Theme 9 Future Ro In the 20t sector, de

Document Sample
Theme 9 Future Ro In the 20t sector, de Powered By Docstoc
					Theme 9
Future Role of Governm and Industry in Foster Innovation
                     ment                   ring       n

In the 20tth century, naations that inv                           earch, both fr
                                       vested significantly in rese             rom the public and the priv     vate 
         eveloped their economies and the quality of life of their citizens s
sector, de                                                                                     better than 
                                                                                 significantly b
nations thhat did not.  Innovation is aan important                             nvestment in innovation, b
                                                    t driver for success.  The in                              both 
          mulation of the initial idea
in the form                           a and the prac ctical application can be critical in the ddevelopment of 
nations.   
 
Historically the United States was a leader in inn novation, science and technology. They      y still file 52% of 
patents, a
         although othe  er nations, inccluding China
                                                   a, South Korea  a are increasing their sharei.  The Unite   ed 
                                                                                  ii
         conomic succe
States’ ec               ess has been attributed too their focus o              n
                                                                  on innovation .  The curren  nt administration 
         create a new O
plans to c                            ovation and Entrepreneurs
                         Office of Inno                                         he Departmen
                                                                   ship within th              nt of Commer     rce to 
encourage  e innovation based busine  essesiii. 
 
The strong correlation between R&    &D investment   t and econom mic growth fueled by innov    vation is not 
limited to
         o the USA or o other OECD nations.  China  a and India ha ave both achi ieved high economic grow     wth 
rates over              – 30 years.  It has been spe
          r the last 20 –                           eculated that                              s success has been 
                                                                  t a significant factor in this
caused by y an increased d output in th
                                      heir innovatioon systemsiv.  China, in parrticular has increased its R&   &D 
expenditu ure from USD 4‐7 billion in n the early 90ss to over USDD20 billion in 2004.  China and India bot     th 
increased focus on the  e integration oof science and business se ectors and inccreased incentives for 
innovationv.   
 
  




                                                                                                                       
         ww.oecd.org/dat
Source: ww                          24236156.pdf 
                       taoecd/49/45/2

The UNES SCO Institute for Statistics report, A Glo             ive on Resear
                                                   obal Perspecti           rch and Development (2009  9), 
         hat most deve
reports th             eloping count                            f GDP in R&D
                                     tries invest less than 1% of           D, although they note that 
China and              significant exceptions. The
         d Tunisia are s                           ey found that in most deveeloped countrries, R&D 
activities are largely financed and conducted by the business sector. Yet, the public sector plays a major 
role in most developing countriesvi. 
 
Investment in innovation appears to contribute to success.  Nations can develop strategies to encourage 
innovation, through both government and industry.  Even in the case of developing countries there is a 
case to be made for setting the climate of encouraging innovation, research and development.   
 
There is an emerging trend for multinational corporations to set up research centers in countries like 
China and India, in many cases to tailor products for those particular markets, but also in some cases to 
contribute to global research and developing knowledge.  Companies such as General Electric, Nokia and 
Motorola have set up R&D laboratories in Chinavii and General Electric set up the John. F. Welch 
Technology Centre in Bangaloreviii. 
 
Other strategies include investment in education; robust intellectual property rights regulations, 
fostering partnerships between universities and private business, and providing fiscal incentives for 
investment in research and development.   
 
Another interesting development is with respect to the aspirations of much smaller nations to focus on 
R&D in specific areas with an objective to punch beyond their weight.  Singapore in biotechnology, 
Ireland with computer hardware, and Abu Dhabi with renewable energy are some examples.  The 
energy industry in the USA has significantly reduced their R&D investments in the last decade, as they 
try to cope with the rising prices of hydrocarbon based energy imports.   However, the same industry is 
also in dire need of increased R&D in renewable energy in order to create and innovative and 
sustainable energy base for the near future.  Current balance sheets of these companies do not support 
such investment into the future.   As a major oil exporter, Abu Dhabi, on the other hand, has been 
blessed with additional liquidity at this time and hence has wisely decided to invest this surplus into R&D 
in renewable energy with a long term view to maintain its lead as a major supplier of energy even after 
running out its hydrocarbon resources.   
 
Some of the critical questions that governments and industry may need to respond for the near future 
include: 
• In the increasingly inter‐connected, globalized business environment, would national governments 
     change their strategies to directly support R&D and indirectly incentivize industry to invest in R&D? 
• How can industry or national governments align their need for larger investment in R&D with their 
     current economic situation?   
• What are the risks and rewards of outsourcing part or all of R&D to nations that may have better 
     availability of well qualified scientists? 
 
Innovations initiated by Defense Industry: 
 
The defense industry in developed nations is another strong driver of innovation.  These innovations 
have resulted in benefits not only for national defense but also for civilian life.  Technical expertise has 
been a key on the battleground since the invention of the club.  Superior equipment and materiel has 
often been a decisive factor in defense: guns replacing the bow, cannons replacing the siege engine, 
mounted cavalry superseded by the tank.  Today, the United States Department of Defense budgets 
nearly $80 billion for Research, Development, Testing and Evaluationix.  Over the last half century the 
Pentagon has funded the pre‐award research of 58% of the Nation’s Nobel Prize winners in chemistry 
and 43% of laureates in physics. x In the United Kingdom, in 2005, 30% of the total public research and 
development budget was spent by the Ministry of Defense.  The UK Ministry of Defense also employs 
40% of all government researchers. 
 
Major innovations developed by the defense industry include: 

•      Radar 
       Although the development of radar systems began in the early twentieth century, it was in 1935 
       that a patent was taken by Robert Watson Watt for a prototype devicexi.  Radar was initially focused 
       on the detection of fighter aircraft, but now is used for civilian aircraft, car speed detection and 
       other civilian uses. 
•      Nuclear Power  
       During World War II, the US government set up the Manhattan Project to develop an atomic bomb.  
       The development of nuclear power followed.  Nuclear weapons were linked to nuclear power as the 
       use of a by‐product; plutonium was instrumental in assessing the feasibility of nuclear power at first. 
       xii
            
•      The Internet 
       On October 29, 1969, the first message, “lo” (the beginning letter of login), was sent between two 
       computers, over network known as ARPANet at UCLAxiii.  The development of ARPANet was funded 
       by ARPA, an agency of the United States Department of Defense.  This later developed into the 
       Internet. 
•      Global Positioning System 
       Originally developed by the Department of Defense in cooperation with MIT, GPS is now in 
       widespread use with many applications, both civilian and military.xiv 
•      Silly Putty 
       Originally created by accident in the US when searching for rubber substitute, it became an 
       extremely popular toy and is used in stress reduction and as an adhesive by Apollo astronautsxv 

Although these innovations may have derived from research and development of the national defense 
industry, questions concerning this need to be raised: 

        •      Would these innovations have occurred if other incentives were funded? 
        •      The civilian uses of military inventions are often side effects.  Would it be better to look for 
               these innovations directly? 
        •      At what point does civilian use of military inventions become a justification for the vested 
               interests? 

                                                            
i
  http://www.allbusiness.com/human‐resources/workforce‐management‐hiring‐recruiting/4061245‐1.html  
ii
   http://www.oecdobserver.org/news/fullstory.php/aid/2322/Towards_an_innovation_strategy_.html 
iii
     http://www.usinnovation.org/articles/office‐innovation‐entrepreneurship_09‐23‐09.asp  
iv
    http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2008/rp2008‐31.pdf  
v
   http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2008/rp2008‐31.pdf  
vi
    http://www.uis.unesco.org/template/pdf/S&T/Factsheet_No2_ST_2009_EN.pdf   
vii
      http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2008/rp2008‐31.pdf  
viii
       http://www.ge.com/research/grc_3_3.html  
                                                                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                               
ix http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/dod07c.pdf  
x
   http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/8050737.stm 
xi
    http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/200604/history.cfm  
xii
     http://www.neis.org/literature/Brochures/weapcon.htm  
xiii
      http://www.engineer.ucla.edu/stories/2004/Internet35.htm  
xiv
      http://www.maps‐gps‐info.com/gps‐history.html  
xv
     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silly_putty