Docstoc

Elementary Education in India

Document Sample
Elementary Education in India Powered By Docstoc
					                       JOIN HANDS IN
                       THE INTEREST
                        OF CHILDREN

The 86th constitutional amendment (2002), & the
 RTFCE Act (2009) give us the tools to provide
      quality education to all our children
EDUCATION FOR ALL




                    2
3
 CHILD’S RIGHT; ADULT’S DUTY

 Adults should train the young of their society in

  the knowledge and skills they would need to
  master and eventually pass on.
 Education enables the development of human
  personality, strengthens the respect for human
  rights, and helps to overcome exploitations and
  inequalities of caste, class and gender.
                                                   4
     Education Depts of State & Union
   Governments have direct responsibility
To provide
 schools,
 infrastructure,
 trained teachers,
 curriculum and
 teaching-learning material, and
 mid-day meal.
A well coordinated mechanism is needed for
inter- sectoral collaboration & convergence.

                                               5
 United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable
          Development (DESD, 2005-2014)


The substance of the right to education is given by
  international legislation. But real meaning is given to it
  as national legislators incorporate it.
 Incorporation is as important as the adhering to an
  international treaty because it is this incorporation that
  entitles people to demand for their right. A true
  democracy makes education universal; people have
  the know-how to govern themselves as citizens of the
  world.                                                       6
primary education
 Education, primary education in particular, is
  expected to bring about desirable behavioral
  changes in young children in the areas of:
 (1) knowledge and understanding,

 (2) skill and competence,
 (3) attitudes and interest, and

 (4) action patterns.

                                                   7
  primary education
 Primary education, thus, is the foundation for the
  development of the child in his social,
  intellectual, and physical aspects.
 The school is required to inculcate the cultural
  values and prepare the child for various
  developmental tasks of his life.
 It should promote expression of his innate
  qualities of head, heart and hand, to their
  maximum capacities.
 Education is the basic necessity for a child to
  grow into a responsible citizen.
                                                     8
Elementary education consists of eight
         years of education.
 The 86th constitutional amendment [2002] has made
    elementary education a fundamental right for the
    children between the age group- 6 to 14.
   According to the 2001 census, the total literacy rate
    in India is 65.38%.
   The female literacy rate is only 54.16%.
   The gap between rural and urban literacy rate is also
    very significant in India.
   This is evident from the fact that only 59.4% of rural
    population are literate as against 80. 3% urban
    population according to the 2001 census.
                                                             9
Elementary Education in India
 Elementary education is preparatory. It prepares the
  pupil to go on to something else, and put his foot on
  the first step of the ladder of knowledge.
 Primary education must do everything possible to
  make pupils feel that they belong to a society, to knit
  them into a social fabric, and make them aware of
  their social responsibilities.
 The objectives of elementary education are (i) to
  enable self-realization; (ii) to develop better human
  relations, and (iii) to enable fulfillment to civic
  responsibilities.

                                                            10
 The Right of Children to Free and
 Compulsory Education Act 2009
 The RTFCE Act was passed by the
 India parliament in 2009.It describes
 the modalities of the provision of free
 and compulsory education for
 children between 6 and 14 in India
 under Article 21A of the Indian
 Constitution.
 The act came into force on April 1, 2010.

                                              11
Norms for government schools
 The Act specifies the minimum norms in
  government schools.
 It specifies reservation of 25% seats in private
  schools for children from poor families,
 prohibits the practice of unrecognized
  schools, and makes provisions for no
  donation or capitation and no interview of the
  child or parent for the admission.
                                                   12
Right to Education Act – 2009
 The act also provides that, no child shall be held
  back, expelled, or required to pass a board
  examination until completion of elementary
  education.
 Provision for special training of school drop-outs to
  bring them at-par with the students of the same age.
 Right to Education of Person with Disabilities till 18
  years of age has been made a Fundamental Right.
 The act also provides for establishment of the
  National Commission for Protection of Child Rights
  and State Commissions for supervising of proper
  implementation of the act, looking after the
  complaints and protection of Child Rights.

                                                           13
Right to Education Act – 2009
 Other provisions regarding improvement of school
  infrastructure, teacher-student ratio and faculty have
  also been provided in the act.
 A committee set up to study the funds requirement
  and funding estimated that Rs 1.71 lakh crore would
  be required in the next five years for implementing
  the Act.
 The government agreed to sharing of funds in the
  ratio of 65 to 35 between the Centre and the states
  for implementing the law, with a ratio of 90 to 10 for
  the north-eastern states.

                                                           14
Struggle for ‘Legally’ universalizing
elementary education
 Everybody acknowledges the value of
  education in the overall development of the
  children.
 Administrators focus on
 Enrolment
 Availability of schools within walking distance
 Provisioning for infrastructure
 Deployment of teachers.


                                                    15
  Educationists are concerned about


What is Learnt, how is it presented?

 Whether or how children learn, and the

 Burden of syllabi, which is passed on to

 Tuition centres or Parents

                                           16
Development professionals discuss

 The impact of years of schooling, for example
  on the age of marriage and family size.
 Economists talk about the economic returns
  on Investment in education
 Parents have expectations from the
  education system_ that it should equip their
  children for gainful employment, and
  economic well being.
                                                 17
            Fulfill goals of
    universal elementary education

 The enforcement of fundamental
 right to education provides us a
 unique opportunity to mount a
 mission encompassing all the
 above discourses to fulfill our goal
 of universal elementary education.
                                        18
              Education System in India:
 The present education
  system in India mainly
  comprises of primary
  education, secondary
  education, senior secondary
  education and higher
  education.
 Elementary education
  consists of eight years of
  education.
 Each of secondary and
  senior secondary education
  consists of two years of
  education. Higher education
  in India starts after passing
  the higher secondary
  education or the 12th
  standard.
                                           19
        Dropped out, child labourers

 There are ‘invisible’ children_ children bonded
  to work with an employer,
 young boys grazing cattle or working in a
  dhabha
 girls working in the fields or as domestic help
  or caring for younger siblings, and
 children being subjected to early marriage.
  Many of these children are formally enrolled
  in a school but have either dropped out or
  have never been there.

                                                    20
      Extremely vulnerable ones

 Many others such as migrant and
 street children, who live in
 extremely vulnerable conditions;
 denying them education is against
 the universal nature of human
 rights.
                                     21
              Enroll, attend, learn,
                       and
          Be empowered by education

 Providing universal access itself is no longer
  enough; making available school facility is
  essential but not sufficient.
 A monitoring mechanism is needed to ensure
  that all children attend school regularly and
  participate in the learning process.




                                                   22
                 Not attending,
           drop-out in a few months?
 Focus must be on the factors that
  prevent children from regularly
  attending & completing elementary
  education. Children from
 weaker sections and
 disadvantaged groups, as also
 girls.
 SOCIAL,CULTURAL,ECONOMIC,
  LINGUISTIC AND PEDAGOGIC ISSUES
                                       23
Reservation of 25% seats in private
schools for children from poor families
 The school may be          Social, economic,
  there but students may      cultural, linguistic,
  not attend, or drop out     pedagogic issues
  after a few months.        Denial or violation of the
 Through school & social     right to elementary
  mapping, many issues        education process
  need to be addressed        requires to be
  that prevent a weak         overcome with the
  child from completing       encouragement and
  the process of              enlightenment of the
  education.                  weak & vulnerable by
                              the civil society.
                                                      24
Free, compulsory and of high quality

 The right to education is free, compulsory and
  it includes good quality education for all.
 A curriculum not only provides good reading
  and understanding of text books but also
  includes learning through activities,
  exploration and discovery.
 Comprehension, competence,
  competitiveness and creativity should be
  developed, not forgetting compassion.
                                                25
Free, compulsory and of high quality

 The right to education is free, compulsory and
  it includes good quality education for all.
 A curriculum not only provides good reading
  and understanding of text books but also
  includes learning through activities,
  exploration and discovery.
 Comprehension, competence,
  competitiveness and creativity should be
  developed, not forgetting compassion.
                                                26
On the part of the whole Govts:
 The factors that contribute to the
  achievement of the overall goal of
  universalizing elementary education as
  a fundamental right requires action on
  the part of the whole Governments.
A well coordinated mechanism is needed for
inter- sectoral collaboration & convergence.

                                               27
Timely & appropriate financial
allocations, redesign school spaces
 The Finance Department to release
 funds at all levels.
 The Public Works Dept. to re-conceive
 and redesign school spaces from the
 pedagogic perspective & Address
 issues of including disabled children
 through barrier free access.
                                          28
Provide Social & Location Mapping of
schools, Water & sanitation facilities
 The Dept. of Science & Technology to
  provide geo-spatial technology to
  perform at
 grass-root survey.
 Provision of access to sufficient safe
  drinking water
 Provision and access to adequate
  sanitation facilities, specially for girl
  child.                                      29
ROLE OF CIVIL SOCEITY in RTE
 Above all, people’s groups, civil society
  organizations & voluntary agencies will play
  an crucial role in the implementation of the
  RTE Act.
 This will help build a new perspective on
  inclusiveness, encompassing gender & social
  inclusion, & ensure that these become
  integral & crosscutting concerns informing
  different aspects like training, curriculum and
  classroom transaction.
                                                30
ROLE OF CIVIL SOCEITY
 A VIBRANT CIVIL SOCEITY MOVEMENT
  CAN ENSURE THAT THE PARENT / CHILD
  FROM WEAKER OR DISADVANTAGED
  SECTIONS BECOME AWARE OF THE
  VALUE OF EXERCISING THE RIGHT TO
  ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND PUT IN
  SERIOUS EFFORTS ON THEIR PART.
 NGO contribution of knowledge, ideas and
  solutions to the challenges are needed.

                                             31
  Prime Minister Manmohan Singh:
"We are committed to ensuring that
all children, irrespective of gender
and social category, have access to
education. An education that
enables them to acquire the skills,
knowledge, values and attitudes
necessary to become responsible
and active citizens of India

                                       32
The 86th constitutional amendment (2002),
And the RTE Act (2009), have given us the
tools to provide quality education to all our
children. It is now imperative that we the
people of India join hands to ensure the
implementation of this law in its true spirit.
The Government is committed to this task
though real change will happen through
collective action.
                                                 33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
In globalisation, education assumes greater meaning; even if
greatness of a nation is measured by its ranking in global
economic order and not by its ability to provide quality
education.
The last two decade have shown enormous improvement in
the average literacy. Education is a vital requirement for
inclusive growth, empowering individual and society,
opening up opportunities and promoting true public
participation in the development process.
It is an important factor that fuels both social change and
economic growth.
                                                              43
44
45

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Categories:
Stats:
views:0
posted:5/5/2013
language:Unknown
pages:45
Description: It is an ambition to be realized by the people of India that quality Elementary Education accesible to all children..