NEW PROGRAM PROPOSAL COVER SHEET - Office of the Provost ...-ag by yaofenji

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									                              GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY
        Graduate Council NEW Certificate, Concentration, Tack or Degree Program
                                Coordination/Approval Form
(Please complete this form and attach any related materials. Forward it as an email attachment to
the Secretary of the Graduate Council. A printed copy of the form with signatures should be
brought to the Graduate Council Meeting.
Title of Program/Certificate, etc: Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

Level (Masters/Ph.D.): Ph.D.
Please Indicate: __X___ Program ______ Certificate                    _______ Concentration_____

Description of certificate, concentration or degree program:
Please attach a description of the new certificate or concentration. Attach Course Inventory
Forms for each new or modified course included in the program. For new degree programs,
please attach the SCHEV Program Proposal submission.

Please list the contact person for this new certificate, concentration, track or program for
incoming students: Dr. Michael Bronzini, Chair, CEIE; 703-993-1675; mbronzin@gmu.edu

Approval from other units:

Please list those units outside of your own who may be affected by this new program. Each of
these units must approve this change prior to its being submitted to the Graduate Council for
approval.

Unit:                                    Head of Unit’s Signature:                 Date:



Unit:                                    Head of Unit’s Signature:                 Date:



Unit:                                    Head of Unit’s Signature:                 Date:



Unit:                                    Head of Unit’s Signature:                 Date:




Submitted by: Aimee Flannery______________________________ Email: aflanner@gmu.edu
Graduate Council approval: __________________________________ Date: _____________

Graduate Council representative: _______________________________ Date: _____________

Provost Office representative: _________________________________ Date: _____________


Program Approval Proposal form for Public Institutions     Page 1 of 27                      May 1, 2002
                        STATE COUNCIL OF HIGHER EDUCATION FOR VIRGINIA
                             PROGRAM PROPOSAL COVER SHEET


 1.   Institution                                        2. Program action (Check one):
                                                                  Spin-off proposal     ____
                                                                  New program proposal _X____
 George Mason University

 3. Title of proposed program                                                  4. CIP code

 Civil and Infrastructure Engineering

 5.   Degree designation                                 6. Term and year of initiation

 Doctor of Philosophy                                       Fall 2008

 7. Term and year of first graduates                     8. For community colleges: date approved by local
                                                            board
 Spring 2010

  9. Date approved by Board of Visitors                  10. For community colleges: date approved by
                                                            State Board for Community Colleges


  11. If collaborative or joint program, identify collaborating institution(s) and attach letter(s) of
      intent/support from corresponding chief academic officers(s)



  12. Location of program within institution (complete for every level, as appropriate). If any
      organizational unit(s) will be new, identify unit(s) and attach a revised organizational chart
      and a letter requesting an organizational change (see Organizational Changes--hotlink).

      School(s) or college(s) of __Volgenau School of Information Technology & Engineering

      Campus (or off-campus site) _Fairfax, VA____________________________

      Distance Delivery (web-based, satellite, etc.) _Not Applicable



  13. Name, title, telephone number, and e-mail address of person(s) other than the institution’s
      chief academic officer who may be contacted by or may be expected to contact Council staff
      regarding this program proposal.

 Dr. Michael Bronzini, Professor and Chair
 Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering
 Volgenau School of Information Technology & Engineering
 (703) 993-1675
 mbronzin@gmu.edu

Program Approval Proposal form for Public Institutions          Page 2 of 27                            May 1, 2002
Program Approval Proposal form for Public Institutions   Page 3 of 27   May 1, 2002
Description of Proposed Program

Introduction

The Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering of the Volgenau School
of Information Technology and Engineering proposes a new doctoral program to meet the needs
of our growing student body. Currently, the only options available at George Mason University
for students wishing to pursue a terminal degree in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering are the
Ph.D. in Information Technology and the Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy. The
current programs require students pursuing a concentration in Civil, Environmental, and
Infrastructure Engineering to study disciplines peripheral to the Civil Engineering discipline.
Despite this drawback our department has graduated on average two doctoral students per year in
the past several years and it is expected to see an increase in this graduation rate with the
approval of the proposed Ph.D. in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

The demand for Civil Engineering education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and in particular,
northern Virginia, has resulted in a constant increase in student enrollment in the CEIE
department over the past five years; total enrollment has more than doubled over this period. In
addition, the 100% placement annually of students in our internship program (often resulting in
more positions than students to fill the demand) points to the demand for Civil Engineers in the
workforce. The addition of the proposed Ph.D. in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering will help
to attract students wishing to pursue a terminal degree as well as new tenure track faculty who
recognize the need for such a degree as a requisite for growing a robust research program.

The CEIE Faculty have the expertise in several key areas of Civil and Infrastructure Engineering
including infrastructure security, water resources, sustainable design, environmental engineering,
transportation engineering, construction engineering and structural engineering to teach a full
range of classes to incoming doctoral students. These resources are already in place and faculty
have been utilizing these resources to advise and graduate doctoral students through the Ph.D. IT
and other doctoral programs available at GMU.

Background

The Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering established the Ph.D. in
Information Technology degree in 1985. The initial program was interdisciplinary in scope, and
spanned the departments represented at that time in the School. The program has been
successful and has attracted students in its interdisciplinary scope. As time went on,
concentrations were added to the program to reflect the diversity of departments and curricula in
the School. The concentrations provided a useful measure to gauge interest in specific
disciplines. As these specific disciplines grew in interest, three spinoff Ph.D. programs,
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, and Statistical Science were created.

The Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering was initially housed
within the Department of Systems Engineering and became an independent unit in 1996 as the
Urban Systems Engineering Program directly under the Dean of the School of Information
Technology and Engineering. In 1998, the Program was elevated to department status with the
name Department of Civil, Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering. The Department has
seen a consistent growth in both students and faculty members since the name change and as of
fall 2007 has an undergraduate and graduate student body of over 270 students and a faculty of
eight tenured and tenure-track faculty and 14 adjunct faculty members.

The CEIE department offers the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Civil and
Infrastructure Engineering (CIE) as well as two graduate certificates. To date, doctoral degrees
have been awarded to our students through the Ph.D. in Information Technology with a
concentration in Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering (CEIE) administered by
the Volgenau School, and through the Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy administered
by the Department of Environmental Science and Policy in the College of Science. The purpose
of this proposal is to create a new Ph.D. degree in CIE that would be administrated by the faculty
of the CEIE department. Upon acceptance of this proposal, it is presumed that the CIE
concentration of the IT Ph.D. of the Volgenau School would end, and students currently enrolled
in that concentration would be offered the opportunity to switch to the new Ph.D. program in
Civil and Infrastructure Engineering or be allowed to complete their studies through the Ph.D. in
IT program. The academic requirements of the new Ph.D. in CIE have been prepared and
submitted for approval by the Graduate Council.

Justification for the Proposed Program

The proposed Ph.D. in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering is needed for the following reasons:

   (1) Recruitment of students from within our undergraduate program or from outside
       institutions is difficult. Civil Engineering is a very mature discipline of study that is not
       often thought of in terms of Information Technology. With the only option currently
       available to civil engineering students of the Volgenau School being the Ph.D. in
       Information Technology, many of our students have elected to study elsewhere and it is
       difficult to quantify the number of students from outside institutions who have rejected
       applying for such a degree when seeking Civil Engineering education. The term
       “information technology” often brings to mind information systems, databases, artificial
       intelligence, advanced programming systems, and e-commerce. While civil engineers
       certainly use these technologies on a regular basis, without reference to their application
       to the civil engineering domain the degree is not as well recognized.
   (2) Civil engineering graduates of the Ph.D. in IT program have difficulty being competitive
       for faculty positions at other institutions, as their Mason degree is viewed as not being
       compatible with traditional civil engineering. Most faculty position announcements
       specify a Ph.D. in civil engineering as the preferred credential.
   (3) With the approval of this proposal, the CEIE department will be able to offer and
       administer a terminal degree thereby improving our ability to recruit, assess, and admit
       students we feel will excel in our program.
   (4) With our growing undergraduate and graduate student body, the CEIE department has
       undertaken several faculty searches in the past few years. Without a terminal degree
       offered through our department it is difficult to recruit new faculty who recognize the
       importance of doctoral students to grow the research and professional sides of our
       department. With this new degree, we are confident that new opportunities will emerge
       to grow and improve our department.


The greater Washington metropolitan area provides numerous opportunities for graduates of a
Ph.D. in CIE. Numerous government laboratories in the area currently employ professionals
with advanced degrees in civil engineering and will benefit from the additional graduates that are
expected to complete our program. The faculty of CEIE has developed working and academic
relationships with a variety of government agencies and laboratories such as the Federal
Highway Administration’s Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center and the Army Corps of
Engineers. The proximity to the federal government makes Mason well-positioned to be a major
provider of employees in civil engineering. In addition, with the continued growth of the land
development sector in northern Virginia, there is a need for graduates with advanced degrees to
analyze and interpret the impact on the infrastructure system and environment that underpins the
ever-expanding development along the east coast of the country.

Admission Requirements

All general Mason and specific Volgenau School admission requirements will continue to apply
to all applicants to the Ph.D. in CIE. Applicants should have a bachelor’s degree with an overall
Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.00 or master’s degree with an overall GPA of 3.50.
Students applying for the Ph.D. program typically have completed either a BS or MS degree in
civil engineering, environmental science, or related technical areas. Students without a BS or
MS in civil engineering are required to show proficiency at the undergraduate level in
hydraulics, construction management, structural mechanics, environmental engineering, and
transportation engineering. In addition, all applicants, including Mason undergraduates, must
submit the following:

       Official transcript of undergraduate and graduate course work

      Applicants whose native language is not English must submit official TOEFL results
       showing a minimum score of 575 for paper based, or 230 for computer based. A
       minimum score of 600 for paper based or 250 for computer based is required for students
       who wish to be considered for a graduate teaching assistantship

      Three letters of recommendation, with at least two from individuals with doctorates

      Recent resume

      Substantial statement of interest that includes a description of specific area of proposed
       dissertation research, contacts they have made with potential faculty advisors, and an
       explanation of career and research goals

      Official results of the GRE General Test are recommended for students with BS or MS
       degrees obtained outside the U.S.
Applicants will be encouraged to schedule an interview with the graduate coordinator or faculty
member in their proposed area of research. Admission decisions will be based on the student’s
qualifications and the availability of a faculty advisor. The application material will be reviewed
by the department doctoral committee and decisions made with input from appropriate faculty
members.

Curriculum

Coursework

The doctoral program requires a minimum of 72 graduate credits beyond the bachelor's degree.
Of these 72 credit hours, 24 credits are required of dissertation research.

Students entering the program with a MS degree in Civil Engineering will be required to
complete a minimum of 48 credit hours including the following:

    24 credits of coursework including
           o A minimum of 3 credits of statistics or operations research at the 500-level or
             above
           o 21 credits of CEIE courses numbered 600 or higher. At least 9 of the 21 credit
             hours must be numbered 700 or higher. No more than 6 credits of individualized
             reading courses are allowed. Course substitutions must be approved by both the
             Doctoral Dissertation Director and the CEIE department Chair.
           o A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required and no C grades are allowed in these 24
             credits
    A minimum of 12 credits of CEIE 998 Doctoral Dissertation Proposal
    A minimum of 12 credits of CEIE 999 Doctoral Dissertation


Students entering the program without a MS degree in Civil Engineering will be required to
complete an additional 24 credits of master level courses including:

    9 credits of fundamental Civil and Infrastructure Engineering courses including: CEIE
     601 Infrastructure Modeling, CEIE 605 Infrastructure Systems Analysis, CEIE 685 Civil
     Engineering Information Management
    An additional 15 credit hours of CEIE coursework at the 500-level or higher
    A minimum GPA of 3.50 is required and no C grades are allowed for these 24 credits


Students entering the program without a BS or MS degree in Civil Engineering Students will be
required to show proficiency at the undergraduate level in hydraulics, construction management,
structural mechanics, environmental engineering, and transportation engineering.
Example Schedule for Full-Time Student

The following is an example schedule for a full-time student pursing a Ph.D. in CIE. The
proposed schedule would include studies in the transportation area. In the proposed schedule,
the student is enrolled full-time and pursuing 6-9 credit hours per semester.

Year 1 Fall Semester
CEIE 670 Civil Engineering Decision Methods and Tools (3 credits)
CEIE 762 Transportation Systems Planning Models (3 credits)
CEIE 610 Construction Systems & Management (3 credits)

Year 1 Spring Semester
CEIE 663 Intelligent Transportation Systems (3 credits)
CEIE 686 Transportation System Security and Safety (3 credits)
PUBP 723 Metropolitan Transportation Policy (3 credits)

Student would sit for Qualifying Exams prior to start of 2nd year of study. Assuming he or she
passed, their plan of study would continue as follows.

Year 2 Fall Semester
STAT 554 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
CEIE 767 Traffic Engineering Modeling and Analysis (3 credits)
CEIE 998 Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (3 credits)

Year 2 Spring Semester
CEIE 998 Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (9 credits)

Student would submit and defend his or her dissertation proposal at the end of the spring
semester. Assuming the student successfully passed the dissertation proposal defense and
research competency exam, the student would begin his or her doctoral dissertation research in
the fall of his or her third year of study.

Year 3 Fall Semester
CEIE 999 Doctoral Dissertation (6 credits)

Year 3 Spring Semester
CEIE 999 Doctoral Dissertation (6 credits)

Student would submit and defend his or her dissertation at the end of the spring semester.
Assuming the student successfully passed the doctoral dissertation, he or she would be expected
to graduate at the end of three years. However, the student could also need additional time to
complete their dissertation and simply take additional credits of CEIE 999 as needed.

Qualifying Exams
Qualifying exams will be offered twice a year prior to the start of the fall and spring semesters.
The qualifying exam is intended to test the student’s familiarity with concepts presented at the
MS level or post-BS level and to serve as guidance for the dissertation director to help shape the
student’s course work needs at the Ph.D. level.

Students entering with an MS degree must take the qualifying exam upon completion of 18
credit hours of study. Students entering without an MS degree must take the qualifying exam
upon completion of 24 credit hours. The qualifying exam consists of a written exam taken in an
eight hour period, and an oral interview attended by an examining committee of at least five of
the CEIE Faculty. The qualifying exam may be repeated once. A student failing the qualifying
exam twice will be removed from the program.

The qualifying exam includes information from the following focus areas:
      Area A: Water & Environmental Engineering
      Area B: Information Technology & Computing in Civil Engineering
      Area C: Construction Engineering and Management
      Area D: Land Development Engineering
      Area E: Transportation Engineering
      Area F: Infrastructure & Security Engineering
      Area G: Structural Engineering

Prior to the exam, students are required to select two focus areas for examination. Ph.D. in IT
and Engineer Degree in IT candidates who wish to transfer to the CIE Ph.D. program who have
successfully completed two qualifying exams based on CEIE courses are not required to take the
CEIE qualifying exam.

Dissertation Committee

A dissertation committee is recommended to be formed within the first semester following
successful completion of the qualifying exams. The dissertation committee is to consist of the
dissertation director from the CEIE department, two or more faculty members from the CEIE
department and at least one committee member from outside the CEIE department. At least
three members of the committee are to be members of the Mason graduate faculty. The
composition of the dissertation committee must be approved by the CEIE department chair and
the Volgenau School Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies.

Research Competency Exam, Dissertation Proposal Defense

Students may not schedule their dissertation proposal defense (research competency exam)
before successful completion of the qualifying exam. Upon completing all course work and
successfully passing the qualifying exam, students are to present their written dissertation
proposal to their dissertation committee. The dissertation proposal defense includes a written
proposal and presentation of the intended direction of the dissertation research. The dissertation
proposal defense is not to include completed research, as the dissertation committee is to use the
dissertation proposal defense to provide input and guidance to the student prior to beginning
dissertation research. The dissertation proposal defense is also an opportunity for dissertation
committee members to examine the student’s knowledge in higher-level course work and
familiarity with existing and emerging research related to the student’s research area. The exam
is administered by the student’s dissertation committee and must be attended by all dissertation
committee members and the department chair.

In preparation for the dissertation proposal defense, the student shall prepare a written
dissertation proposal outlining the intended direction of the research and the review of existing
research previously published on the topic. The dissertation proposal shall be submitted to the
dissertation committee for review at least two weeks prior to the dissertation proposal defense
date. The dissertation proposal is then presented by the student as part of the research
competency exam. If a student fails the competency exam, the student may request to take the
exam again through a formal written request to the doctoral dissertation director within 60 days
of receiving notice of the exam result. If the student fails the competency exam and does not
request to take the exam again within 60 days of the original date, the student will be dismissed
from the Ph.D. program. After successful completion of this requirement the student is formally
admitted as a Ph.D. candidate.

Teaching Requirement

As one of the characteristics of a good researcher and scholar is to be able to express ideas and
concepts to a broader audience in a clear manner, each doctoral candidate will be required to
organize and deliver a series of lectures and recitations in the CEIE department to undergraduate
students. Working with his or her doctoral dissertation advisor, the candidate will gain
experience in the classroom that will benefit the student should he or she decide to pursue an
academic career or advanced research career.

Dissertation Research and Defense

Upon successful completion of the dissertation proposal, students are to conduct research under
the guidance of their dissertation director and dissertation committee members. Students are not
to schedule their dissertation defense sooner than two semesters after a successful proposal
defense. During the dissertation research period, students must present their research at least
once in the form of a departmental seminar. The dissertation must represent achievement in
research, must be a significant contribution to the field of civil engineering, and should be
deemed publishable in refereed journals. When the majority of the research has been completed,
the candidate is to submit a written draft dissertation to the doctoral dissertation committee and
schedule an oral pre-defense with the doctoral dissertation committee. The pre-defense is to be
attended by the doctoral dissertation committee and the department chair.

A final public oral defense may be scheduled no sooner than one month after the conclusion of
the predefense which will allow for a minimum of two weeks to advertise the defense. The final
defense is to be attended by the doctoral dissertation committee and the department chair. Upon
successful completion of the oral defense, students must submit a final publishable dissertation
that meets the guidelines specified by the Guide for Preparing Graduate Theses, Dissertations,
and Projects. If the student fails to defend the dissertation successfully, the student may request
a second defense following the same procedures as the initial defense. There is no time limit for
this request, other than the general time limits for the doctoral degree as per Mason policy. An
additional pre-defense is not required; however, the student is strongly advised to consult with
the committee before scheduling the second defense. If the student fails on the second attempt to
defend the dissertation, the student will be dismissed from the Ph.D. program. Following a
successful public defense and completion of the final form of the dissertation, the dissertation
committee recommends the candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.


Faculty

CEIE currently has eight tenured and tenure-track faculty. Their areas of research expertise are
given below. A short biography for each faculty member is provided at the end of this
document.

    Michael Bronzini, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair
     Freight Systems, Infrastructure Security, and Transportation Planning
    Tomasz Arciszewski, Ph.D., Professor
     Structural Engineering and Artificial Intelligence
    Mark Houck, Ph.D., P.E., Professor
     Water Resources and Environmental Systems
    Sharon deMonsabert, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor
     Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Design
    Aimee Flannery, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor
     Highway Safety and Operations
    Mohan Venigalla, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor
     Air Quality and Transportation Planning
    Michael Casey, Ph.D., P.E., Assistant Professor
     Construction Management
    Girum Urgessa, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
     Structural Engineering and Security

Learning Outcomes

Through the doctoral program, students will demonstrate their advanced knowledge of topics
related to both their specialty area within Civil and Infrastructure Engineering and also areas
such as statistics and operations research which most will utilize in the preparation of their
doctoral dissertations. Students will undergo a series of benchmarks in which their knowledge is
demonstrated through written exams, oral exams, and preparation of research reports for
publication in peer-reviewed journals and publications. Within 24 credit hours of enrollment
into the Ph.D. program, students are required to sit for a series of qualifying exams that will test
their ability to analyze data and recall methodologies and approaches to solving engineering
problems. Upon successful completion of qualifying exams, students will begin to develop their
area of study for their doctoral dissertation. Before fully committing to a particular topic area or
research approach, students will be required to defend their dissertation proposals to a committee
of no fewer than five members of the faculty. The dissertation proposal defense will also include
an oral examination of the student’s research competency to ensure that the student has the
knowledge and skills necessary to complete the proposed dissertation research. After successful
completion of the dissertation research, each student will be required to publish the dissertation
with the University Library system and present the dissertation research at a public presentation
attended by the doctoral committee as well. All of these benchmarks have been created to ensure
that the student emerge from the program an expert in the student’s chosen field and will
contribute to the advancement of the Civil and Infrastructure Engineering discipline.

The aforementioned benchmarks will be used to assess not only the success of individual
students within the proposed Ph.D. in CIE, but can also be used to assess the overall success of
the proposed program. Additional measures of success include the ability to attract top-rated
students who can successfully complete the proposed Ph.D. program in CIE. Over the past five
years the faculty of the CEIE department at GMU have served as dissertation directors for many
students who have graduated with doctoral degrees. Graduates of the Ph.D. in IT program are all
gainfully employed with advanced research laboratories, universities, and the government.
Currently faculty members are working with twenty students enrolled in doctoral studies. These
students would presumably move to the Ph.D. in CIE if the proposal is approved.

The success of the program will lay in the ability of faculty to attract students to the program, to
grow research expenditures, and to place graduates from the program in prominent positions
within industry and academia. Growth in Ph.D. graduates over the past nine years of existence
of the CEIE department demonstrates the demand for the program. However, progress will
continue to be tracked with the acceptance of the proposed program.

In addition, the CEIE department benefits from an advisory board of industry leaders within the
Civil Engineering Institute which helped to establish the CEIE department. The Civil
Engineering Institute has actively contributed to our understanding of the changing landscape of
the Civil Engineering industry through various on-going surveys, and we will continue to utilize
the Institute’s Board of Directors’ expertise to capitalize on emerging research needs and
monitoring of the satisfaction of employers with the graduates of our program.

Each student will demonstrate specific outcomes including:
    The ability to model and analyze complex civil engineering systems and concepts
    The ability to discover new and innovative solutions and successfully apply them to
       complex civil engineering systems
    The ability to explain and teach students civil engineering theories and concepts
    The ability to present and publish research ideas in national and international conferences
       and refereed journals

Assessment

The CEIE department successfully completed accreditation by ABET (Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology) of the undergraduate program in the summer of 2007. Though the
graduate programs are not subject to ABET accreditation, the same tools utilized to track student
performance and assess the overall delivery of the program will be utilized for the proposed
Ph.D. program.
In addition, the CEIE department is scheduled to complete an academic program review of our
M.S. degree by the George Mason University Office of Institutional Assessment in the fall of
2007. The review takes three semesters to complete and requires a self-assessment report, an
academic plan and proposed changes to be made to enhance the program to be written by faculty
who deliver the program. In addition, a report by an external review team is to be submitted.
These internal assessments will be utilized to improve the proposed Ph.D. program in future
years.

Expansion of an Existing Program

This is an expansion of an existing program. Currently the only option available to students
wishing to pursue a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering is the Ph.D. in IT with a concentration in CEIE.
Existing CEIE courses will serve students course requirements and the addition of the proposed
CEIE 998 and 999 will satisfy the doctoral dissertation requirement:

CEIE 998 Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (1-12:0:0) Formal record of commitment to doctoral
dissertation research under direction of faculty member in Civil Engineering. May be repeated
as needed. Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits of doctoral dissertation proposal
(CEIE 998) and 12 credits of dissertation research (CEIE 999). No more than 24 credit hours of
CEIE 998 and 999 may be applied to doctoral degree requirements.

CEIE 999 Doctoral Dissertation (1-12:0:0) Prerequisite: admission to candidacy. Formal record
of commitment to doctoral dissertation research under direction of faculty member in Civil
Engineering. May be repeated as needed. Students must complete minimum of 12 credits of
doctoral dissertation proposal (CEIE 998) and 12 credits of dissertation research (CEIE 999). No
more than 24 credits can be applied to doctoral degree requirements. Students cannot enroll in
CEIE 999 before their research proposal is accepted and approved by the dissertation committee.

Students currently enrolled in the Ph.D. in IT with a concentration in CEIE will be allowed to
transfer to the proposed Ph.D. in CIE. Students who have not yet taken qualifying exams will
simply need to request a change in degree program from the Ph.D. in IT to the Ph.D. in CIE.
Students who have taken qualifying exams will need to demonstrate proficiency in Civil
Engineering. For many, this may already have been accomplished if they sat for and passed two
of their four qualifying exams for the Ph.D. in IT in Civil Engineering topics. For students who
wish to change to the Ph.D. in CIE but did not sit for and pass two Civil Engineering qualifying
exams, they will need to sit for and pass the newly established Civil Engineering qualifying
exams as described above. Course requirements for students in the Ph.D. in IT and the Ph.D. in
CIE are similar, with the exception that students currently in the Ph.D. in IT will need to include
a 500-level or above Statistics course in order to satisfy the requirements of the proposed Ph.D.
in CIE.
Upon approval of the Ph.D. in CIE, the Ph.D. in IT with a concentration in CEIE will no longer
be available to new incoming students, instead these students will be considered for acceptance
into the Ph.D. in CIE program.

Collaborative or Standalone Program?
The proposed degree is a standalone program. No other institution of higher education, nor any
business or industry is involved in the development or operation.

Institutions in the Commonwealth Offering Similar Programs

The Commonwealth of Virginia only has two universities currently offering Ph.D. degrees in
Civil Engineering: The University of Virginia and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University (Virginia Tech). With the approval of the proposed Ph.D. in Civil and Infrastructure
Engineering at George Mason University, a new degree would be offered to students in the
Commonwealth, but more importantly give students in northern Virginia an opportunity to
pursue doctoral studies in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The current graduate program in
the CEIE department has attracted many students from the public and private sector and has
created on-site graduate programs at government agencies such as the Army Corps of Engineers.
Our offering of classes after 4:30 pm also makes our program attractive to full-time working
professionals.

The University of Virginia and Virginia Tech offer Ph.D. programs in Civil Engineering.
Enrollment statistics are as follows according to the latest SCHEV Enrollment Report:

                           University of Virginia                        Virginia Tech
     Year                 FTE              Graduates              FTE               Graduates
   1998-1999              13.0                 4                  57.3                  9
   1999-2000              14.5                 3                  53.0                 13
   2000-2001              16.2                 4                  60.0                 17
   2001-2002              22.7                 3                  60.5                 16
   2002-2003              24.6                 2                  67.0                 13
   2003-2004              28.0                 6                  79.9                 14
   2004-2005              24.3                 6                  88.8                 10

  Table 1 FTE and Graduation Totals for Comparable Degree Programs in the Commonwealth

Evidence that the Commonwealth Needs the Program and Employer Demand for
Graduates

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the demand for Civil Engineers will increase over
the next decade by approximately 9-17 percent and those Civil Engineers specializing in
environmental engineering (a specialty area of Civil Engineering) are expected to see higher than
average growth rates in jobs with expected employment growth exceeding 27 percent in the next
decade. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2004) With the
need for more Civil Engineers, there is an anticipated increase also in faculty to instruct these
additional students. Perhaps due to this forthcoming increased need for Civil Engineers, our
department has experienced a steady increase in student enrollment over the past several years
with a near 20 percent increase in enrollment between fall 2006 and fall 2007 in the CIE
program.
Evidence of Student Demand

A survey was conducted of our current students (both undergraduate and graduate) and a few of
our alumni to determine what demand there may be for the proposed Ph.D. in CIE. Through
conversations with our existing Ph.D. in IT students, most faculty members have reported that
these current students are anxious for the proposed Ph.D. in CIE to be approved so they can
change over to the new program. As stated earlier, in the Civil Engineering discipline, a Ph.D. in
IT is not well recognized and many of our students, while wanting to stay on at Mason, would
prefer to have their degree reflect their studies in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

The purpose of the survey was to gauge the reaction of our students to the proposed Ph.D. in
CIE. The surveys were e-mailed to students through our list-serve and some were distributed in
person. A total of 91 surveys were completed and returned. Of those surveyed, 56 students said
they would be interested in applying or enrolling in the Ph.D. in CIE program. Of those, the
majority (30 students) would elect to pursue the program as a part-time student. The
overwhelming majority (86 students) live in Virginia and intend to stay in the area for the next 3-
4 years (82 students). In addition, in a reflection of our student body, nearly 75 percent are
currently employed, reflecting their desire for part-time pursuit of advanced studies.

Overall the results are promising and demonstrate the desire of our current student population to
have a terminal degree in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering available to them.

 The results are show below. Students were also asked to provide written comments that are
included at the end of the survey questions and results.

                                                                                                      No
                                                                              YES          NO         Response
  1.   Would you be interested in applying or enrolling in a Ph.D. in Civil
       & Infrastructure Engineering? (If no, skip to question 3)               56          33             2

                                                                              FULL-      PART-
                                                                              TIME       TIME         NOT SURE
  2.   If yes, would you prefer to attend the program on a full-time or
       part-time basis?                                                        13          30            13

                                                                              YES          NO

  3.   Have you ever applied to an institution offering a similar program?      4          82

       If so, which program, at which school?
           Norwich University
           VA Tech

                                                                              YES          NO

  4.   Are you currently attending George Mason University?                    88           2

       If so, in what program?
           BS-CEIE - 42
        MS-CEIE - 44
        PhD-IT - 3
        SEOR - 1
                                                                                                      No
                                                                                 YES         NO       Response
5a.   FOR STUDENTS CURRENTLY IN MASON PHD PROGRAMS:
      If this program had been available when you initially applied to Mason,      2          0                  1
      would you have applied for admission to it?

                                                                                 YES         NO        MAYBE
      FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN APPLYING FOR A
5b.   PHD
      PROGRAM IN THE FUTURE: If this program becomes available
      when                                                                        45          9           2
      you apply to Mason, will you apply for admission to it?

                                                                                 YES         NO
5c.   FOR STUDENTS WHO LEFT MASON TO PURSUE EDUCATION
      ELSEWHERE: If this program had been available when you
      completed                                                                    5          3
      your current program, would you have applied for admission?

                                                                                 YES         NO
5d.   FOR STUDENTS WHO LEFT MASON BUT HAVE NOT PURSUED
      FURTHER EDUCATION: If this program had been available when you               7          3
      completed your current program, would you have applied for
      admission?

                                                                                Virginia   Maryland      DC

6.    In which state do you currently live?                                       86          2           1

                                                                                 YES         NO

7.    Do you plan to live in this state for the next three or four years?         82          9

                                                                                                      No
                                                                                 YES         NO       Response

8.    Are you currently employed? (If no, skip to question 14)                    68         22           1


                                                                                Virginia   Maryland      DC          R

9.    If you are employed, please identify the state in which you work.           60          2           5


                                                                                FULL-       PART-     No
                                                                                TIME        TIME      Response

10.   If you are employed, are you employed full-time or part-time?               35         32           1
                                                                                                   No
                                                                                        YES   NO   Response

       If you are employed, would the proposed program help you in your
 11.   work?                                                                            40    26       2


Comments Provided by Students’ Surveyed



While I am not interested in the PhD program myself, I think it is still a good idea.

I am currently an undergrad hoping to enroll in the MS program in the future.
After MS I am determined to go onto PhD, but for that I would have to switch
universities if Mason does not offer it by that time. It is very inconvenient that
Mason does not offer it.

I think that the Masters and the PhD programs need to provide more options
(classes) in Structural as well as Geotechnical engineering.

Great idea, just not for me.

I think the program would be good. I just have no plans at this time to get my PhD.

This would greatly enhance my credentials in my area of expertise. Should have
program that has civil with its focus.

Please keep students updated on the progress of this. What disciplines within
civil engineering would be available for study?

I might be interested in applying to this program further into the future. I would
like to focus on my career for now.

Let's build a great reputation for our BS and MS programs first. After that we can
worry about a PhD program.

Program seems good but I do not plan to get my PhD.

Great idea, but not for me most likely.

Interested, but not for a long time.

Offering the PhD program will give options for us Virginians in the DC metro area
to
have access to an in-state school.

I feel a PhD program can only help George Mason University. This university has
drastically improved, time to take it to the next level.
I believe this would be a great asset to the area (region), and due to the growth of
the
CEIE program, almost a necessity.

Personally, I don't plan to attend a PhD program in CEIE but everything new is
important and beneficial for society.

This is a great idea.

Just completing b/c numbers count…I'm non-degree, and not an engineer.



Projected Resource Needs

Full-time Faculty
The Department of Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering faculty members have a
wide variety of expertise within the Civil Engineering discipline and the ability to teach courses
in the proposed program. The faculty offer these existing courses through the Ph.D. in IT and as
a result, we do not anticipate needing to increase the faculty size to launch the Ph.D. in CIE.
However, with the continued growth in our student body, we are anticipating the need to
continue to grow the faculty to meet the needs of the increased demand for our undergraduate
and graduate programs. If the projected student FTEs are met for the proposed program this
would imply the need to increase the faculty size to meet student demand.

Part-time Faculty
The proposed program does not require any increase in part-time faculty.

Adjunct Faculty
The proposed program does not require any increase in adjunct faculty.

Graduate Assistants
Support of graduate assistants in the form of graduate assistantships is an essential component of
a successful Ph.D. program. Graduate assistants often serve as graduate teaching assistants and
graduate research assistants. Both the students and the faculty benefit from the inclusion of
graduate assistants in the department. Students benefit through financial and tuition support, and
by gaining research and teaching experience. Faculty benefit through their increased
productivity with the inclusion of doctoral students in their research and teaching areas.

Existing assistantships for the proposed Ph.D. in CIE are anticipated to include:

      Graduate research assistantships funded by sponsored research. On average, the CEIE
       faculty support four to five students annually. Through the proposed program, it is
       anticipated that faculty will be able to support eight to nine students annually within five
       years.
      Graduate teaching assistantships. Due to increased undergraduate enrollments, the CEIE
       department has seen an increase in the allocated teaching assistantships to six in the
       current academic year. It is anticipated that with our continued growth, within five years
       the number of teaching assistantships will increase to 10-12 students. It is anticipated
       that teaching assistantships will be used in the first year of a student’s doctoral program
       to allow them to determine their research interests.
      Graduate research assistantships funded by the school. The Volgenau School of
       Information Technology and Engineering provides new tenure track faculty with a new
       two-year GRA position. Given the anticipated continued growth in the CIE program, it is
       anticipated that an additional such position will be created in the next five years.
      Presidential Scholar’s Award. The Office of the Provost will provide one new three-year
       Presidential Scholar’s Award to the program to recruit highly qualified students. This
       award will generate one new assistantship each year over the next five years.

Classified Positions
The Department of CEIE currently employs one full-time classified staff member. It is
anticipated that the time required to administer the proposed program will be less than 10% of
the full-time classified staff person’s work week.

Targeted Financial Aid
No targeted financial aid will be offered for the proposed program.

Equipment
New full-time faculty will require a computer and office furniture.

Library
Current journal subscriptions are adequate to support the proposed program.

Telecommunications
Any new full-time faculty will require phone hardware and services.

Space
No new space is required to initiate and operate the program.

Other Resources
New full-time faculty will receive start up funds.
       SUMMARY OF PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS IN PROPOSED PROGRAM



                                        Projected enrollment:


     Year 1             Year 2             Year 3               Year 4        Target Year

2008 - 2009        2009 - 2010         2010 - 2011        2011 - 2012         2012 – 2013


HDCT      FTES     HDCT       FTES     HDCT      FTES     HDCT      FTES   HDCT   FTES   GRAD
 18        10       22         13       25        15       28        17     29     17      9




                        Definitions:

                        HDCT—fall headcount enrollment
                        FTES—annual full-time equated student enrollment
                        GRADS—annual number of graduates of the proposed program

Assumptions:
               90% Retention
               40% Full time students/ 60% Part time students
               Full time students taking 9 credit hours
               Part time student taking 4.5 credit hours
               Full time students graduate in 4 years
               Part time students graduate in 6 years
                PROJECTED RESOURCE NEEDS FOR PROPOSED PROGRAM

Part A: Answer the following questions about general budget information.

   Has or will the institution submit an addendum budget request
    to cover one-time costs?                                                       Yes_____ No_X__

   Has or will the institution submit an addendum budget request
    to cover operating costs?                                                      Yes_____ No__X__

   Will there be any operating budget requests for this program
    that would exceed normal operating budget guidelines (for
    example, unusual faculty mix, faculty salaries, or resources)?                 Yes_____ No__X__

   Will each type of space for the proposed program be within
    projected guidelines?                                                          Yes__X__ No_____

   Will a capital outlay request in support of this program be
    forthcoming?                                                                   Yes_____ No__X__

Part B: Fill in the number of FTE positions needed for the program.

                                  Program Initiation Year         Total Expected by Target Enrollment Year
                                        2008-2009                                2012-2013
                           Ongoing and
                            Reallocated            Added (new)         Added*            Total FTE Positions
Full-time Faculty               0.00                   0.00             1.00                     1.00
Part-time Faculty               0.00                   0.00             0.00                     0.00
Adjunct Faculty                 0.00                   0.00             0.00                     0.00
Graduate Assistants             6.00                   1.00             4.00                     11.0
Classified Positions            0.00                   0.00             0.00                     0.00
Total                           6.00                   1.00             5.00                    12.00
*Added after program initiation year

Part C: Estimated $$ resources to initiate and operate the program.


                                                                    Total Expected by Target Enrollment Year
                              Program Initiation Year 2008-2009                    2012-2013
                             Ongoing &              Added (New)         Added                Total Resources
                             Reallocated
Full-time Faculty
 Salaries                        $0                    $0              $90,000                  $90,000
 Fringe Benefits                 $0                    $0              $24,885                  $24,885
Part-time Faculty
 Salaries                        $0                    $0                 $0                       $0
 Fringe Benefits                 $0                    $0                 $0                       $0
Adjunct Faculty
 Salaries                       $0                $0                  $0                      $0
 Fringe Benefits                $0                $0                  $0                      $0
Graduate Assistants
 Salaries                    $114,000           $30,000             $141,000             $285,000
 Fringe                         $0                $0                   $                    $
Classified Positions
 Salaries                       $0                $0                  $0                      $0
 Fringe                         $0                $0                  $0                      $0
Total Personnel Costs
 Salaries                    $114,000           $30,000             $141,000             $375,000
 Fringe                         $0                $0                 $24,885              $24,885
TOTAL Personnel Costs
Equipment                       $0                $0                 $5,000               $5,000
Library                         $0                $0                   $0                   $0
Telecommunication Costs         $0                $0                 $1,000               $1,000
TOTAL                        $114,000           $30,000             $171,885             $405,885




Part D: Certification Statement(s)

The institution will require additional state funding to initiate and sustain this program.

        _____ Yes         _______________________________________________
                                   Signature of Chief Academic Officer

        __X__ No          _______________________________________________
                                   Signature of Chief Academic Officer

If “no,” please complete Items 1, 2, and 3 below.

1. Estimated $$ and funding source to initiate and operate the program.

                                         Program initiation year     Target enrollment year
         Funding Source                       2008 - 2009                2012 – 2013
 Reallocation within the                          $0                        $42,000
 department or school (Note below
 the impact this will have within the
 school or department.)
 Reallocation within the                        $30,000                        $90,000
 institution (Note below the impact
 this will have within the school or
 department.)
 Other funding sources                             $0                            $0
 (Please specify and note if these are
 currently available or anticipated.)
2. Statement of Impact/Other Funding Sources.
The Office of the Provost’s three-year Presidential Scholar’s Award is anticipated to be awarded
to a deserving Ph.D. in CIE student each year worth an estimated $30,000. By the target year
2012-2013, the provost’s commitment of Presidential Scholar’s award will be $90,000 per year.
The anticipated increase costs associated with new faculty will only be incurred if increases in
enrollment are achieved. Reallocation of teaching and research assistants will be made as
appropriate to support incoming doctoral students.

No additional resources will be sought from the Commonwealth of Virginia.

3. Secondary Certification.
If resources are reallocated from another unit to support this proposal, the institution will not
subsequently request additional state funding to restore those resources for their original purpose.

       _____ Agree      _______________________________________________
                               Signature of Chief Academic Officer

       _____ Disagree _______________________________________________
                             Signature of Chief Academic Officer
                                    Faculty Biographies

Michael, Bronzini, Ph.D., P.E., Professor, Department Chair and Dewberry Chair

Dr. Bronzini has been conducting research on transportation systems since 1970. His
current research interests include intelligent transportation systems, national transportation
networks and inter-modal systems, inland waterways, transportation cost and performance
models, and sustainable transportation systems and communities. He has produced more
than 180 papers, reports, and presentations about his research. He was appointed the first
holder of the Dewberry Chair in the School of Information Technology and Engineering at
George Mason University in August 1999, where he is continuing his career in research and
teaching, with a focus on innovative solutions to complex multi-modal transportation
systems problems.

From 1990 to 1999 Dr. Bronzini was Director of the Center for Transportation Analysis at
Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, overseeing an interdisciplinary
transportation research program with annual expenditures of $12.5 million. He was also
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Tennessee.

From 1986 to 1990, Dr. Bronzini was Professor and Head of Civil Engineering at Penn State
University. Dr. Bronzini went to Penn State from The University of Tennessee, where he was
Director of the Transportation Center and Professor of Civil Engineering. Prior to that he was
manager of the Transportation Analysis Group at CACI, Inc., a management consulting firm
in Arlington, Virginia. Earlier positions were Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering at the
Georgia Institute of Technology, and Research Assistant at The Pennsylvania State
University.

Dr. Bronzini holds the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Penn State and a B.S. degree from
Stanford University, all in Civil Engineering. He is a registered professional engineer and is a
member of the Transportation Research Board, where he has served on numerous
committees and panels. He is also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers,
Institute of Transportation Engineers, and several other societies. In 1982, he was the
national president of the Transportation Research Forum.


Tomasz Arciszewski, Ph.D., Professor

Dr. Arciszewski is currently involved in two areas of research: evolutionary design and
infrastructure security. In the first area he investigates various design paradigms, utilizing
both single- and multi-population evolution. His studies are in the context of a large class
of engineering design and planning problems, including structural design and homeland
security. In the second area, infrastructure security, he works on the development of a
conceptual and computational foundation for building tools for co-evolutionary design for
blast of steel structural systems. This research involves studies of behavior under blast of
steel frames with various types of connections.

Presently, the research of Dr. Arciszewski is supported mainly by grants from the Defense
Threat Reduction Agency. He has also received research grants from the National Science
Foundation, the NASA Langley Research Center, from various state funding organizations,
and from manufacturing companies, including Daimler Chrysler Corporation.

Dr. Arciszewski has published more than one hundred thirty research and technical articles
in various journals, books, and conference proceedings. He is also an inventor, with patents
in the areas of tall buildings and spaces structures, obtained in three countries (Canada,
Poland, USA).

In the professional arena, Dr. Arciszewski is active in the American Society of Civil
Engineers, where he recently served as the Chair of the Executive Committee of the Council
on Computing and Information Technology. He currently chairs the Executive Committee of
the ASCE Global Center of Excellence in Computing, which has members on all continents.
The Center is focused on the development of educational materials on computing in civil
engineering for worldwide distribution (the first five teaching modules are available for
downloading at (www.asceglobalcenter.org) and is planning to conduct various international
research projects. He also serves as a corresponding member on the ASCE International
Activities Committee, which mission is to plan and organize international activities for the
entire Society. Also, he is a corresponding member of the ASCE Body of Knowledge II
Committee, which develops the definition of the civil engineering body of knowledge as the
necessary and sufficient knowledge to practice civil engineering. Within this Committee, he
is active with three sub-committees, including those on globalization, design, and history
and heritage.

At George Mason University, Dr. Arciszewski teaches courses in the areas of structural
engineering and of design and inventive engineering. He has graduated seven Ph.D.
students, including two at George Mason University.

Dr. Arciszewski earned his B. Sc. and M. Sc. (Summa Cum Laude) in Structural Engineering
in 1970, and his PhD. in Technical Sciences in 1975, all from the Warsaw University of
Technology. Before joining George Mason University in 1994, he was an Associate Professor
at Wayne State University for 10 years. Prior to 1984, he held teaching positions at the
University of Nigeria (Department of Civil Engineering) and at the Warsaw University of
Technology (Department of Metal Structures). He has a formal background in the areas of
structural engineering and mechanics with hands-on design experience in steel space
structures and in general structural engineering gained in Poland and Switzerland.

In 2004, Dr. Arciszewski received the "ASCE Computing in Civil Engineering Award." Last
year, he received the "2006 Intelligent Computing in Engineering Award" from the European
Group for Intelligent Computing in Civil Engineering during an international conference in
Ascona, Switzerland.

Mark Houck, Ph.D., P.E., Professor

Dr. Houck was appointed Professor of Civil, Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering at
George Mason University in 1992. He is also an Affiliate Faculty in the Department of
Systems Engineering and Operations Research, and the Department of Environmental
Science and Policy. Previously, he held faculty appointments in Civil Engineering at the
University of Washington at Seattle (1976-78), and Purdue University (1978-91); and
visiting faculty appointments at The Johns Hopkins University (1989-90), and Heriot-Watt
University in Scotland (2003). In the private sector, he has served as an officer of two firms
specializing in water resources engineering. Dr. Houck is a Fellow of the American Society of
Civil Engineers (ASCE), a Diplomat of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers,
and was awarded the Huber Research Prize by ASCE. He is a Board Certified Environmental
Engineer, a registered Professional Engineer, and a Professional Hydrologist. He holds a
bachelor’s degree in engineering science (BES) and a doctor’s degree in environmental
engineering (PhD) from The Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Houck’s research and teaching interests include water and environmental systems
engineering. He has taught courses on statistics and probability; environmental economics;
systems analysis and engineering; mathematical modeling (optimization and simulation) of
complex engineering systems; operations research; urban systems engineering; and all
aspects of water management and engineering, including hydrology, hydraulics, and water
resources. His most recent research work has been in the area of water and wastewater
infrastructure security.

Sharon deMonsabert, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor

Dr. deMonsabert received the B.S. from the University of Maryland in 1979, and the Ph.D.
from Purdue University in 1982, both in Civil Engineering. She is a member of the American
Society of Civil Engineers, the American Waterworks Association, the American Society for
Engineering Education, the Water Environment Foundation, and the Society of American
Military Engineers (SAME). She is a faculty mentor for the student post of SAME.

Dr. deMonsabert is a registered Professional Engineer in the state of California. She is the
owner of Applied Engineering Management Corporation and has been on the faculty of
George Mason University (GMU) since 1993. She currently serves as a representative to the
faculty senate and athletic council. She is also a Bachelor of Individualized Studies mentor.

Dr. deMonsabert’s broad research interests include environmental systems analysis,
engineering management, water quality modeling, technical entrepreneurship, and
sustainable development. She developed a certificate program for the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers called Technical Entrepreneurship in the Federal Government.

Aimee Flannery, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor

Dr. Aimee Flannery is a transportation engineer specializing in highway operations, level of
service analysis and safety analysis. Dr. Flannery has 14 years of research and teaching
experience in traffic engineering and geometric design, safety analysis, and qualitative
research. She is currently a Member of the TRB’s Highway Capacity and Quality of Service
Committee, and serves as the Chair Quality of Service Task Force. Dr. Flannery has
conducted research in the area of highway operational analysis, urban street performance
modeling, multi-modal quality of service/level of service, identification of performance
measures, survey methods, Intelligent Transportation Systems, and safety performance and
analysis. Dr. Flannery earned her BS and MS in Civil Engineering from Wayne State
University and her Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University. She is a registered
engineer in the State of Michigan.

Dr. Flannery is currently serving as the Principal Investigator for George Mason University
on NCHRP 3-70, Multimodal Level of Service Analysis for Urban Streets. Through her role
as Principal Investigator for George Mason University, Dr. Flannery has experience in project
management, developing large scale data collection plans, coordinating large teams of
researchers and students, database development, statistical modeling and analysis, data
analysis and report writing. Dr. Flannery also serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal
of Intelligent Transportation Systems.


Mohan Venigalla, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor

Mohan Venigalla brings over 18 years of industry, research and teaching experience to
Mason's programs. Prior to joining Mason, Dr. Venigalla most recently served as a Senior
Transportation Systems Engineer in Wilbur Smith Associates Transportation Modeling Group,
located in Columbia, SC. Dr. Venigalla earned his doctorate from the University of
Tennessee in 1994. Dr. Venigalla was the 1991 Student of the Year, as awarded by the US
Department of Transportation. In 1996, he received the Pyke Johnson Award from the
National Research Council for the best research paper in transportation planning. After
receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Venigalla served as a Transportation Systems Engineer at the Volpe
National Transportation Systems Center in Cambridge, MA, working in both the ITS and Air
Quality groups.

Dr. Venigalla is an expert in quantitative methods for transportation planning, air quality,
traffic operations, and traffic simulation. His skills include transportation systems analysis
encompassing travel demand modeling, traffic simulation, network analysis, and ITS related
modeling. He has developed and applied numerous computer models for transportation
planning and traffic engineering problems. His research work in transportation air quality
has received national acclaim. The methods he has developed for determining start nodes
and operating models are being widely used in the industry for air quality modeling. At
Mason, Dr. Venigalla teaches courses in the area of transportation air quality, information
management, and geographic information systems. Dr. Venigalla serves as an Associate
Editor for the ASCE Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering and is a member of the TRB
Committee on Transportation Air Quality and the Committee on Transportation Planning for
Small and Medium Communities.

Michael Casey, Ph.D., P.E., Assistant Professor

Michael Casey is an Assistant Professor in the Civil, Environmental, Infrastructure
Engineering Department in the area of Construction Systems and Project Management. He
completed his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Maryland
at College Park in the area of sensor networks for critical infrastructure surveillance and
security. He teaches classes in construction and project management, IT in civil
engineering, and geographic information systems (GISs). Dr. Casey is currently conducting
research in GIS tools for integrated hydrologic and hydraulic modeling as well survivability
or wireless sensor networks. He is also the advisor for the GMU Chapter of ASCE and is an
active member in the National Capital Section of ASCE.

Dr. Casey received his B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Rutgers University.
He worked as an Environmental Engineer with Camp Dresser and McKee in Edison, NJ on
facilities management and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) projects. Dr. Casey
received his M.S. in Water Resources Engineering at the University of Maryland and
performed research in watershed modeling and GIS application development.

Girum Urgessa, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Dr. Urgessa received the B.S. degree from Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia and both his
M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico. In the industry sector, Dr. Urgessa has
worked as a Structural Engineer with Dekker/Perich/Sabatini Ltd. and is currently working
as a Research Engineer for the Applied Science Division of Weidlinger Associates in
Albuquerque. His research interests include computational mechanics, the study of
structures subjected to extreme loadings and the use of fiber-reinforced polymers in the
design of structures.

								
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