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                          ENGLISH 1301: COMPOSITION I

Within these pages, teacher of English 1302 will find helpful information on the
philosophy and objectives of English 1301 at UHD. You will also find strategies to help
you implement them. You may want to cut and paste some of the material contained in
these pages to distribute to your students.

Please pay particular attention to the course description and course outcomes. Your
awareness of these expectations -- filtered through your own creative good judgment as
teachers -- will help us ensure that all of our students arrive in English 1302 fully
prepared for its challenges.

English 1301 is one of the first courses entering first- year students at UHD encounter.
For most students (about two thirds of your class), gaining a seat in English 1301 depends
on their performance on Accuplacer, our placement test of choice. The rest of your
students come to you through English 1300, or through their work at another college.
Your English 1301 writers may be the first in their family to come to college and thus
may have little conception of what college means, may be working through real
deficiencies in their education, or may be coming from a problematic experience at
another college. They may be traditional, adequately prepared college students, and they
may be slightly older students with experience in the work place. Many may also be
talented writers. Such a mix of abilities, experience, and expectations will challenge you
throughout the semester.

Since many students come into the course utterly unfamiliar with the behaviors that lead
to success in college; do not assume that your students know or understand the processes
you might take for granted: communication with instructors around missed deadlines, the
time needed for essay preparation, strategies for persevering through difficult material.
Part of our job is to teach students the specific strategies employed by successful college
students and to empower them to use them. A review of the information for English
1300/130A, especially the section on Pedagogical Options and Strategies,
may provide you with some useful tools for your work in 1301.

And finally, please let Jon Harned know if there is any other material you would like
added to these pages that you believe would help you and other 1301 instructors at UHD.




CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION FOR ENGLISH 1301

Composition I. English 1301. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 1300 or ENG
130A, or placement by examination. Review of the writing process, including such
elements as audience analysis, invention, drafting and revising. Practice in expository
techniques of writing and attention to readings.
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TEXTBOOKS FOR ENGLISH 1301

All instructors should require The Penguin Handbook, 2nd edition, by Lester Faigley.
They should also require either Rereading America, 7th ed., by Gary Colombo et. al., or
one of the Book Track Options for 1301:

Dyson, Michael. Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of
Disaster
Deloria, Jr., Vine. God is Red: A Native View of Religion
Parks, Gordon. Gordon Parks: Half-Past Autumn
Marin, Cheech. Chicano Visions: American Painters on the Verge
Ebadi, Shirin. Iran Awakening
Schlosser, Eric. Fast Food Nation
Johnson, Steven. Everything Bad is Good For You.

For a rhetoric, the Director of Composition recommends either The Allyn & Bacon Guide
to Writing, 4th edition, by John D. Ramage, John C. Bean, and June Johnson, or They Say,
I Say, by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH 1301

1. Read for Meaning and Critical and Analytic Understanding

      Identify and understand a writer’s stance and major claims
      Synthesize and evaluate ideas from academic texts
      Employ effective annotating strategies
      Produce accurate summaries and paraphrases of readings
      Recognize the historical context and purpose of readings
      Recognize the difference between primary and secondary sources

2. Understand the Writing Process

      Practice flexible and recursive strategies such as invention, drafting, revising,
       editing, and proofreading
      Use critical reading and basic research as the primary tools of invention, though
       students may develop their response to a reading through their experience and
       observation.
      Use evidence and appeals that are rhetorically appropriate to an academic
       audience and purpose
      Provide a clear thesis in an engaging introduction; multiple, well-developed
       supporting paragraphs; and an effective ending
      Use appropriate transitions devices between and within paragraphs so as to keep
       the essay and paragraphs coherent
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      Integrate smoothly ideas from secondary sources and document them using MLA
       in-text citations, with appropriate signal phrases and commentary on the
       quotations
      Observe academic conventions of formality, voice, and diction
      Edit for grammatical, punctuation, and mechanical errors--such as improperly
       marked sentence boundaries, unmarked plurals and possessives, verb tense shifts,
       subject / verb disagreement, and pronoun / antecedent confusion, apostrophes,
       quotation marks—awkward sentences, and poor word choice
      Understand and observe rules regarding intellectual property and plagiarism,
       including recognizing the boundaries between one’s own voice and ideas and
       those of others, and appreciating the consequences of violating the UHD
       Academic Honesty Policy
      Produce two timed, in-class essays and four more heavily weighted, longer, out-
       of-class essays that observe the conventions of academic discourse

3. Write Organized, Sustained, and Developed Argumentative Essays

      Write essays organized around a central, arguable claim, supporting
       claims/reasons, and evidence
      Acknowledge multiple perspectives through a well-qualified thesis, counter-
       arguments, concessions, and sources that represent an adequate range of ideas
      Detect and interrogate unstated assumptions
      Employ a range of rhetorical appeals

THE PHILOSOPHICAL BASIS OF ENGLISH 1301

English 1301, as exemplified in the textbooks and course outcomes, emphasizes
academic content in reading and argumentation in writing. For most scholars--and we
should see our students as serious scholars--writing is both a completion of the act of
reading and a spur to further scholarly inquiry. Students learn to write best when they
read about serious intellectual topics, and when they are required to engage these topics
in sustained ways over time. Practical matters, such as organization and correctness, are
best handled within the framework of a student's growing ability to negotiate complex
questions. In practice, this means reading and writing should be integrated. Students
should be immersed in an ongoing process of inquiry. They will do this by carrying
issues over from one reading to the next, as well as from one writing assignment to the
next. English 1301 reading and writing assignments need to be arranged with clear
sequences in mind. And since students, through their reading, are gradually joining
conversations on challenging intellectual topics, we need to teach them effective ways to
argue within academic communities. Thus, the primary form of writing students should
learn is argumentation.

The new curriculum for English 1301 should narrow a disconcerting gap between 1301
and 1302. Thus, as they will in 1302, 1301 students will read a series of essays or a book
on one topic and write in response to that topic. It is up to the individual instructor to
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decide how many topics the course will cover. The integration of source material is an
important skill in 1301, and toward the end of the semester students should find some of
these sources through independent research

It is also our job to make sure that those students who pass 1301 are operating fully at the
college level. Passing on underprepared students is not compassionate; it only sets them
up for failure at a later date. Our compassion is better used to engage our students
individually to help motivate and assist them to become solid academic writers.




REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Because intellectual growth is central to all college courses, all assignments should
reflect college-level questions, stimulate intellectual reflection, and give rise to
argumentation.

Students should write about six essays, between 15 and 20 finished pages of prose. About
two of those essays should be in-class. It is up to the instructor to choose the specific
forms of argument studied and written in the course.

Most of the major writing in 1301, then, should be arguments that students make based
on their reading. They learn the strategies of argumentation both by reading arguments
and by writing them. They will need to synthesize the readings you choose for them into
their thinking and experiences. There are a number of ways they can use any reading as
the basis for writing: they can respond critically to the writer's argument, use it as support
for their own argument, take a key concept from it as a lens though which to read their
own experiences, interpret various “texts” in the world, compare one argument to a
previous writer's argument, or summarize or quote from it as part of a larger argument
that incorporates other course readings.

All essays in this course should focus on college-level questions and use the concept of
audience to assist in the development of academic essays, even if students use personal
experience as one form of evidence. For example, an argumentative essay that responds
to reading critiquing or defending the educational system might draw for evidence upon
the student's own experiences with that system. By contrast an essay that recalls an event
or person from the student's life in an uncontextualized manner would not.

We ask that you introduce your students to the summary, but not as one of major out-of-
class papers in the class. Some instructors find it a useful assignment at the end of the
course since it is typically the first assignment in 1302.

We ask that critical responses to essays focus primarily on content-based responses more
than analyses of rhetorical moves. They may, of course, require the use of rhetorical
strategies in the response itself. The kind of meta-analysis found in rhetorical analyses is
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better left to 1302. In 1301, critical analyses that investigate the content of complex,
academic arguments as opposed to a primary focus on the rhetorical strategies offer
students the opportunity to read a difficult text very closely for meaning, thus reinforcing
the all-important reading skills that are the foundation of all academic work. Obviously,
the distinction between content and form is not unambiguous, especially in a course that
focuses on argumentative strategies. Moreover, this distinction does not mean that
rhetorical strategies cannot or should not be examined in classroom workshops or in
homework.

Instructors may find that assignment sequences are very useful in this course.
Sequencing assignments allows students to grapple with difficult readings and ideas in
the context of their own values and beliefs over an extended period of time. Sequencing
builds on skills, produces progression, and helps a student divide tasks into manageable
chunks. Courses taught using a thematic motif (e.g. education, social mobility, etc) are
particularly successful in terms of sequenced assignments.

An instructor may divide a larger writing assignment up into sequenced parts according
to the difficulty of those parts. Thus skillful sequencing can result in students doing
better work because the students are able to build on previous successes, as skills are
developed and forms become understandable. Skills should be sequenced appropriately
as sequencing implies a predictable progression of skill development patterns and
difficulty of assignments.

For example, an in-class essay could be graded independently but then expanded as part
of a more developed and complex out-of-class essay. Another method might be to
develop essay questions that become increasingly complex, asking students to rebut
arguments in a text, concede the weaknesses of their own positions, ferret out and
appraise unstated assumptions, all the while developing appeals from logos, ethos,
pathos.




TWO FACULTY SYLLABI AND ASSIGNMENTS FOR ENGLISH 1301

Dagmar Scharold’s Course Materials

                  English 1301: Composition I (3 credits)
Spring 2007 CRN 20124 Mon & Weds. 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.                       Room N-932

Instructor: Dagmar Corrigan Scharold                                 Office: S-1067
Office Hours: Mon. 1-2 p.m., and by appt.                            Phone: 713.221.8297
Email: corrigand@uhd.edu
WebCT login: http://uhdonline.uhd.edu

Course Description
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Placement: English 1300 or 130A or placement by examination.
English 1301, Composition I, introduces the conventions of academic writing and is thus
critical to your academic performance over the next several years. You will learn to
manage your own composing process, including audience analysis, invention, drafting,
revising, and editing. Successful essays will demonstrate clear and substantial
development of a significant topic; audience and purpose analysis; logical connections
within and between paragraphs; the conventions of Standard English. English 1301
anticipates English 1302 by teaching argumentation and beginning elements that 1302
teaches in greater detail, such as critical reading, summary, response, and research.

Course Objectives
Demonstrate critical reading strategies by responding effectively to texts through
   Identification and comprehension of a writer’s stance and major claims;
   Employment of effective annotating strategies;
   Production of accurate summaries of academic texts.

Produce an organized, sustained, and developed argumentative essay that
    Has a clear thesis, a well-established introduction, and developed paragraphs that
      support their claims;
    Addresses a specific purpose and audience using appropriate appeals and
      evidence;
    Appropriately integrates source material from one or two texts. This may include
              Leading into the source material with the appropriate signals;
              Accurately representing the meaning of the source material;
              Tying the source to the point it is intended to support;
              Practicing the above strategies without plagiarizing.
    Acknowledges multiple perspectives on a debate. This may include
              A well- qualified thesis;
              Counter-arguments;
              Support material that reflects and synthesizes a range of ideas.

Develop a writing process that recursively utilizes open and flexible strategies such
as pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading.

In successive edited drafts, control sentence boundaries, use a variety of sentence
patterns, and avoid wordy or garbled sentences. Few major usage error- incorrect verb
tense, subject/verb disagreement, pronoun disagreement, the misuse of plurals and
possessives—will appear.

Employ the conventions required by an academic audience, including appropriate levels
of formality, voice and diction.
Under timed conditions, compose five to six hundred word essays that exhibit the
conventions of academic writing.
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REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS AND MATERIALS
The Penguin Handbook, Second Edition by Lester Faigley
 One book to be chosen from the following list:


Chasing Ghosts: A Soldier’s Fight for America from Baghdad to Washington by Paul
Rieckhoff

Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq by Thomas E. Ricks
State of War: The Secret History of the C.I.A and the Bush Administration by James
Risen

Hard Line: Life and Death on the U.S.—Mexico Border by Ken Ellingwood
Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America by Mai M. Ngai
The New Americans: How the Old Melting Pot Can Work Again by Michael Barone

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell
Everything Bad is Good for You by Steven Johnson
The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream by Barack Obama


   Blank CD for final webfolio project

Reasonable Accommodations Policy
“UHD adheres to all applicable federal, state and local laws, regulations, and guidelines
with respect to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities.
Students with disabilities should register with Disabled Student Services (S409,
713.226.5227) and contact their teacher in a timely manner to arrange for appropriate
accommodations.”

ACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISM:
Plagiarism is the misrepresentation of someone else’s writing or thinking as one’s own
and is considered a serious academic offence, equivalent to cheating on a test. Consult
The St. Martin’s Handbook for definitions and explanations of plagiarism, as well as
discussions about how to avoid it or see me. Writers should familiarize themselves with
the university’s policy of Academic Honesty. Consult the UHD student handbook for
definitions and examples of academic dishonesty as well as the policy for resolving an
accusation of academic dishonesty, specific penalties, which may include suspension or
expulsion from the university.

       The penalty for plagiarism in this course is a filed, written warning and a
    zero (0) for the affected assignment. A second offense constitutes failure in the
    course.
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UHD Grading Scale
90-100                                          A
89-80                                           B
79-70                                           C
69-60                                           D
59 and below                                    F



C or Better Rule:
To move on to English 1302, you MUST pass English 1301 with at least a “C.” While a
“D” is still a possible grade, a “D” will not allow you to register for English 1302 and
requires that you re-take English 1301.

ATTENDENCE POLICY:
Writing is a social act and regular attendance is central to your success. If you miss two
classes, your final grade will be lowered by a full letter grade. If you miss four classes,
you will fail the course. I may make allowances in the case of documented emergencies
and illness. When you return to class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor
during his or her office hours.

Lack of preparation for the day’s planned work may also be counted as an absence, at my
discretion.

Grading and Course Related Activities
Course Requirements                             Percentage of Final Grade
Webfolio                                        50%
Essay Drafts                                    20%
Professionalism, Reflective Blogs, Peer
                                                10%
Responses, Homework, In-class Activities
Study Guide                                     10%
Final Exam                                      10%


All students are required to complete the course related activities

THE WEBFOLIO (50%)
In this English composition class each writer will develop his or her own webfolio, also
known as a portfolio. The webfolio is a showcase for the writer’s best work produced in
this class and presented as a hypertext document. Everything that is written or developed
for this class has the potential for becoming a part of the webfolio. Writers are strongly
advised to save everything for this course.
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Writers choose their webfolio entries from work produced for this course. These choices
must include the following:
    one reflective essay written at the end of the semester.
    one revised essay demonstrating documentation and research skills
    one revised essay of the writer’s choosing
    one blog assignment

Specific requirements for submitting the webfolio will be distributed in class.

ESSAY DRAFTS (20%)
Note: Writers must complete every essay assignment in order to receive credit for
the course. This means that if a writer fails to complete one essay assignment, he or
she will receive an F for the course.

Topics for essay assignments will not be listed on the course outline but will be assigned
separately, distributed in class, and posted in WebCT.

Late Essay Policy: Late essays will not be accepted without prior approval and at
my discretion.

No essays will be accepted for credit without the entire writing process present. Writers
must save every part of the writing process, including brainstorming, lists, outlining,
rough drafts, preliminary drafts, and peer reviewed drafts, and. NO EXCUSES WILL
BE ACCEPTED. When working at a computer, save different versions under different
names, such as Eval.1, Eval.2, Eval.3, etc. or label the hard copies first version, second
version, and so on. Work handed in without the entire writing process will be returned,
and writers will be instructed to begin the assignment again.

Professionalism, Reflective Blogs, Peer Responses, Homework, In-class Activities (10%)
Writers are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner both in class and in
on-line discussions. Professionalism includes being on time, meeting all deadlines
before the class begins, and collaborating with others in addition to regular attendance
( see Attendance Policy below).

Professional cell phone etiquette is also expected during class time. All cell phones
must be turned off or set to silent and put away. No text messaging is allowed during
class time. If you must answer your cell phone during class, this will be considered an
emergency situation, which will require you to leave immediately for the remainder of
the class period.

Late Homework Policy: Late homework will not be accepted without prior
approval and at my discretion. Homework completed during class time will not be
accepted anytime.

Blog assignments will range from class-generated prompts based on the readings to self-
reflection on one’s writing process.
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STUDENT GUIDED DISCUSSIONS (10%)
Each student will lead the discussion for the day. Specific guidelines for this project
will be distributed in class.

Final Exam (10%)
On the last class day, writers will receive materials to use in order to prepare for the final
exam.

Turning in Assignments Before/After Class Time:
If writers submit work outside of the scheduled class time, take the materials to the
English Department (S-1045) and drop it in the white box, inside the office door.
PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE ASSIGNMENTS UNDER MY OFFICE DOOR.

UHD WRITING/READING CENTER (WRC) :
The UHD WRC is located in N-925. As the writing center director, I strongly encourage
all writers to utilize the (free) services offered by the writing center. Peer tutors and
faculty tutors are available to assist writers at any stage of their writing process.

      Writers MUST meet with a WRC tutor at least once this semester for either
       writing or reading. Submit your conference note with your writing process
       materials. This will be graded as a homework assignment.

WITHDRAWING FROM ENGLISH 1301:
It is your responsibility to withdraw from this course. I am not allowed to drop students
from this course. There are two acceptable reasons for withdrawing from English 1301:

   1. External Circumstances- documentable events that have nothing to do with
      academic performance, such as a change in work schedule or a prolonged illness.
   2. Academic Circumstances- the virtual certainty that at the time of the last drop
      date that the student will not be able to pass the course. In this situation, the
      instructor must verify that the student has made a good faith effort to pass, as
      demonstrated through regular attendance and completion of assignments.

If a student wishes to withdraw for External Circumstances, he or she should first see an
adviser in the Academic Advising Center. If a writer wishes to withdraw for Academic
Circumstances, please discuss his or her course standing with me.

Dagmar Corrigan Scharold
English 1301
Summary and Response Essay
Spring 2007


Purpose: To practice note-taking and annotation skills. To practice summary skills.
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Assignment: Write a summary and response essay. Although this essay is divided into
two parts, the final document should be prepared and submitted as one essay, for a total
of three pages. You should work to make a smooth transition from the summary to the
response.

Summary : Summarize pages 17-41 in Everything Bad is Good for You. Use the
summary method described in the handout on how to write a summary. Your goal is to
briefly present the main ideas and use ALL of your own words. No quotes will be
allowed for this summary. Your summary should not be longer than two pages or 500
words.

Response: Write a response to the readings. There is no right or wrong response to the
readings. You will be evaluated on how well you understand the material and how
clearly you explain and support your reactions. Your response should be one page.

Constraints: The essay should be no less than 3 word-processed pages

Paper Formatting: The essay should be presented in MLA format, without a title page.
See http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_mla.html

Submitting your Paper: No paper copies of your final version are necessary. You will
submit your final version to the assignment drop box in VISTA at the beginning of
class (http://uhdonline.uhd.edu).

Computer Guidelines: If you use WORDPERFECT or MS WORKS, save your file
as RICH TEXT FORMAT or as a TEXT ONLY file.

Writing/Reading Center Reminder: You are supposed to visit the Writing/Reading
Center at least once this semester and this counts as a homework assignment. Submit
your conference note when you turn in your paper.

Due Dates:
*** Final Version: February 19, 2007—Final version due in VISTA at the
beginning of class. ***


Dagmar Stuehrk Scharold
English 1301
Spring 2007
Evaluation Essay

Course Objectives:
Produce an organized, sustained, and developed argumentative essay that has a clear
thesis, a well-established introduction, and developed paragraphs that support their claims
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Purpose:
The purpose of the assignment is to develop and apply criteria in order to evaluate a text.

The Assignment:
Write an initial evaluation of the book, Everything Bad is Good for You, up to page 90.
Much like our book choice essay, the evaluation essay will focus on specific criteria by
which you will evaluate the book so far. You should have an argumentative thesis that
can be supported by your criteria. In other words, what makes this a good/bad/mediocre
book so far? You should use the appeals of argument (ethos, pathos, logos) that we have
been discussing in class as your criteria as your justification for your opinion. Don’t
forget to add your own criteria, too.

Note: When you use one of the appeals of argument, be sure to (1) give a definition of
the appeal, (2) summarize an example from the reading, and then (3) tie your definition
and example together. For example, if you focus on pathos, give the definition of pathos
as you understand it (DO NOT QUOTE OR COPY THIS FROM ANY SOURCE), give
an example from the book where pathos is used very clearly, and then name the specific
emotions being evoked by the author.

In your conclusion, give your overall recommendation of the book so far and the author's
use of argumentative appeals. Do you feel this was a well-written book with a convincing
argument at this point? Why or why not? Do you look forward to finishing it?

DO NOT FORGET TO EDIT YOUR WORK. Make sure that I am not the first
person to read your essay all the way through after you have finished writing.

Constraints: The essay should be no less than 3 word-processed pages. Hand written
essays will not be accepted.

Paper Formatting: The essay should be presented in MLA format, without a title page,
and should include a works cited page See
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_mla.html

Submitting your Paper: No paper copies of your final version are necessary. You will
submit your final version to the assignment drop box in WebCT VISTA.

Computer Guidelines: If you use WORDPERFECT or MS WORKS, save a copy of
all your documents, including the versions of your writing process in RICH TEXT
FORMAT or as a TEXT ONLY file.

Due Dates:

*** Peer Review: February 26, 2007****
*** Final Version: February 28, 2007 —Final version due in WebCT VISTA by
midnight
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Dagmar Corrigan Scharold
English 1301
Essay #3 (Issue Paper)
Spring 2007


Purpose: To practice note-taking and annotation skills. To practice summary skills. To
practice library research skills. To utilize campus library resources.

Assignment: Write an essay in which you “report” on the research you found on your
topic. Your paper should have a total of 3 sources—our course book and 2 journal or
magazine articles. You must choose your 2 journal or magazine articles from UHD’s
library research data bases. You should be able to find materials in the following data
bases: Academic Search Premier, OmniFile, and Opposing Viewpoints). DO NOT
“Google” your topic and use websites from the Internet.

Your essay should have an engaging introduction that identifies your topic to the reader
and your initial opinions about your topic. The body of your essay will combine in a
clear, organized manner, the information you gathered from your sources. After reading
your essay, a reader should have a better understanding of the topic and know the
position of the authors whose work you have summarized. Be selective with your
research. Look for information that alters your understanding of the topic and the
arguments that open up new considerations. Your conclusion will discuss the results of
your search and if you have come up with a claim you could defend in our next essay to
convince or persuade an audience. Or your conclusion could explain that you are still
unsure and what you would like to learn by further research. And finally, be sure to
include a works cited page. ( See http://citationmachine.net/index.php )

       Constraints: The essay should be no less than 4 word-processed pages Hand
written essays will not be accepted. The essay should be presented in MLA format,
without the title page and should include a works cited page for your sources.
See http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_mla.html
for an example of this format and for more information about creating works cited pages.

     Submitting your Paper: No paper copies of your final version are necessary.
You will submit your final version to the assignment drop box in WebCT at the
beginning of class (http://uhdonline.uhd.edu).

       Copies of your Sources: You must include paper copies of your sources. You
will submit those on the day the essay is due.

 Computer Guidelines: If you use WORDPERFECT or another word processing
program, save a copy of all your documents, including the versions of your writing
process in RICH TEXT FORMAT or as a TEXT ONLY file.
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 Due Dates:
***March 28th – Peer Review. Bring a printed copy to class. You should have no less
than 3 pages at this time.
*** April 2—Final version due in WebCT, by midnight. ***


Dagmar Corrigan
English 1301
Essay #4 (Arguing to Convince)
Spring 2006


Purpose: To clearly present a controversial issue to a reader. To convince readers that
the reasons offered are valid and logical. To be able to anticipate opposing arguments
and logically refute those objections. To be able to use Internet resources intelligently.
To be able to integrate sources into an essay using the MLA style for documentation.

Assignment: Write a multi-paragraph essay in which you convince your audience of
your position on the topic from your inquiry essay (essay #3). You may choose to write
your argument as a proposal, a causal analysis, or a persuasive argument. Your paper
must use the same 4 sources from your inquiry essay (your reading circle book and 3
journal or magazine articles). You can choose to use direct quotes or summaries of these
sources in your paper. Be sure to document these in your paper using the MLA style.
See The St. Martin’s Handbook or the Purdue OWL
(http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html).

Your essay should have an engaging introduction that identifies your topic to the reader
and a clearly identifiable thesis statement. The body of your essay can follow either the
structure for a classical argument or Rogerian argument (see attached handouts and your
class notes). And finally, be sure to include a works cited page. ( See
http://citationmachine.net/index.php )

If you choose to write a proposal, it should be action oriented, directed at the future, and
audience specific. Your proposal should make a strong, clear claim that something should
or should not happen and then relate this claim to a need or a problem. You will also
have to demonstrate through the use of evidence that your proposal will address this need
or problem and that it is reasonable or feasible.

       Constraints: The essay should be no less than 5 word-processed pages Hand
written essays will not be accepted. The essay should be presented in MLA format,
without the title page and should include a works cited page for your sources.
See http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_mla.html
for an example of this format and for more information about creating works cited pages.
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     Submitting your Paper: No paper copies of your final version are necessary.
You will submit your final version to the assignment drop box in WebCT at the
beginning of class (http://uhdonline.uhd.edu).

You will submit your writing process to me at the beginning of class. No essay will be
accepted for credit without the entire writing process present. You must save every
part of your writing process, including brainstorming, lists, outlining, rough drafts, and
preliminary drafts, and no excuses will be accepted.

 Computer Guidelines: If you use WORDPERFECT or another word processing
program, save a copy of all your documents, including the versions of your writing
process in RICH TEXT FORMAT or as a TEXT ONLY file.

 Due Dates:
***April 7th – Peer Review. Bring a printed copy to class. You should have no less
than 3 pages at this time.
*** April 14th—Final version due in WebCT, at the beginning of class. ***




Nell Sullivan’s Course Materials

English 1301: Freshman Composition I

              UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON-DOWNTOWN, FALL 2006
CRN 10829             MW 4:00 -5:15 p.m.               Room: N932
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Dr. Nell Sullivan   Phone: 713-226-5233  E-mail:
SullivanN@uhd.edu
Office: S-1065         Office Hours: MW 10:00-11:00 a.m., 5:30-6:00 p.m., and by
appointment


CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 1300 or ENG 130A, or placement by
examination.
Review of the writing process, including such elements as audience analysis, invention,
drafting and revising. Practice in expository techniques of writing and attention to
readings.

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND EDUCATIONAL GOALS
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English 1301 is an introduction to college-level writing with an emphasis on
argumentation, which is the kind of writing required most frequently in university
coursework and the public sphere. This course focuses on writing as a recursive process
that includes audience analysis, invention, organization, drafting, revising, and editing.
Students will read and analyze the writing of others in preparation for their own writing
process.

EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES FOR ENGLISH 1301
After successfully completing English 1301, a student will be able to do the following:
    Demonstrate critical reading strategies by responding effectively to texts through
      Identification and comprehension of a writer’s stance and major claims;
      Employment of effective annotating strategies;
      Production of accurate summaries of academic texts.
    Produce an organized, sustained, and developed argumentative essay that
      Has a clear thesis, a well-established introduction, and developed paragraphs
        that support their claims.
      Addresses a specific purpose and audience using appropriate appeals and
        evidence.
        Appropriately integrates source material from one or two texts.
      Acknowledges multiple perspectives on a debate.
    Develop a recursive writing process that uses open and flexible strategies such as
     prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading.
    In successive edited drafts, control sentence boundaries, use a variety of sentence
     patterns, and avoid wordy or garbled sentences. Few major usage errors—such as
     incorrect verb tense, subject/verb disagreement, pronoun disagreement, the
     misuse of plurals and possessives—will appear.
    Employ the conventions required by an academic audience, including appropriate
     levels of formality, voice, and diction.
    Under timed conditions, compose five to six hundred word essays that exhibit the
     conventions of academic writing.

 See http://www.uhd.edu/academic/colleges/humanities/english/1301.html for more
 information on goals.


REQUIRED TEXTS AND SUPPLIES
   Dyson, Michael Eric. Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the
       Color of Disaster. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2006.
   Andrea A. Lunsford, The St. Martin’s Handbook, 5th edition.
   A good collegiate dictionary.
   A diskette or Flash drive device to store work done on the computer.
   A folder for storing all returned essays, quizzes, and assignments.
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    Note: As the semester progresses, we will also be reading essays and journal articles
    that we download from the University’s online databases. These articles are available
    to UHD students at no additional cost.



GRADE COMPUTATION (out of 100%)*
    Essay #1, out-of-class summary essay ........................................................................... 10%
    Essay #2, out-of-class essay, multiple draft ................................................................ 12.5%
    Essay #3 , in-class essay ................................................................................................ 10%
    Essay #4, out-of-class essay , multiple draft .................................................................. 15%
    Essay #5, out-of-class, multiple-draft revision of essay #4, with sources ..................... 20%
    Essay #6, in-class, as Final Examination .................................................................... 12.5%
    In-class response essays and journal entries .................................................................. 10%
    Class participation, quizzes, and miscellaneous homework assignments...................... 10%

Course Grade = .10(#1) + .125(#2) + .10(#3) + .15(#4) + .20(#5) + .125(#6) + .10

(response) +.10(class participation.)


 *NOTE: To pass this course, a student must complete and submit Essays #1-6
                                 as assigned.



GRADE CONVERSION CHART
    Excellent college-level work:                   A+ = 100                                A = 95                          A- = 92
    Good college-level work:                        A-/B+ = 90           B+ = 88            B = 85                          B- = 82
    Adequate college-level work:                    B-/C+ = 80           C+ = 78            C = 75                          C- = 72
    Poor college-level work:                        C-/D+ = 70           D+ = 68            D = 65                          D- = 62
    Failing work:                                   F = 0-59
    No credit:                                      Off-topic essay, plagiarized essay, or no essay
    submitted = 0 points



GRADING CRITERIA
For each essay assigned, I will give students a specific list of criteria, or standards, I will
use to evaluate the essay, but the following are general criteria I use when evaluating
college-level essays:
         • Response to the topic (i.e., does the essay address the assigned topic?).
         • Use of the conventions of academic writing, including structure, thesis, and
         organization.
         • Adherence to guidelines for documenting borrowed information. (See the note
         of “Plagiarism” below.)
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       • Clarity and sophistication of writing style.
       • Grammatical correctness. (Essays with serious or multiple errors are not “A,”
       “B,” or “C” essays.)
       • Use of ample and appropriate detailed evidence.
       • Credibility and originality of the essay (i.e., is the essay convincing and
       interesting?).

THE “C” RULE FOR ADVANCING TO ENGLISH 1302
Students must pass English 1301 with at least a C in order to move on to English 1302 at
UHD. While a D is still a possible grade for the course, earning a D will not allow you to
register for 1302.

READINGS, ASSIGNMENTS, AND QUIZZES
You are responsible for doing assignments by class time. I will give quizzes on the day’s
reading assignment. There are no make-up quizzes. On days when we will discuss
grammar chapters from The St. Martin’s Handbook, you are responsible for having
completed the written exercises before class. There are also quizzes over grammar
scheduled throughout the semester.


IN-CLASS RESPONSE ESSAYS AND JOURNAL ENTRIES
Everyone will keep an electronic journal (i.e., saved to disk). At the beginning of each
class, students will write responses to the assigned readings or an assigned topic in their
journals. Each entry will be followed by an indication of the word count. At the end the
semester, each student should have 3,000 words or more worth of journal writing.
Students will print out their journals periodically for checks over the semester.

IN-CLASS ESSAYS AND THE FINAL EXAM
If you have a conflict and cannot write an in-class essay or the final at the scheduled
time, you must contact me and schedule a make-up examination before the scheduled
date.

PAPERS AND LATE PAPERS
All formal essays written out of class must be typed, double-spaced, with 1-inch margins,
numbered pages, and the student’s named typed in the top left corner of the first page.
Hard-copy essays are due in class on the date specified on the assignment sheet. Keep
photocopies of essays for your records; I am not responsible for papers students lose in
either electronic or paper form.
Late papers are penalized 3 points per calendar day. Since late papers are not submitted
at the same time as the others, they will not be returned to students at the same time as the
on-time assignments. (Last in/Last out).
Submit all your essays to me directly. Do not leave papers outside my office door.
IMPORTANT: Even though students should save their work in electronic form, they
must submit essays in hard-copy, paper form.
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DRAFT (OR PEER REVIEW) WORKSHOPS
All out-of-class essays must be written in drafts, and for each one, there will be a
required peer review workshop. Students will bring a legible, typed draft to class for
feedback. Part of the grade you receive on the final draft depends upon your having
workshopped the first draft.


WITHDRAWING FROM THE COURSE
The drop deadline is 6 p.m., Thursday, October 26, 2006. If you are experiencing
familial, work, or health problems that prevent your participation in the course and
adversely affect your ability to complete assignments, you should note the drop deadlines
on the syllabus. If you wish to withdraw from the course, you must complete the
appropriate forms in the Office of Records. I cannot drop you from the course.

ATTENDANCE AND CLASS ETIQUETTE
Official Attendance Policy for English 1301 and 1302: “Attendance in this course is
central to your success in it. If you miss four classes, your final grade will be lowered by
a full letter grade. If you miss eight classes, you will fail the course. Your instructor may
make allowances in the case of documented emergencies and illness. When you return to
class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor during his or her office hours.”

Students should come to class on time, to be prepared, and to participate intelligently
(i.e., in an informed, pertinent way) in class discussions. Instances of coming in very late
or leaving very early will be counted as an absence, and lack of preparation for the day’s
class (especially on peer review days) may also be counted as an absence, at my
discretion. At UHD, we strive to create a civil atmosphere to create the best possible
environment for learning; thus we do not tolerate disrespectful behavior that negatively
impacts the learning environment.
                                            = 
Therefore, turn off pagers, cell phones, iPods, and portable stereos before coming to
class. If you need to make or receive a call on your cell phone, leave the classroom
before answering or dialing. During class discussions, do not use your computers to surf
the web, work on homework for other classes, or email friends.

WEATHER EMERGENCY INFORMATION
In a weather emergency, call the UHD Switchboard at 713-221-8000 for school-closing
information.

GATOR MAIL
Students at UHD have email accounts through Gator Mail. I may use these accounts to
contact you and to transmit certain documents, such as assignments and checklists.
Please check your Gator Mail frequently.

KEEPING INFORMED
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An important part of your college experience will be networking with classmates, who
are a valuable resource. In addition to checking your Gator Mail and conferring with
your instructor when you miss class, you should also establish a network of classmates
with whom to share information if you have to miss class. Exchange phone numbers
with two classmates so you can call them to discuss missed work and to borrow notes:
Classmate #1: ____________________________________ _______________________________
                      Gator Mail Address: _______________________________________________

Classmate #2: ____________________________________ _______________________________

                      Gator Mail Address: _______________________________________________

PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism includes many forms of academic dishonesty: failing to cite sources (either
willfully or accidentally), looking off someone else’s test or quiz, and passing off
someone else’s ideas or words (including sentences, paragraphs, and whole essays
downloaded from the internet) as one’s own. Any student who plagiarizes will receive a
Zero on the assignment in question for a first offense. Any student who plagiarizes on
more than one assignment will fail the course. We will discuss plagiarism and the UHD
Academic Honesty Policy in class, and we will have a quiz over these issues. All UHD
students should read and familiarize themselves with the UHD Academic Honesty Policy
Statement (available at http://www.uhd.edu/about/hr/PS03A19.pdf ).


REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
UHD adheres to all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and guidelines
with respect to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities.
Students with disabilities should register with Disabled Student Services (409-South,
713-226-5227) and contact their instructors in a timely manner to arrange for appropriate
accommodations.


OTHER POLICIES
Additional course policies may be added and announced in class during the semester. All
official UHD policies, including those enumerated in the UHD Student Handbook and
the Catalog, apply to this course. UHD policies statements can be found at
http://www.uhd.edu/about/hr/policies.htm.
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                Course Schedule for English 1301.10869
                          Preliminary Schedule

       Changes to the schedule will be announced in class.
= Out-of-class assignment due   = In-class essay           = Official
University deadline
       Dyson = Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water. SM= The St. Martin’s Handbook

WEEK 1
M Aug 21     Introduction to English 1301 and academic writing. In class, write
             diagnostic writing sample. (Completion of this essay counts as part of
             your response-essay/journal grade.)
W Aug 23      Before class, read SM Chapters 1 and 2 (pp. 30-56)
             Note: Read the entire Dyson book this week, and as we discuss individual
             chapters, reread those chapters the night before class.


WEEK 2
M Aug 28     Before class, read Dyson ix-52. Quiz over Preface and Chapters 1-3 of
             Dyson. (Future reading quizzes may not be announced; they may be “pop”
             quizzes.)
W Aug 30     Continue discussing Dyson Discuss writing summaries and assignment
             for Essay #1.


WEEK 3
M Sep 4      Labor Day holiday. No class.
T Sep 5     Last Day to drop without a grade.
W Sept 6    Discuss Dyson Chapters 4-6. Peer review for Essay #1; bring a typed
             draft to class.


WEEK 4
M Sept 11   Formal Essay #1 due at the beginning of class. Before class, read SM
             Chapter 11, 236-55. Continue discussing Dyson Chapters 4-6.
W Sept 13    Discuss Dyson Chapters 5-7. Before class, do the exercises 34.1 and 34.2
             in SM Chapter 34, 636-44, on subject-verb agreement.


WEEK 5
M Sept 18    Before class, read SM Chapter 13, 264-300. Also read SM Chapter 39 on
             comma splices and fused sentences, and do Exercises 39.1 and 39.2 before
             class. Discuss Essay #2 assignment.
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W Sept 20     Peer review for Essay #2. Bring a typed draft to class. Discussion:
               Acknowledging other writers. Before class peruse SM Chapter 20,
               “Documenting Sources: MLA Style.”


WEEK 6
M Sept 25     Formal Essay #2 due. Discuss Dyson Chapters 8-10 and Afterword .
W Sept 27      Before class, read SM 40 on fragments, and do the Exercises 40.1 and
               40.2. Begin discussing other views of the Katrina disaster.

Note: Many of the readings assigned for Weeks 7-15 will be newspaper articles,
magazine articles, or scholarly essays that we will discover during the course of our class
research into the Hurricane Katrina disaster. These essays will be announced in class,
and the syllabus updated as readings are chosen.


WEEK 7
M Oct 2       Tentative date for library orientation.
W Oct 4       Quiz on Grammar: SM Chapts 34, 39, and 40. Workshop: Effective
               paragraphs. Before class, read SM Chapter 5, “Developing Paragraphs,”
               113-46. Discuss Essay #3 assignment.

WEEK 8
M Oct 9       Write Formal Essay #3 in class.
W Oct 11       Discuss logical fallacies. Before class, reread SM Chapter 11, especially
               240-54.


WEEK 9
M Oct 16       Discuss Essay #4 assignment. Before class, read SM 48 on commas, and
               do the Exercises 48.1- 48.7 (all exercises).
W Oct 18       Essays on Hurricane Katrina (TBA)

WEEK 10
M Oct 23      Peer review for Out-of-Class Essay #4.
W Oct 25        Essays on Hurricane Katrina (TBA). Also read SM Chapter 52 on
               quotations marks, and do Exercises 52.1 and 52.2.
R Oct 26      Last day to withdraw from the course (6p.m.).


WEEK 11
M Oct 30 Essay #4 due. Workshop: Integrating borrowed material. Before class,
           read SM Chapter 17, “Integrating Sources into Your Writing,” 380-92. 
W Nov 1 GRAMMAR QUIZ 2: SM Chapters 48 and 52. In class, discuss Essay
           #5 assignment.
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WEEK 12
M Nov 6      Essays on Hurricane Katrina (TBA).
W Nov 8      Essays on Hurricane Katrina (TBA).


WEEK 13
M Nov 13    Peer review for Essay #5.      Discuss
W Nov 15     Discuss revising to avoid plagiarism. Review SM Ch 20, “Documenting
             Sources: MLA.”


WEEK 14
M Nov 20    Essay #5 due.
W Nov 22     Thanksgiving Holiday. No class


WEEK 15
M Nov 28     Discuss Essay #6 assignment for final exam.
W Nov 29     Last day of regular classes. Discuss readings for the final examination.
             Do course evaluations.


WEEK 16
W Dec 13    Essay #6, to be written during the final exam period(required). 4:00-
             6:30 p.m.

      Grades will be available 12:00 noon December 20 online at e-services on
                                   www.uhd.edu.
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                             ENGLISH 1301, FALL 2006
                                 Diagnostic Essay
                                 August 21, 2006

                      Instructions: Read the following topic and then write an essay
                      expressing your views, using the allotted time to demonstrate your
                      best writing skills. You may complete the essay on the computer,
                      or you may write it by hand legibly on these sheets. Give your best
                      effort, using the time allotted to plan, write, and edit your essay.

                      This essay will not receive a letter grade, but counts as one your
                      mini response essays and journal entries. I will use it to determine
                      your current writing skills and will compare it to later essays to see
                      what progress you are making in the course.


Topic: In the last decade, citizens of the United States have debated such issues as
welfare reform, national medical insurance and socialized medicine, private school
voucher systems, privatizing Social Security, and the role of federal agencies such as
FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Administration) during disasters. The
underlying question for all these debates is what role the federal government should play
in providing services such as health care, education, and law enforcement. When people
argue about whether the government should provide health insurance to uninsured
Americans or about whether FEMA should have done more for victims of Hurricane
Katrina or that the Federal government should have intervened earlier, they are really
arguing about what a government should do for its people and what government should
be.

In your opinion, what does the federal government (as opposed to the state or city
government) owe its citizens? What should the U.S. federal government be responsible
for, and why? In other words, what should the government do, and what should it not
do? Be sure to use pertinent specific examples to support your views.



                                English 1301, Fall 2006
                            Essay #2: Definition Argument


First Draft:   Peer Review will be Wednesday, September 20, 2006. Bring two copies
               of your essay in-progress (one for you and one for your peer-review
               partner).

Final Draft:   The final draft is due at the beginning of class on Monday, September
               25. Turn in your rough draft (the one with peer-review comments) with
               the final draft.
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Format:                Typed in a standard 12-point font on standard printer paper,
                       double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Type your
                       name and the date in the top left corner. Center the title of the
                       essay three lines above the body of the essay. Beginning with the
                       second page, number your pages in the top right corner. If you are
                       using Microsoft Word, open the header and insert page numbers
                       there.

Length:                700-750 words (about 3 typed pages)

Assignment: How should the term government be defined? What should a national
            government do for its citizens? What are its responsibilities?

        For your first argumentative essay, you will write about a term whose meaning
many people take for granted: government. In Come Hell or High Water, Michael Eric
Dyson dedicates a lot of his argument to addressing the failures of the local, the state, and
especially the federal government during the Hurricane Katrina crisis of 2005.
Throughout his book, he discusses the failures of the various government officials and
thus implies a definition of government; he defines how governments should relate to
those they govern through what is a referred to as a social contract. Not everyone agrees
with the way Dyson defines government. Here is your chance to join the debate! In a
formal essay, argue for the definition that you believe we should use for government.
What should a government be? How should it relate to its citizens? What are its
responsibilities? What should be excluded from the definition?

       As part of your essay, you should discuss Dyson’s views, giving credit to him
when you borrow or refer to one of his ideas, and being sure to indicate when you are
quoting his own words.

        To prepare for your essay, consider the three different types of definitions we
will discuss in class:
              Formal definitions: what larger class does the thing belong to, and how
               does it differ from other members of its class? For this assignment, use
               the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), available on-line at UHD at
               http://dictionary.oed.com/entrance.dtl.
              Operational definitions: what does the thing do or under what conditions
               does it come about? That is, how does the ideal government work? This
               operational definition will be crucial to your argument.
              Definitions by example: what are the individual members of the class
               being defined, and what are the features of members of the class? (That is,
               what are some particular examples of government that fit your definition
               and possibly some negative examples, i.e., examples that fail to live up to
               your definition?)
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Considering the term government from each of these perspectives will help you develop
the most convincing definition argument. Incorporate all three types into your final draft.


     As you plan your essay and decide how to organize it, also keep in mind the
common features of the definition essay, which your essay will need:
                  A thesis (your main claim) involving a question of definition
                  A presentation of a generally accepted definition (perhaps one from a
                   reliable dictionary) of the term in question (government).
                  A presentation of other controversial definition that pertain to your
                   definition. In this case, you will discuss the way Michael Eric Dyson
                   defines government in Come Hell or High Water. How do his
                   expectations of the government compare to yours?
                  An examination of your claim about the meaning of government in light of
                   the other definitions. (That is, how does your definition differ from the
                   accepted definition and/or Dyson’s definition?)
                  Evidence for all the claims you make in the essay
                  An acknowledgement and consideration of other points of view and
                   counterarguments (i.e., possible objections to your claims). Be sure to
                   acknowledge Dyson and the dictionary definition that you use.
                  A discussion of the implications of your new definition of the term. For
                   example, you might discuss what the new, improved definition does for us
                   that the old one didn’t, what the new definition tells us about how the
                   federal, state, or local governments performed in Katrina or other
                   disasters, or whether the new definition signifies a change for the better or
                   for the worse.


                                           Essay #4
                              Out-of-Class Expansion of Essay #3


First Draft:       Peer Review will be Wednesday, October 23. Bring two copies of your
                   essay in-progress (one for you and one for your peer-review partner).

Final Draft:       The final draft is due at the beginning of class on Wednesday, November
                   1, 2006. Turn in your rough draft (the one with peer-review comments)
                   with the final draft.

Format:                   Typed in a standard 12-point font on standard printer paper,
                          double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Type your
                          name and the date in the top left corner. Center the title of the
                          essay three lines above the body of the essay. Beginning with the
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                        second page, number your pages in the top right corner. If you are
                        using Microsoft Word, open the header and insert page numbers
                        there.

Length:                 1,000-1,250 words (about 4-5 typed pages)

Sources:                You are required to use and cite information from Michael Eric
                        Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water as well as information from at
                        least one newspaper or magazine article. (You may use more
                        sources, but you must cite all of them.) Document sources using
                        the MLA-style

Assignment:

Expand your Essay #3 by developing your thesis and supporting your claims with
additional, reliable information obtained from Dyson’s book and from at least one other
source (a newspaper, magazine, or journal article on the topic). As part of your expanded
essay, consider and discuss the alternative perspectives and possible objections to your
claims (counterarguments).


Essay #3 topics were:

Write an argumentative essay supporting one of the following topics:

(1) Why the federal government should prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(2) Why the federal government should not prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(3) Why the federal government should support rebuilding New Orleans but should insist
on changes in architecture, purpose, or location of the rebuilt areas.

(4) Why Katrina evacuees are the responsibility of the city of Houston; why Houston and
Houstonians should continue to support Katrina evacuees who have relocated here.

(5) Why Katrina evacuees should not be the responsibility of the city of Houston.



What your essay should include:
     As you plan your essay and decide how to organize it, also keep in mind the
common features that your essay will need:
              A thesis (your main claim) involving your stand on the Katrina-related
               issue. State this thesis in your introduction.
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                  An organizational pattern that uses paragraphs to manage the flow of
                   information in the essay. Use strong topic sentences at the beginning of
                   body paragraphs to help readers navigate your essay.
                  Clearly stated reasons for your position.
                  Reliable, logical supporting evidence: facts, statistics, authoritative
                   quotations, pertinent analogies, etc.
                  An acknowledgement and consideration of other points of view and
                   counterarguments (i.e., possible objections to your claims). Be sure to
                   acknowledge when/if you use someone else’s published ideas or words.
                   Don’t wait until the conclusion to present these other views.
                  A conclusion that wraps up your argument and/or challenges your readers
                   to act or take a stand.
                  Information from reliable sources, correctly documented, to support your
                   claims
                           One source needs to be Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water.
                           One source needs to be a pertinent newspaper, magazine, or
                            journal article.
                  A Works Cited page that is formatted in the MLA-style.




                                           Essay #4
                              Out-of-Class Expansion of Essay #3


First Draft:       Peer Review will be Wednesday, October 25. Bring two copies of your
                   essay in-progress (one for you and one for your peer-review partner).

Final Draft:       The final draft is due at the beginning of class on Wednesday, November
                   1, 2006. Turn in your rough draft (the one with peer-review comments)
                   with the final draft.

Format:                   Typed in a standard 12-point font on standard printer paper,
                          double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Type your
                          name and the date in the top left corner. Center the title of the
                          essay three lines above the body of the essay. Beginning with the
                          second page, number your pages in the top right corner. If you are
                          using Microsoft Word, open the header and insert page numbers
                          there.

Length:                   1,000-1,250 words (about 4-5 typed pages)
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Sources:                You are required to use and cite information from Michael Eric
                        Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water as well as information from at
                        least one newspaper or magazine article. (You may use more
                        sources, but you must cite all of them.) Document sources using
                        the MLA-style

Assignment:

Expand your Essay #3 by developing your thesis and supporting your claims with
additional, reliable information obtained from Dyson’s book and from at least one other
source (a newspaper, magazine, or journal article on the topic). As part of your expanded
essay, consider and discuss the alternative perspectives and possible objections to your
claims (counterarguments).


Essay #3 topics were:

Write an argumentative essay supporting one of the following topics:

(1) Why the federal government should prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(2) Why the federal government should not prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(3) Why the federal government should support rebuilding New Orleans but should insist
on changes in architecture, purpose, or location of the rebuilt areas.

(4) Why Katrina evacuees are the responsibility of the city of Houston; why Houston and
Houstonians should continue to support Katrina evacuees who have relocated here.

(5) Why Katrina evacuees should not be the responsibility of the city of Houston.



What your essay should include:
     As you plan your essay and decide how to organize it, also keep in mind the
common features that your essay will need:
              a thesis (your main claim) involving your stand on the Katrina-related
               issue. State this thesis in your introduction.
              an organizational pattern that uses paragraphs to manage the flow of
               information in the essay. Use strong topic sentences at the beginning of
               body paragraphs to help readers navigate your essay.
              clearly stated reasons for your position.
              reliable, logical supporting evidence: facts, statistics, authoritative
               quotations, pertinent analogies, etc.
                                                                         c22c57a4-757c-
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                  an acknowledgement and consideration of other points of view and
                   counterarguments (i.e., possible objections to your claims). Be sure to
                   acknowledge when/if you use someone else’s published ideas or words.
                   Don’t wait until the conclusion to present these other views.
                  a conclusion that wraps up your argument and/or challenges your readers
                   to act or take a stand.
                  information from reliable sources, correctly documented, to support your
                   claims
                           One source needs to be Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water.
                           One source needs to be a pertinent newspaper, magazine, or
                            journal article.
                  a Works Cited page that is formatted in the MLA-style.




                                          Essay #4
                             Out-of-Class Expansion of Essay #3


First Draft:       Peer Review will be Wednesday, October 25. Bring two copies of your
                   essay in-progress (one for you and one for your peer-review partner).

Final Draft:       The final draft is due at the beginning of class on Wednesday, November
                   1, 2006. Turn in your rough draft (the one with peer-review comments)
                   with the final draft.

Format:                   Typed in a standard 12-point font on standard printer paper,
                          double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Type your
                          name and the date in the top left corner. Center the title of the
                          essay three lines above the body of the essay. Beginning with the
                          second page, number your pages in the top right corner. If you are
                          using Microsoft Word, open the header and insert page numbers
                          there.

Length:                   1,000-1,250 words (about 4-5 typed pages)

Sources:                  You are required to use and cite information from Michael Eric
                          Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water as well as information from at
                          least one newspaper or magazine article. (You may use more
                          sources, but you must cite all of them.) Document sources using
                          the MLA-style

Assignment:
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Expand your Essay #3 by developing your thesis and supporting your claims with
additional, reliable information obtained from Dyson’s book and from at least one other
source (a newspaper, magazine, or journal article on the topic). As part of your expanded
essay, consider and discuss the alternative perspectives and possible objections to your
claims (counterarguments).


Essay #3 topics were:

Write an argumentative essay supporting one of the following topics:

(1) Why the federal government should prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(2) Why the federal government should not prioritize rebuilding New Orleans.

(3) Why the federal government should support rebuilding New Orleans but should insist
on changes in architecture, purpose, or location of the rebuilt areas.

(4) Why Katrina evacuees are the responsibility of the city of Houston; why Houston and
Houstonians should continue to support Katrina evacuees who have relocated here.

(5) Why Katrina evacuees should not be the responsibility of the city of Houston.



What your essay should include:
     As you plan your essay and decide how to organize it, also keep in mind the
common features that your essay will need:
              A thesis (your main claim) involving your stand on the Katrina-related
               issue. State this thesis in your introduction.
              An organizational pattern that uses paragraphs to manage the flow of
               information in the essay. Use strong topic sentences at the beginning of
               body paragraphs to help readers navigate your essay.
              Clearly stated reasons for your position.
              Reliable, logical supporting evidence: facts, statistics, authoritative
               quotations, pertinent analogies, etc.
              An acknowledgement and consideration of other points of view and
               counterarguments (i.e., possible objections to your claims). Be sure to
               acknowledge when/if you use someone else’s published ideas or words.
               Don’t wait until the conclusion to present these other views.
              A conclusion that wraps up your argument and/or challenges your readers
               to act or take a stand.
                                                                         c22c57a4-757c-
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                  Information from reliable sources, correctly documented, to support your
                   claims
                           One source needs to be Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water.
                           One source needs to be a pertinent newspaper, magazine, or
                            journal article.
                  A Works Cited page that is formatted in the MLA-style.


                                       Essay #5
         Taking an Alternative Position to Your Own Argument from Essay #4

First Draft:       Peer Review will be Monday, November 20. Bring two copies of your
                   essay in-progress (one for you and one for your peer-review partner).

Final Draft:       The final draft is due at the beginning of class on Monday, November 28,
                   2006. Turn in your rough draft (the one with peer-review comments) with
                   the final draft, and turn in a copy of Essay #4.

Format:                   Typed in a standard 12-point font on standard printer paper,
                          double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Type your
                          name and the date in the top left corner. Center the title of the
                          essay three lines above the body of the essay. Beginning with the
                          second page, number your pages in the top right corner. If you are
                          using Microsoft Word, open the header and insert page numbers
                          there.

Length:                   1,250 words (about 5 typed pages)

Sources:                  You are required to use and cite information from Michael Eric
                          Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water as well as information from at
                          least one newspaper or magazine article. (You may use more
                          sources, but you must cite all of them.) Document sources using
                          the MLA-style.

Value:                    This essay is worth 20% of your final grade. (Don’t blow it off.)

Assignment:

        In Essay #5, you will take an alternative position on the same issue you addressed
in Essay #4, arguing against your own position from the earlier essay. Your thesis will
be you position plus your principle reasons for supporting that position. Support your
claims with additional, reliable information obtained from Dyson’s book and from at
least one other source (a newspaper, magazine, or journal article on the topic). You
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should treat your earlier supporting reasons as the counterarguments or possible
objections you must consider, refute, or make concessions to in your Essay #5.

        Choose reasons and evidence that best support your thesis. You do not
necessarily have to refute the reasons you gave in Essay #4 for supporting a different
position. For example, imagine that you argued in Essay #4 that the government should
invest in rebuilding New Orleans and focus on expanding economic opportunities for
residents. Your main reason for supporting this view was that New Orleanians are
American citizens whom the government should protect and support, and that
Houstonians would expect the same if the disaster befell us here. In Essay #5, you want
to argue that the federal government should spend the money instead on relocating
residents to other locations because New Orleans will just be hit again with another
devastating disaster. In #5, you don’t have to deny your previous claims that the
government owes its citizens protection; instead, in this case, you could still say the
government owes citizens protection—but rebuilding New Orleans when it’s only going
to be destroyed again is not really protecting New Orleanians or the taxpayers in the rest
of the nation. Etc. (This is just an example of using the same warrants, or underlying
values, to support a different argument.)


WHAT YOUR ESSAY SHOULD INCLUDE:
     As you plan your essay and decide how to organize it, also keep in mind the
common features that your essay will need:
              A thesis (your main claim) involving your stand on the Katrina-related
               issue. State this thesis in your introduction. The thesis for #5 will differ
               dramatically from the thesis of #4 because you will be taking an
               alternative position to the one you previously argued.
              An organizational pattern that uses paragraphs to manage the flow of
               information in the essay. Use strong topic sentences at the beginning of
               body paragraphs to help readers navigate your essay.
              Clearly stated reasons for your position.
              Reliable, logical supporting evidence: facts, statistics, authoritative
               quotations, pertinent analogies, etc.
              An acknowledgement and consideration of other points of view and
               counterarguments (i.e., possible objections to your claims). Some of these
               other points of view may be the arguments you made previously in Essay
               #4. Be sure to acknowledge when/if you use someone else’s published
               ideas or words. Don’t wait until the conclusion to present these other
               views.
              A conclusion that wraps up your argument and/or challenges your readers
               to act or take a stand.
              Information from reliable sources, correctly documented, to support your
               claims
                                                                         c22c57a4-757c-
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                          One source needs to be Dyson’s Come Hell or High Water.
                          One source needs to be a pertinent newspaper, magazine, or
                           journal article.
                 A Works Cited page that is formatted in the MLA-style (see SM Chapter
                  20).

THESIS FORMULA:

Thesis = your topic + your position + your major reasons

Example:          gun control
                  Stricter gun control is necessary.
                  The US Congress should strengthen gun control laws because without it,
                  too many criminals and irresponsible individuals get possession of lethal
                  weapons, resulting in a large number of preventable deaths every year.



ENGLISH 1301 SUMMARY ESSAY ASSIGNMENT


Polished Final Draft: Monday, September 11, 2006.
First Draft Due:         Wednesday, September 6, 2006. Print out a copy before class.
                         We will conduct a peer review during class.
Audience:                Your immediate audience is your classmates and your instructor.
                         However, your hypothetical audience includes college-educated
                         people interested in Hurricane Katrina who have not yet read
                         Michael Eric Dyson’s book, Come Hell or High Water.
Length:                  600 words/2-pages.
Format:                  Typed in a standard 12-point font, double-spaced, with one-inch
                         margins, your name and the date typed in the top left corner of the
                         first page, numbered pages after page 1, and a title.
Style:                   Semi-formal, using standard grammar. Avoid using slang and
                         second-person pronouns (“you” and “your”). Also, since this is a
                         summary (which never contains the summary writer’s personal
                         views), do not use the personal pronouns I or me.
Value:                   10% of your final grade.
Late penalties:          3 points per each calendar day.

ASSIGNMENT:
                                                                         c22c57a4-757c-
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        Choose one of the eligible chapters from Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane
Katrina and the Color of Disaster, and then write an explanatory summary of that
chapter. Be sure to write the summary essay in your own words, using direct quotations
from the original only sparingly when and only when you cannot avoid quoting. Your
essay should include an acknowledgment of the author, the name of the book, and the
chapter you are summarizing. Your summary should be comprehensive, brief, accurate,
objective, and clear.

       The chapters you may choose from are:
          Chapter 1, “Unnatural Disasters: Race and Poverty”
          Chapter 2, “Does George W. Bush Care About Black People”
          Chapter 3, “ The Politics of Disaster”
          Chapter 4, “Hurricanes and Hesitation”
          Chapter 6, “Follow the Leader?”
          Chapter 7, “Guns and Butter (or FEMA-nizing Disaster”
          Chapter 9, “Frames of Reference: Class, Caste, Culture, and Cameras”
          Chapter 10, “Supernatural Disasters? Theodicy and Prophetic Faith”

STRATEGIES FOR WRITING:

          Read the chapter you have chosen carefully, making annotations and
           highlighting important points.
          Find Michael Eric Dyson’s main point (or thesis), and then look for the main
           supporting ideas or evidence.
          Break the essay down into its parts (that is, is it broken up into sections? If so,
           what’s the main point within each section?)
          After breaking it down into its main parts, and deciding the main idea of each
           part, decide how each part relates to the whole.
          Work on restating this information in your own words.
          Reread the chapter once more before outlining and drafting your summary.
          Once you have a complete draft, read Dyson’s chapter once again to make
           sure you have captured his ideas accurately and completely. Do not leave out
           any major ideas.

QUALITIES OF GOOD SUMMARIES:
        Comprehensiveness—they cover all of the original text, not just the first few
         pages or paragraphs.
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        Brevity—summaries are always brief; that is, they are shorter than the original
         text they summarize.
        Accuracy—summaries present the ideas and information contained in the
         original. The summary writer does not misrepresent or misstate the content of
         the original.
        Neutrality (or objectivity)—the summary writer presents only ideas and
         information contained in the original and does NOT present his or her own
         opinions about the content of the original text or how it was written. In other
         words, as a summary writer, you are not going to pass judgment on the ideas
         or information contained in the original, no matter how strongly you feel
         about that information. Other types of writing assignments will allow you to
         discuss your reactions Dyson’s ideas, but a summary must stick to the
         contents of the original.
        Independent clarity—the summary must make sense by itself. In other words,
         the reader of your summary must be able to understand it without having to
         read the chapter in Dyson’s book.



WHAT TO EXPECT IN ENGLISH 1302
By Jane Creighton

English 1302 builds intensively upon the rhetorical and argumentative skills you learned
in 1301, with a fundamental emphasis on the steps you must take to organize and develop
an effective research paper. You will be required to read a number of essays both as a
class and on your own. This reading will serve as the groundwork for the development of
your ability in at least three ways:

   1. to understand accurately the structure and content of published writing.
   2. to respond to that writing in an informed way, both in class discussion and in your
own writing.
   3. to form positions of your own based on good, critical reading.

You will practice how to summarize, paraphrase, and quote the ideas of others. You will
study how to critically analyze and evaluate the structure and content of essays. You will
learn how to avoid plagiarism of another's ideas and language through the proper use of
documentation as well as through the careful development of your own distinct ideas in
relation to what you have read. You will learn different ways to synthesize your critical
thinking with the ideas in the sources you are using--all in good essay form. And you will
spend a fair amount of time learning the ropes of library research, both in and out of
class.

Typically, there are four major papers in English 1302. They include a summary and/or
response paper, a two-source (sometimes more) informative or argumentative synthesis
paper, a critical analysis of a reading, and the lengthier research paper requiring the use
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of multiple sources, usually ranging from five to ten. In addition, expect weekly reading
and writing assignments, required rough drafts for all papers, peer reviews, and active
class discussion.

English 1302 is an immensely rewarding course for the student who participates
wholeheartedly. The course prepares you for the variety of challenges you will meet in
subsequent courses in whatever discipline you choose; reaching more broadly beyond
your school career, it is also meant to develop your power to speak out to the world
credibly and with authority on subjects you find to be important. As with English 1301,
however, it requires your commitment to being a successful student. Students learn a
great deal from each other in 1302. You have a responsibility to other class members as
well as to yourself to make the course as good as it can be. That means that you must
come to class and participate, do all assignments on time, and avoid falling behind .
Assignments cannot be done at the last minute and are always followed by other
assignments of increasing complexity. In this course, you have much to gain and much to
give through actively promoting your own success.

				
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