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Transition Signals

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					Transition Signals


   Why do we need them?
   Different types
   Punctuation
   Practice
Why do I need them?

   Transition signals make it easy for the reader
    to follow your ideas.
   They are like a road map for the reader,
    telling them how your ideas are related.
   Transition signals help the reader to know
    when you are giving a similar idea, an
    opposite idea, an example, a conclusion, etc.
Read this paragraph:

 When Marcita takes an exam, she follows a
certain procedure. She tries to find a seat in the
room away from others. She might sit at the
back of the room or sit in the front row. She gets
her supplies ready: pencils, pens, and paper.
Sometimes she brings things like a calculator or
textbook if the instructor permits them. She sits
quietly for a moment before the test begins. She
does this to relax and clear her mind.
Now compare it to this one:

   When Marcita takes an exam, she follows a certain
 procedure. First of all, she tries to find a seat in the
 room away from others. She might sit at the back of
 the room, for example, or sit in the front row. Then,
 she gets her supplies ready, such as pencils, pens,
 and paper. Sometimes she brings things like a
 calculator or textbook if the instructor permits them.
 Finally, she sits quietly for a moment before the test
 begins because it relaxes her and clears her mind.
Types of Transition Signals

   Transitions
    –   also called “sentence connectors”
   Coordinators
    –   FANBOYS
   Subordinators
    –   although, because, when, since, if, etc.
   Others
    –   Prepositions, Adjectives, Verbs
Different signals for different purposes

   addition
   comparison
   contrast
   example
   time order
   cause
   effect
   conclusion
Punctuation!

   Transitions
       - Usually at the beginning of a sentence.
       - Can also be at the end or in the middle.
       - Always separated from the rest of the
         sentence by commas.
       - Used with a semi-colon and comma to join two
         independent clauses.
    Transitions: Punctuation Examples


   However, sleeping too much can be detrimental
    to your health.
   Sleeping too much, however, can be
    detrimental to your health.
   Sleeping too much can be detrimental to your
    health, however.
   It’s important to get enough sleep; however, sleeping
    too much can be detrimental to your health.
Punctuation!

   Coordinators
       Always  used with a comma when
        they join two independent clauses.
   Example:
      I want to study art, but my parents want me to
        become an engineer.
       The company’s sales increased last year, so
        everyone got a raise.
Punctuation!

   Subordinators
       Introduce a dependent clause
       The dependent clause can be before
        the independent clause  use a
        comma after it.
       The dependent clause can be after the
        independent clause  do NOT use a
        comma
Subordinators: Punctuation Examples

   Although I love my mother-in-law, I don’t
    want to live with her.
   I like living in Seattle because I enjoy the
    beautiful scenery.
   Because I ride the bus to school, I am
    sometimes late for class.
Choose a transition to complete the
paragraph:



Lie detector tests are often used by police to
help determine guilt or innocence. _______,
these tests often are not very accurate, so
they can not be used in court.
Direct exposure to sunlight is dangerous
because the ultra-violet rays can lead to skin
cancer. __________, tanning booths,
because they also transmit ultra-violet
light, are just as dangerous as sunlight.
In the event of a heart attack, it is important
to first identify the symptoms. _______, call
911 or drive to the nearest emergency room.
Which transition signals will you
use to write your observation
paragraphs?

				
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