Chord Systems by yurtgc548

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									Chord Systems
           Types of chords
• There are five different types of chords
  with 3 of the types being the most used.
• You should get to the point where you
  hear each type.
  – Major chords
  – Minor chords
  – Dominant chords
  – Diminished chords
  – Augmented chords
      Chords relate to scales
• In order to cover this we must first go over
  the major scales.
• There are a total of 15 major scales in
  western music.
• To figure out a major scale use the
  chromatic scale.
• A ½ step is 1 place (or 1 fret) and a whole
  step is 2 places (or 2 frets).
• All major scales have the same formula.
      Pattern of the major scale
• Background – a ½ step is 1 fret and a whole step is 2 –
  ½ steps.
• For a major scale the pattern is as follows – whole,
  whole, ½, whole, whole, whole, ½
• You always go alphabetically. So there will always be
  some type of C, D etc.
• Let’s do one scale as an example:       C Major – start on
  the C then a whole step is D, another whole step is E, a
  ½ step is F, a whole step is G, a whole step is A, a whole
  step is B and a ½ step ends on C.
• Let’s do G, G WS (whole step), A WS, B ½, C WS, D
  WS, E WS, F#, ½ G.
• Try a few yourself – A, E and B.
• Do one scale at a time. Use your ear to hear the sound.
  Best if you sing what you are playing.
• All scales have patterns but they can all be related or
  derived from the major scale.
                 Now chord
•   You always use the major scale.
•   Chords are built off of the odd numbers:
•   Major is the 1 3 and 5th notes of the scale.
•   Minor is 1 lowered 3 (1 fret) and 5.
•   Dominant is 1 3 5 and lowered 7.
     Now in any key the chords
• If we build chords off of a major scale they will
  be as follows:
• The I chord is always major
• The II chord is always minor
• The III chord is always minor
• The IV chord is always major
• The V chord is always dominant
• The VI chord is always minor
• The VII chord is diminished
               Now key of C
• If we build chords off of a major scale they will
  be as follows:
• The I chord is always C major
• The II chord is always D minor
• The III chord is always E minor
• The IV chord is always F major
• The V chord is always G7 dominant
• The VI chord is always A minor
• The VII chord is B diminished
               Now key of G
• If we build chords off of a major scale they will
  be as follows:
• The I chord is always G major
• The II chord is always A minor
• The III chord is always B minor
• The IV chord is always C major
• The V chord is always D7 dominant
• The VI chord is always E minor
• The VII chord is F# diminished
            Chord movement
• In any key the chords want to go back to the I
  chord. Any movement can be back to the I
  chord.
• The V chord in particular will go to the I chord.
  For example, in the key of G the V chord is a D7
  it wants to resolve or move to the I or G chord.
• Chords also can move scalewise: For example
  in the key of G it would be common to go G to
  Am to Bm to C.
           Other movement
• The II chord wants to go to the V chord (in
  G Am to D7).
• The III chord wants to go to the VI chord
  (in G the Bm to the Em chord).
• The VI wants to go to the III chord (in G
  the Em to the Am chord).
• Very common for the IV to go to the V (in
  G the C to D7 chord).
    Use this to figure songs out
• This information takes a little time but once
  learned can really help in figuring out the chord
  changes.
• There are also some types of music that have
  variations. As and example in country music the
  II chord is usually a dominant rather than a
  minor chord (for you theory buffs this is called a
  secondary dominant). The movement would still
  be to the V chord though. Look at Hey Good
  Looking by Hank Williams Sr.
        HEY, GOOD LOOKIN'
        Words and music by Hank Williams, Sr.

        Hey, [C] Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
        [D7] How's about cookin' [G7] somethin' up with [C] me ...
        [G7]
        [C] Hey, sweet baby, don't you think maybe
        [D7] We could find us a [G7] brand new reci-[C] pe. ...
        [C7]

        I got a [F] hot rod Ford and a [C] two dollar bill
        And [F] I know a spot right [C] over the hill
        [F] There's soda pop and the [C] dancin's free
        So if you [D7] wanna have fun come a-[G7] long with me.

        Say [C] Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
        [D7] How's about cookin' [G7] somethin' up with [C] me.

        I'm free and ready so we can go steady
        How's about savin' all your time for me
        No more lookin', I know I've been (*tooken)
        How's about keepin' steady company.

        I'm gonna throw my date book over the fence
        And find me one for five or ten cents.
        I'll keep it 'til it's covered with age
        'Cause I'm writin' your name down on ev'ry page.

        Say Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
        How's about cookin' somethin' up with me.

Transpose to G to play!
HEY, GOOD LOOKIN'
Words and music by Hank Williams, Sr.

Hey, [G] Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
[A7] How's about cookin' [D7] somethin' up with [G] me ...
[D7]
[G] Hey, sweet baby, don't you think maybe
[A7] We could find us a [D7] brand new reci-[G] pe. ...
[G7]

I got a [C] hot rod Ford and a [D] two dollar bill
And [C] I know a spot right [G] over the hill
[C] There's soda pop and the [G] dancin's free
So if you [A7] wanna have fun come a-[D7] long with me.

Say [G] Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
[A7] How's about cookin' [D7] somethin' up with [G] me.

I'm free and ready so we can go steady
How's about savin' all your time for me
No more lookin', I know I've been (*tooken)
How's about keepin' steady company.

I'm gonna throw my date book over the fence
And find me one for five or ten cents.
I'll keep it 'til it's covered with age
'Cause I'm writin' your name down on ev'ry page.

Say Hey, Good Lookin', whatcha got cookin'
How's about cookin' somethin' up with me.
                Summary
• Scales are derived from the chord forms. You
  should know the forms before the chords. The
  scales all have the same whole – ½ step form.
• The scales always go up the neck in the same
  order (CAGED).
• Learn all the scale forms in every key.
• Once they are mastered try the other scales.
  They are all derived from the major scale.
• Chords are built off of the scales.
• Chords move in some set ways.

								
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