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VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 46

									                                                                   is...




Mention pour logo DEC: This document was produced with a
financial contribution by the Government of Canada through
Canada Economic Development.                                 Research Department
“Montréal is…” is a document that Tourisme Montréal has been producing since 1998. Updated every two
years, “Montréal is…” complements other Tourisme Montréal research documents and brings together a
series of information on an array of known and lesser known aspects of the Montréal destination. The
facts and figures in this document will help you get the most of Montréal, its resources and its sometimes
unexpected attractions.


                                                                                                   Enjoy!


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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Table of Contents
Access ............................................................................................................................................................................ 4
Downtown....................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Cinema ........................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Climate ........................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Conventions.................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Cultural Diversity ............................................................................................................................................................ 6
Economy ........................................................................................................................................................................ 7
Education ....................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Trivia............................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Geography.................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Industry......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Innovation ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Language ..................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Housing ........................................................................................................................................................................ 13
Media............................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Fashion......................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Lifestyle ........................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Montréal, International City........................................................................................................................................... 15
Nightlife ........................................................................................................................................................................ 15
Religious Patrimony...................................................................................................................................................... 16
Population .................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Quality of life................................................................................................................................................................. 18
Neighbourhoods & Boroughs........................................................................................................................................ 19
Quartier international .................................................................................................................................................... 20
Restaurants .................................................................................................................................................................. 21
Healthcare and Services .............................................................................................................................................. 22
Public Safety................................................................................................................................................................. 22
Sports and Leisure ....................................................................................................................................................... 23
Tourism ........................................................................................................................................................................ 24
Active Transportation.................................................................................................................................................... 25
Air Transportation ......................................................................................................................................................... 26
Marine Transport .......................................................................................................................................................... 26
Urban Transportation.................................................................................................................................................... 27
Arts and Culture............................................................................................................................................................ 27
Fun and Pleasure in Montréal....................................................................................................................................... 29
Underground Pedestrian Network ................................................................................................................................ 29
Going Green ................................................................................................................................................................. 30
Sources ........................................................................................................................................................................ 33

                                                                                                                                                                                     3
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Access
   −   Montréal is 63 kilometres (39 miles) from the U.S. border.
   −   The closest border crossings of the states of New York and Vermont are a one-hour drive from
       downtown Montréal.
           o   Franklin Centre/Churubusco, NY (open 8 a.m. to 12 a.m. from May 1 to October 31 and 8
               a.m. to 4 p.m from November 1 to April 30).
           o   Covey Hill/Cannon’s Corner, NY (open from 8 a.m. to 12 a.m. from May 1 to October 31
               and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. from November 1 to April 30).
           o   Hemmingford/Mooers, NY
           o   St-Bernard-de Lacolle/Champlain, NY
           o   Lacolle Rte 221/Overton Corners, NY
           o   Lacolle Rte 223/Rouses Point, NY
           o   Noyan/Alburg Springs, VT
   −   The cities of Toronto, New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Washington are less than two hours
       away by plane.
   −   By car, Montréal is two hours from Ottawa, two and a half hours from Québec City and five hours
       from Toronto.
   −   Montréal has 45 bridges and 7 tunnels. Of these, 18 allow travellers to access and leave the
       island of Montréal.

Downtown
   −   Measuring a full 11 km in length and with almost 1,200 stores between Guy and Saint-Denis
       streets (including approximately 450 with storefront access on the street), Sainte-Catherine Street
       is home to the highest concentration of stores in Canada as well as the largest assortment of
       fashion boutiques and ready-to-wear shops in the country.
   −   Nine métro (subway) stations are located along Sainte-Catherine, allowing visitors to discover
       much of this famous street and downtown Montréal.
   −   More than 160,000 vehicles park downtown each day.
   −   There are 8,014 paid parking spaces (parking meters) along the streets of downtown (borough of
       Ville-Marie). There are 351 spaces available at hourly rate of $1. The hourly rate of the remaining
       7,663 spaces is $3 per hour.
   −   Downtown Montréal offers 14,500 available hotel rooms.
   −   Downtown Montréal has 57 movie theatres.
   −   Downtown Montréal (borough of Ville-Marie) has 129 parks and mini-parks in its territory.

Cinema
   −   Montréal is internationally renowned for its creativity in the field of entertainment technology and
       visual effects software. Approximately 80% of special effects software on the world market for
       animation or special effects for movies was developed in Montréal.
   −   On average, Montréal secures between 30 to 50 special effects contracts for big-budget movies
       per year, each worth approximately 5 to 6 million dollars.
   −   Films such as Titanic, Jurassic Park, Godzilla and Spy Kids used software that was made in
       Montréal to create their special effects. Others, such as Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium,
       entrusted Montréal studios with realizing their visual effects.


                                                                                                         4
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   In the last five years, 170 foreign productions were filmed in Montréal.
   −   Feature-length films shot in Montréal include Upside Down (2011), The Factory (2011), Barney’s
       Version (2010), Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian (2009), The Curious Case of
       Benjamin Button (2008), The Spiderwick Chronicles (2007), Blades of Glory (2006), 300 (2006),
       Lucky Number Slevin (2006), The Fountain (2004), The Aviator (2003),The Day After Tomorrow
       (2003), Gothika (2003), Gothika (2003), Taking Lives (2003), The Terminal (2003), Catch me if
       you can (2002) and Les Invasions barbares (filmed in 2002- film by Québec director Denys
       Arcand, recognized as the best screenplay at the Cannes International Film Festival 2003, winner
       of the Oscar for best foreign film at the 2003 Academy Awards and recipient of three Caesars in
       2004).
   −   According to Spotlight magazine, Montréal is one of the few cities in the world where experience
       and expertise in every domain of the giant-screen industry (IMAX) all come together in one
       destination.
   −   Montréal has the technology required to meet the increasing demand for high-quality 3-D full-
       length features (Spotlight magazine).
   −   Montréal has two giant IMAX screens, the first at the Montréal Science Centre in the Old Port and
       the second at the Cinéma Banque Scotia on Sainte-Catherine Street.

Climate
   −   The average annual rainfall in Montréal is 763.8 mm.
   −   Montréal receives an average of 217.5 cm of snow a year.
   −   Montréal’s worst-ever snowstorm occurred on March 4, 1971 when 43.2 cm of snow fell on the
       city.
   −   A total of 383.3 cm of snow, the heaviest snowfall ever recorded, blanketed Montréal during the
       winter of 1970-1971.
   −   With a mere 93.1 cm of snow, the winter of 1979-1980 set the record for the least amount of snow
       to fall in an entire season.
   −   January 15, 1957 was the coldest day ever recorded in Montréal when the temperature dipped to
       –37.8ºC.
   −   With the mercury soaring to 37.6ºC, August 1st, 1975 was the hottest day ever recorded in
       Montréal.
   −   Between January 5 and 9, 1998, Montréal experienced the worst ice storm in its history when 100
       mm of freezing rain fell on the city. Nearly 3.5 million people, or half the province of Québec, were
       left without electricity in some cases for up to 33 days, and over 1.1 billion dollars in insurance
       claims were filed.




                                                                                                          5
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Average monthly temperatures are as follows:
                January                           -10,2 oC             13,6 oF
                February                           -8,4 oC             16,9 oF
                March                              -2,3 oC             27,9 oF
                April                               5,7 oC             42,3 oF
                May                                13,4 oC             56,1 oF
                June                               18,2 oC             64,8 oF
                July                               20,9 oC             79,6 oF
                August                             19,6 oC             67,3 oF
                September                          14,6 oC             58,3 oF
                October                             8,1 oC             46,6 oF
                November                            1,6 oC             34,9 oF
                Décember                           -6,3 oC             20,7 oF

Conventions
   −   In 2009, Montréal ranked 3rd in North America and first in Canada for the number of international
       conventions that it hosted. Montréal also ranked first in North America for hosting international
       associative events.
   −   In 2009, Montréal ranked 25th in the world for the 77 international conventions that it hosted.
   −   In 2009, 251,985 people attended one of the 213 conventions held in Montréal..

Cultural Diversity
   −   Just over one in 3 Montrealers is an immigrant. In fact, the 2006 census revealed that there were
       approximately 560,000 immigrants on the island of Montréal, or 31% of the population, compared
       to 28% in the 2001 census. In 2006, the immigrant population of the Census Metropolitan Area
       (CMA) was 21%. In comparison, the immigrant population of the CMA of Toronto and Vancouver
       was 46% and 40%, respectively.
   −   The five main countries of birth of recent immigrants of Montréal’s CMA are China, Algeria,
       Morocco, Romania and France. The total population from these countries accounts for 40% of the
       CMA’s recent immigrants.
   −   According to the same 2006 census, approximately 66% of immigrants in Québec settle in
       Montréal and 87% in the Montréal census metropolitan area.
   −   Roman Catholicism, Islam, Judaism and Protestantism, in that order, are the most commonly
       practiced religions in the Montréal area.
   −   Visible minorities make up 25% of the population in Montréal. Blacks are the largest visible
       minority at 29%, with Arabs second at 17%.
   −   Every year, Montréal organizes the longest running Saint Patrick’s Day Parade in North America.
       The very first parade was held in 1824. According to the 2006 census, an estimated 216,000
       Montrealers in the city’s CMA are of Irish descent.
   −   Montréal is home to the largest Arab community in Canada. According to the 2006 census, close
       to 100,000 people from the visible Arab minority live in the region, which represents 37.2% of
       Canada’s entire Arab population, 2.8% of Montréal’s population and 16.7% of Montréal’s entire
       population of visible minorities.
   −   Over 80 ethnic groups are represented in the Metropolitan Montréal area.



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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   According to the 2006 census, the principal countries of origin of immigrants to the Metropolitan
       Montréal Area are:
           o   Italy (9.6%)
           o   Haiti (7.2%)
           o   The People’s Republic of China (5.0%)
           o   France (4.8%)
           o   Morocco (4.4%)
           o   Algeria (3.9%)
   − The boroughs in Montréal where cultural communities most often live are:
           o   Saint-Laurent: 50%;
           o   Côte-des-Neiges, Notre-Dame-de-Grâce: 46.6%;
           o   Côte-Saint-Luc: 43.7%
           o   Villeray–Saint-Michel–Parc-Extension: 42.8%;
           o   Saint-Léonard: 41.3%;

Economy
   −   From an economic standpoint, Montréal ranks second in Canada, just behind Toronto.
   −   Montréal ranks 1st in North America for the most competitive operating costs.
   −   Montréal boasts the lowest commercial taxation rate in North America.
   −   According to a study conducted in 2009 by the Union Bank of Switzerland (UBS) of 73 cities
       around the world, Montrealers pay on average 24% of their gross earnings in taxes and other
       deductions. Montréal ranks 31st worldwide (out of 73 cities) for its taxation rate. The number one
       ranking is reserved for the city with the highest taxation rate.
   −   In 2009, there were 60,455 companies or organizations in Montréal.
   −   According to the same study conducted by the UBS of 73 cities around the world, Montréal ranks
       12th worldwide for its residents’ purchasing power. In fact, the purchasing power of Montrealers is
       greater than that of the residents of London, Toronto and Tokyo.
   −   According to a study conducted in 2009 by Mercer Human Resource Consulting, among large
       international metropolises, Montréal has one of the lowest costs of living. In fact, despite the
       strong Canadian dollar over the American dollar, Greater Montréal enjoys an enviable position
       thanks to its stable inflation rate. The healthcare system in Québec is based on the principle of
       universality (free), as is education from elementary up to and including college, in both English
       and French.
   −   Montréal has more than one hundred International Finance Centres (IFC). Financial groups from
       the United States, France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Tunisia, Lebanon and
       Canada hold IFC certification.
   −   In 2007, venture capital investments in Montréal totalled 480.6 million dollars, making Montréal
       the number one Canadian city, before Toronto.
   −   According to Red Herring, a California magazine specialising in the technology sector, the
       Solidarity Fund QFL headquartered in Montréal is among the top 100 venture capital investment
       firms in the world.




                                                                                                        7
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Education
   −   Montréal is home to 11 institutions of higher learning, including four major universities:
       o   Four Major Universities
                   Université de Montréal (French)
                   Université du Québec à Montréal (French)
                   McGill University (English)
                   Concordia University (English)
       o   Seven Other University-Level Institutions
                   The École Polytechnique de Montréal, affiliated with the Université de Montréal.
                   HEC Montréal, a business school affiliated with the Université de Montréal
                   The École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), affiliated with the Université du Québec.
                   The Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), affiliated with the Université
                   du Québec.
                   The École nationale d'administration publique (ENAP), affiliated with the Université du
                   Québec.
                   Télé-université (TELUQ), affiliated with the Université du Québec.
                   A campus of the Université de Sherbrooke in Longueuil.
   −   Montréal ranks 1st in North America for the number of university students per capita.
   −   Montréal ranks 1st in Canada for the number of university students and foreign students
       o   In the fall of 2009, 168,913 students were enrolled in universities in Montréal. In 2007, the
           fields of study with the highest number of students enrolled were administration sciences
           (23.2%), humanities (20.6%) and applied sciences (14.0%).
   −   Montréal ranks first in Canada for the number of university degrees awarded to students (includes
       foreign students).
       o   In 2009, the universities in the Greater Montréal region awarded a total of 40,880 degrees.
   −   Montréal also ranks first in Canada for the number of university degrees awarded to international
       students.
   −   Montréal ranks number one in Canada for the number of university students at the Master’s and
       doctoral levels, as well as number one for the number of university students (at all levels) overall.
   −   In 2009, McGill University ranked 18th among the top 200 universities in the world, according to
       Times Higher Education-QS. The university also ranked 10th overall for humanities and
       biomedicine.
   −   In 2009, HEC Montréal ranked 23rd (ex-aequo) for its Master’s programme in Management
       according to the Financial Times. Furthermore, its intensive MBA programme is considered to be
       the 10th best programme outside of the United States according to Forbes magazine. HEC
       Montréal was the only Canadian school included in the magazine’s ranking.
   −   Montréal is the university research capital of Canada. It ranks number one in Canada for the
       number of research centres and for money invested in university research.
   −   52% of the CMA of Montréal is bilingual (French and English) and close to 20% of the population
       speaks three languages fluently.



                                                                                                          8
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −     There are 5 school boards on the Island of Montréal: 3 French and 2 English. They had 165,041
         and 59,281 students enrolled in 2006-2007, respectively.
   −     During 2007-2008, the total number of students in the public, private and government school
         networks was 110,179 in primary and 105,241 in secondary.
   −     The Montréal region is home to 12 public colleges (CEGEPs) of which 9 are French and 3,
         English. In 2007, there were 53,612 students enrolled in full-time studies, including 19,221 in the
         anglophone system. .
   −     Approximately 78% of Montréal residents (or 2.3 million people) aged 15 and above have at least
         a high school diploma.
   −     A little over 37% of the population of Greater Montréal (or 1 million people) aged 15 and above
         has a college or university degree.
   −     In May 2010, the Montréal Municipal Council proclaimed the city to be a “Knowledge Destination”.
         Two large, scientific conventions attracted close to 15,000 delegates. These two events are the
         most significant in Canada with regards to scientific participation, public openness and economic
         spin-offs.

Trivia
   −     It is not known how Sainte-Catherine Street got its name, but a number of hypotheses have been
         put forward: the street may have been named in honour of Catherine de Bourbonnais (1749-
         1805), a natural-born daughter of Louis XV, or it may have been named after Catherine Viger,
         adopted daughter of Jacques Viger, the first mayor of Montréal, or it may bear the name of the old
         country road that led to the Convent of the Sisters of Notre Dame.
   −     In 1905, St-Laurent Boulevard became the dividing line between the city’s eastern and western
         sections.
   −     Close to 60 antique shops and art galleries line Notre-Dame Street between Peel and Atwater, an
         area known as the Antique Alley
   −     According to The Montreal Gazette (December 5, 1999), the ten most important symbols in
         Montréal are:
         o   The Mount Royal cross
         o   The Olympic Stadium
         o   Place Ville-Marie and its revolving lights
         o   Saint Joseph’s Oratory on Mount Royal
         o   Environment Canada’s Biosphere
         o   The Jacques Cartier Bridge
         o   The University of Montréal tower
         o   The Five Roses neon sign
         o   The Orange Julep (on Décarie Boulevard)
         o   The Guaranteed Milk bottle (on Lucien-L’Allier Street)
   −     The most common building materials used for Montréal houses are grey stone and red brick,
         which were formed thousands of years ago when the entire region lay beneath the Champlain
         Sea. At the time, red clay and grey limestone made up this ancient seabed.
   −     The outer staircases that grace many Montréal homes are one of the city’s distinctive features.
         Their design dates back to a time when homes in the city’s more well-to-do neighbourhoods were
         set back from the street. This started a trend, and soon duplexes and triplexes appeared with


                                                                                                          9
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
       outer staircases of all different shapes and sizes—L- and S-shaped, straight, single and double.
       Exterior staircases were banned in 1940 as a result of pressure from members of the
       Establishment, who were upset by this appalling fad. The ban was lifted in 1994 when, in the
       interests of preserving architectural harmony, outer staircases were allowed to be built on streets
       where the structures already existed.
   −   Established in 1854, the Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery on Mount Royal is Canada’s largest
       cemetery and 3rd largest in North America, with an area of 1.39 km2. The cemetery is the final
       resting place for over one million people and more than 10,000 are buried there every year.
       Approximately 50 km of routes and pathways crisscross the cemetery.
   −   Montréal has an authentic Parisian metro grille (Guimard). A gift to the city from Paris on the
       occasion of Expo 67, the Parisian metro grille was installed in the Square-Victoria station, near the
       Montréal Exchange tower in the Quartier international.
   −   Montréal has approximately 675,000 public trees.
   −   Montréal is famous for its bagels, poutine and smoked meat. Montréal bagels are different from
       New York and Toronto bagels in that they are made with eggs and are baked in wood ovens. In
       comparison, New York bagels are made with water and are spongy, while Toronto bagels are
       usually baked in gas ovens.
   −   The ruelle des Fortifications at the World Trade Centre is home to a piece of the Berlin Wall, which
       the German city gave to Montréal to mark the 350th anniversary of its founding.
   −   Montréal is the only major Canadian city completely surrounded by water.
   −   After Halifax, Montréal has the largest number of Titanic victims buried in its cemeteries—12 in all.
   −   John Lennon and Yoko Ono held their legendary Bed-In from May 26 to June 2nd, 1969 in Suite
       1742 at the Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth hotel in downtown Montréal. There, surrounded by
       celebrities such as Tommy Smothers, Timothy and Rosemary Leary and Petula Clark, they wrote
       the peace anthem, “Give Peace a Chance.”
   −   The cross on Mount Royal was built in 1924 in remembrance of the events of December 25th,
       1642, when a flood threatened to wash away the early French colony. On January 6, 1643, Paul
       de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, carried a cross by himself to the top of the mountain to
       give thanks to God for sparing Ville-Marie from the floodwaters. Fibre-optic lighting, installed when
       Montréal celebrated its 350th anniversary, now illuminates the cross.
   −   The first car accident in Montréal occurred on Saturday, August 11, 1906 on Sainte-Catherine
       Street, claiming the life of one person—Antoine Toutant.
   −   Measuring a full 50 kilometres in length, Gouin Boulevard is the longest street in Montréal.
   −   Quebecers spend the equivalent of two weeks per year on their balconies. Balconies are most
       popular among retired people and middle-class families. The city is considered the official balcony
       capital with more than one and a half million balconies (71% of metropolitan area residents have
       at least one).
   −   Following a winter snowstorm, the city of Montréal has more than 4,100 kilometres of streets and
       6,550 kilometres of sidewalks to clear.
   −   The highest building in Montréal is the 1000 de la Gauchetière. The skyscraper measures 205
       metres, has 51 floors and was built in 1991.
   −   152 Montréal streets include the word “Saint” in their name.
   −   8% of the residents of the Plateau neighbourhood declare themselves as artists on their tax
       returns. This is 10 times the Canadian average of 0.8%.




                                                                                                         10
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Geography
   −   Montréal is located at 450 north latitude and 730 west longitude, just like Venice, Geneva, Lyon
       and Milan!
   −   The Island of Montréal covers a total surface area of 499.2 km2.
   −   As the bird flies, the island of Montréal is 50 kilometres long and 16 kilometres wide.
   −   Montréal’s altitude is 17 metres above sea level.
   −   The total length of the banks of island of Montréal is 266.6 kilometres.
   −   The territory of the Montréal agglomeration has 75 islands, while the CMA is made up of more
       than 380 islands.

Industry
   −   Montréal has the largest bilingual and multicultural labour force in Canada.
   −   Montréal has a stable and highly qualified labour force: according to the 2006 census,
       approximately 56% of Montrealers in the CMA of Montréal aged 15 and above have a post-
       secondary diploma and about 27% are university graduates.
   −   Montréal ranks 5th in North America for number of jobs in the high-tech sector (that is, number of
       jobs available in high technology versus the total employment in the region), ahead of San
       Francisco, San Diego and Toronto. In 2007, one job in 10 in the region was linked to the high-
       tech sector.
   −   Among the major cities in North America and G7 countries, the Montréal region offers the most
       competitive operating costs for companies. According to the KPMG firm, the city ranks 3rd in the
       world for operating costs and 4th among the least-taxed cities.
   −   Montréal’s industrial structure is the most diversified in Canada: 819 fields of activity (out of a
       possible 869).
   −   Research and Development:
           o   Montréal ranks number one in Canada and among the top 10 cities in North America for
               number of research centres.
           o   Montréal is also first in Canada with regards to funds invested in university research.
           o   The greatest synergy between universities and companies is found in Montréal.
           o   With over 200 research centres and more than 2,000 institutions active in research and
               development, the agglomeration of Montréal is home to the largest research complex in
               Canada.
           o   Research and development is a very dynamic section of activity. In fact, there are close to
               24,500 R&D jobs available in the region, in private, public and university centres.
   −   High-tech sectors:
           o   Life Sciences:
                   In Metropolitan Montréal, more than 41,000 people are employed in the life sciences
                   sector in 620 different organizations (including some 150 public and para-
                   governmental research organizations).
                   Greater Montréal offers the most advantageous operating costs in all of North
                   America in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
                   In Greater Montréal, five university establishments offer specialized programs in the
                   life sciences: the Université de Montréal (16 programs), McGill University (10

                                                                                                         11
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
                   programs), the Université du Québec à Montréal (2 programs), Concordia University
                   (3 programs) and the INRS-Institut Armand Frappier (4 programs).
                   In 2007, close to 11,200 people are pursuing studies in a program related to this
                   sector. In 2007, close to 2,500 degrees were awarded in the Greater Montréal area in
                   the life sciences sector..
           o   Aerospace Industry:
                   Montréal is reputed for its expertise in the aerospace industry. The city is particularly
                   renowned for manufacturing, refurbishing and repairing plane motors, as well as for
                   its expertise in avionics and landing gear.
                   The Montréal region is one if the few places in the world where almost all the parts of
                   an airplane are available within a 30-kilometre radius.
                   In addition to Seattle and Toulouse, Montréal is one of the world’s major aerospace
                   hubs. Some 42,000 people in Montréal are employed in the industry that includes 236
                   companies.
                   Some of the most important international aerospace organizations are headquartered
                   in Montréal including The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the
                   International Air Transport Association (IATA) and the Société Internationale de
                   Télécommunications Aéronautiques (SITA)
                   Greater Montréal offers the most competitive operating costs in North America in the
                   aerospace industry.
           o   Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs):
                   In 2008, Metropolitan Montréal ranked 5th in North America for the number of jobs in
                   ICTs.
                   Sales for the Montréal region in this sector are approximately 21 billion dollars.
                   Some 2,700 private companies are located on the territory. Among these, 200 are
                   foreign properties employing more than 23,000 of the 110,000 people in this sector.
                   There are more than 10,800 university students enrolled in ITC-related programs in
                   the region.
                   Greater Montréal offers the most competitive operating costs in North America in this
                   sector.
   −   Other Sectors
           o   Manufacturing Sector:
                   Manufacturing constitutes 250,445 jobs in the Montréal region.
           o   Agri-Food Industry:
                   The Montréal region is home to a large and innovative agri-food industry focused on
                   processing and distribution that represents 38,000 jobs in some 560 companies.

Innovation
   −   According to the study led by Innovation Cities, Montréal is the 9th most innovative North
       American city and the 49th most innovative city in the world.
   −   BIXI, Montréal’s self-serve bicycle rental service, was ranked 19th in Time Magazine’s list of the
       best inventions of 2008. In addition, BIXI received the Gold award for the best product of 2009 in
       the Energy and Sustainability category of the prestigious Edison Best New Products Awards,




                                                                                                         12
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Montréal ranks 5th in North America for growth with regards to the number of invention patents
       awarded, representing close to an 80% increase from 1997 to 2007.

Language
   −   Montréal is the 2nd largest francophone city in the world after Paris.
   −   Montréal is the only francophone metropolis in North America.
   −   Montréal is the most bilingual (French-English) metropolis on the North American continent.
   −   According to the 2006 census, 64.9% of the CMA of Montréal are native French speakers, 11.9%
       have English as their mother tongue and 21.2% of residents are allophones.
   −   Also according to the 2006 census, 52% of Montrealers (CMA) are fluent in both French and
       English, representing the largest bilingual population in Canada. In comparison, only 8.3% of the
       population of Toronto is bilingual (French and English).
   −   Approximately 18.4 % of the population is fluent in a third language.
   −   In all, close to 150 languages are spoken in the Montréal region. According to the 2006 census,
       the most common languages are, in order, French, English, Spanish, Italian, Chinese and Arabic.

Housing
   −   On average, Quebecers move three times within a ten-year period.
   −   Montréal’s housing rate is at 2.5% compared to the Québec provincial rate of 2.4%.
   −   The quantity and quality of housing in or near the downtown core are features that distinguish
       Montréal from other major North American cities.
   −   There is an average of 2.3 people per dwelling in the CMA of Montréal (census 2006).
   −   There are 831,555 private inhabited dwellings on the island of Montréal.
   −   Montréal is a city of tenants. According to the 2006 census, 62% of dwellings on the island of
       Montréal are occupied by tenants, versus 38% by owners. The number of homeowners, however,
       has increased by 9% between 2001 and 2006.. In comparison, only 43% of dwellings in Toronto
       and 48% of homes in Vancouver are rented. This difference is due in part to Montréal’s affordable
       rents.
   −   The highest percentage of tenant dwellings is in the downtown area (borough of Ville-Marie), at
       77%.
   −   Statistics Canada evaluates that each year in Montréal, some 115,000 moves take place; 15% of
       Montréalers moved during the year preceding the census, with the majority moving in a one-
       month period, that being from June 10 to July 10.
   −   According to a study conducted in 2007 by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the
       average rent of a two-bedroom apartment in the CMA of Montréal is $647, that is, 64% lower than
       in Toronto ($1,061) and 68% lower than in Vancouver ($1,084).
   −   According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Montréal has one of the the lowest
       monthly rents in Canada. In 2009, the average monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in
       Montréal was $669 per month, significantly lower than the Canadian average of $812 per month,
       the Toronto average of $1,096 per month and the Vancouver average of $1,169 per month.
   −   More than a third of Montréal homeowners allot more than 30% of their gross annual income to
       housing.
   −   There are currently more than 79,000 people living in the business district (borough of Ville-Marie)
       and the immediate vicinity.


                                                                                                        13
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Medias
   −   Montréal has four daily newspapers: three in French—La Presse, Le Devoir and Le Journal de
       Montréal—and one in English—The Gazette, one of the oldest English-language newspapers in
       North America.
   −   There are also two free dailies, distributed from Monday to Friday, in Montréal: Métro, which is
       available in close to 20 countries and its competitor, 24 Heures.
   −   38 radio stations, including 18 in English and 4 multilingual, serve the greater Montréal area.
   −   Several news agencies, including Agence France-Presse (AFP), , and The Canadian Press, have
       offices in Montréal.

Fashion
   −   Montréal’s fashion industry, which represents some 50,000 jobs, ranks 3rd in North America,
       behind Los Angeles and New York.
   −   The North American Fur and Fashion Exposition in Montréal (NAFFEM) is the largest trade show
       of its kind on the continent and the only exhibition of high-end furs and winter fashion in North
       America. The exhibition, which is also one of the most prestigious marketing events of the fur
       industry in the world, is organized every year by the Canadian Fur Trade Development Institute
       (CFTDI).
   −   Over 85% of all fur coats made in Canada are manufactured in Montréal.
   −   Created in 1999, Sensation Design organizes the Montréal Fashion and Design Festival, which
       celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2010. It is to the credit of this innovative festival, the most
       important fashion event in North America, that Montréal has become North America’s premier
       fashion and design centre. Every year, the festival brings together designers from here and
       abroad, singer-songwriters and performing artists to celebrate Montréal’s legendary passion for
       fashion.
   −   Sensation Design also organizes Montréal Fashion Week, a bi-annual event that brings together
       and showcases clothing and accessories from Montréal designers and manufacturers.
   −   Montréal is home to more than a dozen fashion, design and textile training schools. Over 1,800
       students are registered in these programs each year.
   −   Montréal women spend more their income on fashion items than women in any other part of
       Canada.

Lifestyle
   −   Montréal has an official moving day—more than 200,000 Montrealers move every year on July
       1st. This tradition most likely comes to us from Scotland, where every 1st of May people were
       allowed to “break” their lease in order to find a new home. Scottish immigrants continued this
       tradition when they settled in Québec. Moving day was eventually changed to July 1st so as not to
       disturb the children’s school year.
   −   Eye contact in Montréal differs from that in other major cities. Whereas discretion is the order of
       the day elsewhere, Montrealers do not shy away from making eye contact with strangers,
       especially while sipping a drink on an outdoor terrace in summertime
   −   With the highest number of tango dancers, studios, schools and dance halls on the continent,
       Montréal is, for many, the tango capital of North America.
   −   Greeting a French person from Montréal can be confusing for visitors. The customary way to greet
       friends in Montréal is to kiss them on both cheeks, starting with the right, whereas Canadians in
       other provinces tend to keep their distance and simply shake hands.

                                                                                                         14
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Montréal, International City
   −   Montréal, international city, is:
            o   70 international organizations
            o   95 Consulates General, 55 diplomatic representations on the International Civil Aviation
                Organization (ICAO) Council.
            o   17,000 foreign students
            o   Over 120 ethnocultural communities
            o   More than 1,250 subsidiaries of foreign companies


   −   The Quartier international is a new urban space that was created in 2004 through a partnership
       between the private and public sectors. The project represents an investment of over $90 million
       and accounts for over 80% of employees in international organizations. This area is home to
       Montréal’s recently-expanded Convention Centre (Palais des congrès) and to the headquarters of
       the Caisse de depot et placement du Québec.
   −   With more than 70 international organizations headquartered here, Montréal ranks first in Canada
       for hosting international organizations.
   −   Montréal is the civil aviation capital of Canada and home to the head offices of three international
       organizations—the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the International Air Transport
       Association (IATA) and the Société internationale des telecommunications aéronautiques (SITA).
       With ICAO, Montréal is the only Canadian city that is home to the head offices of a UN
       organization.
   −   Founded by the World Tourism Organization (WTO), a United Nations agency, the World Centre
       of Excellence for Destinations opened in Montréal in 2007. The mission of this new organization is
       to research and create tools to promote sustainable tourism for destinations around the world.
   −   The Global Campaign for Climate Action (GCCA) brings together over twenty of the most
       important organizations from international civil society, including OXFAM, Greepeace and the
       WWF. Its Secretariat was established in Montréal in 2009.
   −   Montréal has more than one hundred International Finance Centres (IFCs). Financial groups from
       the United States, France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Tunisia, Lebanon and
       Canada hold IFC certification.

Nightlife
   −   Montréal is Canada’s nightlife capital. According to Statistics Canada in 2008,, Montréal remains
       the most popular urban destination of all major Canadian cities with tourists who go to bars and/or
       discotheques when they travel. In fact, 36.8% of foreign tourists visit a bar when they come to
       Montréal, ahead of Québec City (33.2%), Toronto (31.0%) and Vancouver (27.8%).
   −   In Montréal’s tourist districts, there are 270 bars, an average of 10.3 bars per km2.
   −   Montréal’s nightlife has a lot to offer. From microbreweries to discotheques, and cigar lounges to
       electronic music clubs, not to mention the city’s traditional terraces, Montréal has something for
       everyone.
   −   Bars are open till 3 o’clock in the morning, but several after-hour clubs (without alcohol) stay open
       all night long so partygoers can dance the night away!
   −   It’s in five different neighbourhoods, each unique in its own way, that Montréal’s nightlife is at its
       most intense:



                                                                                                          15
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
          o   The Plateau Mont-Royal: The lively stomping grounds of artists and non-conformists,
              young urban professionals and intellectuals, the Plateau is Montréal’s hippest and most
              creative neighbourhood. Its cafés, bistros, bars and restaurants abound with a motley
              crew of patrons that move to the beat of the latest trends. And with almost 85 bars and
              bistros centred around Mont-Royal Avenue, the Plateau has something for everyone.
          o   The Quartier latin: In the early 19th century, Montréal’s francophone bourgeoisie first
              established itself in the Quartier latin. Today, as home to the Université du Québec à
              Montréal (UQAM), the Collège du Vieux-Montréal and a number of major cultural
              institutions, the neighbourhood vibrates with the vitality of student life. The area boasts
              some 15 different spots where friends and colleagues can meet for a drink in a casual
              atmosphere.
          o   The Village: Gay-friendly doesn’t begin to describe Montréal, a city founded on cultural
              diversity where different lifestyles are not only accepted, but nurtured. Naturally, Montréal
              is home to one of the largest gay communities in the world. And visitors here will always
              feel safe and respected. The Village is a very animated district that boasts some 35 bars
              to party at. Gay or straight, you’ll always be welcome in the Village!
          o   Crescent Street: This festive street, between René-Lévesque and Maisonneuve
              boulevards, is home to an array of festivals, events and street shows. Crescent is
              legendary for its “terrasses”, trendy restaurants, gourmet cuisine and its nightlife. Patrons
              can choose from several lively restaurants and discotheques, trendy Irish pubs and a little
              over 25 bars.
          o   Saint-Laurent Boulevard: The Montréal “Main” is where it’s at. With more than 60 bars,
              resto-bars, discotheques and lounges between Sherbrooke Street and Mont-Royal
              Avenue, St-Laurent Boulevard is another of Montréal’s nightlife hot spots.
          o   McGill Street: A magnificent stretch of heritage and style located in the west-end of Old
              Montréal, McGill Street is lined with magnificent institutional and office buildings, trendy
              hotels (W and the Hôtel St-Paul) and some 40 boutiques, restaurants, and bars – some
              even with terraces in the summer. In fact, McGill Street has welcomed a multitude of chic
              new restaurants and bars in the last few years, making it one of the most popular nightlife
              venues for Montréalers.

Religious Patrimony
   −   Montréal is home to close to 500 places of worship built before 1975, Roman Catholic and
       Protestant for the most part, but also Jewish, Islamic, and Buddhist. among others.
   −   Notre-Dame Basilica
          o   Montréal’s first parish church was built in 1672.
          o   A new church was erected south of the existing church between 1824 and 1829. In 1830,
              the original church was destroyed, opening up space for the Place d’Armes..
          o   The church was raised to the rank of a minor basilica in 1982.
          o   The basilica has long been the largest house of worship in North America, all faiths
              combined.
          o   The Notre-Dame-des-Neiges cemetery is affiliated with the Notre-Dame Basilica. Located
              on Mount Royal, it is the largest in Canada and third largest in North America.
   −   Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral-Basilica
          o   The seat of the Roman-Catholic archdiocese in Montréal;
          o   The third largest church in Québec;
          o   Is a scale model of Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome;

                                                                                                        16
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
           o   Constructed between 1970 to 1894. .
   −   Saint Joseph’s Oratory :
           o   Saint Joseph’s Oratory was founded in 1904 by Brother André and was originally a small
               chapel. After several additions and expansions, the basilica was inaugurated in 1967. It
               has a seating capacity of 2, 200. .
           o   The basilica’s dome is the third largest of its kind after Our Lady of Peace of
               Yamoussoukro (Ivory Coast) and Saint Peter’s Basilica (Rome).
           o   It is the largest church in Canada.
           o   The basilica welcomed Pope Jean-Paul II in 1984, Mother Teresa in 1988 and the Dalaï
               Lama in 1993.
           o   It is the most important pilgrimage site dedicated to Saint Joseph. Close to 2 million
               visitors visit the Oratory each year, 40% of which are from other countries outside
               Canada.
           o   The Oratory ranks third for the most visited sites in Montréal, after the Casino and the Old
               Port.
           o   There are 283 steps from the square in front of the basilica to the street, 99 of which are
               made of wood and are reserved for prayer; they are also used by pilgrims who wish to
               make the ascent on their knees.
           o   The Saint Joseph’s Oratory set of bells includes 56 bronze bells and is one of the largest
               sets in North America.
   −   Brother André was declared venerable in 1876, was beatified in 1982, and will be formally
       canonized in October 2010. He is the second well-known Québécois saint after Sainte Marguerite
       d’Youville. Eight Canadian martyrs, of which six were Jesuit priests, as well as Marguerite
       Bourgeoys, all born in France and died in Canada, were canonized before Brother André. Brother
       André (André Bessette) was born in 1845 and died in 1937. Hundreds of people attribute their
       miraculous recovery to him, even after his death. Brother André’s heart is preserved in a reliquary
       in the Oratory.
   −   Built between 1684 to 1687, the Saint-Sulpice Seminary (Le Vieux Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice) is
       the oldest building in Montréal’s borough of Ville-Marie. The Society of Priests of Saint-Sulpice
       has been the sole owner since its construction.
   −   Erected between 1843 and 1847, St. Patrick’s Basilica has been declared a historical monument
       and designated a a national historic site. St. Patrick’s congregation is made up largely of loyal
       anglophone catholic followers, namely of Irish origin. Several other Montréal churches as well as
       the cemeteries of Notre-Dame-des-Neiges and Mount Royal have also been classified as
       historical monuments.
   −   Québec’s Religious Patrimony Council took inventory of Québec houses of worship. The
       evaluation of the patrimonial value of these locations was equally evaluated according to their
       historical and symbolic value, the value of their art as well as the interior and exterior architecture.
       The locations determined to be fundamentally vital are as follows:




                                                                                                            17
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
                                                                                     Année de
       Nom                                                          Tradition
                                                                                    construction
       La-Visitation-de-la-Bienheureuse-Vierge-Marie Church          Catholic           1749
       St. Joseph’s Oratory of Mount Royal                           Catholic           1924
       Sainte-Geneviève Church                                       Catholic           1843
       Christ Church Cathedral                                       Anglican           1856
       Erskine and American Church                                    United            1893
       La Citadelle-Salvation Army Church                          Evangelical          1906
       Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral-Basilica                   Catholic           1870
       Notre-Dame Basilica                                           Catholic           1824
       Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel                              Catholic           1771
       Saint-Andrew and Saint-Paul’s Church                        Presbyterian         1931
       Saint-George’s Church                                         Anglican           1869
       Saint-James’ Church                                            United            1887
       Saint-Patrick’s Basilica                                      Catholic           1843
       Saint-Pierre-Apôtre Church                                    Catholic           1851



Population
   −   In 2009, the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) of Montréal recorded 3,814,738 residents, making it
       the 2nd largest CMA in Canada, behind Toronto.
   −   In 2009, the population of the Montréal agglomeration (island) was 1,906,811 an increase of 2.3%
       over 2001.
   −   The population of the city of Montréal was 1,667,700 residents in 2009, increase of 0.5% over
       2008.
   −   In 2009, close to half of Québec’s population (48%) lived in the Montréal CMA. As for the island of
       Montréal, it is home to 24% of Québec households..

Quality of Life
   −   In 2010, Montréal ranked 2nd in Lonely Planet’s list of the World’s 10 Happiest Places.
   −   The UN ranked Canada 4th in the world in terms of the Human Development Index (HDI) in 2009,
       just behind Norway, Australia and Iceland and before Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden.
   −   Montrealers enjoy approximately 14 paid days off per year compared to 15 in Toronto. The two
       cities are below the international average of 20 days per year, but above the North American
       average of 10 days per year.
   −   While US employers are not obliged to grant paid holidays to their employees, Québec employees
       have the right to a minimum of two paid weeks of vacation per year.
   −   According to the Union des Banques Suisses (UBS) in 2009, Montréalers work an average of 1,
       842 hours per year, less than the international average of 1,926 hours per year.




                                                                                                       18
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   The quality of life that Montréal offers is recognized internationally. In 2010, Montréal was ranked
       21st out of 221 world cities in a quality of life survey conducted by Mercer Human Resources
       Consulting. The results of the survey take into account 39 quality of life determinants, specifically
       the political, economic and sociocultural factors, the environment, public services, transportation
       and entertainment.
   −   The city of Montréal boasts a network of 17 major parks for a total of 2,000 hectares of green
       space. A favourite spot for relaxing and playing, these parks are great for recreational,
       educational, cultural, sports and outdoor activities as well as a great venue for major public
       events.
   −   The borough of Ville-Marie alone has and is responsible for the maintenance of 129 parks, mini
       parks and green spaces which contribute to the quality of life of its citizens. There are some
       112,000 trees growing in these green spaces, of which 104,000 are located in Mount Royal Park.
   −   In 2010, the English publication Monocle ranked Montréal 19th in its list of the top 25 most
       liveable cities.

Neighbourhoods & Boroughs
   −   On June 20, 2004, the referendum on the mergers and demergers of the different cities that make
       up Montréal took place. On January 1st, 2006, as prescribed by the Act respecting the
       consultation of citizens with respect to the territorial reorganization of certain municipalities
       (adopted by the National Assembly on December 18, 2003) adopted by the Government of
       Québec and subsequent to the referendums of June 2004, 15 former suburbs on the Island of
       Montréal were reconstituted.
   −   The City of Montréal is comprised of 19 boroughs :
           o   Ahuntsic-Cartierville
           o   Anjou
           o   Côte-des-Neiges - Notre-Dame-de-Grâce
           o   Lachine
           o   LaSalle
           o   L’Île-Bizard - Sainte-Geneviève
           o   Mercier - Hochelaga-Maisonneuve
           o   Montréal-Nord
           o   Outremont
           o   Pierrefonds-Roxboro
           o   Le Plateau-Mont-Royal
           o   Rivière-des-Prairies - Pointe-aux-Trembles
           o   Rosemont - La Petite-Patrie
           o   Saint-Laurent
           o   Saint-Léonard
           o   Le Sud-Ouest
           o   Verdun
           o   Ville-Marie (centre des affaires)
           o   Villeray - Saint-Michel - Parc-Extension




                                                                                                         19
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   The island of Montréal (Montréal agglomeration) is made up of the city of Montréal and of these
       15 cities following mergers:
           o   Baie-d’Urfé
           o   Beaconsfield
           o   Côte-Saint-Luc
           o   Dollard-des-Ormeaux
           o   Dorval
           o   Hampstead
           o   Kirkland
           o   L’Île-Dorval
           o   Montréal-Est
           o   Montréal-Ouest
           o   Mont-Royal
           o   Pointe-Claire
           o   Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue
           o   Senneville
           o   Westmount
   −   The main tourist districts of the Island of Montréal are:
           o   Downtown
           o   Old Montréal/ Old Port
           o   Parc Jean-Drapeau
           o   Mount Royal and surrounding area
           o   Plateau Mont-Royal
           o   Hochelaga-Maisonneuve
           o   LIttle Italy
           o   The Village
           o   Pôle des Rapides
           o   East End, North End and West Island

Quartier international
   −   Inaugurated in 2004, the Quartier international is a new urban area located between the city’s
       business district and Old Montréal. Its mission is to promote and develop Montréal’s international
       vocation and position on the world stage.
   −   This project, which represents an investment of over 90 million dollars, is the new sector for
       strategic growth in Montréal.
   −   The Quartier international is home to the Palais des congrès, the ICAO (International Civil Aviation
       Organization), the World Trade Centre, several hotels and the head office of the Caisse de
       dépôt et placement du Québec
   −   The Quartier alone brings together more than 80% of employees of international organizations.
   −   The Quartier international has the highest concentration of international organizations and
       activities in Canada.
           o           List of International Organizations in the Quartier international:
                            International Air Transport Association (IATA)


                                                                                                        20
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
                           International Criminal Defence Attorneys Association (ICDAA)
                           International Centre for Accessible Transportation (ICAT)
                           International Centre for the Prevention of Crime (ICPC)
                           Montréal World Trade Centre
                           Club of Ambassadors and Entrepreneurs for Africa (CAEA)
                           Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC)
                           World Water Council (WWC) – Office of the Americas
                           International Federation of Multimedia Associations (IFMA)
                           International Federation of Air Traffic Controllers’ Associations (IFATCA)
                           International Federation on Aging
                           Francophone Business Forum
                           Montréal International Forum
                           International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
                           Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD)
                           International Secretariat of Associated Research Centres for Urban
                           Underground Space (ARCUUS)
                           International Secretariat for Water (ISW)
                           Secrétariat international des infirmières et infirmiers de l'espace francophone
                           (SIDIIEF)
                           World Conservation Union (WCU)
   −   The area is delimited by Saint-Urbain, Saint-Antoine, Saint-Jacques (between McGill and
       University) and University streets and Viger Avenue.
   −   The Quartier international enjoys a unique geographical location that is ideal for both tourism and
       business activities.

Restaurants
   −   5,673 licenses in the food service industry were issued in Montréal in 2009, which represents
       27.7% of all the licenses in the industry in the province of Québec.
   −   Montréal is the city with the largest number of restaurants per resident in all of North America. In
       the city’s tourist districts, there is an average of 74.3 restaurants per km2.
   −   Restaurant-goers in Montréal can choose among 80 different types of national and regional
       cuisines.
   −   Each year, Montréal is host to the MONTRÉAL HIGHLIGHTS Festival, which features three
       components: culture, gourmet food and outdoor lighting/activities. After only eleven years, the
       Festival has emerged as one of North America’s most important gourmet events, reinforcing
       Montréal’s reputation as a gastronomic destination as well as the enviable reputation of its chefs.
   −   In 2009, a survey conducted by the Union de Banques Suisses (UBS) on “Prices and Earnings”
       among 73 world cities revealed that Montréal ranked 32nd worldwide for the cost of a restaurant
       meal, the highest ranking given to the most expensive city.
   −   According to the Régie des alcools, des courses et des jeux, Montréal had 292 Bring Your Own
       Wine (BYOW) restaurants in 2010.



                                                                                                        21
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Following in Lyon’s footsteps, Montréal joined the World Good Food Cities Network in 2007. In
       addition to Montréal, Barcelona, Birmingham, Brussels, Canton, Genoa, Gothenburg, Las Vegas,
       Lausanne, Leipzig, Madrid, Milan, Osaka, Philadelphia, Riga, Turin, Saint Louis, Sao Paulo and
       Yokohama are among the leading member cities of this select network.



Healthcare and Services
   −   There are currently 46 public health institutions and 43 private institutions on the Island of
       Montréal. These are:

                                Institution Type                                     Number of Institutions
                                                                                    Public        Private       Total
    Childhood and Youth Protection Centres                                            2             0            2
    Local Community Service Centres                                                  12             1            13
    Hospitals                                                                        26             4            30
    Long-Term Care Facilities                                                        31             34           65
    Rehabilitation Centres                                                           13             5            18
    Note : Establishments with more than one mission type are counted several times in the list.
    Source: Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, July 5, 2010

   −   Montréal has the greatest number of beds available in the province of Québec: 5,731 for general
       and specialized care (short-term care) and 13, 938 for long-term care.
   −   There are 1,031 hospital beds for every 100,000 residents on the island of Montréal.
   −   Between 2005 – 2007,,the life expectancy of Montreal women was 83.3 years and 78.3 years for
       Montréal men.
   −   In 2005, 18.7% of Montréalers smoked regularly.
   −   Montréal is one of the leading Canadian cities for fruit and vegetable consumption. 52.2% of
       Montréalers eat 5 fruits or vegetables or more per day. In comparison, only 38.8% of
       Torontonians consume 5 or more per day and only 43.5% of Vancouverites eat their proper
       amount of fruits and veggies each day.

Public Safety
   −   The low homicide rate and decrease in violent crimes in Montréal make the city one of the safest
       metropolises in North America. In 2007, there were 1.6 homicides per 100,000 residents in
       Montréal, in contrast with 2.0 in Toronto, 4.5 in New York and 8.8 in San Francisco.
   −   The homicide rate increased to 31 homicides in the metropolitan region in 2009. This number is
       much below the average recorded over the past 20 years, which is 56 homicides per year.
                              Nombre d’homicides entre 2001 et 2009
              2001       2002      2003       2004      2005       2006      2007         2008           2009
                66        47        42         41        35         43         42            29           31

   −   The rate of hate crimes is also the lowest among Canada’s 10 major cities. In 2008, one hate
       crime per 100,000 people was reported in Montréal compared to 5.4 in Toronto and 6.3 in
       Vancouver.
   −   The Montréal metro system is one of the safest in the world. This is due in part to the presence of
       160 police officers who patrol the network every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.


                                                                                                                        22
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   In all, 126,991 criminal offences were reported in Montréal in 2009, an 6.5% decrease in the crime
       rate compared to 2005.
   −   Overall, crimes against a person decreased by 6.1% between 2008 and 2009. During the same
       period, crimes against property remained the same.

Sports et Leisure
   −   In Montréal, the major professional sporting teams are the following:
           o Hockey – Montréal Canadiens
           o   Football –Montréal Alouettes
           o   Soccer –Montréal Impact
           o   Hockey – Montréal Juniors (major-junior)
   −   Montréal’s major sporting events are:
          o Formula One Grand Prix du Canada
           o   Tennis Canada international competitions – The Rogers Cup Montréal
           o   Féria du vélo de Montréal
           o   PGA Champions Tour Montréal Golf Championship Golf Tournament
           o   The NASCAR Busch Series of Montréal car race
           o   Oasis de Montréal International Marathon
           o   Montréal International Dragon Boat Race Festival
           o   UCI Women’s Cycling Race
   −   Hockey:
          o According to the International Ice Hockey Federation, hockey was born in Montréal when
              on March 3rd, 1875 the very first hockey game in the world was played at the Victoria rink
              in Montréal. The game apparently ended in a fight.
           o   The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association came into existence in 1886 in Montréal.
           o   The Montréal Canadiens Hockey Club has won the Stanley Cup 24 times since the turn of
               the century, making it the second most successful championship sports team in the world
               after the New York Yankees baseball team, which has won 27 World Series.
           o   The Montréal Canadiens Hockey Club celebrated 100 years of hockey in 2009.
           o   The “Montréal Juniors” is the name of the new Québec Major Junior Hockey League in
               Montréal. The team has been playing at the Verdun Auditorium since the 2008-2009
               season.
           o   In 2010, following the Canadiens victory over the Penguins for the Eastern conference
               semi-final, 50,000 enthusiastic Habs fans took over downtown Montréal.
   −   Automobile sports:
           o Between 2001 and 2006, the Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve Race Track hosted the Champ Car
             series as part of the Montréal Molson Indy. Since 2007, however, the track has been
             turned over to the NASCAR Busch Series, which drew some 130,000 spectators in 2007
           o   Run since 1978 on the track on Montréal’s Île Notre-Dame, the Grand Prix of Canada is
               one of the favourite races of the season for Formula One fans. In 2009, Montréal was not
               included on the world championship racing calendar, but much to the delight of all fans,
               the only race on Canadian soil returned in 2010. More than 300,000 spectators attend
               this edition of the Grand Prix of Canada.


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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Golf:
           o   In 2007, Montréal hosted the prestigious Presidents Cup, a biennial competition which
               pits the United States against the rest of the world (excluding Europe) in a team
               tournament.
           o   There are more than 100 golf courses in the greater Montréal area.
           o   Montréal is home to the very first golf club in North America—the Royal Montréal.
               Founded in 1873 on Mount Royal, the club is now located on Île Bizard in Montréal
           o   Since 2010, Montréal has hosted a tournament on the PGA Championship circuit. The
               Champions Tour is comprised of professional golfers aged 50+ years. The tournament is
               confirmed until 2012.
   −   Surfing:
           o There are a few places to surf in Montréal. About 500 surf enthusiasts regularly tackle the
                waves close to the Habitat 67 housing complex and the Lachine Rapids.
           o   The Habitat 67 wave, a standing wave, can reach 6 feet (1.82 metres) in height, Corran
               Addison, an Olympic kayaker, was the first to ever surf this wave in 2001.
           o   Near Lasalle in the Lachine Rapids, beginners can try their hand at the 3-metre Vague à
               Guy. The Lachine Rapids themselves are reserved for experienced surfers as they are
               quite dangerous.
   −   Others:
          o Jarry Park in Montréal is host to the annual international tennis championships.
               Alternating with Toronto, the women’s competitions take place in even number years and
               the men’s competitions, in odd number years.
           o   Established in 1863, the Lachine Rowing Club is the oldest operating rowing club in North
               America.
           o   Within a 100-kilometre (62 mile) radius of the city, Montrealers have access to 30 or more
               downhill ski runs.
           o   Surrounded by the St. Lawrence River, Montréal is a paradise for water-sports
               enthusiasts, who can enjoy 625 km2 of water and some 380 islands. For its part, the
               Montréal agglomeration has 315 kilometres of river banks, 131 of which have public
               access.
           o   Montréal counts some 24,000 soccer players, making soccer the most played sport in
               Québec and in Canada.

Tourism
   −   Montréal is Canada’s second most popular city after Toronto for the number of visitors that the city
       welcomes every year. In 2009, approximately 17,500,000 people came to Montréal, of which
       7,000,000 were tourists (stays of 24 hours and longer).
   −   Approximately 31,500 hotel rooms were available in the Montréal CMA in 2010.
   −   Montréal is one of the least expensive cities in the world when it comes to the price of a hotel
       room. In 2009, a study led by the Union des Banques Suisses (UBS) ranked 67th worldwide (out
       of 73 cities) for the price of a one-night stay in a hotel room (based on a room with two beds, a
       bath and breakfast for two in a first class hotel), first place going to the most expensive city.
   −   The average price of a short stay in Montréal (including two meals with wine, a one-night stay at
       the hotel for two people, a rental car (100 km) or public transportation and taxis and a few out-of-
       pocket costs (pocketbooks, telephone calls, etc.) is approximately $546 in Canadian funds. As
       such, Montréal ranks 50th internationally among 73 cities (1st place = the most expensive city) for


                                                                                                        24
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
       the price of a short stay (according to the Union des Banques Suisses (UBS) study conducted in
       2009).

Active Transportation
   −   Walking
          o      Montréal ranks third in Canada when it comes to cities that are best for walking according
                 Up! Magazine, a publication of the Canadian airline West Jet. The ranking was
                 determined by many factors such as by how many people walk to work, dedicated
                 pedestrian areas in parks and sidewalk snow removal.
          o      Montréal has one permanently pedestrian street: Prince Arthur Street. Several other
                 streets shut down to traffic to become pedestrian during specific times of the year,
                 including a portion of Ste. Catherine Street and St. Paul Street East.
          o      Montréal has 6, 550 km of sidewalks.
   −   Cycling
          o      The Green Route that crosses Montréal (and the province from east to west) was
                 declared the best cycling route by National Geographic.
          o      Montréal figures in Time Magazine’s top 10 list of best urban cycling trips. The loop along
                 the Lachine Canal ranks third among the best urban cycling paths.
          o      In 2009, approximately 73,000 cyclistes took over Montréal’s streets as part of the annual
                 Féria du vélo (Cycling Festival) that ends with the much-anticipated Tour de l’Île (Tour of
                 the Island).
          o      Montréal boasts 502 km of cycling paths.
          o      According to Smarter Travel, Montréal is one of the best cities for cycling.
   −   BIXI
          o      Since May 2009, Montréal has had a self-serve bike rental service, called BIXI. This
                 service allows users to borrow a bike from one station, ride where they choose and then
                 drop it off at any other station in the network, Montréal currently has 400 stations and
                 5,000 bikes in operation.
          o      BIXI ranked 19th in Time Magazine’s list of top inventions for 2008. In addition, the
                 system was awarded the Gold prize for the best product of 2009 in the “Sustainable
                 Energy and Development” category of the prestigious Edison Best New Products Awards.
          o      BIXI has been exported to London, Melbourne, Boston, Minneapolis, Washington DC and
                 to Washington State University campus on the west coast of the United States.
          o      Each BIXI station is equipped with anchorage points to lock the bikes and a transactional
                 meter. To access a bike, a user simply inserts a subscription key (BIXI-key), an access
                 code or a credit or debit card into the meter. Information and advertising panels are
                 apparent at all BIXI stations and are powered by solar energy. .
          o      In 2010, new stations at the limits of Montréal’s public transportation system in the
                 boroughs of Lasalle. St-Laurent, Verdun and Ahuntsic-Cartierville were implemented as
                 part of a pilot project.
          o      BIXI is a hybrid word, a contraction of the words bicycle and taxi.




                                                                                                         25
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Air Transportation
   −   Montréal is served by two airports:
           o   The Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (Montréal-Trudeau), just 25
               minutes from downtown Montréal, handles all regular flights.
           o   The Montréal–Mirabel International Airport is 55 km northwest of Montréal and handles
               cargo carriers. (As of November 2004, passenger flights no longer fly into Montréal–
               Mirabel International Airport. All flights have been transferred to Montréal-Trudeau.)
   −   Montréal-Trudeau has undergone and continues to undergo major expansion and modernization
       designed in order to increase the terminal’s capacity and substantially enhance the level of
       passenger service. A vast program, which was launched in 2000 and finished in 2009, included,
       among others, the construction of several brand-new facilities, including a jetty for flights to the
       United States, another for overseas flights and a huge international arrivals complex, with a
       border crossing and a baggage terminal. The public arrivals complex was also expanded. The
       domestic sector was renovated in 2007. The construction of a new transborder hall is underway.
       Between 2000 and 2009, improvements totalling some 1.6 billion dollars were completed.
   −   Express rail transfer service between the Montréal-Trudeau Airport and the downtown train station
       is slotted to begin in the summer of 2016.
   −   Montréal ranks 3rd among Canadian airports after Toronto and Vancouver for passenger volume.
   −   In 2010, Montréal airports served 80 regular destinations and 50 seasonal destinations:
           o   Regular destinations: 26 destinations in Canada (including 12 in Québec), 23 in the
               United States (in 21 cities) and 31 international destinations (in 31 cities).
           o   Seasonal destinations: 25 destinations in summer and 25 destinations in winter.
   −   Montréal airports have 36 regular passenger carriers (12 national, 18 international and 6
       transborder), as well as 23 cargo-only carriers.
   −   In 2001 and 2003, the Airports Council International–North America (ACI-NA) honoured Montréal
       airports with the Peggy G. Hereford Overall Award for Excellence, recognized in the airport
       industry as the highest distinction given in communications and marketing.
   −   On November 12, 2007, the Montréal-Trudeau Airport became the first Canadian airport to
       welcome passengers on the Airbus A380, the biggest passenger jet ever built.
   −   In 2009, 12.2 million passengers went through the Montréal-Trudeau Airport. In total, 170,834
       tons of cargo was transported through the two Montréal airports.

Marine Transport
   −   The Port of Montréal is 1,600 kilometres from the Atlantic Ocean and has been open year round
       since January 4th, 1964.
   −   Every year, a Gold-Headed Cane is presented to the captain of the first ocean liner of the year to
       reach port without a stopover. The tradition dates back to sometime around 1840. Until
       approximately 1880, the prize offered was a top hat.
   −   The Port of Montréal is the largest container port on the East Coast. It is the closest international
       port to the industrial heart of North America.
   −   Every year, the Port of Montréal welcomes thousands of cruise ship passengers at its Iberville
       marine terminal. In 2009, the terminal welcomed more than 38,770 passengers.
   −   En 2010, pour la deuxième année consécutive, le Port de Montréal a reçu le prix Best Turnaround
       Port Operations décerné par le magazine Dream World Cruise Destinations. Ce prix récompense
       les ports qui se distinguent par l’excellence de leurs infrastructures de croisières.


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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   The Port of Montréal also won the Best Turnaround Destination 2009 Award for its excellence in
       hospitality and passenger transfer.

Urban Transportation
   −   Public transportation:
           o   The Montréal Transit Commission (known by its French acronym, the STM) serves the
               Island of Montréal. The city’s public transportation system consists of five commuter train
               lines, four metro lines with 68 stations and 1,671 buses covering 196 routes, including
               154 buses with wheelchair access.
           o   The Agence Métropolitain de Transport (AMT) operates 5 commuter train lines covering
               217 kilometres, two express city buses, 16 terminals, 61 park-and-ride areas that include
               29,637 parking spaces and 20 reserved lanes for a total of 85.2 kilometres of reserved
               lanes in the metropolitan Montréal region.
           o   Municipalities to the west, northwest and southwest of the Island of Montréal are linked to
               downtown Montréal by five commuter trains. These trains (Montréal/Dorion-Rigaud,
               Montréal/Deux-Montagnes, Montréal/Blainville, Montréal/St-Hilaire, Montréal/Delson) are
               completely integrated into the STM bus and metro system.
   −   Taxi Industry:
           o   Number of taxi license owners in Montréal: 4,444
           o   Number of taxi drivers in Montréal: 10, 974, of which close to 1.4% are women
           o   Average age of drivers (male and female): 48 years (2004)
           o   Cost of a taxi ride
                         Cost at the start of a ride: $3.30
                         Taximeter rate: $1.60 per kilometre
                         Cost for waiting: 60 cents per minute
           o   In the City of Montréal, there are 266.5 taxis for every 100,000 residents.
           o   Montréal ranks 37th worldwide out of 73 cities for the cost of a 5-kilometre taxi ride in an
               urban area during the day with tip included, first place going to the most expensive city.
           o   Montréal has 7 freeways 18 bridges/tunnels allowing motorists to access and to leave the
               island.
           o   Montréal ranks 5th among international cities for ease of commute, according to a global
               survey performed by IBM. For 67% of Montréalers, it takes less than 30 minutes to get to
               their office or school.

Arts and Culture
   −   Montréal is:
           o   200 theatre companies plus the National Theatre School of Canada;
           o   More than 40 dance companies, including Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal;
           o   Some thirty artist centres;
           o   67 museums that attract close to 5 million visitors annually;
           o   Over 150 performance spaces that present close to 8,000 performances per year,
               representing 3 million tickets;
           o   Close to a hundred festivals, many of which are of international calibre;
           o   44 public libraries that lend over 9 million books per year, representing 21.7 books
               borrowed per library member and 5.6 per resident.
           o   The largest scientific museum complex in Canada (the Montréal Nature Museums);


                                                                                                        27
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
           o   Internationally recognized art schools;
           o   93 record and entertainment companies;
           o   98 film and television companies;
           o   5th place in all of North America for cinematographic production;
           o   Finally, original initiatives that have made Montréal a respected leader in circus, theatre,
               children’s literature, contemporary dance and new media.
   −   The Bell Centre is the 3rd most frequented amphitheatre in North America in terms of shows, and
       the 10th most in the world. Excluding ticket sales for sporting events, the Bell Centre welcomed
       546, 328 spectators in the first nine months of 2009.
   −   Montréal’s music offering is extensive and varied. The Orchestre symphonique de Montréal
       (OSM) has garnered international recognition during its numerous prestigious tours and
       recordings. The Opéra de Montréal is renowned for its interpretation of the most celebrated works
       in lyrical opera. Additionally, Montréal is home to many other great orchestras and significant
       international music festivals.
   −   Montréal’s cultural pulse is the Quartier des spectacles, at the heart of downtown. Stretching out
       from the corner of Sainte-Catherine Street and Saint-Laurent Boulevard, it covers a surface area
       of approximately 1 km2 , encompassing the streets of City Councillors and Berri, Sherbrooke and
       René Lévesque Boulevard. It boasts more than 30 performance halls with a seating capacity of
       close to 28,000, many major world-class festivals, art galleries and venues for alternative art. The
       Quartier des spectacles employs 7,000 people within the cultural sector, from training to
       distribution and making to producing cultural events.
   −   In May 2007, The Global Alliance for Cultural Diversity designated Montréal a “UNESCO City of
       Design” within the Creative Cities Network. Montréal thus became the first North American city to
       become part of UNESCO’s City of Design network after Buenos Aires (August 2005) and Berlin
       (November 2005), joining other cities recognized by UNESCO for excellence in literature, music,
       gastronomy, cinema, folk art and digital art. In giving out this award, UNESCO acknowledges the
       effort and the momentum of both private and public sectors, the citizens of Montréal and the city’s
       potential for economic and social development in the field of design.
   −   Montréal ranks 3rd in North America for its concentration of active music companies in proportion
       to its population, just behind Los Angeles and Nashville.
   −   There is an average of 20.3 shows every evening in the City of Montréal.
   −   The Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal will open its 2011 season in its new concert hall,
       l’Adresse symphonique. This hall features 2,100 seats and is appropriately situated in the
       Quartier des spectacles.
   −   Taking its cue from New York, London and Paris, Montréal now boasts a last-minute ticket office
       in the Quartier, which offers a veritable window on local, national and international culture.
   −   In Montréal’s tourist districts, there is an average of 2.49 movie theatres per km2.
   −   Montréal’s cultural industry represents 8 billion dollars in economic spin-offs, 96, 910 direct jobs
       and an annual growth of 4.6% (calculated over the last ten years).
   −   After the cities of Madrid, Alexandria, New Delhi and Antwerp, UNESCO has named Montréal the
       2005-2006 World Book Capital.
   −   In May 2005, the City of Montréal inaugurated its Grande Bibliothèque nationale, symbol of a
       leading cultural institution. The Grande Bibliothèque nationale welcomed over 3 million visitors in
       2009 and 13 million since it opened in 2005.
   −   According to a report produced by the firm Hill Stratégie that examined Canada’s most creative
       and artistic neighbourhoods (using postal codes as a basis), it appears that of the 10
       neighbourhoods with the highest concentration of artists, 5 are in Montréal:



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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
           o   The H2T zone is a creative force, with an artistic concentration of 7.8% It extends from
               Mont-Royal Avenue to Van Horne Avenue (and the railroad tracks) between St-Denis and
               Jeanne-Mance streets. It is the “most creative neighbourhood in Canada”, with a
               concentration of close to 10 times higher than the Canadian average of 0.8%
           o   The Plateau Mont-Royal (H2W) has 565 artists out of a total working population of 7,510,
               or 7.5% of all employed people on the Plateau. The area is located between des Pins and
               Mont-Royal avenues, St-Denis Street and Parc Avenue and neighbours the H2T zone. It
               is ranked 2nd in Canada
           o   The Old Montréal/Old Port area has a 6.0% concentration of artists, and shares 3rd place
               in Canada with a Toronto neighbourhood..
           o   The H2J zone, is next to the Plateau (from Rachel Street to Carrières Street between
               Papineau and St-Denis Streets), is 6th, ex aequo with another Toronto neighbourhood
               with an artistic concentration of 5.3%.
           o   The H2V zone (Outremont) has an artistic concentration of 5.2% in its population,
               matching ex aequo another Toronto neighbourhood and ranking 8th in Canada.
   −   Close to 300 public art works are scattered across the island of Montréal, with 225 outside and 75
       works integrated into architecture. The public art collection includes sculptures, monuments,
       busts and contemporary art pieces.
   −   The 2017 project proposes to bring an ensemble of international conventions in architecture,
       design and urban development to Montréal in a series of interrelated conventions. The year 2017
       will mark the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, Canada’s 150th and Montréal’s 375th birthdays
       respectively.

Fun and Pleasure in Montréal
   −   In 2006, 12.1% of Montrealers’ expenses were for food, 1.7% more than the Canadian average.
   −   Montrealers are fond of strolling in the streets, just for the pleasure of being with friends.
   −   For Montrealers, the weekend often begins on Thursday night with the traditional happy hour!
   −   In 2009, Montréal was ranked second in the Lonely Planet travel guide’s list of best party cities,
       behind Belgrade in Serbia. The guide praises the city’s many discotheques, jazz clubs and the
       Just For Laughs Festival.

Underground Pedestrian Network
   −   In 2007, National Geographic ranked Montréal’s Underground Pedestrian Network number one in
       its top 10 list of the world’s best underground walking “tours”.
   −   In 2004, Montréal’s Underground Pedestrian Network or “Underground City” was named “RÉSO”.
   −   Montréal’s RÉSO is the biggest of all the man-made underground networks in the world.
   −   Montréal’s RÉSO has 29.7 km of pedestrian walkways, indoor areas and tunnels linking:
           o   many business centres;
           o   some 1,300 boutiques;
           o   4 383 rooms in 9 hotels;
           o   banks, offices, dwellings;
           o   close to 300 restaurants;
           o   3 conference centres and exhibition halls;
           o   19 movie cinemas and a museum;
           o   10 performance halls totalling 22,052 seats;
           o   14 pavillions of 3 colleges and universities;

                                                                                                        29
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
           o   some 15,000 indoor and outdoor parking spaces;
           o   10 métro (subway) stations;
           o   2 train stations and 2 regional bus stations;
           o   an arena.
   −   More than 500,000 people use RÉSO every day.
   −   RÉSO can be accessed through 190 different entrances.

Going Green
   −   In 2007, Montréal became the first city in the world to sign the National Geographic Society
       Geotourism Charter. This distinction underscores Montréal’s ongoing commitment to promoting
       and maintaining sustainable tourism.
   −   A joint venture between the Montréal Exchange (MX) and the Chicago Climate Exchange®
       (CCX), the Montréal Climate Exchange (MCeX) is a financial institution that offers businesses the
       flexibility they need to adapt to the new environmental realities by providing low-cost solutions and
       promoting the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. It is a powerful tool for addressing climate
       change. The mission of MCeX is to provide a transparent and credible marketplace where
       contracts on pollutants and GHG emissions are exchanged.
   −   A study conducted by Statistics Canada on metropolitan regions has revealed that, out of all
       Canadians, Montrealers are the least inclined to use cars. In fact, not even 29% of Montrealers
       living within a 5-kilometre radius of downtown rely on their car to get around, compared to 43% in
       Toronto, 56% in Vancouver and 66% in Calgary. Montréal also boasts the highest number of trips
       using public transportation.
   −   Montréal become the first francophone city to receive official designation from the Centre régional
       d’expertise sur l’éducation en vue du développement durable. Awarded by the United Nations
       University, this designation was announced during the 8th Congress on Environmental Education
       in Montréal.
   −   In order to adopt a brand image in sustainable tourism and to meet the needs of a more informed
       clientele, the Québec Hoteliers Association (QHA) has developed a Programme de
       Reconnaissance en Développement Durable (PRDD) specifically for the hotel industry. Developed
       by Gescona and the Fondation québécoise en environnement, the PRDD is the most respected
       sustainable development program, with a mission to balance environmental, social and economic
       challenges. To date, six Montréal hotels have been certified “Réservert” by the programme.
   −   More than 105 commercial buildings in Montréal were awarded Go Green certification by the
       Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) of Canada, a national award and
       environmental certification program for existing commercial buildings.
   −   Green buildings in Montréal:
           o   Montréal boasts the first residential building in North America to receive LEED
               (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certification, the highest
               award in sustainable green building practices. Located on Parc Avenue, the building in
               question is a duplex that was renovated/built in 2006. At the time the renovations were
               completed, it was considered North America’s greenest building.
           o   The Lassonde Pavilions of the école Polytechnique de Montréal make up the first
               structure in Québec that can be qualified as a “green building.” And green it is. The
               pavilions were built according to the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental
               Design) program of the U.S. Green Building Council. The entire structure was built with
               the environment in mind, from the concrete for the foundation to the paint for the walls.
               “Green buildings” built entirely with recycled materials have the advantage of not
               producing toxic emissions. Their boilers run on natural gas and the toilets have a double
               flush system to vary water output. A drainage system that filters both rainwater and water

                                                                                                         30
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
               from the City of Montréal and reuses it in the toilets was installed, making it possible to
               save 92% of drinking water.
           o   TOHU, cité des arts du cirque, is another fine example of green architecture. The pavilion
               was built on the second largest urban landfill site in North America.
                   The TOHU pavilion is located right next to Gazmont, a business that converts
                   biogases emitted from the landfill site into electricity. The electricity is conveyed to the
                   TOHU pavilion through a network of ducts installed in the floor of the building.
                   The indoor temperature of the pavilion during the summer season is controlled by
                   passive geothermics and an ice bunker.
                   Natural/hybrid ventilation consumes 70% less energy than traditional ventilation
                   systems. This system uses the funnel effect of the theatre to circulate air.
                   A natural basin bordering the administrative sector of the building collects and retains
                   rainwater, thereby allowing it to flow gradually into the City of Montréal rain sewers.
                   The inside was decorated with recycled materials.
           o   The John Molson School of Management of Concordia University built one of the most
               environmentally-friendly university buildings in the country. The building includes solar
               panels on the south-west wall, a “green” roof and low-flow plumbing.
           o   Other green buildings in Montréal: the Biological Sciences Pavilion of the Université du
               Québec à Montréal, the 740 Bel-Air and the Mountain Equipment Coop (MEC) store.
           o   There are several other projects currently in progress in Montréal, including the future Rio
               Tinto Planetarium. This new building, which will join the Quartier de la vie complex near
               the Biodôme, will be a daring and ecological construction featuring a vegetation roof and
               wood structure. The project conforms to LEED platinum standards and is slated for
               inauguration in 2012.
   −   The Saint-Michel Environmental Complex is located on a former landfill site. The crater was
       progressively filled in and covered so as to become the second-largest public park in Montréal.
       The park covers 48 hectares of land and will expand to 192 hectares in 15 years. A sorting centre
       as well as the TOHU are located on the site.
   −   Since 2008, the public bus fleet of the Société des transports de Montréal (STM) runs on
       biodiesel. This choice resulted in a decrease of over 3,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions, or
       the equivalent of 600 cars driving 20,000 km per year, in 2008 alone..
   −   As a result, the STM received the Special Merit Award for Commitment to the Environment at the
       International MetroRail convention in London in 2010. This award recognizes the leadership
       exhibited by the STM with regards to sustainable development and the strategy implemented to
       position public transportation as a wise environmental decision for the population.
   −   The Montréal metro (subway) is also considered to leave the lowest carbon footprints in the world.
   −   The Consortium ÉCHO-Logique is a social economy company that specializes in the
       management of residual materials on event sites.. To this end, the Consortium ÉCHO-Logique
       recommends solutions for environmental, economic and social issues by providing collection and
       recycling services and recycling equipment as well as raising awareness of the environment.
   −   In 2009, during the festival season, the Consortium ÉCHO-Logique recovered more than 230
       tonnes of recyclable materials. In all, 70 special events from 8 of Québec’s regions used
       Consortium ÉCHO-Logique’s services. Of these 70 events, 52 were held in Montréal.
   −   As part of its commitment to meeting the considerable environmental challenges in the tourism
       industry, Tourisme Montréal (Office des congrès et du tourisme du Grand Montréal) has
       developed, in partnership with the tourism industry, an ambitious two-phase greening initiative:
           o   Phase 1: With the help of the organization’s employees, the Board of Directors approved
               the development of a Green Guide to introduce “greener” habits and offices.


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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
          o    Phase 2: Tourisme Montréal is coordinating the creation of a Green Committee within
               Montréal’s tourism industry to develop an action plan that will help reduce the
               environmental footprint despite the industry’s anticipated growth.
   −   In 2009, the Port of Montréal officiallly received Alliance verte certification. This evaluation
       denotes the exemplary performance of the Port of Montréal above and beyond established norms
       and regulations.
   −   Montréal is one of the five top green cities, according to Tree Hugger.com, a popular Web site
       considered to be a central and reliable source of information for green information and news.
   −   In 2009, the City of Montréal was honoured with a Climatic Leadership Award for its
       Transportation Plan. This award underlines the best initiatives to fight climate change. Montréal
       won the award for:
           o   Its commitment to reduce 30% of the city’s greenhouse gas emmissions by 2020 as
               compared to 1990;
           o   Adopting a complete and detailed transportation plan;
           o   Its opposition to projects that would result in an increase or would develop the use of
               automobiles .
   −   The Centre for Sustainable Development will house the offices of several Québecois
       environmental and social groups, an interpretation centre of a sustainable building and meeting
       rooms. To be set up on Sainte Catherine Street, this project is aiming to become a sustainable
       development anchor in the heart of the city and to receive LEED platinum certification.
       Inauguration is planned for September 2011.




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Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
                                             Sources
The information presented in this document was taken from or is based on the following sources:

Access
    −   Wikipédia. « Ponts de        Montréal ».   [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ponts_de_Montr%C3%A9al].
        Consulté en juin 2010.
    −   Google maps. [http://maps.google.com]. Consulté en juin 2010
    −   Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. « Autoroute – Bureau frontalier terrestre ».
        [http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/contact/listing/indexpages/indextype15-f.html]. Consulté en juillet
        2010.
    −   Aéroports de Montréal. « Destinations desservies ».                [http://www.admtl.com/passager/
        services_aeriens/accueil.aspx]. Consulté en juin 2010.
    −   Sherlock, La banque d’information municipale (Ville de Montréal). « Ponts et tunnels sur l’île de
        Montréal ».
        [http://www11.ville.montreal.qc.ca/sherlock2/servlet/template/sherlock%2CAfficherDocumentInter
        net.vm/nodocument/20109;jsessionid=952AC7400F8E91B8E8F81493078CC0F3]. Consulté en
        juin 2010.

Downtown
    −   Champagne, Pierre. « Montréal vous attend! ». Le Soleil, 12 juillet 2003, p. F5.
    −   « La renaissance de la rue Sainte-Catherine ». L’Actualité, 1er octobre 1999, pp. 73-85.
   −    Ville de Montréal. « Plan de transport 2008 – Réinventer Montréal ». 2008, 174 pages.
        [http://servicesenligne2.ville.montreal.qc.ca/sel/publications/PorteAccesTelechargement?lng=Fr&s
        ystemName=59425623&client=Serv_corp]
   −    Corporation de l’industrie touristique du Québec. [http://www.citq.qc.ca/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −    Communication téléphonique avec Stationnement de Montréal pour le nombre de places de
        stationnement     tarifées    sur rue pour l’arrondissement  Ville-Marie. Juin  2010.
        [http://www.statdemtl.qc.ca/]
    −   Ville       de     Montréal.      « Arrondissement    Ville-Marie –     Travaux   publics ».
        [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=87,1424962&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
        Consulté en juin 2010.

Cinema
    −   Parent, Marie-Joëlle. « Montréal — Capitale mondiale des effets spéciaux », Le Journal de
        Montréal, 15 novembre 2007.
    −   Consortium Film Format Géant. « The giant-screen industry in Montréal ». Spotlight, May 2004.
   −    Bureau du cinéma et de la télévision du Québec. « Films tournés au Québec ».
        [http://www.bctq.ca/films-quebec.php]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −    Imax. [http://www.imax.com/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
    −   Bureau du cinéma – Montréal. [http://www.montrealfilm.com]. Consulté en juin 2010.
    −    « Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment s’établit à Montréal – La créativité montréalaise attire
        de nouveaux investissements ». Montréal 2025 (Communiqué). 22 mars 2010.
        [http://www.montreal2025.com/communique.php?id=905&lang=fr].

                                                                                                             33
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Climate
   −   Environnement Canada. [http://www.ec.gc.ca]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Communication courriel du 4 avril 2008, de monsieur Philippe Martin, Climat-Québec, Service
       météorologique du Canada, Environnement Canada- Région du Québec.

Conventions
   −   Union des Associations Internationales. [www.uia.org].
   −   International Congress and Convention Association. [http://www.iccaworld.com/]. Consulté en
       juillet 2010.

Cultural diversity
   −   Vennat, Pierre. « Le plus vieux défilé de la Saint-Patrick en Amérique ». La Presse, samedi 13
       mars 1999, p. A25.
   −   « St. Patrick’s Day parades ». The Gazette (Montréal), 28 décembre 1998.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Population et démographie ». 4 décembre 2007.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,2454741&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Population immigrante selon certains lieux de naissance ». 2008, 8 pages.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,14875093&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTA
       L]
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Population selon les groupes de minorités visibles ». 2008, 3 pages.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,14875093&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTA
       L]
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Profil sociodémographique des arrondissements ». 2006, 28 pages.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,2454613&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
   −   Statistique Canada. « Recensement 2006 ». [http://www.statcan.ca/start_f.html].

Economy
   −   Union de Banques Suisses (UBS). « Prix et salaires, Une comparaison du pouvoir d’achat dans le
       monde », édition 2009, 44 pages.
   −   Montréal International. « Indicateurs d’attractivité 2009-2010 ». 2009. 52 pages.
       [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/centre-de-donnees/index.html]
   −   Centre Financier International Montréal. « Liste des CFI ».
       [http://www.cfimontreal.com/fr/cfi_operation/list.asp]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Mercer Human Resource Consulting. « Worldwide cost of living survey 2009 ».
       [http://www.mercer.com/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   The Conference Board of Canada. [http://www.conferenceboard.ca/].
   −   Montréal 2025. « Le fonds de solidarité FTQ parmi le Top 100 des fonds de capital de risques au
       monde ». [http://www.montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=533&lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Montréal 2025. [http://www.montreal2025.com]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Statistiques Canada. [http://www.statcan.gc.ca]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Bilan économique de l’agglomération de Montréal - 2009 ». 2010. 46 p.



                                                                                                        34
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −     Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain. « Tableau de bord de l’agglomération urbaine
         de Montréal – Perspectives 2010 ». Automne 2009. 24 p.

Education
   −     Badenhausen, Kurt. « The Top Non-U.S. One-Year Business Schools ». Forbes, 5 août 2009.
         [http://www.forbes.com/2009/08/03/best-business-schools-09-leadership-careers-nonus1yr_slide_
         11.html].
   −     Times Higher Education. « Times Higer Education-QS World University Rankings 2009 ».
         [http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/hybrid.asp?typeCode=438]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −     Financial Times. « Business school rankings and MBA rankings from the Financial Times ».
         [http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/masters-in-management]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −     Montréal International. « Indicateurs d’attractivité 2009-2010 ». 2009. 52 pages.
         [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/centre-de-donnees/index.html]
   −     Ministère de l’Éducation du Québec. [www.meq.gouv.qc.ca]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −     Montréal 2025. « Montréal proclamée destination du savoir ».
         [http://montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=985&lang=fr]. 10 mai 2010.
   −     Communication courriel avec la Direction de la recherche, des statistiques et de l’information du
         ministère de l’Éducation, des Loisirs et des Sports pour le nombre de diplômes universitaires
         décernés en 2009. Juin 2010.

Trivia
   −     Bizier, Hélène-Andrée. « La croix sur la montagne, une prière à Dieu ». Montréal fête – album
         souvenir 350e Montréal, Transcom, 1992, p. 59.
   −     Champagne, Pierre, « Montréal vous attend! ». Le Soleil, 12 juillet 2003, p. F5.
   −     Desjardins, Christiane et Caroline Touzin, « Montréal, champion des balcons ». La Presse
         (Montréal), jeudi 20 mai 2004.
   −     Gordon, Beck. « Montreal’s Top Ten ». The Gazette, 5 décembre 1999.
   −     Lamarre, Philippe et Vianney Tremblay, (rédacteur en chef et éditeur). « Le commerce en
         chiffres ». Urbania, no 3, hiver 2003, p. 5.
   −     Lamarre, Philippe et Vianney Tremblay (rédacteur en chef et éditeur). « Rétro en chiffres ».
         Urbania, no 9, été 2005, p. 7.
   −     Urbania. « Montréal en chiffres ». Avril 2009. [http://urbania.ca/canaux/chiffres/223/montreal-en-
         chiffres].
   −     « La renaissance de la rue Sainte-Catherine ». L’Actualité, 1er octobre 1999, p. 73-85.
   −     Métro, section météo, 4 décembre 2007, p. 8.
   −     Ville de Montréal, Ministère des Affaires culturelles. « Les maisons de Montréal, Montréal ». 1992,
         40 pages.
   −     Ville de Montréal. « L’arbre urbain ». Avril 2008. 2 p.
         [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=4837,18289567&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTA
         L].
   −     Environnement Canada. [www.ec.gc.ca].
   −     Le Mont-Royal. « La petite histoire de la croix du Mont-Royal ».
         [http://www.lemontroyal.qc.ca/anniversaire/12.html]. Consulté le 14 octobre 2005.
   −     Quartier des Antiquaires de Montréal. [http://www.qam.ca/QAM.html]. Consulté en avril 2008.

                                                                                                          35
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges. [http://www.cimetierenotredamedesneiges.ca]. Consulté en
       juin 2010

Geography
   −   Ville de Montréal (Groupe d’interventions stratégiques et tactiques, Direction de la planification du
       développement du territoire). « Montréal en bref ». 2007, 59 pages.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,2453865&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]

Industry
   −   Montréal International. « Indicateurs d’attractivité 2009-2010 ». 2009. 52 pages.
       [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/centre-de-donnees/index.html]
   −   Industrie Canada. [www.ic.gc.ca].
   −   Montréal International. [http://www.montrealinternational.com]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Statistique Canada. « Recensement 2006 ». [http://www.statcan.ca/start_f.html].
   −   KPMG. « Choix concurrentiels – Édition 2010, Synthèse ». 2010. 8 p.
   −   « Montréal, centre de commande mondial! ». Ville de Montréal (Communiqué). 26 mai 2010.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5798,42581593&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTA
       L&id=839&ret=http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/url/page/prt_vdm_fr/rep_affaires/rep_act_econ
       om/liste_act_econom]
   −   La Presse Affaires. « Le secteur manufacturier à Montréal ». 23 mars 2010. p. LA PRESSE
       AFFAIRES13.
   −   Développement économique, innovation, exportation. « Portrait socioéconomique des régions du
       Québec ». 2009. 108 p.
   −   Ville de Montréal – Service des finances. « Budget 2010 ». 2010. 376 p.

Innovation
   −   Montréal 2025. « Innovation : Montréal dans le Top 50 mondial et dans le Top 10 américain ».
       [http://www.montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=731&lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   « Prix OR des prestigieux Edison Awards 2009 ». BIXI (Communiqué). 2 avril 2009.
   −   Montréal International. « Indicateurs d’attractivité 2009-2010 ». 2009. 52 pages.
       [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/centre-de-donnees/index.html].

Language
   −   Montréal International. [http://www.montrealinternational.com]. Consulté en avril 2008.
   −   Statistique Canada. « Recensement 2006 ». [http://www.statcan.ca/start_f.html].

Housing
   −   Champagne, Sara. « À vos boîtes, prêts … déménagez ! ». La Presse, 27 juin 2005. p. ACTUEL1
   −   Meunier, Hugo. « Lendemain difficile le 1er juillet ». La Presse, 2 juillet 2009.
   −   Thériault, Normand. « Des condos par milliers ». Le Devoir (Montréal), 17 et 18 avril 2004.
   −   Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement. « Rapport sur le marché locatif — RMR de
       Montréal », 2007, 35 pages. [http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/fr/clfihaclin/remaha/stdo/index.cfm].


                                                                                                         36
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement. « SLC : Enquête sur le marché locatif 2007 »,
       2007, 11 pages.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Profil statistique en habitation de l’agglomération de Montréal ». Mai 2009. 34
       p.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Profil statistique en habitation de l’arrondissement Ville-Marie ». Mai 2009. 31
       p.
   −   Statistique Canada. « Recensement 2006 ». [http://www.statcan.ca/start_f.html].
   −   Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement. « L’observateur du logement au Canada ».
       2009. 157 p.

Medias
   −   24 heures. [http://montreal.24heures.ca/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Métro. [http://www.journalmetro.com/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ptaff.ca. « Liste des stations de radio à Montréal ». [http://ptaff.ca/radio_montreal/]. Consulté en
       juin 2010.

Fashion
   −   Institut de la fourrure du Canada. [http://www.fur.ca]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Montréal en action », volume 2, numéro 5, 18 octobre 2007.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=65,11867574&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
   −   Conseil canadien de la fourrure. [http://www.furcouncil.com/Afficher.aspx?page=31&langue=fr].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Rodgers, Caroline. « Une industrie qui veut rester en vie ». La Presse, 23 mars 2010. p. LA
       PRESSE AFFAIRES12.

Lifestyle
   −   « Montreal is the capital of… ». The Gazette, 28 décembre 1998.
   −   Wikipédia. « Fête du déménagement ».
       [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%AAte_du_d%C3%A9m%C3%A9nagement]. Consulté en juin
       2010.

Montréal, international city
   −   Montréal International. « Montréal Monde, bulletin des organisations internationales », automne
       2006, 3 pages.
   −   Montréal International. « Montréal Monde, bulletin des organisations internationales », automne
       2007, 3 pages.
   −   Montréal International. « Montréal Monde, bulletin des organisations internationales », automne
       2009, 3 pages.
   −   Presse Canadienne. « Montréal accueille un centre mondial sur le tourisme ». Le Devoir, 20
       février 2007.
   −   Centre Financier International Montréal. « Liste des CFI ».
       [http://www.cfimontreal.com/fr/cfi_operation/liste.asp]. Consulté en juin 2010



                                                                                                              37
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Montréal International. [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/accueil/index.aspx]. Consulté en
       juin 2010.
   −   Quartier international. [http://qimtl.qc.ca/accueil.php]. Consulté en juin 2010.

Nightlife
   −   Michel, Julien. « Les 10 grandes capitales du Nightlife ». La Presse (cahier vacances /voyage p.
       4, 29 octobre 2005.
   −   Communication téléphonique avec Ville de Montréal pour le nombre de bars à Montréal et dans
       l’arrondissement Ville-Marie. Juin 2010.
   −   Statistique Canada. « Tourism in Canadian Cities — A Statistical Outlook 2008 », décembre
       2007.
   −   Bonjour plateau. [http://bonjourplateau.com/index_fr.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Crescent Montréal. [http://www.crescentmontreal.com/french_main.htm]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   La Main Boulevard Saint-Laurent. [http://www.boulevardsaintlaurent.com/fr/accueil.aspx].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Société de développement commercial (SDC) du Village.
       [http://www.unmondeunvillage.com/freepage.php?page=152]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Société de développement du Quartier Latin. [http://quartierlatin.ca/fr/index.html]. Consulté en juin
       2010.
   −   Cities 2008 – Adaptation par Research Resolutions & Consulting Ltd de: Statistique Canada,
       microdonnées de l’Enquête sur les voyageurs internationaux 2008 (66C001) et microdonnées de
       l'Enquête sur les voyages des résidents du Canada 2008 (87M006XDB96000)

Religious Patrinomy
   −   Légaré, Denyse. « La basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal. La gloire de Sulpiciens, propriétaires de
       l’île de Montréal ». Conseil du patrimoine religieux du Québec. [http://www.patrimoine-
       religieux.qc.ca/fr/publications/documents.php]. Consulté en juillet 2010.
   −   Bourget, Charles. « La basilique St. Patrick de Montréal. Le désir d’égaler les grandes œuvres du
       mouvement néogothique ». Conseil du patrimoine religieux du Québec. [http://www.patrimoine-
       religieux.qc.ca/fr/publications/documents.php]. Consulté en juillet 2010.
   −   Inventaire des lieux de culte du Québec. [www.lieuxdeculte.qc.ca]. 2006
   −   Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal. « Saviez-vous que…? »
       [http://www.basiliquenddm.org/fr/basilique/saviez-vous.aspx]. Consulté en juillet 2010.
   −   Mommens, Françoise. « Quand le tourisme spirituel prêche pour sa paroisse ». Réseau de veille
       en tourisme, 15 janvier 2006. [http://veilletourisme.ca/2006/01/15/quand-le-tourisme-spirituel-
       preche-pour-sa-paroisse/?tagged=]
   −   Vieux-Montréal. « Fiche d’un bâtiment : Vieux Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice ».
       [http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/inventaire/fiches/fiche_bat.php?sec=p&num=1]. Consulté le 7
       juillet 2010.
   −   Oratoire Saint-Joseph. [http://www.saint-joseph.org/fr_1001_index.php]. Consulté en juillet 2010.
   −   Leduc, Louise. « Le frère André sera canonisé le 17 octobre », Cyberpresse, 19 février 2010.
   −   Fondation du patrimoine religieux du Québec. « Inventaire des lieux de culte du Québec –
       Rapport d’activités ». [http://www.patrimoine-religieux.qc.ca/fr/publications/autres.php]. Consulté
       en juillet 2010.


                                                                                                         38
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Population
   −   Institut de la statistique Québec. « Données démographiques régionales ».
       [http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/index.htm#rmr].
       Consulté en juin 2010.

Quality of life
   −   Union de Banques Suisses (UBS). « Prix et salaires, Une comparaison du pouvoir d’achat dans le
       monde », édition 2009, 44 pages.
   −   Ville de Montréal. Le réseau des grands parcs. « Montréal en vert et
       bleu ».[http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=174,4782045&_dad=portal&_schema=PO
       RTAL]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. Ville-Marie. Vie de quartier. « Parcs et espaces verts ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=87,1425099&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Frey, Christopher. « Quality of life: the liveable cities index ». Monocle.
       [http://www.monocle.com/Magazine/volume-04/issue-35/]. Juillet 2010.
   −   Programme des nations unies pour le développement. « Human Development Report 2009 –
       Country Fact Sheets – Canada ».
       [http://hdrstats.undp.org/fr/countries/country_fact_sheets/cty_fs_CAN.html]. Consulté en juin
       2010.
   −   Mercer Human resource Consulting. « News Release: 2010 Mercer Quality of Living survey ».
       [http://www.mercer.com/qualityoflivingpr#City_Ranking_Tables]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ray, Rebecca et John Schmitt. « No Vacation Nation ». Center for Economic and Policy research.
       Mai 2007

Neighbourhoods & Boroughs
   −   EFF Communication Marketing inc. pour Tourisme Montréal. « Guide touristique officiel de
       Montréal ». 23e édition, 202 pages.
   −   Montréal en statistiques (Ville de Montréal). « En bref : Population de la ville de Montréal et de
       ses arrondissements — 2006 ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,2454613&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
       . Consulté en juin 2010.

Quartier international
   −   Quartier international de Montréal. [http://qimtl.qc.ca]. Consulté en juin 2010.

Restaurants
   −   « Travelocity Highlights 10 Delicious Destinations for Foodies in 2007 ». Hotel News Resource, 15
       mars 2007.
   −   Union de Banques Suisses (UBS). « Prix et salaires, Une comparaison du pouvoir d’achat dans le
       monde », édition 2009, 44 pages.
   −   Communication téléphonique avec Ville de Montréal pour le nombre de restaurants à Montréal,
       dans l’arrondissement Ville-Marie et dans l’arrondissement du Plateau Mont-Royal. Juillet 2010.




                                                                                                         39
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Festival Montréal en lumière. [http://www.montrealenlumiere.com/accueil_fr.aspx]. Consulté en
       juin 2010.
   −   Régie des alcools, des courses et des jeux. [http://www.racj.gouv.qc.ca/index.php?id=70].
   −   Communication courriel avec Monsieur Constantin Tremblay — Ministère de l’Agriculture des
       Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation (MAPAQ), Direction de la normalisation et de l’appui à l’inspection
       des aliments.

Healthcare and services
   −   Santé et services sociaux du Québec. « Établissements — Sommaire régional selon les missions-
       classes-types ».
       [http://wpp01.msss.gouv.qc.ca/appl/m02/M02SommPermisEtabReg.asp?CdRss=06]. Consulté le
       14 juin 2010.
   −   Santé et Services sociaux Québec. « Lits et places dressés ».
       [http://www.msss.gouv.qc.ca/statistiques/stats_sss/index.php?id=78,0,0,1,0,0]. Consulté en juin
       2010.
   −   Statistiques Canada. « Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes ». 2000.
   −   Institut de la statistique – Québec. « Espérance de vie à la naissance selon le sexe, par région
       administrative ». 2010.

Public safety
   −   Service de police de la Ville de Montréal. « Bilan annuel 2009 ». 5 mai 2010. 63 pages.
       [http://www.spvm.qc.ca/fr/documentation/publications-bilan-annuel.asp]
   −   Service de police de la Ville de Montréal. « Actualité GDR ». Février 2010.
       [http://www.spvm.qc.ca/fr/documentation/gd_39.asp].
   −   Société des transports de Montréal. Sécurité. « Les agents de surveillance de la STM ».
       [http://www.stm.info/info/agents.htm]. Consulté le 14 juin 2010.
   −   Montréal International. « Taux d’homicide par tranche de 100 000 habitants – 2007 ».
       [http://www.montrealinternational.com/fr/centre-de-donnees/qualite-de-vie/taux-dhomicide.html].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Statistiques Canada. « Les crimes haineux déclarés par la police ». 14 juin 2010.
       [http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/100614/dq100614b-fra.htm].

Sports and leisure
   −   Meunier, Hugo. « Grabuge au centre-ville : les commerçants amers ». cyberpresse.ca, 13 mai
       2010. [http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/quebec-canada/justice-et-faits-divers/201005/13/01-
       4280060-grabuge-au-centre-ville-les-commercants-amers.php]
   −   Tremblay, Réjean. « On a aussi parlé des Nordiques ». La Presse. 14 juin 2010. p. S4
   −   Tremblay, Gérald. « Le maire à l’écoute ». Journal Métro. 16 juin 2010. p. 15
   −   Lefebvre, Sylvain et Romain Roult. (2009). « Les nouveaux territoires de surf dans la ville ».
       Téoros, vol 28, no 2. p. 55-62
   −   Plein Surf. [http://www.pleinsurf.com]. Consulté en août 2010.
   −   Chaire de tourisme Transat. « Plan stratégique de développement et de commercialisation du golf
       touristique au Québec — Sommaire exécutif ». avril 2006, 14 pages.
   −   Association des stations de ski du Québec. [http://www.maneige.com/fr/]. Consulté en juin 2010


                                                                                                          40
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Aviron Lachine. « Aviron Lachine > Le club ». [http://avironlachine.ca/?page_id=2&lang=fr].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Bibliothèque et Archives Canada. « Regard sur le hockey ».
       [http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/hockey/024002-2005-
       f.html?PHPSESSID=tt3r1mm5qa8elmrfd1aestvs30]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Club de hockey junior de Montréal. [http://www.juniordemontreal.com/main.htm?lnx=fr]. Consulté
       en juin 2010
   −   International Ice Hockey Federation. History. « The early beginnings ». [http://www.iihf.com/iihf-
       home/history.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   The Royal Montreal Golf Club. [http://www.rmgc.org/fr/home.html ]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « À propos du Réseau bleu ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=3096,3533472&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
       . Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « L’accueil d’événements sportifs».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=3056,3514031&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
       . Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Wikipédia. « Presidents Cup ». [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presidents_Cup]. Consulté en juin
       2010.
   −   Wikipédia. « Yankees de New York ». [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankees_de_new_york].
       Consulté en juin 2010.

Tourism
   −   Cities 2008: Adaptation par Research Resolutions & Consulting Ltd de: Statistique Canada,
       microdonnées de l’Enquête sur les voyageurs internationaux 2008 (66C001) et Microdonnées de
       l'Enquête sur les voyages des Canadiens 2008 (87M006XDB96000).
   −   Union de Banques Suisses (UBS). « Prix et salaires, Une comparaison du pouvoir d’achat dans le
       monde », édition 2009, 44 pages.
   −   Estimations de Tourisme Montréal.

Active transportation
   −   Allard, Marc. « La ville de Québec sourit aux piétons ». Le Soleil, 1er juin 2010.
   −   Journet, Paul. « Pour une culture du vélo ». La Presse. 4 juin 2010, p. A6.
   −   « Un 25e Tour de l’île de Montréal grandiose! ». Vélo Québec Événements (Communiqué), 7 juin
       2009.
   −   BIXI. [http://montreal.bixi.com/accueil]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Wikipedia. « BIXI ». [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bixi]. Consulté en août 2010.
   −   National Geographic. « Top 10 Cycle Routes ». [http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/top-
       10/cycle-routes/#page=2]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal – Arrondissement Ville-Marie. « Ville-Marie à pied ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=87,21929558&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juillet 2010.
   −   Bland. Elizabeth. « Top 10 Urban Biking Trips ». Time, 7 août 2009.
       [http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1915050_1915041_1915033,00.html
       ].


                                                                                                            41
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Ville de Montréal – Service des finances. « Budget 2010 ». 2010. 376 p.
   −   Sitarz, Kate. « Ten great cities for walking and biking ». SmarterTravel.com, 21 juin 2010.
       [http://www.smartertravel.com/blogs/today-in-travel/ten-great-cities-for-walking-and-biking.html?id
       =5051447].

Air transportation
   −   Aéroports de Montréal. Rapport annuel 2009, 79 pages.
       [http://www.admtl.com/a_propos/salle_de_presse/Publications.aspx].
   −   « Montréal-Trudeau, premier aéroport canadien prêt à accueillir l’Airbus A380 ». Aéroports de
       Montréal (Communiqué de presse), 12 novembre 2007.
   −   Aéroports de Montréal. À propos d’ADM. Projets et programmes. Améliorations aéroportuaires —
       Montréal-Trudeau.
       [http://www.admtl.com/a_propos/projets_et_programmes/agrandissement.aspx]. Consulté en juin
       2010.
   −   Airports Council International – North America (ACI–NA). « Excellence in Airport Marketing &
       Communications Contest ». [http://www.aci-na.org/about/awards_communications]. Consulté en
       juin 2010.
   −   Airports Council International– North America. Traffic Reports « 2009 North American final
       rankings». [http://www.aci-na.org/stats/stats_traffic].

Urban transportation
   −   Union des Banques Suisses (UBS). « Prix et salaires, Une comparaison du pouvoir d’achat dans
       le monde », édition 2009, 44 pages.
   −   Commission des transports du Québec. « Tarifs de transport privé ». 13 janvier 2006, 1 page.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=660,1119668&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
   −   Société des transports de Montréal. « Rapport annuel 2008 ». 22 pages. [http://www.stm.info/en-
       bref/doc.htm].
   −   Agence métropolitaine de transports. « Rapport annuel 2009 ». 50 pages.
       [http://www.amt.qc.ca/salledepresse/publications.aspx].
   −   Bureau du taxi et du remorquage. « Portrait de l’industrie du taxi ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=660,1119697&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Brousseau-Pouliot, Vincent. « Montréal, ville aux déplacements harmonieux ». cyberpresse.ca, 30
       juin 2010. [http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/regional/montreal/201006/30/01-4294520-
       montreal-ville-aux-deplacements-harmonieux.php]

Marine transport
   −   Administration portuaire de Montréal. « Les activités de croisières reçoivent deux prix
       d’excellence ». Port de Montréal (Communiqués). 17 mars 2010.
   −   Port de Montréal. [http://www.port-montreal.com]. Consulté en juin 2010.




                                                                                                        42
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Arts and culture
   −   Pollstar. « Year End 2009 Special Issue ». Janvier 2010.
   −   « Montréal est désigné par l’UNESCO comme ville de design : Une première en Amérique du
       Nord ». Ville de Montréal (Communiqué), 17 mai 2006.
   −   Montréal 2025. « Centre Bell : l’amphithéâtre le plus achalandé en Amérique du Nord ».
       [http://www.montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=730&lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Hill Stratégies Recherche. « Cartographie des artistes et des travailleurs culturels dans les
       grandes villes du Canada », 9 février 2010.
   −   Notes de l'allocution de Simon Brault, Directeur de l’École nationale de théâtre du Canada &
       Président de Culture Montréal. « Montréal ville créative : réveiller le géant qui dort ». Chambre de
       commerce du Montréal Métropolitain, 30 mars 2004.
   −   Notes de l’allocution de Louise Sicorro, Administratrice de Culture Montréal. « Montréal, ville de
       créativité, pôle de création ». Association des agences de publicités du Québec. 13 juin 2008
   −   Rapport Indexpérience 2006. Annexe : Présentation détaillée des indicateurs de conformité
       (Nombre de spectacles par soir). Tourisme Montréal, février 2007.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « L’art public à Montréal ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=678,1153891&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Bibliothèque nationale du Québec. [http://www.banq.qc.ca/].
   −   BonjourQuébec.com. E-Magazine, vivre la culture. « La Vitrine culturelle de Montréal ».
       [http://www.bonjourquebec.com/qc-fr/07oct_vitrine.html]. 13 avril 2010. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Organisation des Nations Unies, pour l’éducation, la science et la culture. « Célébration de
       Montréal « Capitale mondiale du livre 2005/2006 ». [http://portal.unesco.org/culture/fr/ev.php-
       URL_ID=26443&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Quartier des spectacles. « Quartier ». [http://www.quartierdesspectacles.com/fr/quartier/].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal. Muséums Nature de Montréal. « Présentation »
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5517,27355584&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTA
       L]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Mission Design. [http://www.missiondesign.org/fr/mission-design/]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Secrétariat du suivi du Plan d’action 2007-2017 – Montréal, métropole culturelle. « Coup d’œil
       2009 ». Avril 2010.
   −   Montréal International. « Vie culturelle ». [http://montrealinternational.com/fr/vivre-et-
       travailler/vivre/vie-culturelle.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Communication courriel avec la Ville de Montréal pour le nombre de prêts annuels des
       bibliothèques publiques. Juin 2010.

Fun and pleasure in Montréal
   −   Statistique Canada (CANSIM II). Enquête sur les dépenses des ménages (EDM), Dépenses des
       ménages, catégories de niveau sommaire, selon les provinces, territoires et certaines régions
       métropolitaines.
   −   Montréal 2025. « Montréal, ville de party ». [http://www.montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=769
       &lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.



                                                                                                            43
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
Underground pedestrian network
   −   CITQ. « Hébergement Québec 2010 ». [http://www.citq.info/publication/repertoire.asp]. Consulté
       en juin 2010.
   −   Observatoire de la ville intérieure. « La ville intérieure montréalaise en chiffres ».
       [http://www.ovi.umontreal.ca/sections/chiffres.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal – Arrondissement Ville-Marie. « RÉSO ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=87,51995651&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   National Geographic. « Journeys of a Lifetime, 500 of the World’s Greatest Trips » (Top 10
       Underground Walks). 2007, Toucan Books Ltd., 400 pages.
   −   Wikipédia. « Montréal souterrain. ». [http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montr%C3%A9al_souterrain].
       Consulté en juin 2010.

Going green
   −   « Concordia inaugure un des pavillons les plus écologiques au pays ». Les Affaires, 29 août 2009.
       p. 18.
   −   Bonneau, Danielle. « De plus en plus de maisons vertes à Montréal ». La Presse, 14 juin 2008. p.
       MON TOIT2.
   −   TOHU. « Le pavillon de la TOHU : un bâtiment vert ».
       [http://www.tohu.ca/fr/TOHU/documents.aspx]. Consulté en juin 2010
   −   Gervais. Lisa-Marie. « Lier l’homme au firmament ». Le Devoir, 22 août 2009. p. A1.
   −   Lepisto. Christine. « 5 of the Greenest Cities in the World to Visit ». TreeHugger, 17 juin 2009.
       [http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/06/5-of-the-greenest-cities-in-the-world-to-
       visit.php?page=2]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Montréal 2025. « Le port de Montréal obtient la certification Alliance verte ».
       [http://www.montreal2025.com/nouvelle.php?id=429&lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   STM. « La STM en mouvement ». Décembre 2009. p.1
   −   STM. « La STM en mouvement ». Avril 2010. p.1
   −   STM. « Gestes verts : MouvementCollectif.org ». [http://www.mouvementcollectif.org/fr/category/
       gestes_verts]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Deglise, Fabien. « L’architecture se met au vert à Montréal ». Le Devoir, 10 mai 2004.
       [http://www.ledevoir.com/2004/05/10/54216.html].
   −   Filippi, Carole. « Polytechnique vert ». La science au Québec, 18 octobre 2005.
       [http://www.sciencepresse.qc.ca/archives/quebec/capque1005d.html].
   −   « Montréal devient la première ville à signer la charte de Géotourisme de la National Geographic
       Society ». National Geographic (Communiqué), 18 octobre 2007.
   −   « Tourisme Montréal prend le virage vert ». Tourisme Montréal (Communiqué), 31 mars 2008.
       [http://www.tourisme-montreal.org/Presse/Presse/Communiques-de-presse].
   −   « Virage vert dans les hôtels ». TourismExpress.com, 27 octobre 2005.
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Ce que les études nous révèlent ». 22 janvier 2008.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=2076,2454741&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL]
       .
   −   Ville de Montréal. « Montréal en action », volume 2, numéro 6, 26 novembre 2007.
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=65,11867574&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].

                                                                                                           44
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
   −   Consortium Echo-Logique. « Rapport des événements spéciaux – Saison 2009 », 14 pages.
       [http://www.echologique.ca/doc/Rapport-annuel-des-evenements-speciaux-2009.pdf]. Consulté en
       juin 2010.
   −   Consortium Echo-Logique. « Mission ». [http://www.echologique.ca/index.php?p=page&id=33&
       lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Association des Hôteliers du Québec. Programme de reconnaissance en développement durable
       pour l'hôtellerie québécoise (PRDD). [http://www.hoteliers-
       quebec.org/fr/page.php?label=aPRDD1aInfogen]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   BOMA BESt. [http://www.bomabest.com/fr/index_f.html]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Marché climatique de Montréal. [http://www.mcex.ca/index_fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Sherlock, banque d’information de la Ville de Montréal. « Parc du complexe environnemental de
       St-Michel ». [http://www11.ville.montreal.qc.ca/sherlock2/servlet/template/sherlock%2CAfficher
       DocumentInternet.vm/nodocument/20562]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Ville de Montréal - Environnement. « Complexe environnemental de St-Michel ».
       [http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=916,1607265&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL].
       Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Montréal 2025. « Montréal honorée à Copenhague ». [http://www.montreal2025.com/
       nouvelle.php?id=818&lang=fr]. Consulté en juin 2010.
   −   Montréal 2025. « Maison du développement durable ».
       [http://www.montreal2025.com/projet.php?id=119&lang=fr]. Consulté en juillet 2010.




                                                                                                    45
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010
                                               Annex – Map of the Montréal Territory




                                                                                       46
Montréal is... 2010 – Updated September 2010

								
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