LEWIS by vivi07

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									March 2009

LEWIS
Kevin Whately returns to Oxford in four new feature-length episodes

Introduction ............................................................................................Pages 2 - 3 Kevin Whately is Detective Inspector Robbie Lewis .............................Pages 4 - 7 Laurence Fox is Detective Sergeant James Hathaway ..................... Pages 8 - 11 Synopses............................................................................................ Pages 12 - 19 Cast and production credits .............................................................. Pages 20 - 23

Press Contact: Peter Mares, ITV Press Office 0207 157 3034/ 0161 952 6222/ 0777 896 1415 Peter.mares@itv.com Picture Contact: John Manthorpe, ITV Pictures 0207 157 3045 John.manthorpe@itv.com

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LEWIS
Kevin Whately returns to the role of Inspector Lewis in four new episodes of Lewis, ITV1‟s top-rated drama of 2008.

The much-loved Oxford policeman is once again joined by Laurence Fox as his young colleague DS James Hathaway, whose understanding with the Inspector deepens with every case, while memories of Lewis‟s wife‟s sudden death continue to haunt him.

In this new series, the duo tackles the murderous fallout from an earlier attempt to kill one of Oxford‟s celebrity atheists; sudden death among student thespians, in which Shylock meets a brutally un-Shakespearian end; the killing by Persian mirror of a Czech barmaid around which hover the ghosts of the university‟s fantasy authors C.S. Lewis and J.R.R.Tolkien; and death within the now middle-aged members of a rock band who were the iconography of Lewis‟s youth.

Clare Holman returns as pathologist Dr Laura Hobson and Rebecca Front is back in the role of Lewis‟s boss, Chief Supt Jean Innocent. Kevin Whately remains proud of his drama: “Everywhere I go, people talk about the production values of Lewis. “I love the space in Oxford and the use of the city. It makes a huge

difference, because, when it comes down to it, a lot of these cop shows are inevitably very similar. It makes such a difference to ours, having those

locations and production values.”

The new series of Lewis is very much a family affair for Laurence Fox.

First, his father James guests in the first film, where he comes under investigation by his son.

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And then proud new dad Laurence introduced son Winston to his Oxford film set shortly after his birth last October.

Guest stars in the new quartet of films include Helen Baxendale, Zoë Boyle, Simon Callow, James Fox, David Hayman, Anastasia Hille, Adrian Lukis, Joanna Lumley, Art Malik and Jenny Seagrove.

The series is produced by Chris Burt, who, after producing 11 Morse films, with John Thaw and Kevin W hately, has been responsible for the eight Lewis films screened from 2006 to last year.

Executive producers are Michele Buck, Damien Timmer, and, for WGBH, Rebecca Easton. Michele Buck says: “Lewis continues to provide quality drama for a hugely appreciative audience who are drawn to the excellent production values and intelligent, satisfying murder mysteries. “As ever the city and university of Oxford provide the elegant backdrop for the most unexpected of crimes.” Damien Timmer adds: “There are some significant developments in Robbie Lewis‟s personal life this year, and he faces some baffling cases with the able assistance of DI Hathaway. “We hope the audience will enjoy discovering more about this highly successful duo and be gripped by the four new films.” Lewis is made by ITV Studios.

The Complete Lewis Series 3 will be available from ITV DVD on 13 April.

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Kevin Whately is Robbie Lewis

Never under-estimate your audience warns Kevin Whately, as he points with pride to the production values of his drama Lewis. “Everywhere I go, people talk about the production values of Lewis. “Punters notice it, they‟re not stupid - they know when things are shot in closeup against a brick wall. I love the space in Oxford and the use of the city. It makes a huge difference, because, when it comes down to it, a lot of these cop shows are inevitably very similar. “It makes such a difference to ours, having those locations and production values. “We are still exploring the Hathaway relationship with Lewis - they‟re developing that gradually as we did with Morse and Lewis. It still keeps me interested and we have a lot of fun doing it. I think the characters can develop more.”

And Kevin reveals that at home he has a little list. “I don‟t usually get involved with casting, but there are lots of wonderful people who still haven‟t been in a Morse or Lewis film. When I‟m watching television, I‟ll make a note of particularly good actors who interest me.”

Kevin has no plans to get on the other side of the camera. “It‟s long meetings and trying to juggle 28 departments,” he concludes. “It‟s not me really; I like just focussing on the one thing.” But when not filming, he and his co-star keep their minds on the series‟ future.

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“Laurence and I have an idea for a story, which we want to take forward. We‟ve got a lot of the ingredients, so we‟ll get together soon over a beer.” The two had paternal chats towards the end of last year‟s filming, after Laurence became a dad. “He did well. I don‟t think he was getting much sleep, but it didn‟t affect him that much. “He got advice from everyone, not just from me. Winston is a lovely little kid.”

But Kevin remembers earlier, young visitors to the Morse set. “Phyllis Logan had a new-born baby; I think she was still breast feeding.” Viewers learn a little of Lewis‟s younger days after he is overwhelmed to meet rock chick Esmé, played by Joanna Lumley, in the Counter Culture Blues episode, telling her he had a poster of her on his wall. So who adorned Kevin‟s bedroom as a teenager? “I had a poster of Natalie Delon on my wall,” he recalls, citing the French film star of the 1970s. “And a photo of Tommie Smith giving the Black Panther salute at the 1968 Olympics; I found that so amazing, that really inspired me. “Once I had a flat, I had flyers for rock concerts and stuff like that, as well as posters, but not particularly when I was younger at home.” Recalling his early musical tastes, Kevin says: “I loved Ten Years After; Alvin Lee was one of those guitar gods like Eric Clapton. I was into what was r „n‟ b in those days, like Led Zeppelin and The Who. All the bands that came to Newcastle, we went to City Hall to watch them. “A lot of those guys are suddenly back on the road, which is ridiculous; a couple of years ago I went to see Jon.Hiseman‟s Colosseum in a small venue
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in Milton Keynes; they were a monster band at the end of the 60s. And I see the Lindisfarne bunch; we do charity shows together.”

Kevin is just back from a post-Lewis charity golf tournament in Portugal, organised by Jimmy Tarbuck, to raise money for a children‟s home on the Algarve.

He is currently playing off a handicap of 18. But is he getting better? “No, because this was the first game of golf since last June, when we started Lewis. “I never really move on from that but it‟s a nice bunch of people, old pals.” But, away from the murder trail, shouldn‟t Lewis be out playing the game to help reduce his handicap? “I‟m not sure it‟s quite Lewis‟s style,” says Kevin. “I‟m not sure it‟s my style to be honest.”

Kevin was introduced to the game by fellow Auf Wiedersehn Pet cast member Tim Healey, who asked him one weekend during a break in filming the iconic ITV drama if he fancied a game on the Isle of Man. “I said „I don‟t play golf‟ and Tim said „That doesn‟t matter; it‟s just a p***-up. “So I bought a second-hand set of clubs, went over to the Isle of Man – and it was. But it was great fun - the standard of golf was rather good, so I made an idiot of myself and have been trying to play ever since.” Kevin‟s next project sees him turning away from drama to work on a factual programme for ITV1 dealing with Alzheimer‟s, from which his mother suffers.

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It follows in the footsteps of documentaries made by Fiona Phillips and Terry Pratchett. “We are all involved with the Alzheimer‟s Society, so we are covering all the different bases, trying to give it a higher profile.”

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Laurence Fox is James Hathaway

The new series of Lewis is very much a family affair for Laurence Fox.

First, his father James guests in the first film, where he comes under investigation by his son.

And then proud new dad Laurence introduced son Winston to his Oxford film set shortly after his birth last October. “Billie and Winston came to Oxford when he was about a week old,“ Laurence recalls. “He came down to the set and he was very, very well-behaved! “The production crew were very kind - they shut the unit down for a day after Winston was born. And then it was straight back to work when he was two days old. “There were some real sleepless nights – and there still are. “But in a funny way, your performance can get a bit better if you don‟t sleep; you don‟t make as much effort and therefore you come across as more natural, I suppose. “I had no life other than work or sleep for six weeks, but we got through it and that‟s all that matters. I missed him, I wanted to be at home with my son. I‟m making up for it now.”

So has Laurence made a conscious decision not to take job offers for the foreseeable future? “Oddly I was expecting, as a dad, that I would say „Right, I better get out to work‟ but Billie is preparing to start work, so I‟m just chilling with Winston and enjoying it.

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“He‟s loving his first snowy winter, though I didn‟t make him a snowman.”

Did Laurence get any tips from his Lewis co-star about juggling work and parenthood? “Kev told me little bits and bobs of what works well with a child – and what doesn‟t. But more so when they‟re older; he was brilliant. He‟s the real deal. “He bought a bottle of champagne when I came back to set; it‟s the first time I‟ve had that much champagne at six in the morning, in the make-up truck. Don‟t tell the producer.” Was Winston‟s early visit to see dad at work intended to put him off acting for ever or to encourage nascent talent? “I am going to let him work it out for himself, I doubt he‟ll want to. W ith both of us acting, he‟ll probably dread it.”

But he would be following in the Fox family footsteps, as exemplified by last summer‟s appearance by James in the cast of Allegory of Love. Though both appeared in ITV‟s Colditz, this marks the first time father and son have stepped in front of the camera together. “He was very nice to me because I think he realised I was nervous; he was very supportive.” Why was Laurence nervous? “He‟s my dad and he‟s a really good actor,” he laughs.

Laurence has now been playing the theology student turned police sergeant for four years. “I feel I‟ve got to know him more and I‟m fonder of him.
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“He has a bit more of a social life in this series. W e do see him with a young lady in one story.”

His playing of Hathaway has prompted the 30-year-old actor to turn his thoughts to creating his own Lewis story. “I have an idea for one and I need to write it. You‟ve got to see if you can do it yourself.”

Whoever writes his scripts, Hathaway remains a smart presence on the streets of Oxford. “I‟d love to loll around in jeans and a t-shirt, but we‟re at work; we have to wear the old suit, don‟t we? “I haven‟t really met that many CID people, but imagine it‟s a sort of unofficial uniform. “But I make sure it‟s a nice suit and tie. I want Hathaway to look quite dapper; I‟ve decided he‟s privately wealthy, and he‟s a policeman out of conscience. “I‟ll probably look back in a few years and cringe. But I‟ve never disagreed with what John our costume designer has done; he‟s been brilliant.”

But one particular suit gets a soaking when Laurence, who does all his own stunts, breaks down a door and dives into a swimming pool to rescue a drowning girl. “It was jolly cold. They had to move the filming day and the pool was not warmed up; it was a case of a wet suit under my suit. I did ruin another suit but John, very cleverly, got me wearing a cheaper make of suit that day.

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In the final film of the four-week run, Hathaway looks on with bemusement when Lewis meets the musical icons of his younger years. Are his music al tastes that much different from his boss? “He‟s meant to have a strong love of classical music, with his Cambridge background,” says Laurence. “He likes chamber music and Gregorian chants, but in his secret life, I think he listens to Jeff Buckley. “As for myself, at the moment, though I‟m not getting much time for music, I‟ve gone back to Bruce Springsteen and the Eurythmics.”

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LEWIS
Synopses Allegory of Love Screenplay by Stephen Churchett from a story by David Pirie Oxford University‟s newest chronicler of fantastical tales is celebrating his latest book.

Dorian Crane (Tom Mison) is reading his novel to an expectant audience, among whom is the unlikely figure of Robbie Lewis (Kevin Whately), brought along by his boss Jean Innocent (Rebecca Front), a friend of Dorian‟s mother Ginny (Anastasia Hille).

Following in the literary footsteps of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, Crane enthrals his audience, among whom is his “muse” and bride-to-be Alice Wishart (Cara Horgan) with her doctor father Jem (Adrian Lukis) and war games-obsessed younger brother Hayden (Olly Alexander).

But the following morning, the real, murderous world of the city preoccupies Lewis and Hathaway (Laurence Fox) on a bloody footpath by the river, where the body of Czech barmaid Marina Hartner (Katia Winter) has been found, savagely murdered with an antique Persian mirror. Among the shards of glass is a bloodstained note, with the single word „Uqbara‟, recognised by Hathaway as a place in Iraq.

A lecturer in comparative religion, Hamid Jassim (Art Malik), himself an Iraqi, confirms the mirror was stolen from his unlocked college room, while he attended Crane‟s book launch. Hobson‟s (Clare Holman) post-mortem report reveals that Marina had consensual sex on the night of her murder, and a chambermaid friend Leyla (Farzana Dua

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Elahe) comes forward to tell the police that Marina borrowed her hotel room for an encounter with a man, after leaving the bar where she worked. On Marina‟s laptop, Hathaway finds a website “Meet the Czech Chicks”, where “Ned from Oxford, England” vouches for her beauty.

Phone records link the dead girl with Professor Norman Deering (James Fox), a highly-respected university lecturer – whose middle name is Edward – who swears his relationship with Marina ended a year ago. Idly page-turning through Dorian Crane‟s latest novel, Lewis discovers a chapter is named “The Magic Mirror of Princess Rooksnarl”, in which he writes about it bringing “a swift and ugly death”, though under questioning, the young author denies any involvement in the Czech girl‟s death.

Then Dr Wishart arrives at the police station with a cutting from newspaper coverage of the book launch, sent that morning to his daughter. Across Alice‟s face is scrawled the word “Die!”, in handwriting matching that on the “Uqbara” note.

Recalling that not only were Marina and Alice the same build but wore the same perfume, which in itself brings back memories of his late wife, Lewis becomes convinced that Alice was the intended murder victim.

As he and Hathaway explore the fantasy worlds of the printed page, Lewis expands on his theory, citing Oxford student Lewis Carroll‟s Alice Through The Looking Glass. “If you‟re right, it‟s sick,” concludes Hathaway. “It‟s Oxford,” retorts Lewis. But then more literary whimsy becomes horrific, murderous reality…..

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The Quality of Mercy Screenplay by Alan Plater It‟s the first preview of a new student production of The Merchant of Venice.

Before the critics and agents descend like a pack of ravening wolves, comes a final chance to brush up on lines and perfect stage moves in the college grounds.

But halfway through the half-price performance comes a drama certainly not penned by Shakespeare.

The student Shylock, Richard Scott (Daniel Sharman), is found dead backstage, the production‟s sharp prop knife plunged into his chest. A note found by the body quotes from Hamlet: “Neither a borrower nor a lender be”.

Called to the open-air theatre, Lewis (Kevin Whately) and Hathaway (Laurence Fox) are struck by the lack of grief amongst the cast, in particular Emma Golding (Daisy Lewis), the fiercely ambitious director who, furnished with another student word-perfect in the role, is determined that her show must go on. Lewis‟s questioning of Golding‟s professor – and landlady – Denise Gregson

(Maureen Beattie) reveals that the dead student had an expensive life-style and owed money to cast members and beyond.

Interviewing cast and audience, Hathaway becomes suspicious of Simon Monkford, an out-of-town playgoer, who seems a little too eager to present his ticket stub as an alibi. And later, as the officers enjoy a post-work drink at the Randolph, they hear the hotel may have been the victim of a scam perpetrated by the self-same Monkford.

The next day, after agreeing that the press night performance can go ahead, Lewis meets former student turned freelance journalist Amanda Costello (Shereen
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Martineau), who reveals that Scott was suspected of theft from dressing rooms and digs during the students‟ visit to the Edinburgh Fringe.

His alleged haul included a laptop from student playwright and now cynical Oxford dropout Phil Beaumont (Bryan Dick), who is among the crowd at the post-show party as The Merchant of Venice finally gets under way.

But death intrudes once more on the student thespians when Amanda Costello is found dead in the bar‟s cellar, with another Shakespearian line by her body, this time Puck‟s “I will lead them up and down”.

At the office of a student paper, where Costello was one-time editor, Lewis learns that she was researching what she claimed was a huge news story.

Even with a double murder to investigate, Hathaway is intent on unearthing more about “Simon Monkford, conman, the early years”. His contacts with the Met and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police finally provide him with the answer he expects. “But I‟m not sure whether it‟s the answer I wanted,” he tells a mystified Lewis, just as a phone call alerts them to a break-in at Professor Gregson‟s house.

The Point of Vanishing By Paul Rutman

On the morning after a police dinner, at which Hathaway (Laurence Fox) hears news of a surprise promotion, he and Lewis (Kevin Whately) arrive at an Oxford terraced house where a man has been found beaten and drowned in his bath. By the body they discover a postcard of the city‟s Ashmolean Museum painting of Uccello‟s Renaissance painting The Hunt in the Forest, bearing the anonymous, hand-written message “It was no dream”.
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Lewis recognises the name of the murdered man, Steven Mullan (Dougal Irvine), who, his colleague confirms, was recently released from prison, where he was sent for a drink-driving offence. But the inspector tells Hathaway that there was more to it than that: Mullan, who turned to the Bible after a criminal career as a youngster, attempted to kill Oxford physics don turned celebrity atheist Tom Rattenbury (Julian Wadham). The corpse is identified by Mullan‟s flatmate, Alex Hadley (Danny Midwinter), a council street cleaner, who knows little of the dead man‟s past. At Rattenbury‟s home, the police officers meet his glamorous wife Cecile, (Jenny Seagrove) children Daniel (Ben Aldridge) and Jessica (Ophelia Lovibond), and Daniel‟s East coast American student girlfriend Hope Ransome (Zoe Boyle). The family are shocked by the news of Mullan‟s death. Cecile explains that he was enraged by a particularly blasphemous advert for her husband‟s latest book, and drove a truck into Rattenbury‟s car, only to discover that Jessica was in fact behind the wheel, suffering injuries which left her in a wheelchair. “What that man did to us was evil and wicked but, at the risk of sounding trite, it brought us closer together as a family,” Cecile explains as Lewis and Hathaway take their leave. As they ponder Mullan‟s death by drowning and his past, the police officers suddenly notice a crowd of paparazzi swarming around Hope. Lewis gallantly rescues her from the scrum, only to learn to his surprise that the visiting Rhodes scholar is the daughter of US Secretary of State, Carl Ransome.

That evening, Lewis attends an Oxford Union debate between Rattenbury and his longstanding intellectual rival, and Hope‟s art history tutor, Manfred Canter (Michael Simkins). At the post-debate reception, Daniel abruptly throws his wine at Canter, leading Lewis to wonder if something inappropriate is occurring between Hope and her tutor.
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But such thoughts are forgotten when pathologist Laura Hobson (Clare Holman) drops her bombshell.

The man in the morgue is, in fact, Alex Hadley, whose corpse was identified by his flatmate, the very much living and breathing Steven Mullan, who has since failed to turn up for work. The wanted man eventually appears at Lewis‟s home, brandishing a hammer, and explaining that Alex had taken on his name so that he could continue an affair with his boss‟s wife. But why had Mullan agreed to the identity swap? “Somebody says „Start over. New name. New life.‟ I‟m not gonna think twice, am I?” he tells Lewis, and, stressing that he didn‟t murder his flat-mate, asks for one more day at liberty.

The two detectives take the Uccello postcard to Canter, quizzing him about Daniel‟s sudden vinous outburst.

That evening, Lewis and Hathaway join the guests as the Rattenburys celebrate Jessica‟s 21st birthday at Blenheim Palace, where, alongside the champagne and canapés, murder is on the menu.

Counter Culture Blues By Guy Andrews From a story by Nick Dear

An unholy row has disturbed the Sabbath for a vicar and his congregation.

Gunfire is drowning out their worship, and on their day of rest, the police are called to the church bordering a country estate outside Oxford.

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Following up the complaint, Lewis and Hathaway drive to the mansion of rock legend Richie Maguire (David Hayman) to tackle the offenders. But Lewis is transported back to a world of his own, as he comes face to face with the icons of his youth. The group‟s members are already in a state of shock. “Not every day Esmé Ford comes back from the dead,” Richie explains to his visitors.

And there, before Lewis, is Esmé, (Joanna Lumley) the lead singer whose poster adorned his bedroom wall and who was thought to have drowned in Grenada after the group disbanded in turmoil more than 30 years ago. Less glamorous is the police‟s next rendezvous, where by a disused railway track, Laura Hobson (Clare Holman) kneels over the corpse of a teenage boy killed by a vehicle repeatedly driving over his body.

He was Lucas Emerton, part of a dysfunctional family, whose only living relative, his grandma, didn‟t even know he existed. Recalling that anti-rust paint was found on Lucas‟s body, and that Richie‟s mansion gates were slightly buckled, Lewis is adamant that the youth was murdered there. But what links him to a posse of old rockers? A check on the band‟s gleaming gallery of vehicles finds nothing incriminating, but, during their search, Esmé tells Lewis and Hathaway that Richie‟s daughter Kitten (Perdita Weeks) resents her intrusion into the house. “Last year he did a whole album of songs dedicated to her,” Esme reveals, to Lewis‟s surprise. “Recorded, not released,” she clarifies. “Somebody who won‟t own up wiped the tapes. Richie issued a rather intemperate press release saying he was going to find the culprit and kill him.”

Then the police find a stash of money hidden beneath the passenger seat of the car belonging to the band‟s music supervisor Bone (Zig Byfield).
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Meanwhile, in Oxford itself, the band‟s former manager Vernon Oxe (Simon Callow) is settled into his hotel, and seeks out Kitten‟s music tutor Samantha Wheeler (Isobel Middleton) who wrote the sleeve notes for their albums and knows every detail of their turbulent lives. Then, in a dingy bar‟s toilets, Bone is found dead, a tourniquet tied round his arm. But Lewis doesn‟t believe the injection was self-inflicted – it‟s a case of murder. And the death toll rises to three when Hathaway, intent on questioning Wheeler, finds her at her computer – strangled with a lute string. With the imminent arrival home of Richie‟s wife Caroline (Helen Baxendale), and their boss Innocent (Rebecca Front) pressing for a swift result, can Lewis and Hathaway find a harmonious resolution to the murderous mayhem among the musicians?

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Cast DI Robbie Lewis ................................................................................. Kevin Whately DS James Hathaway .......................................................................... Laurence Fox CSI Jean Innocent ............................................................................ Rebecca Front Dr Laura Hobson................................................................................. Clare Holman Allegory Of Love Alice Wishart ....................................................................................... Cara Horgan Jem Wishart .......................................................................................... Adrian Lukis Hayden Wishart ...............................................................................Olly Alexcander Ginny Harris ...................................................................................... Anastasia Hille Dorian Crane ........................................................................................... Tom Mison Professor Hamid Jassim ............................................................................. Art Malik Professor Norman Deering ..................................................................... James Fox Melanie Harding ................................................................................... Louise Dylan Marina Hartner ...................................................................................... Katia Winter Leyla Adam ................................................................................Farzana Dua Elahe Kelly Bedford ........................................................................................ Claire Brown Canadian tourist ...................................................................................... Simon Kerr

Screenplay ..................................................................................Stephen Churchett From a story by ........................................................................................David Pirie Director .................................................................................................Bill Anderson The Quality Of Mercy

Emma Golding .......................................................................................Daisy Lewis Richard Scott................................................................................... Daniel Sharman Simon Monkford ................................................................................... Ronan Vibert Graham Wilkinson.....................................................................Shaughan Seymour Isabel Dawson ......................................................................................... Abby Ford Phil Beaumont ..........................................................................................Bryan Dick Barham Rezvani ...................................................................................Tariq Jordan

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Sally .......................................................................................................... Jo Herbert Alison ................................................................................................. Sonya Cassidy Denise Gregson ............................................................................. Maureen Beattie Joe Myers ............................................................................................. Geoff Breton Christine Harper ........................................................................... Annabelle Dowler Professor James Alderson ......................................................... Nicholas Pritchard Duffy ......................................................................................................Aled Pedrick Amanda Costello........................................................................ Shereen Martineau Terry Bainbridge .................................................................................... Gwilym Lee Webster ................................................................................................. William Petri

Screenplay .............................................................................................. Alan Plater Director .............................................................................................Bille Eltringham

The Point Of Vanishing Alex Hadley .................................................................................... Danny Midwinter Steven Mullan ......................................................................................Dougal Irvine Tom Rattenbury ............................................................................... Julian Wadham Hope Ransom ........................................................................................... Zoe Boyle Daniel Rattenbury ................................................................................ Ben Aldridge Cecile Rattenbury ...........................................................................Jenny Seagrove Jessica Rattenbury .......................................................................Ophelia Lovibond Manfred Carter ................................................................................Michael Simkins Madeleine Cotton ................................................................................. Kellie Shirley Fiona Mckendrick .......................................................................... Catherine Walker Marc Cotton.............................................................................................Tim Treloar Frances Wheeler...................................................................................Susan Tracy

Screenplay ........................................................................................... Paul Rutman Director .............................................................................................Maurice Phillips

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Counter Culture Blues Richie Maguire .................................................................................. David Hayman Esme Ford ........................................................................................ Joanna Lumley Kitten ................................................................................................. Perdita Weeks Vernon Oxe ......................................................................................... Simon Callow Franco ............................................................................................ Anthony Higgins Jo ...................................................................................................... Jessica Manley Bone ......................................................................................................... Zig Byfield Caroline ........................................................................................ Helen Baxendale Mack .................................................................................................... Hilton McRae Samantha Wheeler ........................................................................ Isobel Middleton Declan ...............................................................................................Daniel Kaluuya Felipe .................................................................................................... Junix Inocian Jacinta ....................................................................................... Renee Montemayor Paul .........................................................................................................Harry Lloyd Rev Armstrong ................................................................................ Nick Malinowski Frisch ..................................................................................................... Jane Bertish Lucas .................................................................................................. Thomas Kane Concierge ............................................................................................ Philip Correia Simon Bell ............................................................................................ Paul Raffield Cleaner .............................................................................................. Shola Adewusi Solicitor.............................................................................................Nicholas Briggs Screenplay .......................................................................................... Guy Andrews From a story by ......................................................................................... Nick Dear Director .................................................................................................Bill Anderson

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Crew

Executive producers ....................Michele Buck, Damien Timmer, Rebecca Eaton Producer .................................................................................................... Chris Burt Casting ................................................................................................ Susie Parriss Directors of photography ........................................... Chris O‟Dell BSC, Paul Bond Composer .................................................................................Barrington Pheloung Production designer ............................................................................. Paul Spriggs Costume designer ................................................................................. John Lindlar Hair and make-up designer ......................................................... Vanessa Johnson

Press Contact: Peter Mares, ITV Press Office 0207 157 3034/ 0161 952 6222/ 0777 896 1415 Peter.mares@itv.com Picture Contact: John Manthorpe, ITV Pictures 0207 157 3045 John.manthorpe@itv.com

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