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					2010 FIFA World CupTM Aviation Operations Draft Plan

May 2008

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Table of Contents
Introduction Creating Airlift Capacity ahead of demand 1.0 2.0 The Event Aviation 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 5.0 Airports Airlines Airport Infrastructure Airspace Management Johannesburg Tshwane Cape Town Durban Port Elizabeth Bloemfontein Rustenburg Polokwane Nelspruit 5 6 9 12 13 16 18 18 20 20 30 30 37 42 51 57 58 59 61 62 62 63 65 66 67 67 68 71 72 74 75 81

Host Cities; Venues and Airports

Capacity Modeling Operational Planning 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 International Arrivals: Participating Teams International Arrivals: FIFA Officials International Arrivals: Accredited Media International Departures: Participating Teams International Departures: FIFA Officials International Departures: Accredited Media Domestic Air Travel: Participating Teams Domestic Air Travel: FIFA Officials General Spectators: International & Domestic

6.0

Typical Match Day Travel Time Table

Annexure A Annexure B

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2010 FIFA World CupTM Aviation Operations Draft Plan

Introduction Shortly after South Africa was nominated as host country for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Event, the Department of Transport (DOT) initiated a process of consultation with and coordination of all modes of transport through the 2010 Transport Action Agenda. The transport sector is committed to support the success of the 2010 football event by ensuring the successful mobility of the members of the FIFA Family and spectators. Whilst South Africa’s aviation sector has coped well with past events, the demands on both international and domestic air travel during 2010 World Cup will place unprecedented demands on the aviation sector. As required by the 2010 Transport Action Agenda, the Aviation Sub-sector Task Team was established in 2006 to develop a framework and operations plan for the sector. From the outset, it became clear that the need for intense co-ordination and collaboration extends not only to the airport facilities, air traffic management and airlines, but also to the myriad of sub-contracting business and labour contracts that make such facilities work. Operations planning at airport and airline level will, therefore, also include maintenance plans, refuelling, line maintenance, catering, baggage handling, security, and on-flight service contracts between airlines and their staff. Facility issues include the extensions of operational hours for most airports as well as ad hoc international status for certain airports to facilitate cross-border VIP movements. The DOT has called for World Cup Period Operational Plans for all transport sectors. The Aviation Operations Plan detailed in this document is a “work in progress” due to various uncertainties which are currently being addressed based on qualified assumptions based on probability. The Aviation Operations Plan will be frequently updated as new information becomes available.

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1.0

Creating airlift capacity ahead of demand

AIRLIFT STRATEGY, 2006: Cabinet, at its ordinary meeting on 26 July 2006, approved a five-year Airlift Strategy for the regulation of air transport to enhance the air transport sector's contribution to sustainable growth. This Strategy promotes greater alignment with the tourism strategy in particular, and was developed on the basis of aviation policy directives and as a specific contribution to ASGISA.

The implementation of the Airlift Strategy supports the Department’s aim to increase the volume of international air traffic to and from South Africa. In particular, the increase of flight frequencies as well as the introduction of new players into the system will boost the availability of passenger seats in support of the projected demands of the FIFA World Cup 2010. To this end, the Department is vigorously pursuing engagements through bilateral air services negotiations with various countries during the period leading up to the Event. Charter air service operators will be encouraged to take up any potential shortfall in meeting the passenger and cargo demand. In the context of major global events, this is noted as a natural trend.

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Addressing unused allocated capacity International Air Services Act No. 60 of 1993: Section 21 Hearings – • In terms of the above section, the International Air Services Council is addressing unused frequencies. • • Licensees are offered at least 90 days to commence servicing routes. Failure to do so; - license is withdrawn and re-advertised for allocation.

The World Cup 2010 provides an excellent catalyst to attract particularly new entrants to South Africa and thus opening new business and tourism markets that previously would not necessarily have enjoyed the same priority. Any increase in airline operations will generate significant economic benefits for other market sectors and provide new job opportunities. The sustainability of air services will, however, depend on the ability of the relevant sectors to ensure that South Africa remains competitive as a tourism destination within the global market, especially in regard to the availability and cost of travel (all modes), affordability of accommodation and service standards. Instruments for increasing capacity

• •

Licensing Act provides for the authorization of Supplementary flights Air Services framework makes provision for the allocation of supplementary flights

• •

Authorisation of charter flights Increase frequencies - ASA

The following key elements of the Airlift Strategy are of importance in preparation for the World Cup 2010 event:

•

Capacity ahead of demand: In order to ensure forward planning of sufficient capacity to cater for demand, capacity (flight frequencies) are negotiated based on the principle of providing capacity ahead of demand. It is important to note that whilst the DOT creates the policy and enabling framework for the regulation of air transport, the airlines ultimately decide, on a commercial basis, whether they wish to utilize traffic rights as well as the level of activity. A number of air

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services agreements have been negotiated based on political importance and may only become economically viable within the medium to long term. Annexure A of this document details the Foreign Operators Permits and Capacity licensed / used by SA and foreign airlines to and from South Africa per Region (As of 4 June 2007). • Seasonality and capacity demands due to special events: The need for provision of adequate capacity to meet seasonal demand through the bilateral framework and interface with current SA airlines on the primary routes are acknowledged. The following tactical approach has been adopted in this regard: • Temporary capacity needs due to seasonal demands to be met through the granting of supplementary flights in terms of the relevant air services agreement(s) on request. Reciprocal opportunities for SA airlines to be ensured;

•

Non-scheduled (charter) air services to compliment scheduled air services during these periods and should be allowed, subject to the meeting of safety and security standards.

Annexure B of this document details the BILATERAL AIR SERVICES SCHEDULE FOR 2008/09. The countries identified and the proposed capacity to be negotiated ahead of the demand projected for the FIFA World CupTM event.

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1.

The Event

The FIFA 2010 World CupTM event will be staged from the 11th of June 2010 to the 11th of July 2010, with the main demand for transportation requirements being experienced within the first two weeks of the tournament, during which period the teams will participate in the group stages. The group stage accounts for 48 matches during this two week period. The various matches will be spread through ten (10) stadiums and nine (9) host cities across the country. The Aviation Sub-Sector Task Team has been mandated to coordinate the planning and operation phase for air transportation. Work towards addressing operational matters and demand requirements are ongoing. A team of consultants were appointed to conduct a capacity study of the existing aviation network with specific focus on capacity versus supply and demand for the FIFA World Cup 2010 event in South Africa. Their initial findings and recommendations are based on a scenario planning exercise which takes into consideration the projected data supplied by the South African aviation industry and that of the South African Local Organising Committee (SALOC). The group stage matches are followed by a second stage set of matches (the knock-out rounds) which in theory proposes to be less demanding in transportation needs based on the reduced number of matches to be played. A total of sixteen (16) matches including the final are to be played over this remaining period. There would still be a need for air transportation for those teams and supporters departing South Africa should the respective countries fail to progress from the group stages into the second stage of the tournament. In accordance with the reduction of both teams and matches to be played, the number of host cities and venues will also reduce during this stage. It is assumed that this will result in a reduced demand for transport around the country. Demand for air transport will peak for the final rounds of the group phase as the period between matches at the same venue are reduced to one day. This demand curve requires the moving of spectators in and out of venues within +/- 24hrs during this critical phase, (see draft match schedule - draft version 7.0 – November 2007 - Figure 1 & 2 as reflected overleaf).

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FIGURE 1

FIGURE 2

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Given the uncertainty at this time regarding accommodation nodes for the spectators from participating countries that may be travelling to and from match venues, the scenario planning undertaken by the consultants have made certain assumptions based from a high to low range of demand. The consultants were briefed by the Aviation SubSector Task Team to draft a capacity model which is able to generate a High; Medium and Low scenario based on available information and to make qualified assumptions based on probability. An event schedule was used as a basis for the model requirements for air transport for the event. The event schedule is reflected as Figure 3. The model is robust enough to accommodate and adjust the projected demand when new information which is deemed to have a direct input become available and the model will make all the necessary adjustments that have a direct impact on the operational requirement needed to fulfil the air transport demand.

FIGURE 3

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2.

AVIATION

Air Transport will form an integral component of the overall transport strategy structured for the event. The land based transport systems and operational plans will impact directly on aviation. These transport modes must ensure full alignment with the aviation sector thus ensuring a seamless efficient use of transportation for the event. In light of identified capacity limitations at various airports and airspace constraints, air transport requirements for the FIFA Family, participating teams, officials, dignitaries, VIP guests and general spectators will require and necessitate close coordination amongst all stakeholders. Within the context of the FIFA WC 2010™ tournament, the South African domestic airline commercial operators have submitted a revised increased seat capacity figure based on the projected demands for the affected period. The measures outlined by the operators may include the possible increase in fleet capacity, and or an increase utilisation of existing aircraft, and an increase in their operational hours to cater for the demand curve. As time progresses and the teams and venues details are finalised the individual operators will make the necessary adjustments within their operational plans to meet and fulfil such demand. An assumption on this initial operations plan is that there will be a fifty (50%) displacement of ‘normal schedule traffic during this time. The displacement traffic will obviously be utilised for the event. In order to maximise the utilisation of available resources, all aircraft movements will be strictly controlled throughout the network, particularly during the critical period leading up to and during the event. A Slot-coordination System will require all aircraft operators to apply for, and obtain arrival and departure slots prior to any aircraft movement to and from a coordinated airport. To ensure that adequate planning of all resources for the industry can be put into place, application for these arrival and departure slots are required early (2009). Management of slots is under the control of Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS). ATNS will manage the airspace for the event and will lead the operational requirements for air traffic management. The global industry already operates under such mechanisms and there would just be additional requirements and stipulations due to the expected demands during the event. It is important that the airspace in the Johannesburg Terminal Manoeuvring Area (TMA), which is undoubtedly the busiest airspace in South Africa for both international and domestic movements, is

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particularly well managed for the event. In order to maintain discipline and ensure that safety of the airspace is not compromised the ATNS will apply the slot allocation mechanism diligently and any deviation from operators will not be condoned. Such deviation may necessitate an operator being penalised for the slot and moved down the queue. All key airports have been identified and categorised, based on specific criteria and requirements for this event. These airports will be required to perform different and varied functions, from the busiest, high volume passenger movements to the smaller VIP charter/business aircraft type operations. This network will be managed in terms of the declared airport and airspace capacity as confirmed by the Aviation Sub-Sector Task Team. Airport operational managers and the Air Traffic Control will sign-off on the agreed capacity which will include the indicated peak operations to be handled per hour. Agreed capacity will be driven primarily by runway occupancy and apron capacity at individual airports. 2.1 Airports

For purposes of the FIFA WC 2010™ event, airports will be classified as either Primary, secondary, support and alternate airports. Airports will be limited in receiving aircraft types as per their declared capacity. State agencies required for facilitation purposes, will be required to have a twenty four hour presence at these airports. Airports officially declared and to be utilised for the event as Ports of Entry (POE). POE Airports will be required to service the projected spectator demands at the depicted stadiums denoted in Figure 4 below.

FIGURE 4

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2.1.1. Primary and/or Secondary airports: a) Existing role as a major port of entry (international airport status). b) Existing and planned infrastructure capacity and capabilities. c) Scheduled network air traffic movements. d) Category of airport rating (fire and rescue / runway specifications). e) Location within proximity of host cities and venues. f) Scale of operations, expertise and available equipment. g) Connectivity: International, Regional and Domestic. h) Accommodation node. 2.1.2 Support Airports: a) Existing daily operations – including non schedule movements. b) Existing and planned infrastructure capacity and capabilities. c) Scheduled network of air traffic movements. d) Category of airport rating (fire and rescue / runway specifications). e) Location within proximity of host cities and venues. f) Scale of operations; expertise and equipment. g) Domestic connectivity. h) Accommodation node. 2.1.3 Alternate Airports: a) Location. b) Infrastructure and ability to provide specific services. c) Category of airport rating (fire and rescue / runway specifications).. d) Availability of resources. e) Scale of operations; expertise and equipment. Primary and secondary airports, representing the primary airport network, will form the backbone of all the air transport operations required for the expected high volume movements of passengers and cargo, inclusive of SALOC responsibilities to FIFA officials; teams; sponsors; media; invited guests and general spectators. Coordination between the SALOC and the Aviation Sub-Sector Task Team is critical to ensure

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alignment of the domestic air transport schedule and to accommodate increased aircraft movements, particularly the needs of the FIFA Family and general spectators. Certain limitations at some airports may cause operational imbalances during the event, particularly in respect of slot allocations. Information on current air traffic movements and average seat availability is reflected in Figure 5 & 6 below.

Average seats per day (June/July 2007) Total 17,600 international arrival seats

FIGURE 5

Daily international ATM’s per region

FIGURE 6

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The support and/or alternate airports are identified to provide relief for parking facilities to either international or regional charters, particularly on match days. These airports may reduce the impact on infrastructure capacity overload at host cities, particularly on match days when the ‘drop/pick-up and go’ principle may be applied at the primary and secondary airports. Note: Restricted ‘air zones’, may be declared for military/police air patrols above host cities and/or stadiums on match day. Figure 7 below depicts the projected airport passenger handling capacity per hour.

FIGURE 7 2.2 Airlines

The domestic airline operators are included in having to apply for any additional slots (new or existing routes over and above existing schedules) and would have to ensure that planning around supply and demand is inclusive of existing scheduled operations. New routes that could include a typical ‘dead-leg’ operation on certain sectors, or ‘drop and go’ will have to be factored in the pricing structures by airline operators. Airline operators are to ensure the an operating agreement with relevant airport operators and/or ground handling operators where no such agreements are currently in place. In certain instances, scheduled services exist between two points but these may have to be increased once the final demand has been identified. At this initial stage, domestic

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airline operators are cautious in over-committing themselves, and await confirmed data on the announcement of countries who will participate in this event. Increased services on routes particularly on match day will be considered as is the current practice within the industry. Provision for the utilisation of various other instruments such as charter flight operations, supplementary flights are available. The ability to use these instruments will have to be in accordance with the South African Civil Aviation Authority and the Department of Transport requirements. Such flights will have to be applied for approval. Crew rotation and operational hours including staff, will have to be structured around the event times, as the possibility of twenty four (24) hour operations at various airports (notably primary and secondary airports) will be required. The South African airline industry has been informed of this requirement and has accordingly been advised to include this in their internal operating plans. The current domestic airline market is well structured with a 14% growth per annum being recorded. The low cost carrier market represents a significant segment of the domestic market and the safety record of all domestic airlines is comparative to world best practice. In fact South Africa boosts one of the world’s best air transport safety statistics for commercial operations. Currently daily scheduled services are operated to 5 (five) of the host venues and key accommodation nodes. In order to meet projected increased demands, airlines have been informed to engage on commercial arrangements with foreign airlines for the utilisation of aircraft in terms of ‘wet lease agreements’. It is common industry practice for long-haul flight into South Africa to remain idle on the ground for periods ranging form four to twelve hours. Hence in line with agreed legally acceptable commercial practice these aircraft may be utilised on the basis of a ‘wet lease’ to operate for the normally acceptable idle periods and transit passengers around the country to specific host cities. This arrangement should in theory ensure an increase in aircraft capacity which will be able to meet demand as required. The projected demand has been calculated based on various assumptions for a high case scenario. The airlines have used their route and network planners to provide capacity to meet this projected demand. This measure is not only route specific, but may also related to high density accommodation nodes. Note: Some high density accommodation nodes may be placed in remote areas, or within the vicinity of smaller airports which in theory may require a greater emphasis on land based transportation.

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2.3

Airport Infrastructure

Most of the identified airports have sufficient infra-structure capacity to handle the projected volumes in 2010, operating for 24 hours, and at peak handling capacity for 10 hours or more. These airports will receive and facilitate most of the increased airline seat capacities throughput via their terminal buildings. There are other airports that have infra-structure constraints and as such will only be able to handle a reduced number of passenger volumes even with the addition of temporary facilities. The temporary requirements that are being considered will have to include provision of all support services and skilled resources. On agreement with the relevant stakeholders to proceed, engagement with a supplier and the logistics of operating such a temporary facility will guide to the final costing. It is anticipated that this would be refined to address the basic operational requirements and not be exaggerated by a ‘nice to have’. The cost recovery through various applicable charges may be applied. These airports are located within a reasonable distance for land-based travel time which may enhance the movement of projected spectator volumes to the venues. These airports are able to facilitate the FIFA requirements for participating teams; officials; VIP’s and other guests. The general spectator movements will be very limited based on the projected capacity requirements, after consideration is given for the handling of participating teams; officials; VIP’s and other guests. 2.4 Airspace Management

The Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS) will be responsible for the control of all aircraft movements during the event, including monitoring of ‘restricted airspace’. Airport infrastructure capacities and the rotation/turn-around time of aircraft at a particular airport as well as airspace capacity will determine the joint capacity of that airport system. The ATNS will be responsible for the allocation of all slot allocations (joint airspace and airport slots) with due regard to FIFA requirements; government guarantees and scheduled daily operations as a priority. ATNS will also ensure the safety of aircraft movements at all times and may divert from the operational plan should

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the necessity arise to ensure aviation safety. An underlying principle here is that aviation safety is the primary mandate of the ATNS, and as such may not be compromised. The maximum capacity any particular airport can handle per hour will also dictate what air traffic control can move through airports. Airports with a single runway or terminal building with limited dimensions, capable of handling an aircraft of maximum 150 passengers, will not be able to significantly increase capacity with just simple temporary facilities. Temporary terminal facilities may be required to facilitate separation of spectators from officials and teams. Figure 8 event. below states the aerodrome capacity for the major airports identified for the

FIGURE 8

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3. HOST CITIES; VENUES and AIRPORTS 3.1 Johannesburg 3.1.1 Soccer City (87, 600) & Ellis Park Stadium (62, 567), hosting a collective of ten

(10) matches in the group stage and five (5) in the remainder, including the all important final match of the tournament. 3.1.2 Johannesburg will be in the unique position of a single host city with two match

venues supported by two primary and three support airports. Of these, only O.R.Tambo International (ORTIA) is owned and operated by ACSA. Lanseria International airport is a smaller, privately owned and operated facility. The three other airports are also privately owned and operated, housing mostly training schools and private aircraft owners. Collectively all airports will, however, have to deliver on the demand of passenger; business; charter and regional air traffic movements during the event. 3.1.3 ORTIA and Lanseria airport have supported each other well when Gauteng

(Johannesburg), has hosted major events. Both airports are key to this event as there are three host venues located in Gauteng where twelve teams and there spectators is to be accommodated. a) ORTIA is the countries’ primary International Port of Entry for scheduled passenger and air freight traffic movements. Designed to receive and handle the new Airbus A380 type aircraft, this is also the hub for the domestic air distribution throughout the country with infrastructure and terminal capacity expected to exceed the hourly demand rate projected. In the case of unexpected demand, temporary facilities are available and will require minimum attention to become operational. A detailed analysis of O R Tambo International Airport is reflected in the table overleaf.

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Name

ICAO designator

IATA

Current ARFF

Aerodrome

Reference Elevation (amsl)

ref point / Temp

Category coordinates O R Tambo FAJS International Airport JNB 9 26 08 01.30 21.2 ° C S 28 14 32.34 E 5,558 ft

Airport ownership and management Ownership: Airports Company South Africa Management: Airports Company South Africa

Aircraft types

• All types including Code B, C, D, E and F • Breakdown is approximately as follows for scheduled international aircraft: • • • • • • Code A: 0% Code B: 21% Code C: 74% Code D: 0% Code E: 5% Code F: 0%

• Breakdown is approximately as follows for scheduled domestic aircraft: • • • • • • Additional comments Code A: 0% Code B: 20% Code C: 71% Code D: 0% Code E: 9% Code F: 0%

See runway code, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitations and performance

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Flight movements (last 5 years and forecasts)

Total flight movements (current and historical)

07/08: 172,946 06/07: 211,641 05/06: 199,496 04/05: 185,753 03/04: 178,808 None

Forecast flight movements

Year Total 2010

Domestic 172,120

International 60,915

Regional 24,189

Cargo 12,686

269,910

Passenger volumes (last 5 years and forecasts)

Comments Total passenger (pax) volumes (current and historical) 07/08: 14,777,290 06/07: 17,794,100 05/06: 16,078,440 04/05: 14,555,364 03/04: 13,168,477 None

Forecast passenger volumes

Year 2010

Domestic

International

Regional 746,898

Total 22,555,925

13,050,250 8,758,777

Infrastructure, facilities and operations (current and future plans)

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Runway

Surface: asphalt

Surface: asphalt

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Existing infrastructure and equipment

Length: 4,418m Width: 75m Orientation: 03L/21R PCN: 56 FAWU Declared distances: TORA LDA 03L 4,418 4,418 21R 4,418 4,418 4,518 4,418 4,518 TODA ASDA

Length: 3,400m Width: 75m Orientation: 03R/21L PCN: 50 FAWU Declared distances: TORA TODA ASDA LDA 03R 3,400 3,460 4,418 21L 2,400 3,460 3,400 3,400 3,400 3,400

Taxiway

Well connected series of asphalt surfaced taxiways, including: – Parallel taxiways – RET’s – Holding bays

Apron

117 hard stands available – Contact and non-contact stands available – Stands are multi-configured for different aircraft types 40 stairs available – Swissport x 16 – Equity x 24 – Air bridges are available as contact stands – Aircraft mobile steps for class C, D and E currently in use 36 baggage loaders available – Swissport x 16 – Equity x 20 – Conveyor belts in use for all types of aircraft Fuel pits on all hard stands – 20 dispensers – 7 tankers – 2 Avgas trucks

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Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Maximum capacity is 45m litres – Useable stock of 28m litres – Average daily use of 4.5m litres Baggage handling equipment – Swissport x 256 dollies – Swissport x 56 baggage wagons Baggage handling vehicles – Swissport x 15 bartow – Swissport x 12 tractors – Equity x 60 LDV and baggage tractors Container movers – Swissport x 10 container movers – Equity x 20 container movers

Arrivals terminal

INTERNATIONAL Passenger holding area x 2 – Capacity of 450 sq m – Maximum 250 pax per hour Baggage carousels x 7 – 2 x belt automated – 60 bags per belt (60m) Immigration counters (passport control) x 5 – Only manned for scheduled cross-border flights – Equipment requires upgrading Customs counters (customs control) x 3 – Only manned for scheduled cross-border flights – Limited resources Public “meet and greet” area – Capacity 2,500 sq m – Maximum 1,000 pax No car rentals or shuttle services available (only in multi-storey parkade) Bureau de change x 5

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Existing infrastructure and equipment

Baggage trolleys – 4,000 trolleys – Adequate, but requires good management process DOMESTIC Passenger holding area x 1 – Capacity of 450 sq m – Maximum 250 pax per hour Baggage carousels x 6 – 2 x belt automated – 60 bags per belt Public “meet and greet” area – Capacity 2,500 sq m – Maximum 1,000 pax – Shops and seating areas on retail level

Departures terminal

INTERNATIONAL Check-in counters x 104 – Adequate for existing operations – Allocated to scheduled carriers Customs control and VAT checks x 4 – Counters need to be upgraded – Adequate for existing operations Security check points x 8 – Adequate for existing operations Screening equipment – Automatic metal detectors x 8 – Hand held metal detectors x 6 – No private screening area – AMDs adequate for existing operations – No stand-by equipment Immigration counters x 20 – Adequate for existing operations VAT refund (after customs clearance) x 2

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Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Adequate for existing operations Holding area and boarding gates – Waiting area 300 sq m – Limited seating DOMESTIC Check-in counters x 75 – Adequate for existing operations – Allocated to scheduled carriers – 10 CUSS counters Security check-in x 6 – Adequate for existing operations Screening equipment – Automatic metal detectors x 6 – Hand held metal detectors x 6 – No private screening area – AMDs adequate for existing operations – No stand-by equipment Holding area – Boarding gates x 26 – Waiting area 300 sq m – Limited seating Parking Multi-storey parkade and shaded parking – MSP: 9,500 – Western carports: 600 – Super south: 4,000 – Underground: 1,400 – Piazza: 90 – Shade 1: 500 – Shade 2: 650 – Shade 3: 700 Safety / emergency 3 fire stations (CAT 9) 3 x Rosenbauer macro fire tenders, capacity of 24,300 litres

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Existing infrastructure and equipment

One water tanker available 12 fire-fighters on duty MOU with local authority (Ekhuruleni Metro) ATNS, navigational and flight aids Lighting TDZL CL HIRL A2 03L/21R CAT II / I 03R/21L CAT II PAPIs

b) Lanseria International Airport is significantly smaller than ORTIA, but has the ability to handle regional and domestic movements to alleviate peak capacity demands at ORTIA. There are also existing daily scheduled domestic and regional air services operating to and from Lanseria. The airport is currently undergoing expansion geared to be fully operation before 2010. Primary activities include non-scheduled daily flights (charter type operations), ideally suited for teams, officials and sponsors, particularly due to access to and from major road networks and implementation of strict security controls which have been agreed with SALOC and SAPS.

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Lanseria International Airport

Name

ICAO designator

IATA

Current ARFF Category

Aerodrome coordinates S 23.0 E 027 55 28.8 25

Reference Elevation (amsl)

ref point / Temp

Lanseria International Airport

FALA

HLA

7

56 24 ° C

4517ft 1377m

Airport ownership and management Ownership: Private consortium Management: Private consortium

Aircraft types

Executive jets Light training and charter aircraft B373 type used by Kulula

Additional comments

See runway code, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitations and performance

Flight movements (last 5 years and forecasts) C Infrastructure, facilities 2007: considered confidential 2006: considered confidential 2005: 100,000 2004: 107,000 2003: 101,000 Considered confidential Plans for Lanseria to become Gatwick Expect to have all major airlines servicing the airport within 5 years Gauteng’s

and operations (current and future plans)

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Comair interest (Gatwick /

has in a

expressed London

Luton) Lanseria flight

3.1.3

Advantages – a) Road and rail inner city network including the Gautrain (ORTIA only). b) Economic support, development and expertise. c) Available resources. d) FIFA and SALOC Headquarters close and easily accessible by road. e) Connectivity Polokwane. with Cape Town, Durban, Bloemfontein, Nelspruit,

3.1.4

Risks – a) Temporary closure of the airport will have a high impact on network. b) Adequacy of airport city links and land-based transport services. c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Required air traffic movements (ATMs) per hour at peak. e) Network support. f) Congestion of land-based support services.

Airport capacity table

Domestic Arrivals (ORTIA) 2010 = 30 000 (3 000 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 45 000 (3 000 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak (LANSERIA) 2010 = 9 000 (900 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 13 500 (900 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

Domestic Departures (ORTIA) 2010 = 30 000 ( 3 000 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 45 000 (3 000 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak (LANSERIA) 2010 = 9 000 (900 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 13 500 (900 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

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3.2

Tshwane / Pretoria: 3.2.1 Loftus Stadium (49, 598), with five group stage matches and one (1) remaining knock-out stage match is supported by ORTIA, Wonderboom and Lanseria airports located within close proximity of the city and stadium. 3.2.2 Advantages – a) Road and rail inner city network. b) National road and rail network links. c) Economic support, development and expertise. d) Available resources. e) Group stage matches may require no air travel. 3.2.3 Risks – a) Temporary closure of the airports will have a high impact on the network. b) Adequacy of airport city links and land-based transport services. c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Gauteng airports are also identified as support for Rustenburg. e) Congestion of land-based support services.

3.3

Cape Town: 3.3.1 Greenpoint Stadium (70,000), with five (5) group stage and three (3) remaining knock-out stage matches, including a semi-final. There are four (4) airports with only one (1) being commercially operated and the remaining three (3), are military air force bases but suitable for providing support. 3.3.2 Cape Town International Airport (CIA) is the second biggest Port of Entry for scheduled commercial air traffic and with good terminal infrastructure but limitations of only 1 (one) runway. The airport is currently being upgraded and the terminal capacity has been designed to exceed the projected per hour demands during the event.

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3.3.3

The Ysterplaat Air Force Base (AFB) is suited for smaller type aircraft operations (VIP and business aircraft), and is being considered for FIFA / SALOC officials and invited dignitaries. Existing security and VIP operations makes this airport suitable to handle these operations and will provide some capacity relief to CTIA. AFB Langebaan is to be considered as an emergency diversion airport for teams, officials and VIP’s only. These AFBs will all require some minor upgrades of their respective VIP lounges. AFB Overberg is being considered for the parking of narrow body charter and other aircraft to be used in the drop-off/pick-up and go scenarios.

Cape Town International Airport

Name

ICAO designator

IATA

Current ARFF Category

Aerodrome coordinates

Reference Elevation (amsl)

ref point / Temp

Cape Town International Airport

FACT

CPT

9

33 58 05.32 22.2 ° C S 18 36 16.70 E

151ft

Airport ownership and management Ownership: ACSA Management: ACSA

Aircraft types

Breakdown is approximately as follows for scheduled international aircraft: – Code A: 0% – Code B: 20% – Code C: 71% – Code D: 0% – Code E: 9% – Code F: 0% Breakdown is approximately as follows for scheduled domestic

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aircraft: – Code A: 0% – Code B: 25% – Code C: 25% – Code D: 0% – Code E: 50% – Code F: 0% General aviation – Non-scheduled movements are mainly Code B and helicopter movements Additional comments See runway code, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitations and performance

Flight movements (last 5 years and forecasts) C Total flight movements (current and historical) 07/08: 76,467 06/07: 91,393 05/06: 88,890 04/05: 92,561 03/04: 92,283 Forecast flight movements 2008: 84,178 2009: 91,080 2010: 101,211

Passenger volumes (last 5 years and forecasts)

Comments Total passenger (pax) volumes (current and historical) 6,214,903 6,834,173 04/05: 7,518,543 05/06: 6,191,681 06/07: 07/08: None

32

03/04: 5,461,703 Forecast passenger volumes 2008: 8,516,181 2009: 9,214,508 2010: 10,614,324

Infrastructure, facilities and operations (current and future plans)

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Runway

Surface: asphalt Length: 3,201m Width: 61m Orientation: 01-19 PCN: 57FAXU Declared distances: not recorded

Surface: asphalt Length: 1,701m Width: 46m Orientation: 16-34 PCN: 32 FAXU Declared recorded distances: not

Taxiway

TWY capable of accommodating Code E aircraft PCN 57FAXU TWY D3 and D4 PCN 13 PAXT

Apron

Hard stand – A apron – Capacity for 5 wide-body (747 type) with pax loading bridges (PLBs); 4 PLBs to international terminal and 1 PLB to domestic – Capacity for 10 narrow-body (B737) type with 5 PLBs; all PLBs to domestic terminal Hard stand – B apron infrastructure and equipment – Multi-configured to accommodate 10 wide-body or 20 narrow-body aircraft New aprons to be built by 2010 Stairs – 19 for wide-body aircraft – 11 for narrow-body aircraft Baggage loader – 13 baggage loaders with conveyer belts Fuelling

33

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– All main apron bays have fuel hydrants - 3.2m litres - 5 dispensers currently - Storage capacity of 2.7 tons - 61 fuel pits - Pumping capacity of 6,000 litres per minute – Bowser refuelling for remote freight and general aviation aprons (1 x 18,000 litres) Baggage handling – 45 dollies – 27 dolly vehicles – 8 loading containers Arrivals terminal INTERNATIONAL International holding area (1,775 sq m) 4 x baggage carousels (1,062 bags per hour) 18 x immigration counters (1,440 pax per hour) 18 x passport control counters (1,526 sq m) 16 x customs control counters (1,047 pax per hour, 345 sq m) Meet and greet / information / commercial area – Space for 951 meeters and greeters – Total space of 1,616 sq m 2,250 x baggage trolleys DOMESTIC Domestic holding area (1,092 sq m) 4 x baggage carousels (924 bags per hour) Meet and greet / information / commercial area – Space for 328 meeters and greeters – Total space of 558 sq m 2,250 x baggage trolleys Departures terminal International check-in counters – 68 check-in counters – 1360 pax per hour – Space for 716 pax

34

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Total space of 1,288 sq m Security check points – 2 check points – 655 pax per hour Security check point area – Total space of 184 sq m – Space for 184 pax Security screening equipment – 2 x AMD machines – 1 x X-ray machine (stand-by) Immigration counters – 14 passport control counters – Capacity to process 1,120 pax per hour Immigration counter area – Total space of 205 sq m – Space for 205 pax VAT refund counters x 3 Holding area – Total space of 4,215 sq m – Space for 3,513 pax Boarding gates – 8 x boarding gates – Capacity to process 3,600 pax per hour DOMESTIC Domestic check-in counters – 45 check-in counters – 900 pax per hour – Space for 472 pax – Total space of 614 sq m Security check points – 4 check points – 1309 pax per hour Security screening equipment

35

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– 4 x AMD machines – 4 x X-ray machines – 2 x search rooms Holding area – Total size of 1,249 sq m – Capacity for 735 pax per hour Boarding gates – 16 x boarding gates – Capacity to process 7,200 pax through boarding gates Safety / emergency Fire tenders x 4 – Total water on wheels capacity of 12,000 litres per fire tender – Total foam on wheels of 500 litres per fire tender – Reserved foam of minimum 4,000 litres 57 trained personnel – Minimum of 12 on duty at all times ATNS, navigational and flight aids Lighting VORTAC NDB DME CAT II/III ILS TDZL CL HIRL A PAPI

3.3.4

Advantages –

a) Available tourist attractions. b) Supply of accommodation. c) Road and rail network between major cities. d) Inner city bus and rail network. e) Available resources. f) Connectivity with Johannesburg and Durban.

36

3.3.5

Risks -

a) Temporary closure of the airports will have a high impact on the network. b) Adequacy of airport city links and land based transport services. c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Required atm’s per hour at peak. e) Network support. f) Accommodation node. g) High tourist attraction point. h) SANDF / SAAF approval of AFB’s. Airport capacity table

Domestic Arrivals 2010 = 24 500 (2 450 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 36 000 (2 450 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

Domestic Departures 2010 = 24 500 ( 2 450 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 36 000 (2 450 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.4

Durban: 3.4.1 Host city venue for e’Thekwini Stadium (70,000), with five (5) group stage and two (2), remaining knock-out stage matches of which one is a semifinal match. There is currently one (1) primary airport and one (1) under construction, of which either would be a major Port of Entry for scheduled airline operators. The infrastructure of the new airport would be advantageous in the ability to handle wide bodied aircraft without restrictions as is current. The new airport would also have state of the art technology and systems. It has been agreed that the existing airport be included in the planning purposes even in the event of the new one being ready, will offer increased capacity for Durban as a host city. It is also agreed that these two would compliment each other as parking airports for the event. The remaining

37

airports within the region are support airports geared to handle small light commercial and business type traffic. Durban International Airport Name Name ICAO designator IATA Current ARFF Aerodrome Reference Elevation (amsl)

ref point / Temp

Category coordinates Durban International Airport FADN DUR 9 29 57 56.08 25.3 ° C S 30 56 57.34 E 33ft

Airport ownership and management Ownership: ACSA Management: ACSA

Aircraft types

To be provided Additional comments

Additional comments

See runway code, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitations and performance

Infrastructure, facilities and operations (current and future plans)

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Runway

Surface: asphalt Length: 2,440m Width: 60m Orientation: 06/24 PCN: 49 FAXU

38

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Declared distances: not recorded Apron Hard stand – Parking for max 11 737-800 type aircraft – Parking for max 2 wide-bodied (e.g. B747) aircraft – 1 stand for cargo aircraft (up to B747) and GA (max 15 caravan type aircraft) Stairs x 4 – 3 for B737-800 aircraft – 1 for MD82 Baggage handling equipment x 13 – Dollies (500kg each, 60 bags per dolley) Baggage handling vehicles x 6 – 2 x VW LDV – 4 electric vehicles (golf cars) Fuel – 21 fuel pit points – 2 bowsers – 3 refueling trucks – Pump capacity up to 4,000 litres per minute – Storage cpapacity of 300,000 litres – SAPREF pipeline available 24/7 Arrivals terminal INTERNATIONAL Holding area – Capacity of 900 sq m – Max 550 pax per hour Baggage carousels x 1isting infrastructure and equipment – Capacity of 460 bags per hour Immigration counters x 8 – Manned for scheduled cross-border flights Customs counters x 7 – 1 green and 8 red channels Public “meet and greet” area

39

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Capacity of 2,347 sq m – Max 1,000 pax – Adequate for existing operations Baggage trolleys – 1,078 trolleys (international and domestic) – Requires good management process DOMESTIC Holding area – Capacity of 1,050 sq m – Max 550 pax per hour – Adequate for existing operations Baggage carousels x 3 – 2 belt automated – Capacity of 460 bags per hour Public “meet and greet” area – Capacity of 2,347 sq m – Max 1,000 pax – Adequate for existing operations Baggage trolleys – 1,078 trolleys (international and domestic) – Requires good management process Departures terminal INTERNATIONAL Customs control and VAT check x 1 – Adequate for existing operations Check-in counters x 9 – Adequate for existing operations – Allocated to scheduled carriers Security check points x 1 – Adequate for existing operations – Can handle 550 pax per hour Screening equipment (for international and domestic) – Automatic metal detectors x 4 – Hand held metal detectors x 8

40

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– AMDs adequate for existing operations Immigration counters x 4 – Adequate for existing operations No VAT refund counter after customs clearance Holding area – Boarding gates x 2 – Able to process 550 pax per hour DOMESTIC Check-in counters x 47 – Inadequate for existing operations – Allocated to schedule carriers Security check points x 3 – Adequate for existing operations – Each check point can handle 550 pax per hour Screening equipment (for international and domestic) – Automatic metal detectors x 4 – Hand held metal detectors x 8 – No private screening areaisting infrastructure and equipment – AMDs adequate for existing operations Holding area – Boarding gates x 11 – Able to process 550 pax per hour Parking A Parking: 212 B Parking: 938 MSP: 601 Parking E: 125 North parking: 93 South parking: 129 Safety / emergency Fire tenders x 4 (Rosenbauer) – 4,000 on vehicles – 6,000 litres of foam in stock – Service level agreement with Ethekwini Metro

41

Existing infrastructure and equipment

ATNS, navigational

PAPIs ILS

3.4.2

Advantages–

a) Available tourist attractions. b) Supply of accommodation. c) Road and rail network between major cities. d) Inner city bus and rail network. e) Available resources. f) 3.4.3 Connectivity with Johannesburg and Cape Town. Risks -

a) Temporary closure of the airport will have a high impact on the network. b) Existing airport (outdated) vs. new airport technology - in-time commissioning of the new airport. c) Runway limitations for wide bodied aircraft at existing airport (should new airport not be ready in time). d) Airport city links and land based transport services. e) Weather conditions (diversions). f) Accommodation node. g) High tourist attraction point. h) SANDF / SAAF approval for the use of military facility Airport capacity table

Domestic Arrivals 2010 = 17 500 (1 750 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 26 250(1 750 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

Domestic Departures 2010 = 17 500 (1 750 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 26 250 (1 750 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.5

Port Elizabeth (Nelson Mandela):

42

3.5.1

Host city venue for Port Elizabeth Stadium (47, 592), with five (5) group stage matches and three (3) knock-out stage matches including the 3rd/4th place play-off. Port Elizabeth airport (ACSA) has very limited capacity for wide bodied aircraft and in addition will require temporary terminal facilities to increase passenger handling capacity for the event. The airports of East London and Bisho are considered as support airports, but will require dedicated land-based transport between the cities in order for them to be effectively utilised in the aviation planning phase for the region.

3.5.2

Port Elizabeth airport is also a recognised Port of Entry but has limited border control capabilities. This is however being addressed with the government agencies responsible and will be factored in their operational plans in support of the aviation requirements.

ACSA airports Port Elizabeth International Airport

Name

ICAO designator

IATA

Current ARFF

Aerodrome

Reference Elevation (amsl)

ref point / Temp

Category coordinates Port Elizabeth International Airport FAPE PLZ 7 33 59 24 S 25 36 37 E 22.4° C 226ft

Airport ownership and management Ownership: ACSA Management: ACSA

Aircraft types

General aviation (GA) light aircraft (80% of all Air Traffic Movements) Reports handling up to ARFF CAT 7 aircraft – B737-800 – B737-400 – MD80

43

– A319 – B727 Note: Main Runway ICAO Code D Runway (aircraft with 36m wingspan up to but not including 52m), but maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) limited due existing PCN 50 Additional comments Reports ability to handle bigger aircraft subject to special permission from DG CAA i.e. Airbus 340 ACSA planning runway extension using MD11 as design aircraft See runway code, slopes, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitation and performance

Flight movements (last 5 years and forecasts)

Total flight movements (current and historical)

07/08: 50,582 06/07: 59,881 05/06: 36,160 04/05: 32,669 03/04: 33,924

Mostly GA (predominately training & IFR flights): 80% Scheduled flights: 20% PLZ does not operate a Slot Allocation System During busy commercial periods ATNS require / restrict GA training traffic, relocating airborne activities to other local airfields No designated helipad, use GA “compound” commercial

Forecast flight movements

No formal forecasts are conducted locally Forecasts produced at ACSA Head Office –

GA traffic volumes are growing fast and significantly ATNS has restricted GA activity – Highest reported peak at ~ 69 movements per hour

44

– Advised IFR traffic capacity ~ 20 movements per hour – ACSA / PLZ have submitted a proposal to the Nelson Mandela Metro to relocate all GA training activity to one of the smaller aerodromes within the province 2010 planning – No GA training activity allowed on match days

Infrastructure, facilities and operations (current and future plans)

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Runway

Surface: asphalt Orientation: 08/26 Length: 1,980m Width: 46m PCN: 50/ FBXT Declared distances: RWY 08 – TORA: 1,980 – TODA: 2,040 – ASDA: 1,980 – LDA: 1,980 RWY 26 – TORA: 1,980 – TODA: 2,070 – ASDA: 2,070 – LDA: 1,830

Surface: grass Orientation: 10/28 Grass LCN:16 Length: 1,187m Width: 18m Declared distances: RWY 10 – TORA: 1,187 – TODA: 1,187 – ASDA: 1,187 – LDA: 1,187 RWY 28 – TORA: 1,187 – TODA: 1187 – ASDA: 1187 – LDA: 1187

Taxiway

Taxiway 1: – Surface: asphalt

45

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Width 22.5m – PCN: 36FBXU Taxiway “C1” – Surface: asphalt – Width 7.5m – PCN 12 FBYU Apron p/hr – 1x remote (cargo & general aviation), max 15 x caravan type aircraft Stairs x 4 – Max for aircraft of 737-800 type – Manually manoeuvred and operated Baggage loader x 2 – Automated belt. Max for aircraft 737-800 type Fuel – No pit fuel points – Bowser pump operation for aircraft max 737-800 – Fuel Types: JETA-1, AVGAS 100 – 2 Bowsers, total capacity 10,000 litres, 600 litres / minute each – Maximum fuel storage: 300,000 litres (2 days supply) – Operating capacity: 120,000 litres Baggage handling equipment – Dolley x 20 – 50% reasonable condition; remainder requires repairs Baggage handling vehicles x 4 – To move dollies between aircraft and terminal baggage claim belts Container mover x 1 – Not good condition; has not been used for years Arrivals terminal INTERNATIONAL International holding area – Capacity: 172.8 sq m ÷ 1.7sqm per pax = 101.65 pax – This area is adequate to handle the current demand; this is a newly Hard stand – Main in front of terminal to accommodate max 2 x 737-800 type aircraft

46

Existing infrastructure and equipment

upgraded area and is fairly modern Baggage carousels (1 x automated belt) – Capacity: 1200 bags per hour per carousel at 1½ cycle per bag – 900 at two cycles per bag – 1,800 at 1 cycle per bag – Area capacity: 446.52 sq m ÷ 1,7sqm per pax = 262.66 pax Immigration counters – Only manned for schedule cross-border flights – No equipment on site Customs counters – Only manned for scheduled cross-border flights – Operational hours (Callout basis) Public area – Standing area capacity: 467.72 sq m ÷ 1.7sqm per pax = 275.13 – Seated area capacity: 12.42 sq m ÷ 1.7 sq m per pax = 7.30 x 5 seats = 36.5 pax seated – This is a newly upgraded area and is fairly modern however this area is not sufficient for current operations – Shops and seating areas scattered throughout the area (see commercial for full tenant list) Trolleys – 350 heavy duty trolleys, adequate for current operations – Additional trolleys to be purchased to ensure meeting increased demand Shuttle services – Game lodges; tourist group’s collection and meeting point – Concession (Blundens and Southern Reservations) DOMESTIC Domestic holding area – Standing area capacity: 530.04 sq m ÷ 1.7 sq m = 311.79 pax – Seated area capacity: 9.66 sq m ÷ 1.7 sq m per pax x 5 seats = 28.41 – Although newly renovated not adequate to handle current capacity Baggage carousels

47

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– 1 x automated belt – Capacity: 1,800 at 1 cycle per bag – 1,200 bags per hour per carousel at 1 ½ cycle per bag – 900 at two cycles per bag – Area Capacity: 456.8sqm ÷ 1,7sqm per pax = 268.71pax Public area – Standing area capacity: 467.72 sq m ÷ 1.7sqm per pax = 275.13 – Seated area capacity: 12.42 sq m ÷ 1.7 sq m per pax = 7.30 x 5 seats = 36.5 pax seated – This is a newly upgraded area and is fairly modern however this area is not sufficient for current operations – Shops and seating areas scattered throughout the area Trolleys x 350 – Adequate – Additional trolleys to be purchased Departures terminal INTERNATIONAL Customs control and VAT check x 2 – Modern update equipment. Adequate for current operational status International check-in counters x 2 – Adequate for existing operations – Allocated to chartered operators Security check points x 2 – Adequate for existing operations – Can handle 480 pax per hour – Lack of staff hampers the operations due to the fact the when both machines needs to be operated the additional staff to be resourced from contract security Security screening equipment – 2x AMD – 2x X-Ray machines (1 back-up) – 2x AMD (1 back-up) – 2x HHMD Immigration counters (offices)

48

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Passport controlxisting infrastructure and equipment – Adequate for current operational status. Holding area & Boarding Gates – Airlines able to process 906 per hr – Boarding gate readers in place. – Standing waiting area: 141.68 sq m ÷ 1.2 sq m per pax = 118.07 pax – Seated waiting area: 22.08 sq m ÷ 1.7 sq m per pax = 12.98 pax x 5 seats = 64.9 seated pax DOMESTIC Domestic check-in counters x 19 – Adequate for existing operations – Allocated to schedule carriers – Require additional facilities for WC 2010, currently inadequate space for such. Security check points x 2 – Adequate for existing operations – Can handle 480 pax per hour if both points are open – Lack of staff hampers the operations due to the fact, when both machines needs to be operated the additional staff to be resourced from contract security – Will be inadequate for expected throughput required for WC 2010 – 3 shifts consisting of 7 members per shift – Area capacity: 23.2 sq m ÷ 1.0 sq m per pax = 23.2 pax Security screening equipment – 2x X-Ray machines (1 back-up) – 2x AMD (1 back-up) – 2x HHMD Holding area – Boarding gates x 5 – All operations are done manually – Gate readers already in place at each gate – Standing waiting area: 732.02 sqm ÷1.2 = 610.02 pax – Seated waiting area: 62.1 sqm ÷ 1.7 sqm per pax = 36.52 pax x 5

49

Existing infrastructure and equipment

seats = 182.6 seated pax seated – 1 restaurant and 1 gift shop in this area Safety / emergency 1x water tanker 1x foam dispenser 2x fire fighting Rosenbauer trucks Limited trained staff Safety Management System Manual availa ATNS, navigational and flight aids ILS/VOR/DME LOC 109.5 MHz TRANS (RWY 26) (PDI) ICAO ILS: Cat 1 HS ILS GP (RWY 26) 332.6 MHz ICAO Cat 1 HS ILS/LOC 111.1 MHz TRANS (RWY 08) (PEI) HS ILS GP (RWY 08) 331.7 MHz HS NDB (PD) 372.5 kHz H24 VOR (PEV) 112.9 MHz transmits HS UHF DME (PEV) 76X (co-located with VOR) H24 RADAR subject to terrain clearance Aviation Meteorology – Fully automated weather station and office H24 with associated MET Office at Pretoria. Information point TWR, APP and Area

3.5.3

Advantages –

a) Road and rail network between major cities. b) Inner city bus and rail network. c) Connectivity with Johannesburg; Cape Town and Durban. d) High average daily schedule connectivity within the network. e) Location to city centre and stadium. f) 3.5.4 Tourist attractions and accommodation. Risks -

a) Temporary closure of the airport will have a high impact on the network. b) Airport city links and land-based transport services. c) Required air traffic movements (ATMs) per hour at peak.

50

d) Availability / serviceability of support airports. e) Limited tourist attractions and accommodation located distance from the city.

Airport capacity table

Domestic Arrivals 2010 = 6 000 (600 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 9 000 (600 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

Domestic Departures 2010 = 6 000 (600 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 9 600 (600 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.6

Bloemfontein: 3.6.1 Host city venue for the Free State Stadium (45, 368), with five (5) group stage matches and one (1) remaining game in the knock-out stage. Limited upgrade to existing infrastructure currently being undertaken and additional temporary terminal facilities to be effected to meet the capacity demands of the event. The airport has International status, but with limited border control capabilities. The existing military operational area at Bloemfontein airport will be ideally suited for the officials and team movements, as there is existing security and access control systems in place. It should be noted however that both military and commercial operations utilise the same runway for arrivals and departures. 3.6.2 The support airport of Kimberley has capacity limitations, but could be used for VIP / business and small light aircraft operations. Upington airport, which is located further away has good infrastructure for parking of wide and narrow bodied aircraft and would be well suited to serve as a support airport to among others, Bloemfontein on scheduled match days.

Bloemfontein International Airport

Name

ICAO

IATA

Current

Aerodrome

Reference Elevation

51

designator

ARFF Category

ref point / Temp coordinates 29 05 37.64 25.6 ° C S 26 18 14.27 E

(amsl)

Bloemfontein FABL International Airport

BFN

8

4,457ft

52

Airport ownership and management Ownership: ACSA Management: ACSA

Aircraft types

Scheduled aircraft: – DH 8 – J41 – 737-800 – Focker 28 – CRJ – DC9 Other aircraft – 748 – Airbus – 737 (military) – 777 (military)

Additional comments

The military aircraft arrive and depart every 3 months – Training for the troops takes place in Bloemfontein and all the UN missions are coordinated from here See runway code, taxiway widths, PCN and reference temperature to determine aircraft size / weight limitations and performance

Flight movements (last 5 years and forecasts)

Total flight movements (current and historical)

07/08: 19,625 06/07: 22,362 05/06: 17,358 04/05: 13,839 03/04: 13,086

Bloemfontein is the official diversion airport for airlines Lesotho flights The flights Peacekeeping missions (UN) flights into international are mainly Defence Force account for regional

53

Africa and international diversions Mango withdrew their Durban aircraft Forecast flight movements No formal forecasts conducted GA) Expect 6% growth in flight movements (drive by route because they didn’t have enough

Passenger volumes (last 5 years and forecasts)

Comments Total passenger (pax) volumes (current and historical) 06/07: 353,723 05/06: 254,805 04/05: 229,887 03/04: 217,824 Passenger numbers are dropping in general due to increasing interest rates, higher fuel costs, etc

Forecast passenger volumes

No formal forecasts conducted

Expect 8% growth; driven by GA

Infrastructure, facilities and operations (current and future plans)

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Runway

Surface: Asphalt Orientation: 02/20 Length: 2,559m Width: 46m PCN: 44

Surface: Asphalt Orientation: 12/30 Length: 2,195m Width: 46m PCN: 44

54

Existing infrastructure and equipment

Declared distances: not recorded Taxiway Surface: asphalt Width: 23m PCN: 44 FAXU Apron

Declared recorded

distances:

not

Apron A: main apron in front of terminal – 14,324 sq m hard stand – PCN: 40 – Accommodates max 3 x A300 type aircraft – Aircraft parked on power in, power out principle Apron B: facing terminal building from northern airside – 6,954 sq m – Interlocking bricks – PCN: unknown (aircraft parking weight max 30 tons) – Accommodates 3 DH8 or 3 CRJ – Aircraft parked on power in, power out principle Stairs x 5 – 3 x 737-800 type – 2 x 747-400 type – 2 x manually manoeuvred – 3 x mechanical operated Baggage loader x 1 – Automated belt – Max for aircraft 747/757 type Baggage handling equipment x 12 – Equity x 6 enclose trolleys – SA Express x 6 enclose trolleys Baggage handling vehicles x 3 – Equity x 1 Mitsubishi low bed and 1 x trolley tug – SA express x 1 tractor Container dollies x 1 – Poor condition, not in use Fuel

55

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– 6 x refuelling pits (Apron A) – 1 x refuelling pits (Apron B) – 1 x Avgas pump – 1 x Jet A1 fuel bowser (1,000 litres) – 1 x Jet A1 fuel bowser (16,000 litres) – Pump speed 400 litres per minute – Storage capacity x 210,000 litres – One of the only airports that own the fuel infrastructure Arrivals terminal INTERNATIONAL and DOMESTIC No holding area Baggage carousels x 1 – 1 x belt automated – Capacity of 16 bags per minute No immigration or customs counters – Call out system for unscheduled cross-border flights – No equipment at airport – Limited operations Public “meet and greet” area – Capacity of 587 sq m – Maximum of 345 pax – Adequate for existing operations Baggage trolleys – 150 trolleys – Adequate for existing operations Departures terminal Check-in counters x 8 – Adequate for existing operations Security check points x 1 – Capacity of 350 pax per hour Screening equipment – 2 x AMD – 4 x HHMD – 1 x X-RAY – Private screening area

56

Existing infrastructure and equipment

– Adequate for existing operations No customs control and VAT check No immigration counters No VAT refund after customs clearance DOMESTIC Check-in counters x 8 – Adequate for existing operations Security check points x 1 – Capacity of 350 pax per hour – Adequate for existing operations Screening equipment – 1 x AMD – Private screening area – Stand-by equipment available (AMD, HHMD and X-RAY) Holding area – 2 boarding gates – Able to process 350 pax per hour per gate Parking Inadequate for existing operations 205 parking bays Safety / emergency CAT 8 fire cover (can upgrade to CAT 9 with assistance of SA Air Force, MOU in place) – 2 x MAN fire truck – 1 x Supreme Buffalo ATNS, navigational and flight aids VOR NDB Low and high visual radar Outside beacons

3.6.3

Advantages –

a) Road and rail network between major cities. b) Inner city bus and rail network. c) Limited connectivity with Johannesburg and Cape Town only.

57

d) SANDF / SAAF approval of AFB utilisation. 3.6.4 Risks -

a) Temporary closure of the airport will have a high impact on the network . b) Airport city links and land based transport services. c) Required air traffic movements (ATMs) per hour at peak. d) Route network support e) Low daily schedule operational services and with limited seat capacity. f) VIP facilities are limited.

Airport capacity table

2010 = 3 000 (300 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 4 500 (300 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

2010 = 3 000 (300 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 4 500 (300 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.7

Rustenburg: 3.7.1 Host city venue for the Royal Bafokeng Stadium (44, 732), with five (5) group stage matches and one (1) remaining knock-out stage matches. ORTIA, Pilanesberg, Lanseria and Wonderboom airports have been identified as the primary and secondary airports for this venue. Land-based transport systems will be critical for this part of the operational plan as there are severe limitations on airports within the region. Pilanesberg airport (ACSA), infrastructure and handling capacity does not make it viable for the movement of volumes, but is able to handle a limited amount of small light aircraft and business travel. It is also conveniently located to Sun City which is identified as a corporate sponsor accommodation node, and the airport ability to handle medium size charter aircraft at low hourly movement requirements would be best suited for such type of traffic. 3.7.1 Advantages – a) Good road and rail connectivity with Johannesburg and Pretoria. b) Approximately 2 / 2.5 hours from JHB and Pretoria. c) Sun City accommodation node + surrounding game farms.

58

3.7.2

Risks – a) Temporary closure of airports. b) Airport city links and land-based transport services. c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Required air traffic movements (ATMs) per hour at peak. e) Route network support. f) Congestion of land-based support services

Airport capacity table

(LANSERIA) 2010 = 9 000 (900 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 13 500 (900 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

(LANSERIA) 2010 = 9 000 (900 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 13 500 (900 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.8 Polokwane: 3.8.1 Host city venue for Peter Mokaba Stadium (45, 553), with four (4), group stage matches only. The existing Gateway International airport provincially owned and operated), is a designated POE with variable infrastructure that will require limited upgrade. The operational expertise and availability of trained resources with knowledge of aviation operations is very limited. 3.8.2 Advantages – a) Good road and rail connectivity with Johannesburg and Pretoria. b) Approximately 3 / 4 hours from JHB and Pretoria (road and rail). c) Only 4 matches. d) Very close to stadium. e) Limited connectivity,( existing Johannesburg only) 3.8.3 Risks – a) Temporary closure of airports will have a high impact on the network. b) Airport city links and land-based transport services. c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Limited resources, experience and expertise.

59

e) Route network support. f) Accommodation limitations Airport capacity table

2010 = 3 000 (300 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 4 500 (300 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

2010 = 3 000 (300 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 4 500 (300 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

3.9 Nelspruit: 3.9.1 Host city venue to Mbombela Stadium (45, 014), with four (4), group stage matches only. The existing Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport is privately owned and operated, and a designated Port of Entry with limited infrastructure (severe runway/taxiway turn-around limitations), that will require dedicated temporary terminal facilities for general spectator processing. The limitations of the runway/taxiway system impacts significantly on the peak hour demand capabilities which are limited to eight (8) movements. The availability of trained resources with knowledge of aviation operations is limited even though the operational expertise is satisfactory. With the expected volumes and additional facilities, there will be a requirement for temporary additional trained resources for the event. The available support airport is located quite a distance away and offers limited relief. The detailed Operational Plan will include these airports as they would be strategic for drop/pick-up and go or parking. 3.9.2 Advantages – a) Good road and rail connectivity with Johannesburg and Pretoria. b) Approximately 5 / 6 hours from JHB and Pretoria (road and rail) & Maputo. c) Only 4 matches. d) High accommodation availability. e) Limited connectivity, (existing Johannesburg) 3.9.3 Risks – a) Temporary closure of airports will have a high impact on the network.. b) Airport city links and land-based transport services.

60

c) Weather conditions (diversions). d) Limited resources e) Route network support. f) Stadium proximity to airport - availability of adequate land transport.

Airport capacity table

2010 = 2 500 (250 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 3 750 (250 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

2010 = 2 500 (250 p/p/hr) @ 10hrs peak 2010 = 3 750 (250 p/p/hr) @ 15hrs peak

61

4.

Capacity Modelling

The modelling methodology has taken in cognisance the available information pertaining to the projected passenger volumes expected for the event. These figures were then split by category, expected routes, days and hours. Following which a consolidation exercise was drawn which projected expected demand for airline capacity which was adjusted to equate to airport / airspace handling capacity. Figure 9 and 10 below depicts the modelling methodology utilised.

FIGURE 9

FIGURE 10

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5.

Operational Planning

The detailed operation plans for the abovementioned airports will also be the template for all the other support airports within the identified network to be utilised during FIFA World Cup Finals 2010 event. The plans will include details for the facilitation and processing of FIFA Officials, Teams, Media, Sponsors and general spectators. All FIFA officials and participating teams will be processed through an identified dedicated facility on the airport premises (Protocol Lounge), on their arrival and departure. These facilities at the international Ports of Entry (POE), will have the required governmental departments resources available for speedy clearances as per the standard legal obligations. Access to these facilities will be limited and secured by the SAPS to authorised and accredited persons only, including the meet and greet team of the SALOC. All arrangements for local dignitaries including government officials must be cleared in advance with the Department of Foreign Affairs Head Office. 5.1 International Arrivals: Participating Teams 5.1.1 The aircraft will be allocated the most convenient parking bay on the apron in relation to quick pedestrian access to the lounge facility provided at each airport. This pedestrian access route should be well policed and shortest route possible not exceeding 5 (five) minutes. 5.1.2 The participating team will disembark the aircraft first and be met by a select welcome group as per the SALOC/DFA, and with minimum delay proceed to the designated lounge. 5.1.3 The participating team’s appointed liaison person will have collected all passport and customs documentation for processing with the relevant government departments. Where additional specific requirements need processing, the relevant authorities will be available to ensure a quick and smooth transition of all teams. 5.1.4 Responsibility for all refreshments and other requirements will be agreed between the SALOC and DFA officials a minimum of 48hrs prior to the arrival of the first participating team.

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5.1.5 All luggage and equipment will be collected from the aircraft and brought directly to the protocol lounge for identification and clearance. 5.1.6 It is expected that the participating teams will be travelling with training equipment and related items requiring a dedicated supervised service and which will be provided by the appointed ground handling company. They will together with the a senior representative of the respective air carrier and team baggage liaison officer, ensure that a dedicated baggage team under their direct guidance and supervision, with a senior supervisor communicate with the JOC at all times until completion. 5.1.7 The luggage/baggage will be escorted by SAPS with the baggage master to the coaches and luggage vans provided, for transport to the hotels. These will be allocated parking immediately in the front of the terminal building for the shortest available route taking into account the safety and security of players and officials, particularly from supporters and media who would want to engage them. 5.1.8 No press/media conferences will be scheduled at the airports upon participating team arrivals and departures. 5.1.9 The SALOC will provide details of the coach / luggage / baggage transport companies a minimum of seven (7) working days prior to the arrival of participating teams at all of the identified airports. 5.1.10 The local authority metro traffic departments and SAPS to provide detail plans on the escort of teams and players through the airports and their departure to and from the main terminal buildings. 5.2 International Arrivals: FIFA Officials 5.2.1 The SALOC’s transport appointed person, will provide the ASSTT Coordinators Office with a detail information programme of the FIFA officials; their planned arrivals dates; domestic movements and departure dates.

64

5.2.2 The SALOC (MATCH), will confirm the information supplied a minimum of seventy two (72) hours prior to the first arrivals, including the list of official meet and greet dignitaries including written confirmation from the Department of Foreign Affairs State Protocol lounge liaison person designated for the facilitation at all airports. 5.2.3 Where permits are required for entry into restricted areas by the meet and greet group, the Department of Foreign Affairs; airport authority and SALOC to liaise a minimum seven (7) working days prior to the arrival of dignitaries or teams. 5.2.4 The FIFA VIP officials will disembark the aircraft first and be met by a select welcome group as per the SALOC/DFA protocol, and with minimum delay proceed to the designated lounge. 5.2.5 The State Protocol appointed liaison person will collect the passports and customs documentation for processing with the relevant government departments. Where additional specific requirements need processing, the relevant authorities will be immediately available to ensure a quick and smooth transition. 5.2.6 All arrangements for refreshments and other requirements within the State Protocol Lounge or VIP facility will be strictly agreed between the SALOC; SAPS and DFA officials a minimum of 48hrs prior to the arrival of the first participating team. 5.2.7 All luggage and equipment will be collected from the aircraft and brought directly to the protocol lounge for identification and clearance by customs. 5.2.8 The baggage ground handling company together with the air carrier senior representative will ensure that a dedicated baggage handling team under direct guidance and supervision of a senior manager and in direct communication with the Joint Operation Centre (JOC) at all times until completion. 5.2.9 The luggage/baggage will be escorted by SAPS with the baggage master to the vehicles and luggage vans provided, for transport to the hotels. These vehicles will be allocated parking immediately in the front of the terminal building for the shortest available route to ensure the safety and security of officials particularly

65

from supporters and media. SALOC to provide detail information as will be required by the relevant airports management. 5.2.10 No press/media conferences will be scheduled at the airports upon participating team arrivals and departures. 5.2.11 The SALOC will provide details of the vehicle / luggage / baggage transport companies a minimum of seven (7) working days prior to the arrival of participating teams at all of the identified airports. 5.2.12 The local authority metro traffic departments and SAPS to provide detail plans on the escort of teams and players through the airports and their departure to and from the main terminal buildings. 5.3 International Arrivals: Accredited media 5.3.1 The SALOC’s media liaison appointed person will provide the ASSTT coordinators office with a detailed list of the accredited local and international media, particularly those that would be arriving by air transport. 5.3.2 The SALOC (MATCH), will confirm the information supplied a minimum of seventy two (72) hours prior to the first arrivals and that there will be dedicated immigration counters and customs officials to help facilitate processing, particularly with equipment. Immigration and customs will ensure that a senior manager on duty is at the respective processing points to facilitate where it may be required. This includes any other government department agencies operating at airports. 5.3.4 The baggage ground handling company together with the air carrier senior representative will ensure that a dedicated baggage team under direct guidance and supervision of a senior manager in direct communication at all times with the Joint operation centre (JOC) until the process has been completed. 5.3.5 The media will follow the normal procedures of declarations as is required through the international POE.

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5.3.6 There will be a general police presence within the airport precinct, but not provide any dedicated escort for media. 5.3.7 No press/media conferences will be scheduled at the airports upon participating team arrivals and departures. 5.3.8 Any special media or broadcasting request to be submitted to the ASSTT coordinators office a minimum one (1) month prior to the event for consideration and further engagement. 5.3.9 All media to be responsible for the handling of their own equipment and the moving around thereof. The use of private porters and transport to and from airports will be for their own arrangements with no exception. 5.4 International Departures: Participating Teams 5.4.1 All participating teams’ liaison officers and/or management to confirm departure flight details a minimum of twenty four (24) hours prior to departure. 5.4.2 The teams luggage / baggage / equipment to arrive at the airport departure hall a minimum of three (3) hours prior to general check-in times. This in order to ensure a dedicated counter can be secured by the airline operator for the purpose of ensuring a smooth facilitation process. A participating team appointed representative will accompany the baggage van and will be in possession of all the passports and travel documents required. 5.4.3 The airline operator will ensure that a senior manager is on duty during this time at the check–in counter to assist with any detail. The team liaison representative will be responsible to ensure that all the baggage is correct and accounted for at check-in and when processed will retain the baggage tag information details supplied by the airline. 5.4.4 The ground baggage handler will ensure that a senior manager is on duty during this check-in process, with a dedicated team responsible for the tagging and containerisation thereof. The SAPS to provide a dedicated person to oversee this complete process at all airports.

67

5.4.5 Under traffic police escort, the teams will arrive in front of the departure terminal building and be escorted by SAPS to the place where the team liaison person will issue the players and management with their respective documentation and proceed through the dedicated security and immigration checks. 5.4.6 The teams will be under the direct escort of team management and airline staff, whether utilising the airline facilities provided or indulging in the airport duty free shopping mall. 5.5 International Departures: FIFA officials 5.5.1 The SALOC (MATCH), will confirm the information supplied a minimum of seventy two (72) hours prior to the first arrivals, including the list of official meet and greet dignitaries including written confirmation from the Department of Foreign Affairs State Protocol lounge liaison person designated for the facilitation at all airports. 5.5.2 On arrival at the departure terminal of the airport under metro police escort, the motorcade will park in the designated agreed parking bays and the FIFA official will disembark and proceed directly to the state protocol lounge, where the appointed protocol officer will collect all relevant documentation required for check-in, inclusive of all hold baggage. 5.5.3 The protocol officer will ensure that all baggage tags and boarding passes are correctly processed and return them to the FIFA official in the protocol lounge. 5.5.4 As per the airline requirements, the FIFA official will be informed ten (10) minutes prior to boarding, to ensure that adequate time is allowed for final greeting and proceed directly under escort of the protocol officer to the aircraft for departure. 5.6 International Departures: Accredited media 5.6.1 The media will follow the normal procedures on departures of declarations as is required through international POE.

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5.6.2 There will be a general police presence within the airport precinct, but not provide any dedicated escort for media. 5.6.3 The baggage ground handling company together with the air carrier senior representative will ensure that a dedicated baggage team under direct guidance and senior supervision be direct communication with the Joint Operation Centre (JOC) at all times until the process has been completed. 5.6.4 All media check-in will be as per the standard normal airline procedures and where required with advance notification, early check-in of large equipment may be facilitated with the airline carrier’s approval. 5.6.7 Media will then follow the routine security and immigration procedures after clearing all customs required documentation. Customs will ensure that a senior manager is on duty for this part of the operations. 5.7 Domestic air travel: Participating Teams 5.7.1 Arrivals: a. On arrival at the destination airport, the aircraft will be allocated an appropriate parking bay closest to the terminal building for easy and shortest pedestrian access to thereto. Where loading bridges exist, it is recommended that such access to the building be used for ease of safety and security. b. The airport authority; SALOC and ASSTT coordinator will have agreed a dedicated VIP facility a minimum of six (6) months prior to the commencement of the tournament, for the welcoming arrival and processing of participating teams. This facility will be limited to the accredited persons as approved by the SALOC and FIFA with regards the number of persons to be present. No media/press conferences will be allowed at any of the airports during this time. c. The facility will be made available by the respective airport operators/ management but will be decorated; stocked with refreshment and maintained by the SALOC or as otherwise agreed. Any additional requirements to be addressed

69

though the ASSTT coordinators office to ensure as near possible replica of facilities at all airports. d. The dedicated ground handling company, together with the air carrier senior representative and team baggage liaison representative, will ensure that a dedicated baggage team under direct guidance and supervision be in communication with the JOC at all times until the process has been completed. e. The players will proceed directly under SAPS escort via the shortest route to the waiting coach transport provided on the landside and together with their personal luggage depart under escort to the appropriate venue. f. Team management and players will again be responsible for all personal possessions during the transfer from aircraft to coaches. g. SAPS will ensure that thorough Public Order Policing is in place well in advance of the respective team arrivals and departures from various airports. h. The airport JOC to constantly update the Provincial JOC on the operational status, pre– during– and post the operational phases. i. The luggage/baggage will be escorted by SAPS with the baggage master to the coaches and luggage vans provided, for transport to the hotels. These will be allocated parking immediately in the front of the terminal building for the shortest available route to ensure the safety and security of players and officials particularly from the supporters and media. j. The SALOC will provide details of the coach / luggage / baggage transport companies a minimum of seven (7) working days prior to the arrival of participating teams at all of the identified airports. k. The local authority metro traffic departments and SAPS to provide detail plans on the escort of teams and players through the airports and their departure to and from the main terminal buildings.

70

5.7.2 Departures: a. The SALOC’s transport appointed person, will provide the ASSTT Coordinators Office with a detailed information programme of the participating teams; their planned arrivals dates; domestic movements and departure dates. b. The SALOC (MATCH) will confirm the travel information supplied, a minimum of seventy two (72) hours prior to the first movements and provide a dedicated person designated for the facilitation at each of the nominated airports. This will be done in conjunction with SAPS operational escort plan. c. Scheduled flights or private charter will be processed in the same manner and in strict accordance with International Civil Aviation Regulations. d. Participating teams will arrive under metro police escort at the domestic departures terminals a minimum of one (1) hour prior to departure. Luggage / baggage / equipment must arrive at the airport, a minimum of two (2) hours prior to departure of the flight. This is inclusive of chartered flights and with full support of the airline and ground baggage handlers. e. Changes to the movement schedule to be approved by all parties prior to confirmation. All airports will be slot coordinated and require good communication in order to prevent disruptions to scheduled daily operations at all airports and airlines. f. The airline operator will ensure that a senior manager is on duty during this time at the check–in counter to assist with any detail. The team liaison representative will be responsible to ensure that all the baggage is correct and accounted for at check-in and when processed will retain the baggage tag information details supplied by the airline. g. The ground baggage handler will ensure that a senior manager is on duty during this check-in process, with a dedicated team responsible for the tagging and containerisation thereof. The SAPS to provide a dedicated person to oversee this complete process at all airports.

71

h. The team liaison representative will issue the team and management with correct travel documents prior to proceeding to the dedicated security screening points for boarding. i. Should the team be allocated use of the airline lounge, it will be the responsibility of the team management and airline senior manager on duty to facilitate this, including the boarding procedures. It will be the responsibility of the team’s management to ensure that all the players are under their direct supervision and that no liability for the loss; damage or theft of personal items in their possession during this phase will be accepted by the event organisers. j. The charter operator (where applicable), will automatically assume the same role and responsibility to that of a scheduled carrier’s operations at all of the airports, unless a signed contractual agreement copied to the ASSTT coordinators office and airport management has been received. 5.8 Domestic air travel: FIFA / SALOC officials a. The SALOC transport appointed person, will provide the ASSTT coordinators office with a detail information programme of the FIFA / SALOC officials; their planned arrivals dates; domestic movements and departure dates. b. The SALOC (MATCH), will confirm the information supplied a minimum of seventy two (72) hours prior to the first movements and provide a dedicated person designated for the facilitation at each of the nominated airports. c. Scheduled or private charter will be processed in the same manner and in strict accordance with International Civil Aviation Regulations. d. The FIFA and SALOC officials will arrive in private limousine vehicles under metro police escort at the domestic departures terminals a minimum of one (1) hour prior to departure. Luggage / baggage / equipment must arrive at the airport, a minimum of two (2) hours prior to departure of the flight. This is

72

inclusive of chartered flights and with full support of airline and ground baggage handler. e. Changes to the movement schedule to be approved by all parties prior to confirmation. All airports will be slot coordinated and require good communication in order to prevent disruptions to scheduled daily operations at all airports and airlines. 5.9 General Spectators (International and Domestic)

a. All arriving and departing general spectators will be facilitated in accordance with the standard international passenger travel. b. At arrivals, there will be a welcome host desk strategically positioned within the terminal building, supplied and manned by SALOC volunteers, who will provide general information to the arriving general spectators. c. There will be colour coded information signage placed on the floor at the arrivals exit to guide spectators to the relevant points. d. Airport authorities will also have client managers within the terminal building to assist arriving passengers with any airport related queries. e. On the departure level, there will also be additional strategic placed signage to assist the various spectators. f. The International departure requirements for immigration and VAT refunds will be included in their respective operational plans. g. International departure of charter and/or supplementary flights will be in accordance with the airport operator making available facilities for the check-in process of their passengers. This will be negotiated between the relevant role-players in advance by the charter operator. h. Airline staff will have additional staff and supervisors at the departure check-in area to assist departing passengers.

73

i.

All domestic flights will be conducted by the existing domestic commercial airline operators as approved by the domestic licensing council. This includes the use of code-share partner’s equipment which has been approved along the legal statutory requirements.

j.

The ‘MATCH’ packaged ticket sales will be done in accordance with the domestic market supply prior to any consideration by the Department of Transport considering applications forf domestic charter operations for general spectators.

k. All passengers will have to comply with the global aviation security requirements enforced by airport authorities and airline operators. l. Domestic travel will be the same as international with additional signage, welcome desk (with SALOC volunteers) and airport client managers. m. Off-site check-in facilities for domestic travel is being considered, but will require the relevant security clearances to be obtained in order for finalisation. n. The domestic movements on schedule airline aircraft will be handled as per the standard operational procedures and the charter operators will be provided with temporary facilities where applicable and required. o. Where airports have existing check-in facility constraints, the airport operator and airline operators to ensure that the relevant temporary requirements are put in place to ensure operational efficiency. p. SALOC to provide operational plans for the welcome desks; the volunteer programme and any other additional requirements.

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6. TYPICAL MATCH DAY TRAVEL TIME TABLE Whilst conventional processing times required at airports for the checking in of passengers and facilitation thereof requires operational handling time of three hours, the scenario for the event would require that passengers afford adequate land based travel time in order to depart and arrive at identified airports. It must also be noted that certain of the matches would finish in the latter part of the night and as such it would be necessary for these spectators who would utilise air transport as a mode of transportation would in theory travel into the early hours of the morning. Figure 11 below depicts typical match day time travel table.

FIGURE 11

75

ANNEXURE A
Capacity licensed / Foreign Operators Permits used by SA and foreign airlines to and from South Africa per Region (As of 4 June 2007).

SADC
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA SA Airlines Licensed Angola: 3 3 Foreign Airlines FOP 3 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa None Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines None Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (SA) – 3 + 1 supplementary flight SA Express (SA1) 30 SAA (4) to Kinsasha SA Express (3) to Lubumbashi SAA (14) Comair (BA6) -7 SA Express (16)
Windhoek – 10 Walvisbay – 6

Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

Taag Angola Airlines (DT) - 3 Air Botswana (BP) - 27 Hewa Bora (EO)
Kinshasa.ubumbashi –(2)

Botswana: Unlimited capacity DRC: Kinshasa and Lubumbashi: 7 Namibia: 76

7

5

Unlimited capacity None 2

55

5

21

71

Air Namibia (SW) 11

Mozambique: Route specific PRIMARY ROUTE:

SAA (13) Jnb-Maputo 11 11 Route specific Route specific SA Airlink (SA8) - 6 Beira (4) Pemba(2) Pelican (PDF) Vilanculos (3)

LAM (TM) (25)
Jnb-Maputo (18) Jnb – Beira (5) Jnb-Pemba (2)

Maputo-Johannesburg: 11 flights per week / 1560 seats. SECONDARY ROUTES:
Durban-Maputo: 145 seats per week Lanseria-Maputo: 130 seats per week KMIA-Maputo: 160 seats per week Cape Town-Maputo: 200 seats per week Jnb-Vilankulu: 250 seats per week Durban-Vilankulu: 130 seats per week

76

State: Capacity allocated ito BASA

SA Airlines

Foreign Airlines

Unallocated Capacity for South Africa

Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines

Capacity used by South African Airlines:

Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

Licensed

FOP’s

Lanseria-Vilankulu: 130 seats per week KMIA-Vilanculu: 130 seats per week Cape Town-Vilankulu: 130 seats per week Jnb - Inhambane: 130 seats per week Durban-Inhambane: 130 seats per week Lanseria-Inhambane: 130 seats per week KMIA-Inhambane: 130 seats per week

Cape Town-Inhambane: 200 seats per week JohannesburgNampula: 230 seats per week
Durban-Nampula: 200 seats per week LanseriaNampula: 200 seats per week Cape Town-Nampula: 200 seats per week

KMIA-Nampula: seats per week

200

Jnb-Pemba: 200 seats per week
Durban - Pemba: 200 seats per week Lanseria-Pemba: 200 seats per week Cape Town-Pemba: 200 seats per week KMIA-Pemba: 200 seats per week Malawi: 7

7

7

None

None

SAA (7) Blantyre: 2 flights Lilonger: 5 flights SAA (7) c/s with MK Comair – (1)

Air Malawi (QM) 7
Blantyre: 5 flights Lilonger: 2 flights

Mauritius: 17 units (100 seats per unit)

16

8

None

Air Mauritius (MK) 7: c/s with SAA

77

State: Capacity allocated ito BASA

SA Airlines Licensed

Foreign Airlines FOP’s

Unallocated Capacity for South Africa

Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines

Capacity used by South African Airlines:

Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

SAA (21): Zambia: Route specific Jnb – Lusaka: 3000 seats Jnb – Ndola: 2700 seats Jnb – Livingstone: 2200 seats Pilanesberg – Livingstone: 400 seats Jnb - Mfuwe: 400 seats Tanzania: 14 7059 (seat dependent) 7 Route specific Route specific
Jnb-Lusaka (14) Jnb-Livingstone (7)

Mines Air Trading As Zambian Airways (Q3) 20
Lusaka-Jnb (14) Ndola-Jnb (6)

Nationwide (13):
Jnb- Livingstone

SA Airlink (12):
Jnb – Ndola

12

1

ito BASA

SAA code shares on TC services @ 7 flights: SAA (21):
Jnb – Harare: (14) Jnb – Vic Falls: (7)

Air Tanzania (TC) -7

Zimbabwe: 65

48

17

ito BASA

Comair (14):
Jnb – Harare: (7) Jnb – Vic Falls (7)

Air Zimbabwe (18) Harare -Jnb((14) Vic Falls -Jnb (4)

Seychelles: 7 Swaziland: 30

2 12

2 18

5 Depends on the aircraft size

5 Depends on the aircraft size ito BASA

No operation SA Airlink (28)

Air Seychelles (HM) -2 No operation

Madagascar: 14

5

ito BASA

9

SA Airlink (2) + c/s with MD

Air Madagascar (2)

EAST AFRICA
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA Kenya: Unlimited capacity SA Airlines Licensed 7 Foreign Airlines FOP’s Ito BASA Unallocated Capacity for South Africa Unlimited capacity available Unlimited capacity available Unlimited capacity available Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines Unlimited capacity available Unlimited capacity available Unlimited capacity available Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (7) Capacity used by Foreign Airlines Kenya Airways (KQ) - 14 Ethiopian Airlines (ET) - 7 No operation

Ethiopia: Unlimited capacity

3

5

Uganda: Unlimited capacity

3

0

SAA code shares on ET services @ 7 flights SAA (4)

WEST AFRICA
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA Rwanda: 7 Nigeria: 4 SA Airlines Licensed 1 4 Foreign Airlines FOP’s 3 3 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 1 0 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines None 1 Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (3) SAA (4) Capacity used by Foreign Airlines Rwandair Express (3) Virgin Nigeria (VK)

78

Ghana: 3 Gabon: Unlimited capacity

3 2

3 Ito BASA

Ivory Coast: 2 Senegal: 14

2 14

None None

0 Unlimited capacity available 0 0

0 Unlimited capacity available 2 14

SAA (2) Interair (D6) - 1

4 No operation No operation

SAA (2) SAA (14)

No operation No operation

Mali: 4

3

None

1

None

Interair (1)

No operation

NORTH AFRICA
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA Egypt: Unlimited capacity SA Airlines Licensed 1 Foreign Airlines FOP’s 5 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa Unlimited capacity available Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines Unlimited capacity available Capacity used by South African Airlines SAA c/s with MS as marketing carrier (5) Capacity used by Foreign Airlines Egyptair (MS) - 5

MIDDLE EAST
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA UAE: 25 SA Airlines Licensed 4 Foreign Airlines FOP’s 20 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 21 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines 5 Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA code shares with EY @ 7 flights to Dubai) No operation SAA code shares on LY services @ 3 flights Capacity used by Foreign Airlines Emirates (EK)) – 18 Etihad (EY) - 2 Saudi Arabian Airlines (SV) - 2 EL AL Israel Airlines (LY) - 3

Saudi Arabia: 2 Israel: 4

2 3

2 ito BASA

None 1

None ito BASA

AUSTRALASIA:
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA SA Airlines Licensed 10 1 1 7 5 Foreign Airlines FOP’s 0 ito BASA 4 0 5 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 4 9 3 0 0 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines 14 ito BASA 0 7 0 Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (5) to Mumbai No operation No operation SAA (7) SAA on Perth (5) and a c/s with QF SAA code shares on OZ services via Hong Kong @ Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

India: 14 Singapore: 10 Malaysia: 4 Hong Kong: 7 Australia: 5

No operation Singapore Airlines (SQ) - 7 Malaysian Airlines (HM) - 3 Cathay Pacific (CX) 7 Qantas on Sydney (5) and c/s with SA Asiana Airlines c/s as marketing carrier on the services of SAA

Korea: 1

1

0

0

1

79

China (PRC): 4 Thailand: 7

4 3

2 3

0 4

2 4

7 flights to Seoul No operations SAA c/s with Thai Airways @ (3)

China Eastern Airlines (MU) - 2 Thai Airways (TG) 3

EUROPE:
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA SA Airlines Licensed 37 Foreign Airlines FOP’s ito BASA Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 8 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines ito BASA Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (21)
Jnb – 14 Capt - 7

Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

UK: 42

British Airways (21)
Jnb – 14 Capt - 7

Nationwide (4) Germany: 21 18 ito BASA 3 ito BASA SAA (7): SAA code shares with Lufthansa No operation SAA (7)

Virgin Atlantic (7) Lufthansa (7)

Switzerland: 12 France: 10

7 7+2

7 ito BASA

5 3

5 ito BASA

Swiss Intl’ Air Lines (LX) - 6 Air France (AF) – 14 Air Austral (UU)

Interair c/s with UU to Reunion Netherlands: 16 Portugal: 3 Greece: 4 Spain: 7 9 3 0 3 ito BASA 3 ito BASA ito BASA 7 0 4 4 ito BASA 0 ito BASA ito BASA No operation No operation No allocation No operation

Jnb – Reunion - 2

KLM (KL)
Jnb – 7 Capt - 4

Air Portugal (TP) - 4 Olympic Airways (OA) - 3 Iberia Airlines (IB) 5

NORTH AMERICA:
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA SA Airlines Licensed 21 Foreign Airlines FOP”s 7 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 0 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines 14 Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (7) New York SAA(7) Washington Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

US: 21

Delta (DL) - 7 Atlanta – Jnb

80

LATIN AMERICA
State: Capacity allocated ito BASA SA Airlines Licensed 11 supplem ented by IBSA Foreign Airlines Unused 0 Unallocated Capacity for South Africa 0 Unused Capacity for Foreign Airlines 7 Capacity used by South African Airlines: SAA (7) Capacity used by Foreign Airlines

Brazil: 7

No operation

81

ANNEXURE B

BILATERAL AIR SERVICES SCHEDULE FOR 2008/09
COUNTRY CURRENT STATUS OF BASA CAPACITY & DESIGNATION REGIMES Passenger: 1 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: MD None RECOMMENDED NEGOTIATING POSITIONS Passenger: 14 All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: *MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 21 All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: All-cargo: Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 1 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 1 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD PROPOSED DATES 23 – 24 APRIL 2008 (Confirmed) 8 - 9 MAY 2008 (Confirmed) 12 – 13 MAY 2008 (POSTPON ED) 27 – 28 MAY 2008 (Confirmed) 16-17 SEPT 2008 PLACE

KOREA

SEOUL (Done)

GAMBIA

BANJUL (Done)

SENEGAL

Passenger: 14 All-cargo: 1 Current regime applicable: SD Passenger:7 All-cargo: 3 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 5 All-cargo: 2 Current regime applicable: *SD Passenger: 42 All-cargo: 7 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 3 All-cargo:0 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 5 All-cargo: 1 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Seats All-cargo: 3 Current regime applicable: *RMD

DAKAR

BRAZIL

PRETORIA

ANGOLA

PRETORIA

UNITED KINGDOM

3 – 4 JUNE 2008 (Confirmed) 12 – 13 JUNE 2008 (Confirmed) 18 – 19 JUNE 2008 (Confirmed) 24 – 25 JUNE 2008

PRETORIA

NEW ZEALAND

WELLINGT ON

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

MOZAMBIQUE

PRETORIA

82

COUNTRY

ARGENTINA

NETHERLAND S

NIGERIA

CANADA

SENEGAL

CAMEROON

INDIA

GHANA

QATAR

JAMAICA (CARICOM) KENYA

CURRENT STATUS OF BASA CAPACITY & DESIGNATION REGIMES Passenger: 3 All-cargo: 7 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 16 All-cargo: 5 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 4 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 0 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: None Passenger: 14 All-cargo: 1 Current regime applicable: SD Passenger: 2 All-cargo: 1 Current regime applicable: SD Passenger: 14 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: RMD* Passenger:3 All-cargo: 2 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 7 All-cargo: 7 Current regime applicable NONE Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD

RECOMMENDED NEGOTIATING POSITIONS Passenger: All-cargo: Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 1 All-cargo: 0 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: All-cargo: Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 7 All-cargo: 7 Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: Unlimited All-cargo: Unlimited Current regime applicable: MD Passenger: 7 All-cargo: 7 Current regime applicable Passenger: 7 All-cargo: 3 Secure 5th freedom traffic right out of Nairobi to Amsterdam

PROPOSED DATES 2 – 3 JULY 2008

PLACE

BUENOS AIRES

9 – 10 JULY 2008 (Confirmed) WEEK OF 14 JULY & 21 JULY 2008 29 - 30 JULY 2008

PRETORIA

LAGOS

OTTAWA

4–5 AUGUST 2008 (Confirmed) 19 – 20 AUGUST 2008 12 – 13 AUGUST 2008 10 – 11 SEPT 2008

PRETORIA

YAOUNDÉ

PRETORIA

ACCRA

25 26 SEPT

PRETORIA

22 – 23 OCT 2008 26 – 27 AUGUST 2008

PRETORIA NAIROBI

*MD - MULTIPLE DESIGNATION *RMD – RESTRICTED MULTIPLE DESIGNATION *SD – SINDLY DESIGNATION

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