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					Strengthening
Prevention
Approaches
through Gender
Analysis:
Know Your
Epidemic
Relevance of Gender Analysis

   Gender analysis is central to understanding
    HIV/AIDS      transmission   and   initiating
    appropriate programmes of action

   Stereotypical gender roles and relations and
    gender inequality lead to vulnerability and risk
    generating behavior
Stereotypical Gender Roles and
Relations

   At-risk groups:
   MSM: Sexual practice counter to gendered
    expectations of masculine sexuality as
    heterosexual
   Sex workers and in particular female sex
    workers: Sexual practice counter to
    expectations of femininity- monogamy,
    romantic love, sexual conservatism and
    chastity
   Stigma and discrimination experienced by
    those who live counter dominant culture
    reinforced in law, in popular culture
   Stigma is one cause of HIV vulnerability
   HIV vulnerability: Limited ability to self-protect,
    double lives, sexual exploitation, limited access
    to protective and preventative services
   Gender norms and expectations shape the
    sexual behaviour of women and men in
    heterosexual relationships as well
Gender relations

   Heterosexual masculinity associated with
    sexual freedom, sexual adventure, sexual
    pleasure, rejection of homosexuality
    –   Behaviours driven by this dominant view of
        masculinity
            Early sexual initiation
            Multiple partnerships
            Risk taking
            Reluctant condom use
Gender Relations/Inequality and
Femininity

   Femininity associated variously with sexual
    submissiveness, sexual availability,
    expectations of fidelity, fertility, expectations of
    the male bread winner model
    –   Implications: limits on capacity/inclination to
        demand safe sex
    Gender Inequality: Vulnerability to gender-
     based violence in the private and public
     sphere; economic dependency
These features of Caribbean gendered
identities are important dimensions which have
to taken into account in devising prevention
strategies.
They can also undermine to some extent the
viability of the ABC strategy
Multi-sectoral, gender-responsive
programming

   Child protection: Legislation and enforcement;
    mandatory reporting; response protocols;
    education for cultural change to address
    impunity

   Violence against women and girls: Effective
    legal provisions and administration of justice;
    adequately resourced social services including
    shelters; social communications for zero
    tolerance
   Social protection: Support to most vulnerable
    households- single parent households to
    advance economic security
   Human rights: Removal of discriminatory laws
    and practices; advancement of anti-
    discriminatory legisaltion; enforcemenmt of
    protective legislation; access to sexual and
    reproductive rights
   Social Communications: Challenging Popular
    Culture
    –   Developing an ethical, values-based ABCD
    –   Autonomy
    –   Be Respectful
    –   Care
    –   Dignity
    –   Esteem -self

				
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posted:5/10/2013
language:English
pages:11