Docstoc

AP_Calculus_AB_Pieratti

Document Sample
AP_Calculus_AB_Pieratti Powered By Docstoc
					AB Calculus Syllabus

Syllabus is based on the following text issued to all students
Page references are to this text

Calculus Graphical, Numerical Algebraic
Ross, Demana, Waits and Kennedy
Scott Foresman  Addison Wesley 1999
ISBN 0­201­32445­8

Syllabus

I    Review and Overview of Functions: Pages 9 – 50 (1 week)
        A.  Functions and Graphs
                  i) Domain and Range
                 ii) Odd and Even Functions
        B.  Piece­wise Functions
        C.  One­to­One Functions and Inverse Functions
        D   Exponential Functions and Logarithmic Functions
        E.  Trigonometric Functions

        Review is kept brief so as to not forestall the introduction of calculus for too long. 
        Further review of exponential logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions 
        is done when these topics are reached during the course.

II  Limits and Continuity: Pages 55 – 81  (2.5 weeks)
            A. Rates of Change
                      i) Graphically Evaluated
                     ii) Numerically Evaluated
            B. Definition of a Limit (Informal)
                      i) Properties
                     ii) One­Sided and Two Sided Limits
                    iii) The Sandwich Theorem
            C. Infinite Limits
                      i) Properties
                     ii) End Behavior and Asymptotes
            D. Continuity
                      i) Continuity at a Point
                     ii) Discontinuity at a Point
                    iii) Removable versus Non­Removable Discontinuities
                    iv) The Intermediate Value Theorem
            E. Average Rate of Change
                      i) The Tangent Line Problem
                     ii) Slope of a Curve at a Point
                    iii) The Normal Line to a Curve

III Derivatives:  Pages 95 – 173 (3.5 Weeks)
            A: Derivative of a Function
                      i) Definition of Derivative Function and at a Point
                     ii) Relationship between the graphs of f and f’’
                    iii) One sided Derivatives
            B: Differentiability
                      i) Points of non­Differentiability
                     ii) Differentiability  Implies Local Linearity
                    iii) Using nDeriv on the Calculator 
                    iv) Differentiability Implies Continuity
                     v) The Intermediate Value Theorem for Derivatives
            C: Differentiation Rules
                     i) Constant, Constant Multiple, Sum, Difference, Power,
                        Product, Quotient, Negative Powers 
                    ii) Derivatives of Higher Order
            D: Linear Motion, Velocity and Acceleration
            E: Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions
            F: The Chain Rule
                    i) Multiple Applications as in f(g(h(x)))
            G: Implicit Differentiation
            H: Derivatives of Inverse Functions
            I: Derivatives of Inverse Trigonometric Functions
            J: Derivatives  of Exponential And Logarithmic Functions
                    i) Logarithmic Differentiation

IV Extreme Values of a Function and Curve Sketching: Pages 177­206 (2.5 Weeks)
       A: The Extreme Value Theorem
       B: Critical Values
       C:  Maxima and Minima
            i) Relative Extrema
           ii)Absolute Extrema
        D: Rolle’s Theorem
        E: The Mean Value Theorem
        F: Increasing and Decreasing Functions
        G: Determining where a Graph Rises or Falls
        H: Connecting f’ and f’’ with f
        I:  The 1st Derivative Test
        J: Concavity and Points of Inflection
        K: The 2nd Derivative Test

V Optimization and Linearization: Pages and Related Rates 206 – 245 (2.5 Weeks)
            A: Set­up and Solution of Maximization and Minimization Problems
            B: Linear Approximation L(x) = f(a) + f’(a)(x­a)
            C: Related Rates
                     i) Triangles, Shadows and Moving Ladders
                    ii) Cones, Cylinders, Spheres and other Solids
                    iii) Angle Problems
                    iv) Miscellaneous Problems

VI The Definite Integral: Pages 247 – 301 (3 Weeks)
            A: Estimating Finite Sums
                     i) Rectangular Approximation Methods
                    ii) The Trapezoidal Rule
            B: Definite Integrals
                      i) Riemann Sums and Numerical Approximations
                     ii) Integrals on the Calculator – Using fnInt
                    iii) Rules for Antiderivatives
                    iv) The Average Value of a Function on an Interval
                     v) The Mean Value Theorem for Definite Integrals
                    vi) The Connection Between Integral and Differential Calculus
            C: The 1st and 2nd Fundamental Theorems of Calculus

VII Anti­Derivatives and Integration Techniques: Pages 306 – 322 (3 Weeks)
            A: The Indefinite Integral
                      i) Properties
                     ii) Rules (Power, Trig, Inverse Trig, Exponential and Logarithmic)
                    iii) Change of Variable

VIII Differential Equations: Pages 303 – 340, 363­373 (2 Weeks)
       A: Initial Value Problems
            B: Separable Differential Equations
            C: Slope Fields
            D: Exponential Growth and Decay
                      i) Real World Applications – Population, Radioactivity, Interest etc.
            E: Linear Motion
                      i) Displacement versus Distance
                     ii) Speed versus Velocity

IX   Area and Volume Pages 374 – 394: (2 Weeks)
            A: Area
                     i) Under a Curve
                    ii) Between Two Curves
            B: Volume – Solids of Revolution
                     i) Disk Method
                    ii) Washer Method
            C: Volume of Solids with Known Cross­Sections

X    Review (3 Weeks)




                  



         The use of the graphing calculator is integral to this syllabus.  Students use the 
table function in seeing limits numerically.  Students zoom in to see limits graphically. 
Zeros and intersections are calculated.  Local linearity is demonstrated.  Derivatives and 
integrals are found using the graphing calculator.  The standard calculator for instruction 
in my classroom is the TI­84.  Some lessons are geared specifically for instruction in its 
use.  In these instances, I will use an overhead projector and an emulator.  At other times 
I will simply have mine on hand and the students will have theirs as well.  

        Students work independently and collaboratively.  Students are tested 
approximately every two weeks.  Past AP Questions are regularly incorporated into 
instruction and testing to make clear material and make students aware of the level of 
performance they are expected to reach.  Some specific examples include

            Problem                     Topic(s) Illustrated as per my Syllabus
       2005 #6                        VIII A, B, C
       2004 #2                         IX Aii, Bii, C
       2004 #5                         VI C,  IV H
       2004B #3                       VI Ai, B iv, v, III D
       2003 #6                          II Di, ii,  III B, VI Biv
       2002 #5                          V Cii

        Though I have indicated a period of approximately three weeks of dedicated 
review just prior to the administration of the AP exam in early May, I incorporate regular 
review into my instruction once we have begun integration.  This review involves short 
“power quizzes” comprised of released AP short answer questions or questions of a 
similar level and format, as well as spiraling past AP free response questions into student 
homework.  Students are expected to support their answers mathematically and to 
provide written justifications for their answers in full sentence form.  Students are 
acquainted with scoring rubrics used for grading past free response questions and are 
provided with sample responses and the scores such responses would have received. 
Students are also asked to critique and grade responses from fellow students given to 
them in an anonymous fashion.

       In the month just prior to the exam I make myself available for 1 or more 
weekend sessions where we take full practice exams.  Students also pick topics on which 
they will do team presentations after the AP testing period has ended.  These include 
topics which are optional for or are excluded from the AB exam which I nonetheless feel 
should be covered in an introductory Calculus course.  These have in the past included 
L’Hopital’s rule, Integration by Parts, Partial Fractions, Cylindrical Shells, Arc Length 
and Surface Area, Euler’s Method and Logistic Growth. 

Supplementary Materials:

   1. Calculus with Analytic Geometry 3rd Brief Edition: Anton
      John Wiley & Sons, Inc.  ISBN: 0­471­62742­9

   2. Calculus 6th Edition: Larson, Hostetler and Edwards
      Houghton Mifflin ISBN: 0­395­86974­9

   3. Calculus with Analytic Geometry 2nd Alternate Edition: Swokowski
      PWS – Kent  ISBN: 0­87150­008­6

   4. Calculus: Single Variable 2nd Edition: Stewart, Brooks and Cole 
      5.   Preparing for the AB Calculus Examination: Best and Lux
            Venture Publishing

   6. AP Calculus (AB) Released Multiple Choice and Free Response Questions 1969
         to Present  The College Board (ETS)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:5/16/2013
language:Unknown
pages:6
Fischer Fost Fischer Fost SPM http://razzi.me/iasiatube
About If the shared docs can help you, pls view some as to support my sharing.