A Workshop for Managers_ Policy Makers_ and Scientists Sponsored

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					A Workshop for Managers, Policy Makers, and Scientists Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (facilitated by the Soil and Water Conservation Society) December 9-11, 2009 Des Moines Marriott (Downtown), Des Moines, Iowa Deadline for Abstracts: September 30, 2009 Additional workshop information at www.swcs.org/s2s
Workshop Structure Interested participants are encouraged to respond to this call for posters/technology demonstrations that fits within one of the topic areas. If appropriate, submitting poster authors may be selected by the program committee to make a short oral presentation to complement/contrast the invited presentations. There will be facilitated discussion time for each topic area consisting of comments, questions, and answers. The facilitator will drive the discussion to obtain an outcome that can be presented in a follow-up final report/summary document on the workshop theme. Accepted posters will be prominently displayed throughout the workshop and several opportunities will be available for viewing and interaction, including a reception on Wednesday and Thursday evening. Workshop Summary The purpose of the workshop is to explore science-based solutions for reducing sources of nutrient loads exported from the upper portion of the Mississippi River drainage system to the Gulf of Mexico. The focus is on the Missouri, Upper Mississippi River, Ohio, and Tennessee River Basins. The workshop will explore three themes, including Post-Workshop Report A final report is expected to summarize keynote and selected presentations, as well as a synthesis of break-out discussions. potential solutions indicated by regional modeling, watershed and field-scale research, and socioeconomic studies; data and information gaps that limit scientific analyses and assessments; and science-based information needs of managers and policy makers to implement solutions and nutrient reduction strategies. The workshop consists of five sessions with invited speakers and a facilitated discussion and contributed posters. This three-day workshop will invite speakers and panelists working in the Missouri, Upper Mississippi River, Ohio, and Tennessee River Basins and provide a forum for interactive discussions amongst scientists, policy makers, and managers. Specifically, this forum will bring together managers, policy makers, conservationists, and scientists working in these basins to discuss and learn about: o Potential science-based solutions including limitations and uncertainties. o The role, capabilities, and gaps in science (data and models) in addressing management and policy. o How management and policy decisions currently are made and the regulations and criteria guiding those decisions. o How science and policy decisions can be brought together to improve the implementation of nutrient management practices and land conservation.

Additional information on the workshop is available online. http://www.swcs.org/s2s

A Workshop for Managers, Policy Makers, and Scientists Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (facilitated by the Soil and Water Conservation Society) December 9-11, 2009 Des Moines Marriott (Downtown), Des Moines, Iowa

Workshop Objectives o To convey relevant scientific findings on potential solutions to resource managers and policy makers. o To assure that science continues to inform decisions and that decision makers are getting the information they need. o To improve communication on what scientific findings mean in defining the key land and water issues and in finding real solutions. o To advance monitoring, assessment, and modeling in the Mississippi River Basin needed to support specific management actions that ultimately reduce nutrients in streams and rivers in the Basin and in the Gulf of Mexico.
SWCS Abstract Review Guidelines The Program Committee has developed and agreed to a list of minimum standards that every abstract must meet. Our goal is to enable all submitted abstracts to be included in the final program and we expect that most abstracts will be acceptable without revision. The purpose of these guidelines is to enable the reviewer to easily identify any substandard abstracts. If an abstract does not meet minimal standards the reviewer will notify a Program Committee designee who will notify the author and work with them to bring the abstract up to standard. The abstract should include the following components: 1. Explanation of the importance of the research or activity (and relevance to one of the three themes of the workshop) 2. Objectives/goals/purpose 3. Methods 4. Results/expected results 5. Conclusion/summary Abstract reviewers use the following criteria: o Importance and relevance of topic o Innovation and contribution to knowledge base o Clarity and completeness – made up of the following: overall quality, purposes and objectives, theoretical and/or applied focus, research/activity methods, findings, and potential practical application.

Workshop Session Descriptions
Management Issues and Needs Session – will address data, assessments, and models that State managers use and need to inform nutrient management decisions Human Dimension Session – will provide an overview of the social and economic factors that influence a farmer's decisions to adopt practices that reduce nonpoint source agricultural nutrient inputs. What incentives and program policies work best and why? Lessons Learned from Small-Scale Watershed Studies Session – will provide an overview of studies on mitigation of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment transport and loss from small watersheds. These overview presentations will be designed to stimulate discussion linking the oral presentations to selected workshop posters on conservation technologies, erosion control strategies, stream restoration, and wetland construction projects. Data Availability and Gaps Session – will address limitations of monitoring data, nutrient source data, and land conservation/management data needed to better quantify and understand the effects of agricultural and urban development on water quality. Small and Large Scale models Session – will describe catchment-scale (HSPF) to large regional-scale models (SPARROW and HUMUS-SWAT) currently being used to assess the sources, transport, and export of nutrients in the Upper Mississippi River Basin. Presentations and a panel discussion will address the capabilities, limitations, and uncertainties of these models, including their use to inform nutrient management and policy decisions at the local, State, and Federal levels.

Key Dates
September 30, 2009 .......... Abstract submission deadline October 13, 2009 .................... Notification of acceptance October 22, 2009 ................ Final/Revised abstracts due November 2, 2009 .......... Presenter registration deadline December 9-11, 2009 .... Science to Solutions Workshop

A Workshop for Managers, Policy Makers, and Scientists Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (facilitated by the Soil and Water Conservation Society) December 9-11, 2009 Des Moines Marriott (Downtown), Des Moines, Iowa

Submission Guidelines for Abstracts for Poster Presentations and/or Interactive Decision Support Tools
Required Information o Title of poster o Contact person with affiliation and email address o Presenter and affiliation o Other author(s) and affiliation(s) o Identification as either poster presentation or technology demonstration o Keywords o Designation of session topic area most closely related to the presentation: o Session 1: Management Issues o Session 2: Human Dimension o Session 3: Lessons Learned: Small Watershed Studies o Session 4: Data Availability and Gaps o Session 5: Small and Large Scale models o Abstract of 350 words or less The author should be sure to include in the abstract a summary of the findings that pertain to one or more of the three themes. (1) Science-based management issues and needs; (2) Data gaps; and (3) Modeling and small watershed studies
Additional Information Posters and interactive decision support tools will be on display throughout the workshop. Presenters are expected to be present at their boards or tables during the break associated with their topic session and during the evening receptions to answer questions and discuss their experiences and results with workshop attendees. Abstracts from students and from all professional sectors addressing the topic areas are encouraged. A poster presentation entails affixing printed materials (typed information, photos, graphs, etc.) on a specific topic to a four-foot high by eight-foot wide (4'x8') poster board. Authors offering technology demonstrations are required to provide their own equipment, computers, monitors, etc. We will only accept submissions made through the SWCS website at www.swcs.org. Abstracts will be transmitted to reviewers for consideration. All abstracts will be reviewed anonymously and rated individually. An abstract is indicative of final quality; therefore, authors are urged to prepare quality abstracts. The abstract should emphasize objectives and results. Inclusion of tentative or final conclusions will greatly strengthen proposals.

Please Note: SWCS does not reimburse authors for expenses incurred for travel to the workshop. All presenters who indicate intent to participate in the workshop imply agreement to register for the workshop at the appropriate fee, attend the workshop, and make the presentation in person.

A Workshop for Managers, Policy Makers, and Scientists Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (facilitated by the Soil and Water Conservation Society) December 9-11, 2009 Des Moines Marriott (Downtown), Des Moines, Iowa

Specific times for sessions yet to be assigned The opening plenary session on December 9th will begin at 1:00 PM The closing panel session on December 11th will conclude by Noon.

Condensed Agenda

December 9, 2009
Plenary Session: A common need to move science to policy and solutions to reduce nutrient inputs to the Gulf Session 1: Management Issues: Day-to-day decisions, needs, and tools o What data/assessments/tools do managers rely upon to make decisions? o What data/assessments/tools do they need? o Are models providing the right information? Session 2: Human Dimension: Social and Economic factors that influence decision making and adoption o What kind of incentives work and why? o What kind of policies/programs work the best? o What are the common factors/processes among community action and local organizations that are successful in achieving nutrient reductions within a watershed? Evening Reception and Poster Session

Session 4: Data Availability and Gaps: Limitations of data required to quantify and understand the effects of agricultural and urban development on water quality o Water-quality monitoring data o Agricultural effects data o Urban effects data Session 5: Small and Large Scale Models: Capabilities, limitations and implications to assess the sources, transport, and export of nutrients. o Model benefits o Model limitations and uncertainties o Effects of model scale and implications for decision making o Model comparisons: data input, processes, ability to track water-quality effects of management practices Modeling Panel: A panel of State, Federal, and University representatives will convene following the Modeling Session to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these models and potential applications of the model results to inform nutrient management strategies. Evening Reception and Poster Session

December 10, 2009
Session 3: Lessons Learned from Small Watershed Studies: Overview of small watershed studies that highlight successful nutrient control strategies/technologies o Conservation technologies and existing practices o Erosion control for phosphorussedimentation basins o Stream restoration and wetland construction

December 11, 2009
Breakout Discussions--small group facilitated discussions on the three themes: (1) Sciencebased management issues and needs; (2) Data gaps; and (3) Modeling and watershed-scale research: current capabilities, uncertainties and needs. Closing panel--Future Needs and Directions for Nutrient Assessments, Modeling, and Policy Closing remarks from State and Federal leaders on data gaps, capabilities of models, and future policy needs and directions to improve the implementation of nutrient management practices and land conservation in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

Additional workshop information online at: www.swcs.org/S2S


				
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