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AVBC Education forum 2012 Melbourne_ 29-30 November

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					AVBC EDUCATION FORUM 2012

MELBOURNE, 29-30 NOVEMBER
Key points and action items
REFLECTION AND REVIEW OF
IDEAS FROM DAY 1
KEY ISSUES STILL RELEVANT
 Funding issues – reliant on individual universities’
  willingness to cross-subsidise
 Sustainability of involvement of practitioners/farms
  in training
   Issues about QA and OH&S
   Few true rural practices
 Support for Year 1 graduates
   Focus on Day 1 competencies – but need a focus also on Year
     1 and beyond
 Economics and financial literacy of the profession
   Need for innovative ways of teaching students financial
     issues and making directly relevant
 Commercial challenges in Veterinary Teaching
  Hospitals
 Veterinary Manpower requirements
   Will there be too many or too few veterinarians?
Emerging Issues
 Business model for veterinary schools
     We are keeping on doing the same thing when the model is
      clearly unsustainable
 On-line technology and impact on the classroom
 Globalisation and financial pressures on US and UK
    schools
     Competition for students
 Government policy – likelihood of no new funds and
    continuing significant regulation
   Paraveterinary technicians
   Corporatisation of veterinary practices
   Demographics of the profession and pathways back
    into the profession for parents who took time out
   Generation Y and different ways of interacting and
    learning
Government Funding
 Total of $23.7 billion for higher education – about
  ¼ of which comes from HECS and international
  student fees
 There has been an increase in base funding per
  student in real terms
 No government decisions on key
  recommendations from the Bradley and Lomax-
  Small reviews
 Neither major political parties planning on
  increasing funding and may be a decrease.
 Further deregulation of higher education unlikely
AVMA and International
Context
 OIE focus on improving veterinary standards in
  developing countries – minimum competencies
 New model for a model curriculum developed –
  likely to be ratified by the OIE in May 2013
 AVMA under great pressure from US members
  concerned about international veterinarians
  coming to US when there is potential oversupply
  of veterinarians
 Challenges to AVMA role in accreditation and
  perceived “conflict of interest”
Engineering Accreditation
 Three levels of accreditation – 4-5 year
    degrees, 3 year degrees and 2 year programs
   36 Engineering schools and 400 degree
    programs
   Clear need for good systems and processes
   Overseen by industry Board
   Visit manager for each site visit
   Requirement for Schools to have an Industry
    Panel involved with the School
Reviewing the Reviewers
 Better management of conflict of interest/conflict
  of duty
 Clarity about weighting of the different standards
  and management of information flow
 Definitions of requirements – better definition of
  benchmarks required
 Recognition of cost of visits
 External review of the whole process – stepping
  back for high level overview – how well does the
  current system work and what changes are
  needed?
Pedagogy and Educational Models
 Many curricula are overloaded with content and PBL
    approaches can help to get adaptive responses
   Agreement that curricula need to be more outcomes
    and student focused
   Need to further develop distributed models for
    clinical learning and teaching
   Most med schools have gone to PBL – self-directive,
    collaborative, team based, contextualised,
    integrated AND expensive!
   Jury still out in relation to evidence base that PBL
    delivers better results
   Critical role of feedback to students and challenges
    about this
   Socially accountable medical education
Veterinary Educational
Models
 Significant diversity now in different Schools’
  approaches
 Modified PBL embraced in a few schools
 Radical change of degree program (eg
  postgrad DVM) drives radical curriculum
  change
 Curriculum change is challenging, intense,
  traumatic and slow
Workshop
 What struck you from Day 1 as the
 most significant issue where
 action is needed and where there
 will be a major potential benefit
 to the veterinary profession?

 What are the most important
  barriers to progress in this area?
Dr Liz Tudor
CURRICULUM MAPPING
Professor Glen Coleman
OUTCOMES – WHAT ARE THEY
AND WHY ARE THEY IMPORTANT?
Professor Stephen May
THE RCVS PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT PHASE
Dr Barry Smyth
ECONOMICS OF THE VETERINARY
PROFESSION
WORKSHOP AND REVIEW TO
DETERMINE KEY AREAS FOR
ACTION AND FURTHER
CONSIDERATION
 Priorities for Action
1.        Development of a sustainable veterinary profession (24 votes)
            Creation of non-clinical opportunities
            Economics and HR
            Implementation from start of vet school economic realities and
             engagement in training
2.        Support for Year 1 graduates and beyond – like RCVS PDP (20 votes)
3.        Sustainability of the profession in clinical training (10 votes)
            Costs to school, practitioners and students
            How long do students need to spend?
            How do placements fit into development of graduates
4.        Sustainability of the profession in veterinary education – the role of
          financial success (8 votes)
            Rebalancing the clinical/technical emphasis to have greater focus on
             financial outcomes
            Staff to mentor and monitor business success
5.        Making the profession financially viable (8 votes)
     1.      Improving collaboration between veterinary schools
6.        Review of overarching university & faculty business models (3
          votes)
     1.      New approaches to ensure sustainability
     2.      Issue of burden the clinical practitioners
Key Areas for Action
 Write up a draft terms of reference of the
  particular issue

 Indicate the most logical sequence of action
  steps that you think are needed to ensure
  progress is made on this issue

 Identify the groups/organisations most likely
  to be able and willing take on this particular
  issue as a priority
  Development of a sustainable veterinary
     profession (+training and modelling financial
     success, overarching uni/vet school business
     models)
 TOR
   Creation of non-clinical opportunities – scope current opportunities
    for employment for veterinarians; determine the areas where
    veterinarians are not represented or under-represented; identify
    what skills, knowledge and attributes are required to increase
    employment opportunities; undertake GAP analysis to see where
    current training is limiting opportunities
 ACTION STEPS
   Identify an AVA and NZVA working party and budget; frame how
    data would be captured and then an initial report
   Identify where there are training shortfalls
 RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
   Profession related issue – AVA, NZVA and ANZCVS
 CHAMPION
   Barry Smyth
    Development of a sustainable veterinary
       profession (+training and modelling financial
       success, overarching uni/vet school business
       models)
   TOR
       Identify the varied roles that are taken up by veterinary graduates (including those no longer
        registered)
       Identifying reasons that graduates do change roles or cease work
       Identifying why new graduates are not satisfactorily performing in relation to their contribution
        to the businesses – and improving these prior to graduation



   ACTION STEPS
       Getting funds - will be needed for survey work and demographic study
       Creating a task force
       Accessing university alumni lists
       Considering that the state boards have lists – may have lists that are for vets no longer
        registered
       Using social media

   RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
       AVA, NZVA, Universities
   CHAMPION
       Barry Smyth
Support for Year 1 graduates
and beyond – like RCVS PDP
 TOR
   Adopt a model with the same aims as the RCVS model
 ACTION STEPS
   To determine who would administer the scheme
   How it is to be funded
   How to enrol new graduates
   Identify champion or champion boards (like WA Board) to pilot
    the scheme or champion to other boards
   Disseminate Barry Smyth’s information in a compacted form
   Check on what is happening in NZ
 RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
   AVBC, AVA and each State Board
 CHAMPION
   Paul Davey in WA to pick up?
Support for Year 1 graduates
and beyond – like RCVS PDP
   TOR
       Scoping out the problem
       Identifying the issues, problems and stressors that should be addressed
       Engaging the stakholders – AVA, unis etc to identify appetite for doing
        something
       Looking for solutions and appraising what is being offered – how effective,
        how can gaps be addressed, determining whether RCVS model can be used to
        address needs
       Identify mental health issues and financial losses
       Whether programs should be compulsory and linked to registration
       Importance placed on self-reflective practice – foster at PG stage
   ACTION STEPS
       Scoping problem and information gathering (finding data and issues at hand)
       Identifying what is available
       Who amongst stakeholders would be best at taking on the problem

   RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
       AVBC, AVA, CPD providers and call for areas of interest
   CHAMPION
Sustainability of the profession in
clinical training
   TOR
    Identify different types of EMS – see only (traditional), more advanced EMS
       (tailored learning outcomes and reporting) and more integrated private
       businesses incorporated into university processes.
    Proportion of different types of EMS
    What’s in it for me? Biggest driver are budgetary constraints and also better
       learning outcomes for students; recognition of practices; stimulation for
       practices; cost for the practice; fringe benefitts eg CE
    Recruitment opportunities; labour a benefit to the practice
    Cost to the students


   ACTION STEPS
       What proportion of the different types of EMS are provided
       Collaboration from unis about different approaches
       Centralised register of requirements from different universities – coordinated
        from Dean’s Council
   RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
       AVA and Deans Council involved plus perhaps the AVA
   CHAMPION
Sustainability of the profession in
clinical training
 TOR
   Scope definition – take into account all undergrad clinical
    traininig
   Define the components of a value propostion – financial and non
    financial
   Components in relation to sustainability and quality
   Develop collaborative scenarios
 ACTION STEPS
   Arrange for all of placement coordinators to meet and discuss
   Determine the key learning objectives wanted for clinical
    training
   Identify suitable practices to consult with
 RESPONSIBLE GROUPS
   Universities, practitioners and students; special interest groups;
    take on state vet boards opinions
 CHAMPION

				
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