POSITIVE PROGRAMMING by dffhrtcv3

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									  Christa Jachym, BCBA
Benhaven Learning Network
     March 22, 2010
PROBLEM BEHAVIOR IS AN
  ERROR IN LEARNING .
 THEREFORE, OUR JOB IS
      TO TEACH.
           Times are Changing
• Parents are 5-6 times more likely to have
  negative interactions with their children than
  positive ones.
• In 1930 parent-child contact averaged 3-4 hours
  per day.
• In 1984 parent-child contact averaged 14.5
  minutes
• Of that 14.5 minutes, 12.5 minutes were spent in
  negative interactions
  (Latham, 2004)
       The Rules of Behavior
• Behavior is strengthened or weakened by its
  consequences.
• Behavior responds more favorably to positive
  consequences.
• It is only known whether a behavior has been
  punished or reinforced by the course of that
  behavior in the future.
• Behavior is largely a product of its immediate
  environment.
      The ABC’s of Behavior
• Antecedents- 3 types
   – Immediate-What happened immediately before the
     behavior occurred?
      • Locations, people, instructions given, events, times of day,
        specific materials, etc.
   – Distant-What happened before the behavior occurred?
      • Previous events, cumulative events, etc.
   – Internal State-How is he/she feeling?
      • Hungry, Tired, Sick, etc.
     The ABC’s of Behavior
• Behavior- What does the student do? What
  does it look like?

  – Be objective
  – Use observable language
  – Avoid vague terminology
     The ABC’s of Behavior
• Consequence- 2 types
  – What happens immediately following the
    behavior? How do I/others react upon seeing
    or hearing the behavior?
     • Verbal feedback, reactions of others, items
       removed or attained, etc.
  – Reinforcement-increases the likelihood that
    the behavior will occur again (pleasant).
  – Punishment-decreases the likelihood that the
    behavior will occur again (unpleasant)
 Behavior As Communication
• People do things for a reason – to get something
  or to cause something to happen. We refer to this
  as the communicative intent of behavior.

• Different messages can be communicated:
   –   Escape or Avoid
   –   Gain attention/reaction
   –   Get something
   –   Self-regulation
  Behavior as Communication
• We need to understand what function or purpose the
  behavior is serving for the individual?

• Assessment involves asking the questions:
   – What?
   – When? Most/Least likely to occur
   – Who?
   – How does the behavior work for the individual?
   – Why?

• The answers should lead to prediction.
         Behaviors to Consider
•   Functional communication
    –   How can he appropriately escape?
    –   How can she gain attention?
    –   How does he ask for help?
    –   Can the she make choices?
•   Self Regulation
    –   Understanding the Rules
    –   Paying Attention
    –   Emotions
    –   Delayed Gratification
          Think Positive…

• Begin with the end in sight…
• Instead of focusing on what you want the
  child to STOP doing, focus on what you
  want the child to DO.
• Avoid negative language (will vs won’t).
          Think Positive…

• Shift from asking the question, “What can
  we do to stop behaviors?” to “What skills
  can be taught to increase the child’s
  chance for success?”
     Positive Programming
• Fix the environment and you’ll fix the
  behavior.

• 90% OF ALL BEHAVIORAL
  DIFFICULTIES CAN BE
  POSITIVELY AFFECTED BY THE
  ENVIRONMENT.

								
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