explores the inside of a butter clam with Sequim eighth-grader Shelby
Schleve.
Photo by Tiffany Royal, NWIFC

By Hansi Hals, Environmental Planning Manager                         to represent oil from cars and powdered chocolate to rep­
                                                                      resent loose soil from construction zones and logging. All
Shelby Schleve scrunched up her nose at the butter clams              were flooded into the “bay,” using spray bottles mimicking a
lying open on the picnic table, their slimy innards exposed.          rainstorm, creating a mucky body of water.
But it didn’t take long for the Sequim Middle School eighth-
grader to start poking at the clam’s digestive system for a           In conjunction with the field stations on the bay, students
closer look.                                                          also visited the Dungeness River at the Audubon Center
                                                                      where they learned about river dynamics and native riparian
“We’re	learning	there’s	some	pretty	nasty	stuff	in	the	water­         vegetation.
shed,” she said, after hearing about fecal coliform bacteria.
                                                                      Dungeness Bay is still impacted by both elevated bacteria
IGAP funding supports community outreach including field              and nutrients, but we have seen a downward trend over the
trips such as this one to Dungeness Bay. For the past four            last five years. Thanks in part to this education effort, rea­
years, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation            sons for improvement include better management of farms,
District and Dungeness River Audubon Center have taught               identifying and fixing failing septic systems, and reminding
eighth-graders about water pollution and more importantly,            dog owners to pick up after their pets.
how to keep pollution out of nearby streams and the bay.
Last year more than 200 students participated.                                                              Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe
                                                                                                                   1033 Old Blyn Hwy.
With	a	plastic	model	representing	Dungeness	Bay,	Jenni­                                                             Sequim, WA 98382
fer Coyle-Bond of the conservation district added cupcake                                                               (360) 683-1109
                                                                                                              info@jamestowntribe.org
sprinkles to represent animal waste and fertilizers, soy sauce




                                                                 Page 9
IGAP’s Alaska Circuit Rider & Peer Assistance Program

          Circuit Riders travel by plane, boat and all-terrain vehicles to rural villages at a Tribe’s re­
          quest. They assist the communities in developing the capacity to build their environmental
          programs, specifically through grants management, financial and administrative training.
          This could be anything from setting up an office system to Tribal Council/Board develop­
          ment. The Circuit Riders provide hands-on technical assistance for individual Tribes, as
          well as group trainings in hub communities. The goal is to assist Tribes in establishing
          internal systems to maintain best practices and ensure successful management of their
          environmental grants.

          When	you	consider	the	vast	expanse	that	is	Alaska,	it	is	not	surprising	that	Circuit	Riders	
          serve	a	crucial	role	here.	With	a	land	area	of	more	than	570,000	square	miles,	Alaska	is	
          twice the size of Texas – the second largest U.S. state. Most of Alaska is sparsely popu­
          lated and unconnected by road systems.

          Of the 229 federally recognized Tribes in Alaska, more than 80 percent receive IGAP
          grants. Many Tribes live in isolated regions. In 2004, Alaska Tribes identified a criti­
          cal need for more administrative and fiscal training to better manage their IGAP grants.
          Subsequently, Region 10’s Tribal Trust and Assistance Unit set aside funds for coopera­
          tive agreements that became known as the Circuit Rider & Peer Assistance Program.
          Between FY06 and FY08 an estimated $2 million in IGAP funds were dedicated to Circuit
          Riders, approximately 2 percent of the total IGAP budget.

          Region 10’s IGAP supports Circuit Riders for seven regions of Alaska:

          	   •	   Aleutian	and	Pribilof	Islands
          	   •	   Yukon/Kuskokwim	Delta
          	   •	   Southeast	Alaska
          	   •	   Middle	&	Upper	Kuskokwim
          	   •	   Lower	Cook	Inlet,	Prince	Williams	Sound,	Kodiak	and	Iliamna	Villages
          	   •	   Yukon	River	Tribes
          	   •	   Cook	Inlet

          The story that follows is from one of the first Circuit Riders funded by Region 10’s Tribal
          Trust and Assistance Unit.




                                                     Page 10
Life as an Alaska Circuit Rider

In this story Klaudia Klaudi, a Circuit Rider for the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, talks about what drew her to this unusual position and why
she stays. Since IGAP started funding Circuit Riders in Alaska in 2006, Klaudia has made 28 visits to 16 different Tribes in remote areas.




Klaudia’s ‘Goose Ride’ to Akutan                                         Circuit Rider Klaudia Klaudi with Ray Johnson, Tribal President
                                                                         of the Native Village of Nelson’s Lagoon (far left) and Mark
                                                                         McNeley, IGAP Coordinator. In early December of 2008, Klaudia
                                                                         traveled to Nelson Lagoon for a 3-day visit that included training
                                                                         in procurement methods and record keeping, as well as financial
                                                                         tracking.
                                                                         Photo by Mahri Lowinger
By Klaudia Klaudi, Circuit Rider

I have been an Office Administrator for the Aleutian Pribilof            Every one of the villages I have visited requires flying from
Islands Association, Inc. (APIA) since 1998. Besides office              a major airport by small plane to the village except for Sand
administration, a primary function has been to assist with the           Point and Barrow. Akutan is the most fun because they are
management and reporting requirements of the APIA Indian                 still	using	a	WW	II	Grumman	Goose	which	lands	in	the	wa­
General Assistance Program Grant (IGAP). APIA is the                     ter. Some of the more remote villages require that I bring my
non profit consortium for the 13 federally recognized Aleut              own food and in one village I had to sleep on the floor at the
Tribes in the Aleutian and Pribilof Island Region. Prior to my           school. I am always prepared to be stranded due to weather
employment with APIA I lived and worked in the region for 8              so I bring plenty of reading material.
years and developed emotional and cultural ties.
                                                                         The Tribes let me know ahead of time what kind of as­
APIA developed the Circuit Rider Program beginning with my               sistance they need. The topics needing attention run from
site visit in 2001 to one of our remote villages where I spent           assisting in organizing the office and files; setting up contract
two weeks assisting the IGAP Coordinator with setting up                 and employee files; travel authorizations, trip reports and
the Tribal Office and files. This visit was paid for with Tribal         how to calculate per diem; procurement methods and record
funds to answer a need. The IGAP Coordinator at the time                 keeping; financial tracking using Excel and QuickBooks;
was also the President of the Tribe in addition to other nu­             and quarterly and financial reports. Several topics may be
merous responsibilities. This is typical in small remote bush            covered during a site visit if time allows.
Alaska; often there is not enough personnel to go around
and there is a lot of staff turnover. Subsequently, EPA, rec­            The person-to-person contact has established a trust and
ognizing a need, graciously provided APIA with some funds                ease of communication between the grantees and the Circuit
to do a pilot Circuit Rider Program to provide office and grant          Rider and IGAP Coordinator here at APIA. The grantees
administration	assistance	to	tribes	in	need.		When	the	pro­              do not hesitate to call or email for guidance and consulta­
gram officially began in 2006 I stepped forward requesting               tion about anything that is uncertain or questionable. It is a
to be the APIA Circuit Rider. I was confident that because of            great satisfaction to see a Tribe successfully manage their
my past and continuing association with the Aleut people and             grant and tribal office and build the capacity to move on to
my experience as Office Administrator that I was the best                challenging environmental issues and applying for additional
qualified person to fill this need. I knew that I could establish        grants.
the trust and communication lines to make it work.
                                                                         Seeing and visiting old friends and making new ones is one
                                                                         of the best perks of all.




                                                                   Page 11
                       Region 10 Tribal Coordinators
                                            1-800-424-4EPA
                                                   Alaska
  Jennifer Brown . . . .      Norton Sound, Yukon Delta, Middle Yukon. . . .(907) 271-6323

  Katherine Brown. . .        Southcentral, Kodiak Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(206) 553-7263

  Michelle Davis . . . .      Southeast,	Prince	William	Sound . . . . . . . . . . .(907) 271-3434

  Adrienne Fleek . . . .      Middle Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta . . . . . . . . . . . .(907) 271-6558

  Tami Fordham . . . .        Aleutian and Pribilof Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(907) 271-1484

	 Westley	Foster . . . .      Bristol Bay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(206) 553-1604

  Santina Gay . . . . . .     Bay of Kuskokwim Delta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(907) 271-3413

  Sherry Kimmons. . .         Copper River, Eastern & Upper Interior . . . . . .(907) 271-6322

  Mahri Lowinger. . . .       Upper & Middle Kuskokwim, Circuit Riders                            (907) 271-6334

  Cathy Villa . . . . . . .   Arctic and Northwest Arctic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(907) 271-1270

	 Wenona	Wilson . . .         Lake Iliamna, Kvichak & Nushagak Rivers . . . .(206) 553-2148



                                Idaho and Eastern Washington
                                  Jim Zokan . . . . . .(208) 378-5691


                                                  Oregon
                                  Kris Carre . . . . . .(503) 326-7024


                                               Washington
                                Alan Moomaw . . . . . .(360) 753-8071

                                Diana Boquist . . . . . .(206) 553-1586

                                 Robin Slate . . . . . .(206) 553-8545





                              http://yosemite.epa.gov/r10/tribal.NSF/
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Region 10 Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs
1200 Sixth Ave., Suite 900, ETPA-085                                                                                    PRESORTED STANDARD
Seattle,	Washington		98101-3140                                                                                          POSTAGE & FEES PAID
                                                                                                                                EPA
http://yosemite.epa.gov/r10/tribal.NSF/                                                                                    PERMIT NO. G-35
Official Business
Penalty for Private Use
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     Printed on 100% recycled/recyclable paper with a minimum of 50% post-consumer fiber using vegetable-based ink


                        United States                                                         Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs, Region 10
                        Environmental Protection                                                                                     EPA 910-B-09-003
                        Agency                                                                                                                 July 2009

								
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