Course Proposal Checklist by teeth7200

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									                                NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY
                             CURRICULAR PROPOSAL TRANSMISSION FORM

Program/Course abbreviated title (existing)____________________________________                        Course _____ _____
_____ _____ ________
                                                   (limit 29 characters)                                      Dept   Disc     #
Cr hrs Contact hrs

                                (proposed) _CHEM 306L Environmental Chemistry in the City______ Course __GES___
_____306L __2 cr    __3.5_
                                                                                                              Dept    Disc
#   Cr hrs Contact hrs
Program                                 Course                                      Other Course Information
 New Program                   x New Course                     Course Prerequisite Change       Catalog Description
Change
 Program deletion                 Course deletion              Course number change                Credit hour change
 Program modification             Course description change    Course title change                 Course level change
 Program admission req.           Title varies                 300-level proposed for             
                                   Web-based course                 Graduate credit
Constraints

Requirement of General  Y            Restriction by X None           Major Only          Times offered/year ____1___
Education Program      X N            student level   Fr & Soph.  Jr. & Sr.              Number students/year __2.5___
                                                      Grad Only
Prerequisites___CHEM 211, CHEM 212, CHEM 213 or Permission of Instructor Program requirement  Y X N
____Chemistry_____________________

(Program name)
Linked Courses___________________________________                                   Elective X Y  N
                        (Dept/Disc/Number and abbr. title)
Materials Submitted
 Syllabus (required)  Proposal Checklist  Added Support (chair level)         Other Support (college level) Summary
Table of Proposed changes


1. Review by Department____________________________________________                 2. Review by
Chair_____________________________________________
                           (signature)                  (date)                                                       (signature)
(date)

3. Review by CAAC________________________________________________                   4. Review by College
Dean______________________________________
                        (signature)                   (date)                                                         (signature)
               (date)

5. Review by GCAC________________________________________________                   6. Review by Graduate
Dean_____________________________________
                        (signature)                   (date)                                                         (signature)
               (date)

7. Review by GEC_________________________________________________
                        (signature)                   (date)

8. Review by FCAA________________________________________________                   9. Approved by
Provost_________________________________________
                             (signature)                        (date)
          (signature)                  (date)
                             Course Proposal Checklist
                              (Submit for each course)
           · Course Abbreviated Title : Environmental Chemistry in the City
         · Course Complete Title: Special Topics in Chemistry: Environmental
                                Chemistry in the City
                         Average Weekly Contact Hours: 3.5
                        · Discussion 0 Field Experience 2.5
                       · Lecture 1.0      Independent Study 0
                     · Student Teaching 0 Web-Based Course 0
                Course Description (100 words maximum for catalog)

  This is an introductory laboratory and field course that will concentrate on topics of
   environmental interest in the city of Chicago. Field work will include visits to the
 Chicago River, Lake Michigan, the Chicago Forest Preserve, and other locations in the
metropolitan area. Students will learn proper methods of sample collection, storage, and
      transport. Chemical analysis of collected samples by titrimetric, gravimetric,
spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods will take place in the field
   and in the laboratory. Lecture 1 hr, Lab/Field 2.5 hrs. Prerequisite: CHEM 213 or
                                consent of the instructor




Course Proposal Checklist
Before submitting a proposal, please indicate whether each of the following tasks
have been fulfilled.

                                                                            Yes No N/A
1. Does the course proposal include a rationale?                            X
2. Does this proposal require coordination with other departments in the        X
College or University? If so, please attach supporting documentation.
3. Are there adequate library resources (print and media) to support this     X
proposal? If not, state how resources would be developed or how the
proposal would be affected.
4. Are additional resources (staff, fiscal, or technical, including lab space   X
and equipment) required to support this proposal? If so, please identify the
resources. If those resources are not available, state how the proposal would
be affected.
5. Has academic computing been consulted regarding the adequacy of                X
resources (lab space, hardware and software) to support this proposal? If
computing resources are not available, describe how those resources would
be developed or how the proposal be affected.
6. If this proposal concerns a 300-level course to be offered for graduate            X
credit, is the required academic rationale attached?
7. Is a course syllabus attached in support of this proposal? (See attached       X
syllabus requirements)
8. Are all supporting documents attached?                                         X

Course Rationale
        Environmental Chemistry in the City is being proposed as a new lecture,
laboratory, and field experience course in the chemistry program. This two-credit course
will serve the students in a variety of ways. First of all, it will provide an entry point for
students into the chemistry program who are still undecided about a particular major in
the STEM disciplines. An active, hands-on, field experience can be a window into what
a career in chemistry entail on a day-to-day basis.
        This new course will also compliment an existing lecture only course, Chemical
Concepts in Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 319). Environmental Chemistry in the
City will focus on specific techniques of chemical sensing and analysis that are only
discussed in a more theoretical manner in CHEM 319. This will benefit chemistry
majors and minors by giving them an opportunity to hone their laboratory skills in the
context of another specific chemistry discipline.
        Environmental Chemistry in the City will also serve our students by giving them
an opportunity to meet, work, and interact with people in environmental chemistry
careers in the city of Chicago. Trips to water treatment facilities, urban development and
planning offices, waste remediation sites, among others will introduce students to the
most important environmental chemistry issues in Chicago. Ideas for research and
independent study will likely result from these field experiences, giving students another
opportunity to develop a unique and attractive skill set as they enter a competitive job
market.
Goals and Assessment
Learning Objectives                            Performance Criteria

Gain a familiarity with sampling and                  Ability to design a procedure to
chemical sensing techniques used in                    collect and analyze samples
environmental chemistry
                                                      Capability to perform experiments
                                                       safely and accurately

Develop and sharpen analytical skills used            Capacity to use statistics to analyze
in the lab and the field                               data for significance and error

                                                      Skill to use a variety of approaches
                                                       to investigate a problem

Explore the environmental chemistry                   Active participation at field sites to
issues impacting the city of Chicago                   collect and analyze data
                                                   Attendance and engagement at
                                                    environmental facilities in the city

Learning Objective                           Performance Criteria


Search, analyze and critique primary and           Ability to summarize the key
secondary environmental chemistry                   findings of a journal article and
literature                                          identify the impact to the field of
                                                    environmental chemistry

                                                   Capacity to recognize the
                                                    connection of literature to field work

Work in a collaborative setting to solve           Skills to complete a specific task
problems                                            that contributes to a team goal

                                                   Willingness and ability to listen,
                                                    depend on peers, and treat everyone
                                                    with respect

Write and maintain a laboratory notebook           Clarity of the presentation of data
and field journal
                                                   Analysis of results and conclusions

                                                   Ability to clearly describe field
                                                    experiences, develop related
                                                    questions, and make connections to
                                                    community and personal behavior



Instruments to Measure Student Success
     Field trips and field experiments

           o Attendance

           o Participation

           o Engagement

      Laboratory reports (both campus and field work)

      Brief-essays on chemical literature
   Journal writing

   Laboratory examination

        o Designing an experiment

        o Carry-out design in a team setting

        o Reporting results clearly, concisely

   Student assessment

        o Survey (pre- and post- class experience)

        o Feedback during course


Improvement of Teaching and Student Learning
    Design of laboratory procedures will measure students’ ability to critically
      analyze a problem and accurately use the tools available to perform tests.
      This assessment is crucial developing teaching strategies that will help
      students think “outside the box”.

       Student engagement in field work will assess interest in specific areas of
        environmental chemistry. This will enable the instructor to design and
        reconfigure the course in a way that will give the students the best possible
        experience and the most opportunities for future independent study.

       Analysis and review of primary and secondary literature will begin to provide
        the foundation for future student success in research. This will also help the
        students relate the work they are doing in the field to research recently
        completed in the scientific community.

       Emphasizing team work in the laboratory and the field will give students
        valuable experience for a future career in science. This will also help the
        instructor to identify leaders, active doers, followers, etc. within each team.

       Regular review of laboratory reports by the instructor will provide students
        feedback that will enable them to improve their presentation and analysis of
        data.

       Review of journals will enable the instructor to assess the quality of ideas and
        experiences generated by the field trips and activities. The journals will
        encourage the students to spend time reflecting on their engagement and better
        assess their own learning. It will also help them analyze what activities had
           the greatest impact which may be useful in deciding what major/research
           project/career to pursue in the future.


Syllabus
CHEM 306L: Environmental Chemistry in the City
Course Description: This is an introductory laboratory and field course that will
concentrate on topics of environmental interest in the city of Chicago. Field work will
include visits to the Chicago River, Lake Michigan, the Chicago Forest Preserve, and
other locations in the metropolitan area. Students will learn proper methods of sample
collection, storage, and transport. Chemical analysis of collected samples by titrimetric,
gravimetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods will take
place in the field and in the laboratory.
Instructor: Dr. Ken Nicholson                                 Office: S212G
Email: k-nicholson@neiu.edu and ktn187@earthlink.net Phone: X5684
Office Hours: M 10-11:30 am, T 1:30-2:30 pm, W 2-3:30 pm, and R 1:30-2:30 pm
Required Materials: Safety glasses, laboratory notebook, journal notebook, scientific
calculator
Prerequisites: CHEM 211 and CHEM 212, minimum grade of “C”
Learning Objectives:
Goals and Assessment
Learning Objectives                           Performance Criteria

Gain a familiarity with sampling and                Ability to design a procedure to
chemical sensing techniques used in                  collect and analyze samples
environmental chemistry
                                                    Capability to perform experiments
                                                     safely and accurately

Develop and sharpen analytical skills used          Capacity to use statistics to analyze
in the lab and the field                             data for significance and error

                                                    Skill to use a variety of approaches
                                                     to investigate a problem

Explore the environmental chemistry                 Active participation at field sites to
issues impacting the city of Chicago                 collect and analyze data

                                                    Attendance and engagement at
                                                     environmental facilities in the city

Learning Objective                                   Performance Criteria
Search, analyze and critique primary and             Ability to summarize the key
secondary environmental chemistry                     findings of a journal article and
literature                                            identify the impact to the field of
                                                      environmental chemistry

                                                     Capacity to recognize the
                                                      connection of literature to field work

Work in a collaborative setting to solve
problems                                             Skills to complete a specific task
                                                      that contributes to a team goal

                                                     Willingness and ability to listen,
                                                      depend on peers, and treat everyone
                                                      with respect

Write and maintain a laboratory notebook             Clarity of the presentation of data
and field journal
                                                     Analysis of results and conclusions

                                                     Ability to clearly describe field
                                                      experiences, develop related
                                                      questions, and make connections to
                                                      community and personal behavior


Assessment of Learning Objectives
Attendance, Engagement and Participation at Field Sites           15%
Laboratory Reports                                                50%
Laboratory Examination                                            25%
Field Journal                                                     10%
Grading
A: 90-100%, B: 75-89%, C: 60-74%, D: 50-59 %
Depending on the class average, these grading levels may be adjusted downward at the
end of the course. However, given this set scale, everyone may achieve an “A” in the
course.
Course Policies

Attendance in lecture portion of this course is strongly recommended, but will not be
taken.

Attendance is required for the laboratory and at the field experiences. We will do our
best to arrange transportation and carpool to locations in the city in advance. Sometimes,
this may require using the public transportation system if poor weather inhibits car travel.
Missed laboratory or field experiences can only be made up or excused with a legitimate
reason. The decision will be made by the instructor on a case by case basis.
Documentation may be required. Please contact me by phone or email if absence is
unavoidable (or tardiness in the case of field work). I want especially emphasize this as a
courtesy if this is a field experience. Please do not have the rest of the group wait for you
if you are unable to attend.
Course Outline
Week 1:         Course Overview, Scope of Environmental Chemistry in Chicago,
                Laboratory Check-in, Safety Review, Field-Kit Assembly
Week 2:         Sampling Methods, Field Experience: Chicago River
Week 3:         Titrimetric Analysis of Water Samples: Determination of Chlorine content
                in water
Week 4:         Field Experience: Water Treatment Facility
Week 5:         Spectroscopic Methods in Environmental Chemistry, Field Experience:
                Lake Michigan
Week 6:         Spectroscopic Methods Continued, Laboratory: Nitrate and Nitrite
                Analysis.
Week 7:         Separations and Chromatographic Methods
Week 8:         Electrochemical Methods, Laboratory: Ion Selective Electrodes
Week 9:         Field Experience: Forrest Preserve
Week 10:        Soil Analysis Continued
Week 11:        Transport in Environmental Chemistry, Field Experience: Watershed
Week 12:        Pollutant Analysis in Watersheds
Week 13:        Laboratory Examination
Please note this outline is subject to change based on weather conditions and field site
                availability.


Bibliography
Dunnivant, Frank, “Environmental Laboratory Exercises for Instrumental Analysis and
               Environmental Chemistry”, 1st Ed., Wiley-Interscience, 2004.
Zhang, C., “Fundamentals of Environmental Sampling and Analysis”, 1st Ed, Wiley-
               Interscience, 2007.
Baird, C., Cann, M., “Environmental Chemistry”, 4th Ed., Freeman and Company, 2008.
Weiner, Eugene, “Applications of Aquatic Chemistry: A Practical Guide”, 2nd Ed., CRC,
2008.
Eby, N. “Principles of Environmental Geochemistry”, 1st Ed., Brooks-Cole, 2004.
Kebbekus, E., Mitra, S., “Environmental Chemical Analysis” CRC, 1st Ed., 1997.

								
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