HFP NEWS by vivi07

VIEWS: 18 PAGES: 4

									HFP NEWS

POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION CANCER SCREENING CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE HEALTH MESSAGES FROM HFP HUDSON COUNTY CANCER COALITION HOBOKEN FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES • • • • Feeling worthless and guilty Loss of interest or pleasure in activities Withdrawal from friends and family Having headaches, chest pains, heart palpitations (the heart beating fast and feeling like it is skipping beats), or hyperventilation (fast and shallow breathing) After pregnancy, signs of depression may also include being afraid of hurting the baby or oneself and not having any interest in the baby. What is the difference between “baby blues, ”postpartum depression, and postpartum psychosis? The baby blues can happen in the days right after childbirth and normally go away within a few days to a week. A new mother can have sudden mood swings, sadness, crying spells, loss of appetite, sleeping problems, and feel irritable, restless, anxious, and lonely. Symptoms are not severe and treatment isn’t needed. But there are things you can do to feel better. Nap when the baby does. Ask for help from your spouse, family members, and friends. Join a support group of new moms or talk with other moms. Postpartum depression can happen anytime within the first year after childbirth. A woman may have a number of symptoms such as sadness, lack of energy, trouble concentrating, anxiety, and feelings of guilt and worthlessness. The difference between postpartum depression and the baby blues is that postpartum depression often affects a woman’s well-being and keeps her from functioning well for a longer period of time. Postpartum depression needs to be treated by a doctor. Counseling, support groups, and medicines are things that can help. Postpartum psychosis is rare. It occurs in 1 or 2 out of every 1000 births and usually begins in the first 6 weeks postpartum. Women who have bipolar disorder or another psychiatric problem called schizoaffective disorder have a higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis. Symptoms may include delusions, hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and obsessive thoughts about the baby. A woman may have rapid mood swings, from depression to irritability to euphoria. What steps can I take if I have symptoms of depression during pregnancy or after childbirth? Some women don’t tell anyone about their symptoms because they feel embarrassed, ashamed, or guilty about feeling depressed when they are supposed to be happy. They worry that they will be viewed as unfit parents. Perinatal depression can happen to any woman. It does not mean you are a bad or “not together” mom. You and your baby don’t have to suffer. There is help. There are different types of individual and group “talk therapies” that can help a woman with perinatal depression feel better and do better as a mom and as a person.
(Continued on page 2)

Postpartum Depression- Know the Signs What is Postpartum Depression? t is depression left after pregnancy caused by hormonal changes in the body during that time. If left untreated, postpartum depression can lead to further depression, substance abuse, loss of employment, divorce, and further social alienation, self-destructive behavior, or even suicide.

I

Also, untreated postpartum depression impacts society through its effect on the infant’s physical and psychological cognitive development, child abuse, neglect or death of the infant or other siblings, and the disruption of the family. Therefore everyone should be aware of the signs and symptoms of postpartum depression and seek medical intervention as soon as any of these are noted.

What are symptoms of depression? Any of these symptoms during and after pregnancy that last longer than two weeks are signs of depression: • Feeling restless or irritable • Feeling sad, hopeless, and overwhelmed • Crying a lot • Having no energy or motivation • Eating too little or too much • Sleeping too little or too much • Trouble focusing, remembering, or making decisions

HFP News Page 2
Limited research suggests that many women with perinatal depression improve when treated with anti-depressant medicine. Your doctor can help you learn more about these options and decide which approach is best for you and your baby. The next section contains more detailed information about available treatments. Speak to your doctor or midwife if you are having symptoms of depression while you are pregnant or after you deliver your baby. Your doctor or midwife can give you a questionnaire to test for depression and can also refer you to a mental health professional who specializes in treating depression. Here are some other helpful tips: • Try to get as much rest as you can. Try to nap when the baby naps. • Stop putting pressure on yourself to do everything. Do as much as you can and leave the rest! • Ask for help with household chores and nighttime feedings. Ask your husband or partner to bring the baby to you so you can breastfeed. If you can, have a friend, family member, or professional support person help you in the home for part of the day. • Talk to your husband, partner, family, and friends about how you are feeling. • Do not spend a lot of time alone. Get dressed and leave the house. Run an errand or take a short walk. • Spend time alone with your husband or partner. • Talk with other mothers, so you can learn from their experiences. • Join a support group for women with depression. Call a local hotline or look in your telephone book for information and services. • Don’t make any major life changes during pregnancy. Major changes can cause unneeded stress. Sometimes big changes cannot be avoided. When that happens, try to arrange support and help in your new situation ahead of time.■ Information taken from:
www.womenshealth.gov/faq/postpartum.htm

Hudson County Cancer Coalition

the many services that we discuss are prostate screening, pap smears, colorectal exams, oral cancer screening and mammograms At the present time, pap smears, colorectal exams, prostate screening and mammograms are available at no cost to eligible Hudson County residents through the funding of a NJ CEED program, and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. We encourage you to contact Hoboken Family Planning at 201-963-0300 to see if you are eligible for one of these free screenings. During this spring season give a gift to yourself and your family. Protect your life by receiving a cancer screening. Also consider giving a screening as a Mother’s Day gift or a Father’s Day gift to your loved ones, for it is the gift of good health. I wish all of you a very happy, healthy, and sunny spring season.■
By: Joyce Tolliver Adams

Joyce Tolliver Adams Marketing Consultant

CANCER SCREENING CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE

R

emember the old saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”? Today we do realize that good nutrition and exercise are contributing factors to good health. But, too often we forget that periodic checkups from our doctor are also a large contributor to a healthy life. Early detection of most diseases very often saves lives. The number of diagnosed cases of cancer in Hudson County is shocking. It is important that we understand that early screening: testing and diagnosis can be a major stalwart in the fight against cancer. Often many people do not receive testing and screening and go undiagnosed to the point that it becomes dangerous for their very survival. The number of men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer is frightening. Often males put off important annual visits to the doctor and ignore signs from their bodies that something is wrong. Consistently women are encouraged, particularly during certain times of the year, to have mammograms and fight breast cancer by having screening tests annually. We at the Hudson County Cancer Coalition believe that every day should be cancer prevention day. The Hudson County Cancer Coalition was started about four years ago in order to bring Cancer Awareness to the population of Hudson County. Among

Health Messages from Hoboken Family Planning
emember mom on Mother’s Day and remind her of the importance of having annual mammograms. She may have a free breast exam plus mammogram through the NJCEED program (NJ Cancer Education and Early Detection) Call (201) 963-0300 for qualification criteria. We celebrate Father’s Day in June. It is the NJCEED’s Father’s Day Prostate Cancer Initiative—No man left behind. If your Dad qualifies, he may receive free prostate cancer screening. Again call (201) 963-0300 for more information. And… In preparation for the summer months, remember sun safety is a must. Protect your skin from the sun to reduce your risk for sunburn, skin cancer, and wrinkles. When in the sun, use sunscreen, wear a wide brimmed hat, long sleeves and protective sunglasses.■ Have a great and healthy summer!

R

HFP News Page 3

Hudson County Cancer Coalition

Bill Bullock (HCCC) Coordinator.

M

r. Michael Toleno, the Assistant Director of the New Jersey Commission on Cancer Research (NJCCR) was the guest speaker at the Hudson County Cancer Coalition’s January 9th meeting. He commented that the NJCCR is the only New Jersey State agency that funds cancer research projects in New Jersey and, since its inception, has provided over $30 million in cancer research funds to New Jersey based scientists. The NJCCR receives its funding from cigarette taxes and the sale of special New Jersey license plates that advocate cancer awareness. Mr. Toleno informed the meeting attendees of a program called “IMPACT New Jersey” that the Commission has developed to Improve Minority and Medically underserved Participation and Access in Clinical Trials. He said the Commission would work with Hudson County community leaders to implement IMPACT NJ in the county. According to the meeting evaluations, the attendees described Mr. Toleno’s presentation as “interesting and informative” and one of the community leaders who attended the meeting asked Mr. Toleno to call him about IMPACT NJ.

their incomes exceed 250% of federal poverty. Letters describing this gap were sent to over 300 people in Hudson County, including business leaders, elected officials, health industry representatives, faith and community based organization directors and other interested citizens. Nearly $1,000 in contributions and or pledges, have been received thus far to pay for breast cancer screenings for women in this socio-economic category. The HCCC also collaborated with Hoboken Family Planning on a breast cancer awareness event in October at which this gap in the safety net was discussed with approximately 25 people who attended this event. This project is considered a success because of the awareness raised by the two activities described above and the contributions received. The HCCC also has attended or participated this fiscal year in many other public functions and events to raise breast cancer awareness in Hudson County. The events included staffing exhibit tables and distributing a large volume of breast cancer educational material at two major public events held each year in Hudson County: • The Hoboken Feast of the Martyrs, a four day event held in Hoboken in September 2007 and attended by an estimated 60,000 people, and The Earth Day Celebration, a one day event held at Liberty State in April 2008 and attended by an estimated 10,000 people.

other directly related event, the HCCC met with the Jersey City Board of Education Community Liaison person to discuss a breast cancer awareness initiative for the fall of 2007 and, as a follow-up to this meeting, the HCCC conducted two breast cancer awareness programs for the Parent Teachers Council at Public School #34 in Jersey City. It is difficult to measure the impact of these efforts in terms of how many women were motivated to seek beast cancer screenings. However, two of the immediate benefits are: an increase in the number of calls to the Hudson County NJ-CEED Program requesting information about breast cancer screening; and, an increase in the number of new patients actually screened for breast cancer by this Program. The HCCC’s second cancer related project for F/Y 2007/8 is an oral/ oropharyngeal cancer awareness and screening campaign that peaks in April of each year with free oral cancer screenings being offered at several location in the county. This is the second year that the HCCC has participated in this event in partnership with the Oral Cancer Consortium. The Oral Cancer Consortium has been holding a multi-state, free oral cancer-screening event in April for many years and the HCCC participated in it for the first time in 2007 along with five other northern New Jersey County Cancer Coalitions, Essex, Union, Passaic, Morris and Bergen. The HCCC decided to initiate an oral/oropharyngeal cancer awareness and screening campaign in Hudson County because the county’s adult male population is bearing a much heavier burden from this disease than is the New Jersey male population. We plan to hold this event annually, in April, in partnership with the Oral Cancer Consortium and the other participating counties in the hope that as this annual event develops and grows, it will become a factor in reducing the burden of oral cancer in Hudson County. Last April, free oral cancer screenings were offered at four locations in Hudson County and, although the campaign was limited by a lack of funding, approximately 50 people were screened for oral cancer. We hope to do better this year.■
By: Bill Bullock

•

As previously reported, the HCCC selected raising breast cancer awareness in Hudson County as its cancer related project for F/Y 2007/8. Toward that end, the HCCC has engaged in many activities including a collaboration with Hoboken Family Planning (HFP), the NJCEED Grantee for Hudson County, to raise awareness of a gap in the current breast cancer screening safety net involving uninsured (working) women who do not qualify for free breast cancer screening in the NJ-CEED Program because

In addition, the HCCC staffed exhibit tables and distributed breast cancer and other cancer educational materials this fiscal year at many other events in Hudson County such as: the Hudson County Perinatal Consortium’s “Tie a Pink Ribbon” breast cancer awareness event at Hoboken City Hall; a Hoboken University Medical Center’s Health Fair, a Save Latin America Family Festival and a Hudson County Community College health awareness event. The HCCC also participated in the American Cancer Society’s October 14th “Strides for Life Walk” in Jersey City, attended monthly meetings of Hudson County Community Network Association, monthly meetings of the Jersey City Cancer Initiative, and quarterly meetings of LINCS Access to Care Committee. In an-

Special Services
We offer services to detect the following types of cancer: For Men: Prostate • Testicular • Colorectal

What is Family Planning?
Family Planning is a preventative health service that provides quality, low cost, and easily accessible reproductive health care to women and men during their reproductive years. Family Planning services are confidential. Everyone has the right to informed consent regarding their reproductive choices and birth control clients with the information and counseling needed to do this.

For Women: Breast • Cervical • Colorectal These services may be offered free if you qualify.

Community Education Services •
Workshops and programs for schools, community groups and others.

ALL SERVICES INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

As A Patient You Have These Rights • • • • • • • •
Considerate, respectful, private treatment. Confidential care. Informed participation in the planning of health care you will receive here. Full up-to-date information to assist you with your decision-making Facts and discussion on the what, why and how of your tests and exam. Freedom to ask questions. Answers, complete as possible, in words you understand. To consent to or refuse any treatment.

Medical Services • • • • • • •
Physical exams and health screening. Pelvic and breast exams. Pap smear. Blood pressure & weight check. Pregnancy testing & options counseling. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) screening, diagnosis and treatment. Birth control methods, use and counseling.

Hoboken Family Planning, Inc.
124 Grand Street Hoboken, NJ 07030 Tel. (201) 963-0300

Union City Summit Center
1206 Summit Avenue Union City, NJ 07087 Tel. (201) 319-9200

Family Planning Center Of West New York
5305 Hudson Avenue West New York, NJ 07093 Tel. (201) 866-8071
Artwork and Design: by Juan Rivera

For more information visit us on the web at www.sex-ed101.com


								
To top