hook in class examples by huangyuarong

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 5

									                         HOOK

A hook is at the very beginning of a story. The reason it is
called a hook is because you are trying to “hook” your
reader, like a fisherman, to draw them into your story. It
must be good, or the person will stop reading.


Example: Mandy took her brother’s itouch and hid it in the
treehouse.


DIALOGUE:

      “Where did you hide my itouch!” screamed James, at
his sister Mandy.

      “What do you mean? I didn’t hide it. Maybe you just
lost it,” Mandy smirked sarcastically.



CHARACTER DESCRIPTION:
     Mandy’s big, brown eyes lurked for her brother’s
itouch. She was mad at him for hitting her, so she wanted
revenge.


SETTING DESCRIPTION:
     Inside James’ bright orange room, lined with trophies
from his soccer and basketball tournaments, Mandy was
busy pulling out things from drawers, knocking down
shelves, and tossing around his stained clothes that were all
over the dirty floor. She had to be quick because the stench
of the room was making her want to vomit.




A hook is at the very beginning of a story. The reason it is
called a hook is because you are trying to “hook” your
reader, like a fisherman, to draw them into your story. It
must be good, or the person will stop reading.

Books with good hooks
http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson969/great.pdf
FOUR TYPES OF HOOKS YOU CAN USE

1. DIALOGUE: Conversation between two people.
“Who ate all of my cookies?!” I yelled to my sister
“What cookies? I thought those were all gone,” my sister
innocently responded.
“The extra ones I hid under my bed, as if you didn’t know,”
I said, sarcastically.

2. HUMOR:
Would you believe it if I told you that my dog ate 20
cookies? He sniffed them out from under my bed.

3. CHARACTER DESCRIPTION
She was a thin girl, though she was addicted to cookies.
And now, as her large brown eyes spied under the bed to
sniff out her private collection of chocolate chip, mint, and
Christmas cookies, she sat frozen, her thin limbs quivering
with rage, ready to kill the one who took her stomach’s
treasure.

4. SETTING DESCRIPTION
As she quietly crept into my room, locking the door behind
her, she lifted the blue and red paisley comforter on my
bed, and grabbed the entire plate of cookies, leaving only
traces of crumbs on the floor.
PICK ONE OF THESE TWO TOPICS AND WRITE
TWO TYPES OF HOOKS WITH THEM. Write at least
two sentences for each hook.
(Remember the types of hooks are:
dialogue, humor, character description, setting
description)

1. “I once was attacked by a bird.”
2. “Why I love pizza.”

1. Dialogue
“When are we going home? I’m bored,” said my son, George. But within seconds his
boredom was replaced by terror as a midnight black crow swooped down on his head and
grabbed at his ear with his sharp right talon.
2. Description of a person
   The little girl with red ribbons on her head was playing in the sand. She was humming
the chorus of “My Telephone” to herself as she scooped the grains into her bucket with a
plastic blue shovel. Suddenly, a large, black crow, rushed at her out of the tree, scraping
her hand with his talon, the blood flowing out of her like a stream.
3. Description of setting
The shore was quiet except for the gentle waves striking the land near the little girl. There
were a few tourists lying around on their towels, an older man in blue Hawaiian flower
shorts slowly swimming away from the boat he had just jumped from. His head was
bobbing from side to side as he took shallow breaths before he dunked his head back
underwater and released the air, making tiny bubbles surface. His splashing arms were
barely visible. A bird, spotting his bald head and mistaking it for a fish, rushed down
from the sky, opening its large sharp beak, and grabbed the man’s ear, tearing a large
chunk of it and escaping back into the sky.


PIZZA

Write three hooks with the following topic:
“I once was attacked by a bird.”
1. Dialogue
“When are we going home? I’m bored,” said my son, George. But within seconds his
boredom was replaced by terror as a midnight black crow swooped down on his head and
grabbed at his ear with his sharp right talon.
2. Description of a person
   The little girl with red ribbons on her head was playing in the sand. She was humming
the chorus of “My Telephone” to herself as she scooped the grains into her bucket with a
plastic blue shovel. Suddenly, a large, black crow, rushed at her out of the tree, scraping
her hand with his talon, the blood flowing out of her like a stream.
3. Description of setting
The shore was quiet except for the gentle waves striking the land near the little girl. There
were a few tourists lying around on their towels, an older man in blue Hawaiian flower
shorts slowly swimming away from the boat he had just jumped from. His head was
bobbing from side to side as he took shallow breaths before he dunked his head back
underwater and released the air, making tiny bubbles surface. His splashing arms were
barely visible. A bird, spotting his bald head and mistaking it for a fish, rushed down
from the sky, opening its large sharp beak, and grabbed the man’s ear, tearing a large
chunk of it and escaping back into the sky.

								
To top