READY TO by mifei

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									THE OFFICIAL PANASONIC TOYOTA RACING MAGAZINE

ISSUE 01 2009

ROLL

READY TO

INSIDE
THE CONTENDER FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION HEAD TO HEAD UNDER THE SPOTLIGHT

Welcome to PUSH, the brand new official magazine for the Panasonic Toyota Racing team. PUSH is your exclusive access behind the scenes of Toyota’s Formula 1 activities and contains information on the team that you will not find anywhere else. There will be four issues throughout the season and each copy will also be available online at www.toyota-f1-push.com If you have any questions about PUSH, please contact us at PUSH@toyota-f1.com. Thanks for supporting Panasonic Toyota Racing as we PUSH for success in Formula 1.

ACTION!
TF109 PORTIMAO, PORTUGAL - FIRST OUTING

...AND

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REVIEW PLOT
Panasonic Toyota Racing has its sights set on the top step of the Formula 1 podium with its radical TF109 Contender. New technical regulations have altered the car’s appearance from its predecessor but the team has retained critically acclaimed duo Jarno Trulli (Italy) and Timo Glock (Germany) in lead roles as they bid for their most successful season yet at the pinnacle of motorsport where passion and determination are paramount. The 2009 Contender is a sophisticated addition to Panasonic Toyota Racing’s expanding portfolio of Formula 1 race cars and with a slick and innovative online launch, the team has made its intentions for the coming season abundantly clear. Nothing other than a win will suffice. Having started to threaten the top three teams in last season’s championship, the team is now ready to target that elusive top step of the podium, and has the driver line-up to do just that. Fresh from their trophy-winning performances in 2008, Jarno and Timo take centre stage once again in this latest production. Never before has anticipation for a new car been so high. Snippets of information about the reveal of the new car were teasingly leaked before The Contender’s premiere and the final edit did not disappoint.

Even third driver Kamui Kobayashi gets in on the act in a splendid supporting role, a casting decision that only adds to the team spirit that embodies The Contender’s storyline. ‘It’s time for a change,’ booms the voiceover. ‘It’s time for a challenge. It’s time to win.’ And with that firm statement left ringing in our ears, the TF109 bursts on to our screens and sets the tone for what promises to be a dramatic season to come. With its sleek new brushstroke design, emphatically narrower rear wing and a front wing that looks like it is being viewed under a magnifying glass, the TF109 – even before turning a wheel on the race track– threatens and taunts its rivals.

SHOWING

NOW

A dark and moody atmosphere gives a chilling undercurrent as the new TF109 fights for attention deep in the heart of the Toyota Motorsport factory in Cologne. Clever use of flickering lights, echoing noise and dramatic music build a tension that rises to a nervetingling crescendo as the drivers are about to confront The Contender for the first time.

AT A RACE TRACK NEAR YOU

OUTSTANDING!
A TRUE MASTERPIECE FROM PANASONIC TOYOTA RACING - A GREAT LOOKING CAR AND A WONDERFULLY TALENTED CAST WHO PULL OUT ALL THE STOPS.
VERDICT
A true masterpiece from Panasonic Toyota Racing - a great looking car and a wonderfully talented cast who pull out all the stops. Jarno, best known for taking Toyota’s debut podium result in Malaysia 2005, and Timo, who took a starring role in last year’s Hungarian GP, prove once again to be the perfect double act. And you wouldn’t bet against them taking honours through the 17race tour of Formula 1’s Golden Globe. ‘For those with no fear, there is a new force to face,’ claims the movie. Well that force is the TF109. And fear it they should. Magnificent stuff.

IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE. IT’S TIME FOR A CHALLENGE. IT’S TIME TO WIN. THE TF109 BURSTS ON TO OUR SCREENS AND SETS THE TONE FOR WHAT PROMISES TO BE A DRAMATIC SEASON TO COME.

STILL SCREENING AT www.toyota-f1.com
04 05

A NEW TAKE ON THE ESTABLISHED BRUSHSTROKE SEES THE TF109 ADOPT ELEMENTS OF THE NEWLY CREATED ‘UNITING SPIRAL’ DESIGN, REPRESENTING TEAM-WORK AND HARMONY IN THE FACE OF CHALLENGE

THE DRIVER’S STEERING WHEEL JUST GOT MORE COMPLICATED. A NEW FUNCTION FOR 2009 ALLOWS THE DRIVER TO ADJUST FRONT WING SETTINGS. USEFUL FOR OVERTAKING... OR LAPPING BACKMARKERS

THE PANASONIC LOGO FITS MORE SNUGLY THAN EVER WITHIN A DRAMATICALLY ALTERED REAR WING DESIGN THAT IS 25% NARROWER THAN ITS PREDECESSOR AT JUST 750MM

THEY’RE STILL BLACK BUT A BIT SLICKER THAN BEFORE, TYRE SUPPLIER BRIDGESTONE IS GOING ALL RETRO WITH PROVISION OF SLICK POTENZA TYRES FOR THE 2009 CHAMPIONSHIP

POWER NEEDS TO BE COUPLED WITH ENDURANCE IN 2009 AS NO DRIVER MAY USE MORE THAN EIGHT ENGINE UNITS DURING THE SEASON

FORM FOLLOWS

FUNCTION
TF109 NEW RULES AND REGULATIONS

AERODYNAMICS

AT A GLANCE: SEASON 09
FRONT WINGS WIDER – Increased to 1800mm, they are as wide as the outside of the front tyres LOWER – Reduced from 150mm to 75mm to reduce airflow disturbance during overtaking ADJUSTABLE – Drivers can compensate for lost downforce during overtaking by adjusting front wing setting once per lap REAR WINGS NARROWER – Reduced by 25% HIGHER – Raised by 150mm DIFFUSER – Moved rearwards by 330mm to reduce downforce and improve handling when overtaking

Add-ons such as turning vanes, barge boards and winglets are BANNED in a bid to reduce downforce levels TYRES SLICK tyres will be provided by tyre supplier Bridgestone instead of grooves which will increase mechanical grip and cornering speeds ENGINES LIMITED – Only eight engines may be used per driver per season REVS – Reduced from maximum 19,000rpm to 18,000rpm PARTS – Development of internal components further restricted SUPPLY – Manufacturers have agreed to supply engines to independent teams with 50% cost reduction

KERS Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems can be used as an option – using energy recovered under braking as a kind of boost to promote overtaking possibilities TESTING TRACK – Testing outside of a GP weekend is banned after the first race of the season WINDTUNNEL – Testing is limited to 60% models with speeds no greater than 50m/s FACTORY Formula 1 factories must close for a number of weeks during the year to save costs

SIZE MOST DEFINITELY IS EVERYTHING THIS YEAR WITH AN EXTENDED FRONT WING THAT NOW DICTATES THE OVERALL WIDTH OF THE CAR AT 1800MM WIDE. EXPECT SOME SPACIAL AWARENESS ISSUES INTO THE FIRST CORNER!

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INSIGHT JARNO TRULLI
This is your fifth season with Panasonic Toyota Racing, what makes the team so special? For me Toyota is more than a Formula 1 team, it is like my family. I have given them their first podium in Formula 1, their first pole position, and my aim is to now give them their first victory. Do you think much about getting that first win? That is my constant dream and what I want to achieve this year. I have given Toyota a lot but I have received a lot from them and they have been very kind to me. That’s why I am keen to keep on pushing for that first victory. There is less testing during the season, does this mean you will have more free time? Yeah I think so, but maybe we will have too much time off now. I used to like testing to be honest because I love driving the car, so I will miss it (laughs). How are you going to fill the void? I have a competitive spirit, so I will probably join some more half marathons or ski marathons or something like that. I don’t want to be lying down on my sofa because that’s not me - I want to compete in something. Formula 1 is the first passion – I wish I could drive even more during the season. Is Jarno the racer different from Jarno the family man? I think there are some fundamental things that are very different, but on the other hand I am quite an ordinary person. When I am at the track I am working but I am extremely focussed because I love what I am doing.

RACE DRIVER CAR 10

TIMO GLOCK
Nationality Born Marital Status Height Weight GP Debut German 18 March 1982 - Lindenfels, Germany Single 1.69m 64kg Canada 2004

INSIGHT TIMO GLOCK

Behind the Italian’s softly-spoken and well enunciated English resonates the voice of a pure and loyal racer who thrives on competition and the desire to win. Jarno is open to discussing all aspects of his life, but the topic always comes back to one thing: racing.

Best Championship 10th (2008) Result

TRULLI

People took notice when he scored a spectacular podium in Hungary last year, but now his sights are set much higher. Speaking ahead of his second season with Panasonic Toyota Racing, Timo talks about his team, his writing ambitions, Guns N’Roses and, erm, scaffolding.

MADLY, DEEPLY
IT’S A TOUGH CHALLENGE TO FIND ANYONE MORE DEDICATED TO HIS CAUSE THAN JARNO TRULLI.
What do you think of your team-mate, Timo – who is more competitive? I think we are both very competitive. I am more experienced but he is extremely keen on learning and he’s focussed. He is a great team-mate as well as a great person. I am glad that he is in the team. You have your wine business, do you ever get the chance to enjoy any of it yourself? I drink at home when I have some friends coming over for dinner, but I don’t drink much to be honest. I taste it more than drink it.

GLOCK
After a successful debut season with Toyota, you are now entering year two with new targets – are you feeling the pressure? With one year of experience, everything is a bit easier. I know what I have to do, I know the people in the company, which is important and everything is a bit easier to handle. Your team-mate Jarno is very experienced, how is working with him? (Laughs) When I was 16 or 17, I was watching F1 on TV and, of course, watching Jarno as well. To be his team-mate a few years later was, at the first moment, a bit strange because when you watch TV, the F1 drivers are like heroes, and then you are into it as well. To then become the teammate of Jarno was quite special but at the end he is a normal person like everybody else. Would you ever consider writing a book about your career? Every race driver makes his own experience. I have had a lot of ups and downs in my career, different race categories, different lifestyles, different racing philosophies, so this could be a good idea but at the moment I would have no clue how I would start. What would you have done for a profession if you were not a racing driver? I think I would work for my Dad’s scaffolding company. I worked there for three years so maybe I would be taking it over now. Not an office, suit and tie job? No, no, I came back Sunday from F3 races and went immediately out to work on Monday morning. My Dad was pretty straight on that and

ANIMATED AND RELAXED, TIMO GLOCK IS A MAN WITH A MISSION.

-ENSPIEL
it was a good experience. It was quite technical work with lots of different things and a lot of people don’t appreciate that. The best thing I’ve ever seen are the Kölner Dom roof repairs. They have the scaffolding on the top – it’s just unreal. Is it true you listen to Guns N’ Roses before the race? (Smiles) Yeah, music just takes you away a little bit from the stress before the race. A good friend of mine gave me the CD in 2007 and said ‘hey listen to this and you will win the championship’, and I won the championship, so that’s the reason why I still listen to that music.

RACE DRIVER CAR 9

JARNO TRULLI
Nationality Born Marital Status Height Weight GP Debut Italian 13 July 1974 - Pescara, Italy Married to Barbara, 2 sons (Enzo and Marco) 1.73m 60kg Australia 1997

Best Championship 6th (2004) Result

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PERSPECTIVE

WE USED THE ASCARI RESORT AS A RACING CATWALK FOR US TO SHOW OFF THE BEAUTY AND PROWESS OF OUR LATEST RACE CAR, THE TF109.

BEHIND THE
A vital part of Panasonic Toyota Racing’s preseason activity took place in January – but this was definitely no test session. With just two months to go before Melbourne, as engineers and mechanics work tirelessly to get the new car ready for its world debut and initial track tests, the marketing and PR team are preparing all the promotional materials that will see the Panasonic Toyota Racing team name emblazoned in print and on screen across the world for the coming year. And so to the Ascari Race Resort in the southern Spanish region of Andalucia. Ascari – a name that is steeped in motorsport heritage and prestige, and brings to mind an array of sleek and sophisticated race cars – was the perfect venue for Toyota to make its mark on the 2009 season with a carefully choreographed three-day filming session. “The purpose of the filming is to capture running footage of the car, drivers and team with the updated livery for the new season which we give to our partners and to the Toyota family globally,” says Marketing and Sponsorship

CAMERA

of footage and accumulated over 7,000 static images from the three-day shoot. It was also the first time we have filmed exclusively in High Definition,” he continues. It must be a daunting effort directing the entire team, including two race engineers used to giving orders rather than receiving them. And not forgetting the drivers whose acting skills are now known to millions after The Contender movie. “Jarno, Timo and Kamui are easy to work with, as are the guys in the team,” continues Patrick. “They all appreciate the importance of this filming and there was a friendly, relaxed atmosphere – quite amazing considering the long hours and the amount of work. The end product will be as much thanks to their support as anything.” And at least the Spanish weather was good, right? “We were told that Ascari has 300 dry days out of 365, so it was rather unfortunate that when we turned up it started to rain. It was also very cold with a sub-zero wind. Not exactly a summer holiday...but that’s the glamorous life of a Formula 1 team,” concludes Patrick. VIEW THE VIDEO AT WWW.TOYOTA-F1.COM

30 TEAM STAFF, 3 MAN TRUCKS, 3 DRIVERS, 1 RACE TRACK AND 1 BRAND NEW TF109 RACE CAR

WE FILMED 20 HOURS OF FOOTAGE
Manager Patrick Wendt . “We want to show the Panasonic Toyota Racing team in a breathtaking light and to showcase our Formula 1 activities in a stunning and spectacular way. We used the Ascari resort as a racing catwalk for us to show off the beauty and prowess of our latest race car, the TF109.” So how exactly do you capture moving images of a Formula 1 race car that is capable of speeds in excess of 300km/h? Well, a crew of 40 film specialists, 10 different cameras and a Russian invention, of course.

“We use state-of-the-art technology, working with a variety of cameras, including the so-called Russian Arm which is a clever piece of equipment that keeps steady footage even when the cars are running at high speed, although not quite as fast as we see them achieve in the race. We want super slow motion that shows off the assets of the car and the intricacies of the team-work,” says Patrick. No angle is left unfilmed in order to fulfil the detailed photo and film brief that comprises specific shot requests from each of Toyota’s sponsors and partners. “We filmed 20 hours

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HEAD TO HEAD

JH: “There have been so many really, I don’t know which is the proudest. Maybe the first pan-European dealer meeting organisation stands out as one. Coming to work in Formula 1 is another. Being involved in the product planning team for the first generation Yaris. There are many. I am proud really just to work for Toyota.” Do you have any daily rituals or routines? TY: “I like good smells, so I put fragrance on, that is an everyday routine. Sometimes the fragrance

sitting there can really understand what is going on. We have a Japanese garden right next to it, so there is a nice overview. It’s a good place to work.” What are you doing right after this interview? TY: “Right now after this meeting I must report something to Japan.” JH: “I am returning to my office to continue writing my key note speech for a Panasonic event in Amsterdam.” Why is Toyota going to win in Formula 1 in 2009? TY: “My Formula 1 experience is just three years, this is my third year, but the people can grasp some kind of feeling that this year is going to be, I think, the best year. I don’t want to say details but I am sure.” JH: “I think because fundamentally we had an extremely strong 2008 season. Aerodynamics is 90% of the performance of an F1 car and in 2008 we understood how to make the car go quick and what we put on the car delivered what we expected. We raced better than we ever have in 2008 and that will continue and improve this year. Timo and Jarno are the perfect pairing with the slick tyres and the new aero regs, so for me we should win.” What is the best and worst part of your job? TY: “My personality is always focussed on the positive, so I don’t have any worst periods even when we lose. Instead, I always think ‘okay next race, never give up’. The best period? It is my personality always to do my best, to think the best, so I suppose doing the best we can

is the best part of the job (laughs). And I have five words to describe my principles - create, challenge, courage, communication and cost – five Cs.” JH: “I don’t think there is ever a best or worst part of a job really. In the end, it is what you achieve through the people who work for you. I think probably a negative part is when people are struggling and you are not giving them the support they need. At the same time, the best compliment you can have if you leave an organisation is if performance continues or even improves when you have gone.” Could you drive an F1 car? TY: “I think so. Of course. No problem. In my case, when I was in Japan, I was in charge of the Top Gun team, working with lots of people with very, very professional skills to drive and I learned from them. Sometimes I drove on Suzuka or Fuji or some other speedway, so I really want to drive a Formula 1 car and I think I’d be quite good.” JH: “No way! When I joined Toyota Team Europe back in 1977, I drove with Hannu Mikola at the Bagshot test facility and I thought I could drive quickly until he took me round. Then you realise that you don’t have the skill these guys have.” What can you not live without? TY: “Love.” JH: “I think family. My wife and daughters give me huge support so that is definitely necessary. Also animals – a great dog, a couple of horses - they add a huge amount.”

TADASHI YAMASHINA VS JOHN

HOWETT
relaxes me or gets me passionate, or something. Every day during the race weekends, I share a Japanese fortune cookie with Mr. Kinoshita or Mr. Arai, just one Japanese cookie, we break four pieces and we eat to pray for the win.” JH: “Not really. Every day is different. Every day is a new challenge. Always look forward.” Describe the management office at Toyota Motorsport? TY: “Our office is open plan, but the funny thing is that most communication is sent through email so the room is very, very quiet, we hear just typing sounds. But if there is an important issue or important conversation, I just say ‘Hey, John, let’s have a meeting’. That sort of conversation is very important for me.” JH: “It is open plan, so it is really great for communications and means that all the people

FIGURE
TY: “John? Oh. He’s a very honest and brave person.” What were your first impressions of the Panasonic Toyota Racing team on your first day in office? TY: “My first impression when coming to Panasonic Toyota Racing was that I had come into an unknown world. That was my first impression because I did not know the Formula 1 world at all. I didn’t feel anything about the size of the factory, just that it was a relatively clean and comfortable environment.” JH: “I was working in motorsport in the late 1970s and I was responsible for moving Toyota Team Europe from Brussels to Cologne, so my first thoughts were that it was great to be back in motorsport, great to come back.”

THE

HEADS
How would you describe your colleague? one memorable media dinner that we had in Monza when our former Chairman Mr. Tomita decided to take drastic action when a torrential shower started rather unexpectedly at the end of a pleasant summer’s evening, fashioning raincoats out of black plastic bin liners. The memory of journalists, the team, including our Japanese team principal, running through the paddock to escape the inclement weather, late into the evening, wearing bin liners, will always bring a smile to my face.” Who is your favourite driver ever? TY: “Of course my favourite drivers are Jarno and Timo. No others, no way.” JH: “That’s easy - Jim Clark. No question.” What has been your proudest moment at Toyota? TY: “Of course you know my proudest moment is always working with my colleagues, mechanics and factory staff, everybody. I am proud of working with them all.” JH: “George has great passion, energy and determination. He is the consummate professional and fun to work with.” What has been your most amusing incident at the race track? TY: “The year before last our racing did not result in the desired performance at times and there were some reliability issues and I really got angry and I kicked a chair in the garage. After that, for the next race, our mechanics prepared a chair in front of me and said ‘Hey George, next time you must kick this chair’ (laughs) and several times I kicked a chair or some toolbox or something. And another funny thing is that once I kicked - I mean really kicked - some steel plate and I damaged my foot. I’m very emotional at the race track.” JH: “There have always been moments of humour at the race track. We had a long-serving team member who built up quite a flair for impersonations of many paddock stars which could always lighten the mood. There was also

2 MEN, THE SAME 12 QUESTIONS. WE UNCOVER THE ....MOTIVATION AND PASSION BEHIND THE FIGUREHEADS OF TOYOTA’S F1 OPERATION – TEAM CHAIRMAN TADASHI ‘GEORGE’ YAMASHINA AND PRESIDENT JOHN HOWETT.

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INSIDE TRACK
01 ING AUSTRALIAN GRAND PRIX (Melbourne) 27 - 29 Mar

I AM VERY PLEASED WITH THE INITIAL RESULTS FROM THE TF109 AND I BELIEVE WE HAVE GOOD REASON FOR OPTIMISM
02 PETRONAS MALAYSIAN GRAND PRIX (Kuala Lumpur) 03 - 05 Apr

ALL HAIL THE
‘Lifeboat on standby!’ read the light-hearted message on the media centre timing screen on the final day of the TF109’s maiden voyage in Portimao, perfectly summarising the week’s work at the new Algarve Motor Park in Portugal. Rain, wind and hailstorms prevented Jarno, Timo and Kamui from putting the new car fully through its paces over the four days but the initial impressions of the new TF109 were still enough to give the team cause for optimism ahead of the new season. “It’s always a very exciting moment to see your new car begin pre-season testing,” said Senior General Manager Chassis Pascal Vasselon. “That is especially true this year after such a significant regulation change. Overall I am very pleased with the initial results from the TF109 and I believe we have good reason for optimism.”

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CHINESE GRAND PRIX (Shanghai) 17 - 19 Apr

TF109
04

Timo reflects on the first ever night race in Formula 1 - Singapore 2008

WORLD TOUR
A QUARTET OF INTERCONTINENTAL RACES GETS THE NEW-LOOK 2009 FORMULA 1 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP UNDERWAY WITH AUSTRALIA, MALAYSIA, CHINA AND BAHRAIN SETTING THE STANDARD FOR THIS YEAR’S 17-EVENT WORLD TOUR.
GULF AIR BAHRAIN GRAND PRIX (Sakhir) 24 - 26 Apr 05 GRAN PREMIO DE ESPANA TELEFONICA (Catalunya) 06 GRAND PRIX DE MONACO (Monte Carlo) 07 ING TURKISH GRAND PRIX (Istanbul) 08 SANTANDER BRITISH GRAND PRIX (Silverstone) 09 GROSSER PREIS SANTANDER VON DEUTSCHLAND Last year’s race debutantes Valencia and Singapore both make welcome re-appearances on this year’s calendar, while two old favourites return. Panasonic Toyota Racing’s traditional home races in Germany and Japan both switch location this year with Nürburgring replacing Hockenheim and Suzuka replacing Fuji as part of the agreed rotation system between the host venues. There is a brand new addition in the shape of the Yas Marina circuit in Abu Dhabi which has the distinguished honour of hosting the season finale at the start of November and already looks set to be a spectacular asset to the Formula 1 calendar.
(Nürburgring) 08 - 10 May 21 - 24 May 05 - 07 Jun 19 - 21 Jun 10 - 12 Jul 24 - 26 Jul 21 - 23 Aug 28 - 30 Aug 11 - 13 Sep 25 - 27 Sep 02 - 04 Oct 16 - 18 Oct 30 Oct - 01 Nov

The facility boasts an incredible 64 different circuit layouts, including the 4.7km FIAhomologated F1 version, its longest configuration, with a total of 18 corners. Third driver Kamui Kobayashi was taken aback with the circuit: “It was my first time driving at the track and I have to say that I am very impressed; the lay-out is really exciting and quite challenging for a driver.”

2009

FOUR WHEELS IN THE ALGARVE
The Autódromo Internacional do Algarve, or Algarve Motor Park for those not so well versed in the Portuguese language, is one of the latest additions to Formula 1’s portfolio of testing venues.

10 ING MAGYAR NAGYDIJ (Budapest) 11 TELEFONICA GRAND PRIX OF EUROPE (Valencia) 12 ING BELGIAN GRAND PRIX (Spa-Francorchamps) 13 GRAN PREMIO SANTANDER D’ITALIA (Monza) 14 SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX (Singapore) 15 FUJI TELEVISION JAPANESE GRAND PRIX (Suzuka) 16 GRANDE PREMIO DO BRASIL (Sao Paulo) 17 ETIHAD AIRWAYS ABU DHABI GRAND PRIX
(Yas Marina Circuit)

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INSIDE TRACK
The biggest of all house parties took place at the start of January as the doors to the Toyota Motorsport factory in Cologne were opened to over 700 very special visitors. These were no ordinary guests, but friends and family of the company’s dedicated workforce. At the centre of proceedings was the brand new TF109, making its first ever public appearance to a captivated audience.

Panasonic reaffirmed its commitment to Toyota F1 by using the team’s film session at the Ascari Race Resort in Spain to showcase its latest range of Toughbooks. More than 30 journalists were invited to watch the team in action and to see just how Panasonic uses its products in the high-speed world of F1. Guests were given the chance to speak first hand to the team members who use the Toughbooks and also to see team drivers Timo and Kamui in their work place. Panasonic has been title sponsor of the team since Toyota’s inaugural year in Formula 1 back in 2002 and has recently extended its contract for a further three seasons to cover 2010, 2011 and 2012, for what will be the tenth anniversary of Panasonic Toyota Racing.

TOUGH

HANGING

SIGN

The drivers were also keen to get in on the action with Jarno, Timo and Kamui joining their colleagues for the day. All employees and guests were invited to sign the special board which adorns the factory’s reception, committing their support to the team for the coming season.

OF THE TIMES

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UNDER THE SPOTLIGHT JENS MARQUARDT

planes and even now I am impressed at how tonnes of steel can make it into the air.” With the aerospace industry suffering in Germany in the early 1990s, Jens moved into the automotive sector and never looked back. A three-year tenure in Mercedes’ passenger car development department in Stuttgart evolved into a race engine position at Ilmor. A transatlantic trip followed with a trackside support role for the company’s activities with the US-based Champ Car series for two years before the move back to Germany with Toyota Motorsport.

HR boss calls you in the middle of the evening at home’. I said ‘yeeeeees?’ and he said straight away ‘don’t worry but I need to see you urgently tomorrow morning’. So I went in to see him and he explained that Richard was leaving and that they wanted me to do the job. The role differs incrementally from team to team, but at Toyota incorporates logistics and operations management both at the factory and at the race track, liaison with the FIA and the team drivers. It is a less technical job than on the engine side. It is like a spanning function within the team, bringing the team together. The technical background does help with on-track meetings, for example when we are discussing sporting regulations with the FIA, it can bring some insight. “I was lucky to have had the chance to work alongside Richard for six races and it would take hours to go into details about every little thing he taught me, told me, advised me. Richard was

IT IS A LESS TECHNICAL JOB THAN ON THE ENGINE SIDE. IT IS LIKE A SPANNING FUNCTION WITHIN THE TEAM, BRINGING THE TEAM TOGETHER.
well known for his two phrases ‘Attention to detail’ and ‘Check, check and check again’ and that was fantastic, that was Richard. I now have to find my phrase and make my own mark.” And that should come pretty easily for a man of Jens’s motivation. “I usually wake up before my alarm goes off – which my wife never understands – my inner clock works pretty well. I just enjoy having a new day ahead of me, coming to work with the people I work with, at the cutting edge of automotive development and that’s great. That’s motivation.”

MAKING HIS

MARQUARDT
“It is fairly comprehensive and you can’t know everything by heart,” he admits, “but I have my little sporting regulations booklet and I have a night-time read, over the weekend, when I am on the plane.” It is that sort of commitment that saw Toyota choose Jens Marquardt to replace long-serving Team Manager Richard Cregan in one of the team’s most challenging roles. Jens started his Toyota career at the turn of the new Millennium, joining the corporation’s Formula 1 team in its infancy, but the 41-year-old German actually began his career looking skyward. “I’m not a typical petrolhead,” he freely admits. “I don’t have a vintage car at home, I don’t spend my weekend with dirty, oily fingers, fixing engines or whatever, but I have spent my entire career in automotive.” “At university I studied aerospace and was involved with aeroplanes, which is probably also because of my family, because my brother was a pilot. As kids we always went to airfields to watch In 2001, the newly formed Panasonic Toyota Racing Team began an exhaustive test programme with Jens working as a test and development engineer in the engine department. By 2003, he had attained Group Leader status, heading up test preparation, dyno development and building the team up. When Toyota seriously considered customer engine supply a few years later, Jens was chosen to lead the project, a challenge that he relished. “I was involved in all areas from initial proposals to negotiating contracts which was really interesting for me,” he says. And then came the offer to alter his career trajectory by moving into the shoes of departing Team Manager Richard Cregan. “It came out of the blue,” he says. “One evening I got a call and saw Rob Leupen, (GM Human Resources) on the display and I thought ‘mmm not good if the

THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY 4,500 DIFFERENT COMPONENTS IN A MODERN DAY FORMULA 1 ENGINE, SO LEARNING 46 ARTICLES OF FORMULA 1’S SPORTING REGULATIONS BY HEART SHOULD BE NO ISSUE FOR PANASONIC TOYOTA RACING’S NEW TEAM MANAGER, FORMER ENGINE MAN JENS MARQUARDT.

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FINISHING LINE GLOSSARY OF TERMS
FIA - The Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile is the governing body for world motorsport, including Formula 1. It governs and controls the sport’s rules and regulations and is effectively the Big Brother for four-wheeled racing. Its President is Max Mosley

COMPETITION TIME

LETTERS
PAGE

KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems will be permitted in Formula 1 from 2009 and will be mandatory from 2010. Essentially a boost button on the steering wheel, KERS takes wasted kinetic energy generated under braking and reuses it to give around 80 horsepower extra for around 6.5 seconds per lap ECU - A standard Electronic Control Unit was introduced in 2008 and regulates electronics across all cars on the grid. In 2009, the ECU will play a greater role in F1 racing, regulating the adjustable front wing function that drivers can use via the steering wheel, as well as monitoring the minimum ‘back to pit time’ in which drivers must now return to the pits for refuelling under the safety car. If the driver arrives in the pit lane before that minimum time he will be penalised FP - Commonly referred to within the paddock as FP1, FP2 and FP3, there are three Free Practice sessions during a Formula 1 race weekend. Two sessions on Friday total three hours, one Saturday morning session of 60 minutes precedes the afternoon qualifying hour which, in turn, determines the grid for Sunday afternoon’s race SC - SC indicates the deployment of the Safety Car. Driven by Bernd Mayländer, it is a track vehicle that takes up position at the front of the field during a race in the event of an incident that requires cars to be slowed HANS - The Head and Neck Support system was introduced to Formula 1 in 2003 as a compulsory safety device that is designed to reduce the load on a driver’s head and neck during the rapid deceleration caused by an accident

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ENTRY FORM
HOW TO ENTER: Fill in the entry form and either leave it in the Paddock Club with one of our staff members or email your answer and details to push@toyota-f1.com CLOSING DATE: 3rd May 2009 ANSWER:

WIN AN AUTOGRAPHED
REPLICA RACE SUIT
Q: WHO IS JOHN HOWETT’S ALL-TIME FAVOURITE DRIVER?

Name: Country: Email: Address:

FORMULA 1, LIKE ANY ENGINEERING BASED SPORT IS FULL OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS - THIS PAGE GIVES AN EXPLANATION OF WHAT THESE LETTERS STAND FOR TO KEEP YOU UP TO SPEED.
FOA - Formula 1 Administration is the sport’s commercial rights holder FOM - Formula 1 Management is responsible for managing the sport’s commercial rights and for promoting Formula 1. President and CEO of FOA and FOM is Bernie Ecclestone FOTA - The Formula 1 Teams Association was formed in 2008 with representatives from each team and the initial aim of working with the FIA and FOM “to agree upon regulations and commercial conditions which will provide a framework for a strong and dynamic sport”

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CREDITS AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
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• Only fully completed entries with the correct answer will be considered • CLOSING DATE AND TIME: midnight GMT 3rd May • PRIZE: one replica race suit signed by Timo Glock & Jarno Trulli - non exchangeable/non transferable for cash • For full Terms & Conditions - go to www.toyota-f1-push.com

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The contents and concepts within PUSH should not be reproduced without prior permission from Toyota Motorport GmbH, Toyota Allee 7, 50858 Köln, Germany PUSH is produced on behalf of Toyota Motorsport GmbH by Sine Qua Non International, Ltd. www.sinequanon-intl.com Editorial and Account Management: Chris Hughes Design and Creative Direction: Clare Milsom, Laura Hastie For any questions or information on PUSH, please contact push@toyota-f1.com

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