The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100

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					The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100 Grades 6, 7 and 8 – Language Arts
Overview
Purpose To write a story from the point of view of one of the participants in the early years of the Santa Claus Parade Strand: Writing Writing skills include the ability to generate, gather and organize ideas and information to create a story using a variety of appropriate literary and stylistic elements. Online Exhibit The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100 http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/exhibits/parade/index.html

Expectations
Overall Expectations 1. Students will generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience. 2. Students will draft and revise student writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience. Specific Expectations 1. Developing and Organizing Content (i) (ii) Identify the story’s topic, purpose and audience. Develop ideas and identify those most appropriate for their story.

(iii) Research and gather information to support their story ideas. (iv) Classify ideas by viewing information from different perspectives and to make connections between ideas.

Overview

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100

(v)

Organize main ideas and supporting details into units that can be used to develop a multi-paragraph story.

(vi) Review the research to determine if it is sufficient for the purpose of their story. 2. Form and Style of Writing (i) (ii) Write a fictional narrative on an historical event. Establish a distinctive, narrative voice.

(iii) Choose and use vivid language. (iv) Pay attention to sentence fluency and rhythm, using a variety of sentence types. (v) Prepare to revise initial drafts by identifying weakness in the story

(vi) Revise story to improve it.

Related Online Exhibit
The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100 On December 2, 1905, Santa Claus paraded through the streets of Toronto for the first time as a guest of the Eaton's Department Store and he has been coming back each year since. His first visit could hardly be called a parade as he rode atop a wagon pulled by a team of horses but he was received enthusiastically and the Eaton's department store continued the tradition until 1982 when a non-profit organization took over. In the early years, Santa Claus depended on horse power to ride through the city streets and, in 1907, he even rode into town on the back of a white horse. In 1913, his sled was “pulled by live reindeer” (actually four caribou from Labrador who rode on a float that was pulled by horse). But by the 1920s, old-fashioned horse power gave way to motorized vehicles and the horses were replaced by trucks and tractors which were better able to pull the large floats along the crowded parade route. Over time, every element of the parade grew bigger – the number and size of floats, the number of costumed participants and the size of the crowds that lined the streets. The changes in the parade are captured through photographs, reminiscences and film clips at The Archives of Ontario’s on line exhibit “The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100.” http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/exhibits/parade/index.html

Related Online Exhibit

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100

Lesson Plan
Description Students will research the Santa Claus Parade exhibit in order to write a story that combines fact with fiction. They will assume the identity of one of three characters and create a story from that character’s perspective during a specific era of the parade. 1. A horse that is no longer needed the year that a tractor is used to pull Santa’s float. Circa 1920. 2. A caribou brought to Toronto from the peaceful tundra of Labrador to the crowded, noisy streets of Toronto. 1913. 3. A boy or girl who becomes a costumed character in the parade after years of being a parade watcher. 1928. All three scenarios involve a character adapting to change and will require the student writer to view information from a different perspective and assume the voice of their character. The story should use a first-person narrative voice and the story’s theme should be about “change.” Getting Organized Advance preparation: Review the online exhibit to familiarize yourself with the content. You will note that the exhibit includes 8 sections. This activity is meant to concentrate on only the first two – The Early Days and The 1920s and 1930s. Familiarity with material in the other sections will be helpful but be prepared to steer students back to the relevant sections after they have explored the Parade exhibit. Students can search the internet for Eatons christmas parade. (The exhibit should be the first item in the results. However, try the search yourself beforehand.) Review and assemble resources. Prepare two charts that will be used in the brainstorming session. One will be to record the useful descriptive details students identify during their study of the site’s photographs and film clips. Set it up using a heading for each of the five senses (sight, sound, smell, touch, taste.) The second chart will be a simple two-column chart for each of the three identified story characters (horse, caribou, parade participant) that will record their THEN and NOW experiences. Print out the student assignment/activity sheets that describe the activity.

Lesson Plan

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100

Required time: Minimum of two sessions that can be extended as necessary, depending on the revision process. Session 1: Use half the session for exploration of the exhibit and note taking. The second half of the session will be used to brainstorm and share the class’s observations. Session 2: Students will write their stories. Teaching and Learning Strategies Discussion: Begin the lesson by familiarizing the students with the history of the Eaton’s Santa Claus parade, explaining how the event changed over the years. Review the research component described on the student handout. Research: Break students up into small groups, assigning them each a character to portray (or letting them choose a character for the group). Depending on the availability of computer stations, students can do their initial website exploration individually or in a group. Brainstorming: Discuss with the whole class the range of descriptive detail they gleaned during their research. Encourage students to add these details to their own lists. Give each group a THEN and NOW chart so they can collectively discuss and record their observations about their assigned characters Writing: Explain to the class the idea of “voice,” reinforcing the idea that they are going to assume the identity and feelings of their assigned character. Writing should be done individually. Once started in class, it can be completed as homework if time is short. Encourage the students to refer to their research charts while writing in order to strengthen their descriptive writing and the voice of their character. Ask them to think about how their characters in terms of the changes the parade has brought to their lives. Revision: Have the students share their stories with the other members of their group. Groups can discuss the work of each member and make positive suggestions for changes.

Lesson Plan

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100

Marking Rubric
Criteria Knowledge and Understanding The student demonstrates understanding of the research material=s meaning and significance. Characteristics of a Narrative: Orientation, Problem, Resolution Demonstrates a thorough knowledge and understanding of the research material. Clearly and creatively includes all characteristics of a narrative: Orientation, Problem, Resolution Demonstrates considerable knowledge and understanding of the research material. Clearly includes many characteristics of a narrative: Orientation, Problem, Resolution Demonstrates some knowledge and understanding of the research material. Includes some characteristics of a narrative: Orientation, Problem, Resolution Demonstrates a limited knowledge and understanding of the research material. Misses many characteristics of a narrative, it is hard to identify this as a narrative Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Level 1

Thinking and Interpretation The student demonstrates critical and creative thinking skills and processes. Demonstrates a high degree of effectiveness in the use of critical and creative thinking skills and processes. Demonstrates considerable effectiveness in the use of critical and creative thinking skills and processes. Demonstrates some degree of effectiveness in the use of critical and creative thinking skills and processes. Demonstrates a limited degree of effectiveness in the use of critical and creative thinking skills and processes.

Marking Rubric

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100 Criteria Story Structure The story has all of: • a strong interesting beginning that captures reader=s attention, • a creative problem. • a series of well-written events, • an ending that clearly and creatively solves the problem. The story has most of: • an interesting beginning, • a problem. • several wellwritten events, • an ending that clearly solves the problem. The story has some of: • a sense of a beginning, • a problem that may be hard to identify, • several wellwritten events= • a sense of ending that may not solve the problem. The story: • unclear orientation of who, when, where • a problem that is missing or hard to identify • few events which may not be sequenced • an ending that may not solve the problem or may be missing • resolution is unclear Sentence Structure Sentences are varied in length and structure. Some sentences are varied in length and structure. Few sentences are varied in length and structure Only short, simple sentences are used. Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Level 1

Communication The student writes effectively to convey meaning through the use of appropriate style, voice, and point of view. Vocabulary and Word Usage Demonstrates a high degree of effectiveness in communicating meaning. Demonstrates considerable effectiveness in communicating meaning. Demonstrates some degree of effectiveness in communicating meaning. Demonstrates a limited degree of effectiveness in communicating meaning.

Uses strong verbs and vivid language.

Uses some strong verbs and good description.

Uses ordinary verbs and adds little description.

Uses few details or action words.

Marking Rubric

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Archives of Ontario Lesson Plans: The Santa Claus Parade Turns 100 Criteria Application The student uses the knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts. Demonstrates a high degree of effectiveness in transferring knowledge and making connections within and between various contexts. Almost no errors. Demonstrates considerable effectiveness in transferring knowledge and making connections within and between various contexts A few minor errors. Demonstrates some degree of effectiveness in transferring knowledge and making connections within and between various contexts. Several errors. Demonstrates a limited degree of effectiveness in transferring knowledge and making connections within and between various contexts. Many errors. Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Level 1

Conventions: Spelling, capitalization, grammar, punctuation, etc.

Marking Rubric

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