Course Selection Guide 2013-14 - Prince George Secondary School

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Course Selection Guide 2013-14 - Prince George Secondary School Powered By Docstoc
					                2013 - 2014

Prince George Secondary School




           HOME OF THE POLARS




 Course Selection Guide
   Graduation Requirements
   Complete course descriptions for Grade 8 - 12
   Course planning worksheets Grade 8 - 12
Introduction

Students attending PGSS live in all areas of Prince George. Approximately 1280 students attend
classes on a semester system. Of these, just over 575 are in the senior Grade 11 and 12 years with
approximately 710 in grades 8, 9 and 10. The students at PGSS are ethnically diverse and very
welcoming. There are approximately 180 teaching and support staff at Prince George Secondary
School. The facility is superlative; offering Vanier Hall, a recording studio, a fitness room and a
cafeteria unique to PGSS.

WE OFFER:

   A large selection of Grade 8 - 12 academic and elective courses.

   An Enriched Program including Honours courses, AP English Literature, and AP Calculus.

   Apprenticeship and Career Programs in Adventure Tourism, Cafeteria, Cooks Training, Health
   Sciences, and Trades.

   Special Learning Resources Program with an emphasis on integration into appropriate classes and
   community transitions.

   Comprehensive Alternative Programs that offer course credit leading to a Dogwood Certificate.

   Pre-employment Program that explores the skills and knowledge needed in the work environment -
   appropriate work placements are facilitated by PGSS staff.

   Support Program at the Grade 8,9 & 10 levels that addresses individual student needs in the area
   of Mathematics and English skills, behaviour, attendance and assignment completion.

   Aboriginal Student Support Services, employing four Aboriginal Education Workers. These workers
   offer enhanced services such as family connections, tutorial support, community connections,
   scholarship and transition information, healing circles and other activities that address individual
   student needs.

   A variety of specialty courses utilizing facilities including Vanier Hall and a full kitchen/cafeteria.
   These facilities enhance our Performing Arts offerings of Band, Drama, Music Composition and
   Dance as well as our Cafeteria and Cooks Training programs.

   Up to date computer labs and media centre that enhance our ability to address student learning
   needs in core classes as well as in Digital Photography, Video Conference and Video Production
   courses, and Information and Communications Technology courses.

   Transition into the Trades course, working with members from the construction industry and
   focusing on those skills necessary for entering the work force.

   Language instruction in French, German and Spanish.

   An International Exchange program.

   A focus on Hockey, Athletics and much more.



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TABLE OF CONTENTS



Introduction ............................................................................................. 2
Grade 8 Program ...................................................................................... 4
Grade 9 Program ...................................................................................... 5
Graduation Requirements ......................................................................... 6-7
Grade 10 Program ................................................................................... 8
Grade 11 Program ................................................................................... 9
Grade 12 Program ................................................................................... 10
Arts ......................................................................................................... 11-12
Business Technology ................................................................................ 13-14
Computer Technology .............................................................................. 15-16
Drama – Film & Television ........................................................................ 15
Dance ...................................................................................................... 16
English..................................................................................................... 17-18
Food & Textile Studies.............................................................................. 19-20
Health & Human Services .......................................................................... 21
Languages ............................................................................................... 22-23
Mathematics ............................................................................................ 24-26
Montessori .............................................................................................. 26
Music ....................................................................................................... 27
Physical Education.................................................................................... 28-30
Sciences ................................................................................................... 31-32
Social Studies ........................................................................................... 33-34
Theatre .................................................................................................... 35
Trades & Technology................................................................................ 36-39
Enriched Program..................................................................................... 40-41




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Grade 8 Program
Grade 8 is an important transition year for students. You are entering a dynamic atmosphere. The staff at PGSS
strives to make your transition year seamless; meeting with students in their elementary schools prior to arrival at
PGSS. Some other transition activities include: invitations to the Spirit Hockey Game at the CN Centre, drama
productions, parent nights, a tour and BBQ, a grade 7 volleyball camp, and informal visits to your new school. In
Grade 8, all students will take foundation studies and then choose from an exciting choice of elective classes.

Foundation Studies (Required)

        Humanities 8 (English and Social Studies)
        French 8
        Mathematics 8 (minimum 3 terms)
        Physical Education 8
        Science 8

Electives:
Students will choose electives. Please rank the following banks of electives. Put (1) by your favorite bank, (2) by
your next favorite and (3) by your least favorite bank.



Foods 8                                Tech Ed 8                           Woodwork 8
Digital Media 8                        Art 8                               Drama 8
Metalwork 8                            Textiles 8                          Electronics 8
Band 8                                 Outdoor Ed 8                        Guitar 8



____________                          ____________                         ____________



Please indicate which pair of courses you would prefer of the following:

Foods 8/Woodwork 8 ________ OR           Art 8/Info Tech 8________

PGSS also offers a Hockey 8 as a semester course. If you would like Hockey 8, please indicate it below, and only
select one of the banks above.

____ Hockey 8



Name: ____________________________                       Parent Signature____________________

School:______________________________




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Grade 9 Program

Name:____________________

           Foundation Studies (Required Courses)


           MEN--09---    English Language Arts 9
           MMA--09---    Mathematics 9
           MPE--09---    Physical Education 9
           MSC--09---    Science 9
           MSS--09---    Social Studies 9


           Elective Courses (Students choose 3)

           YLRA-0BHKY    BA Hockey 10B
           YIPS-0ALEA    BA Leadership 10A
           YVPA-0AMES    BA Media Studies 10A
           MBEG-10---    Business Education 10: General
           MDNC-10---    Dance 10
           MDRG-10---    Drama 10: General
           MFR--09---    French 9
           XLDCA09HKY    Hockey 9 (need own equipment)
           MFDN-10---    Home Economics 10 - Foods & Nutrition
           MTXT-10---    Home Economics 10 - Textiles
           MINT--10---   Information Technology 10
           MMU--09CBA    Music 9 - Concert Band
           MTED-10---    Technical Education 10: Drafting & Design
           MTEE-10---    Technical Education 10: Electronics
           MTEG-10---    Technical Education 10: General
           MTEM-10---    Technical Education 10: Metalwork
           MTEW-10---    Technical Education 10: Woodwork
           YHEC-OATAC    Textiles Arts & Crafts 10
           MVAG-10---    Visual Arts 10: General


           Elective Choices                        Alternate Choices

           1. _____________________                1. _____________________
           2. _____________________                2. _____________________
           3. _____________________                3. _____________________

Parent Signature: _____________________




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Graduation Requirements (Grades 10 -12)

Graduation Requirements
Check with your school counsellor early in the year to ensure:
             You are taking all the courses you need to graduate
             You are taking all the courses you need for admission to your chosen post secondary institution or
             as preparation for your preferred job field

Provincial exams are required to be written in 5 areas:

        English 10                           Science 10
        English 10 First Peoples             Social Studies 11 or BC First Nations Studies 12
        English12 / Communications 12        Mathematics 10
        English 12 First Peoples


Graduation Credit Requirements at a Glance:

        80 Credits
        You will be working towards the graduation requirement of 80 credits. Of the 80 credits, 48 are required,
        28 are electives and 4 credits are for the mandatory Graduation Transition Program, (includes the
        required Daily Physical Activity – DPA). Successful completion of each course is worth 4 credits.

        48 Credits
        Required Courses, including
               English 10 or English 10 First Peoples
               English 11 or Communications 11
               English 12 or Communications 12 or English 12 First Peoples
               Social Studies 10
               Social Studies 11 or BC First Nations Studies 12
               a Mathematics 10
               a Mathematics 11
               Science 10
               a Science 11
               a Fine Arts or Applied Skills 10, 11 or 12
               Physical Education 10
               Planning 10

        28 Credits
                are Elective Courses *(See description of grade 10/11/12 electives)

        4 Credits
                Graduation Transitions (includes the required Daily Physical Activity – DPA)



        Minimum of 16 credits at the Grade 12 level for graduation (including English/Communications 12).
        All courses authorized by the Ministry or School Board are eligible.

        Students planning to attend post secondary are responsible for checking admission requirements at each
        institution.




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Graduation Requirements

    Course Selection Worksheet Grade 10, 11 & 12 (All courses are 4 credit courses)




          Grade 10                            Grade 11                                Grade 12
Required Courses                 Required Courses                        Required Courses
English 10 or                    English 11 or Communications 11         English 12, Communications 12 or
English 10 First Peoples**                                               English 12 First Peoples**

Social Studies 10                Social Studies 11** or                  Graduation Transitions
                                 BC First Nations 12**                   DPA Tracking
A Mathematics 10**               Mathematics 11 Course                   Elective Courses
                                                                         Grade 12 Elective
                                                                         At least 12 credits must be at the
                                                                         Grade 12 level
Science 10**                     A Science 11 Course                     Grade 12 Elective

Physical Education 10            Elective                                Grade 12 Elective

Planning 10                      Elective                                Grade 12 Elective

Elective Courses                 Elective                                Other Grade 10-12 Electives
Elective                                                                 Elective
Elective                         Elective                                Elective

DPA Tracking                     DPA Tracking                            Elective




1. A minimum of 80 credits in grades 10-12.
2. 48 credits from required courses
       - 16 credits are at the Grade 12 level (includes English12/Communications 12)
3. 28 credits from elective courses – 4 credits from Fine Art OR Applied Skill, Grades 10-12
4. Graduation Transitions, DPA Tracking (start in Grade 10, complete in Grade 12)
5. **Mandatory provincial exams




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GRADE 10 PROGRAM                                              Name:___________________________



Grade 10 is a very important year as it begins the Graduation Program for students. From grade 10 to 12,
students will be required to earn 80 credits, 48 of which are required, 28 of which are electives and 4 for
Graduation Transitions in Grade 12. Students in grade 10 are to select 6 required courses and 2 electives.
These options are outlined below:

Foundation Studies (Required):
MEN--10---      English 10 or
MEFP-10---      English First Peoples 10                      Course Selected:________________
MSC--10---      Science 10
MSS--10---      Social Studies 10
MPLAN10---      Planning 10
MPE--10---      Physical Education 10

Mathematics 10 – One of:

MFMP-10---      Foundations of Math 10                        Course Selected:________________
MAWM-10---      Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics 10

Elective Courses:
Please see the course selection guide and course overview sheet for a detailed description of all the elective
courses offered to grade 10 students. Grade 10 students are permitted to take grade 11 electives. Once you
have selected 2 electives and 2 alternates, please place them in the spaces below.

Elective Choices:                                             Alternate Choices:

   1. _____________________________                           1. __________________________

   2. _____________________________                           2. __________________________



Note – If you are repeating a required course, please indicate the course(s) below:
    1. _____________________________

    2. _____________________________



Parent Signature: _____________________




                                                                                                            8
GRADE 11 PROGRAM                                                 Name: _____________________



Students in Grade 11 are in the middle of their Graduation Program. At this point they should have earned 24
credits in required courses and 8 credits in electives (from their grade 10 year). Students must take the following
Grade 11 courses:

Foundation Studies (Required):

MEN--11---      English 11 or                            Course Selected:__________________
MCOM-11---      Communications 11


MSS--11---      Social Studies 11 or
MFNS-12---      First Nations Studies 12                 Course Selected:__________________


MAWM-11---      Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics 11
MFOM-11---      Foundations of Mathematics 11       Course Selected:__________________
MPREC11---      Pre-Calculus 11


ONE Science 11:

MBI--11---      Biology 11                               Course Selected:__________________
MCH--11---      Chemistry 11
MESC-11---      Earth Science 11
MGEOL12---      Geology 12
MPH--11---      Physics 11
MSCT-11---      Science and Technology 11
MSR—11---       Sustainable Resources 11


Elective Courses:

Please see the course selection guide and course overview sheet for a detailed description of all elective courses.
Students in Grade 11 may also take Grade 12 electives.

Elective Choices:                                                Alternate Choices:

    1 _________________________                          1    _______________________

    2 _________________________                          2    _______________________

    3   ____________________________

    4 _________________________

Note – If you are repeating a required course, please indicate the course(s) below:

    1 _________________________

    2 _________________________                          Parent Signature: _____________________




                                                                                                                 9
GRADE 12 PROGRAM                                                          Name: ________________



Students in Grade 12 are in the culminating year of their Graduation Program. Students in Grade 12 will be
required to complete their Graduation Transitions for 4 credits, as well as their required grade 12 courses.
Students must complete English/Communications 12, along with 3 other Grade 12 courses to be eligible for
Graduation. They will need 80 total credits, 48 of which are required, 28 of which are electives and 4 for their
Grad Transitions. Grade 12 students will select 7 courses, as they are entitled to one spare block.



Foundation Studies (Required):

MEN-12---       English 12 or
MCOM-12---      Communications 12 or                             Course Selected:__________________
MEFP-12---      English First Peoples 12



Elective Courses:

Please see the course selection guide and course overview sheet for a detailed description of all elective courses.

Elective Choices:                                                Alternate Choices:

    1 _________________________                          1    _______________________

    2   ____________________________                     2   __________________________

    3 _________________________

    4 _________________________

    5 _________________________

    6 _________________________

    7 _________________________



Note – If you are repeating a required course, please indicate the course(s) below:.


    1   _____________________________

    2   _____________________________


Parent Signature: _____________________




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Arts
Visual Arts 8
The program represents a core curriculum and may consist of introductory work in drawing, painting, graphics,
ceramics, sculpture and fibre art. There is a strong focus on the elements and principles of art (the language of
art).

Visual Arts 10
This program is for students wishing to continue their general art education or to take Art for the first time and thus
build art foundation skills, studying a minimum of four areas in ceramics, drawing, painting, graphics and sculpture
or fibre arts. There is a final project which includes 15 studies (sketch work) and 5 free choice assignments done
throughout the year.

Art Foundations 11
Pre-requisite: A previous Art course is recommended
Students study a wide range of 2D and 3D art processes selected from drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture,
fibre arts and print making. Image development and design strategies, elements and principles of art and
technical development are explored. Art career research as well as art history and criticism are included. There is
a final project which consists of 15 studies (sketch work) and five free choice assignments done throughout the
year.

Art Foundations 12
Pre-requisite: Any Art 11 course
This course will have more advanced projects and studies (sketch work) in a wide range of media and processes.
There is also a final project for studies and free choice work.

Studio Arts 11 - Drawing & Painting
This course offers a focus on drawing and painting in a wide variety of media (materials) and a variety of
processes in class and study (sketch work) assignments. A final project reflects personal exploration of the
elements and principles of design as well as art styles and creative strategies in various media.

Studio Arts 12 - Drawing & Painting
Pre-requisite: any Art 11 course
This course will have more advanced projects and studies (sketch work) in a wide variety of drawing and painting
media. A final project reflects personal exploration of the language of art, creative strategies and art history in
various media and processes.




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Studio Arts 11 – Drawing, Painting & Photo
This course offers a variety of drawing and painting projects and studies (sketch work). It includes some black and
white still photography processes and assignments thereby adding another art medium. A final project of studies
and free choice work reflects personal expression with a focus on the language of art, creative strategies and art
styles. *Students cannot get credit for BOTH Drawing and Painting 11 & Drawing, Painting & Photography 11.

Studio Arts 12 - Drawing, Painting & Photo
Pre-requisite: Any Art 11 course
This course will offer more advanced projects and studies (sketch work) in a variety of drawing and painting media
and includes some still photography assignments also. The course concludes with a final project which reflects
personal expression with a focus on the language of art, creative strategies and art styles.
*Students cannot get credit for BOTH Drawing and Painting 12 AND Drawing and Painting-Photography 12.

Studio Arts 11 - Ceramics & Sculpture
Studio Arts 12 - Ceramics & Sculpture
Pre-requisite: Ceramics & Sculpture 11
Students will work with a variety of ceramics and sculpture media (which may include clay, found materials, paper
maché, plaster and mixed media). A variety of processes will be explored, and may include additive, subtractive,
modeling, surface treatments and decorative processes.

Visual Arts – Media Arts 11
Visual Arts – Media Arts 12
Pre-requisite: Media Arts 11
                                      th
Students will examine the impact of 20 - century technology on the creation of visual artworks. Students will
apply traditional art-making processes to technology. This course may include graphic design, digital
photography, computer graphics and animation programs.




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Business Technology
Planning 10 (Required Course)
The focus is on requirements for the graduation program: portfolios, education and career transitions, financial
planning, and informed decision-making related to health issues. Students develop resume and cover letter
writing skills and can earn WHMIS and Student Work Safe Certification.

Business Education 10 - General
A course designed to help students explore the world of business. Students develop computer skills while learning
basic business operations such as marketing, entrepreneurship, accounting, economics, data processing,
managing information, and business management. A course designed to help students sample and decide what
areas of Business and Applied Business to focus on in senior grades and post-secondary studies.

Accounting 11
This course is an introduction to accounting and its role in business. Students learn accounting principles,
practices, forms, and procedures useful for work in business or operating their own enterprises. Knowledge
and skills gained in accounting will assist students in understanding the importance of accounting in business.

Business Computer Applications 11
Pre-requisite: Good keyboarding skills recommended
In this course, students develop keyboarding proficiency while working with a wide range of software related to
business, such as MS Office for word processing, spreadsheets, database management, Internet studies, and
E-communications. Students develop technology skills and analyze legal and ethical issues associated with
computer technology. Students can develop an e-portfolio for Grad Portfolio presentation in this course.

BA Journalism & Publishing 12
Journalism and Publishing 12 introduces students to print journalism and publication. Students will learn reporting
skills, including interviewing and writing for specific purposes such as feature, sports and opinion pieces.
Journalism and Publishing 12 students will prepare for contributing to the school’s newspaper and yearbook.
Students will cover digital photography and editing, page layout and graphic design. Students will also be
involved in aspects of marketing and advertising.

Journalism and Publishing 12 explores the components and issues of print journalism. Students learn about
gathering and writing news, reporting ethically, preparing editorials, writing features, preparing photos, and
evaluating magazines and advertising. Journalism and Publishing 12 also gives students an opportunity to
choose one aspect of journalism and explore it in more depth. This course will be yearlong with the classes every
other day.

Entrepreneurship 12
The world of business is changing and trends indicate there will be more independent, self-managed, freelance,
and small business employment. Students learn analytical, research, and decision-making processes to
determine the viability of business ventures. Students learn to write a business plan and implement and evaluate
a business venture. Students will have the opportunity to run their own business venture.




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Tourism 11
Note: Optional charge for certificate courses and field trips
An introduction to the world’s largest industry – tourism. Students have the opportunity to obtain industry-
recognized certificates such as Super Host Fundamentals, Serving it Right, and Local Tour Guide while
developing employability skills such as communication, customer service, and teamwork.

Tourism 12
Pre-requisite: Tourism 11
Note: Optional charge for certificate courses and field trips
Students examine current tourism trends, develop destination-planning skills, and focus on the adventure and
accommodation sectors. Students may have the opportunity to obtain industry-recognized certificates such as
Super Host Service Across Cultures, Super Host Customers with Disabilities, Food Safe Level II, Front Desk
Agent, Adventure Tourism, and Emergency First Aid (time permitting). This course is highly recommended for
students interested in world travel or post-secondary studies or employment in the tourism industry. Students that
complete Tourism 11 and 12 and have industry-related work experience are eligible for a national Canadian
Academy of Travel & Tourism certificate and advanced placement into CNC tourism programs.

Marketing 12
Students learn how marketing helps businesses determine and meet customer needs, how businesses present a
variety of products and services, and how marketing helps businesses and individuals succeed. A practical
activity-based course that involves using the 4 Ps of marketing to develop, price, and promote a unique product or
service.

Work Experience 12 (yearlong)
Provides students with an opportunity to participate in, observe or learn about the performance of tasks and
responsibilities related to an occupation or career. The goal is to help students prepare for the transition from
secondary school to the world of work, and help students connect what they learn in the classroom with the skills,
knowledge and attitudes needed in the workplace. In-school orientation prepares students prior to monitored
worksite placements.




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Computer and Information Technology
Digital Media 8
Students will work with computers, digital cameras, digital video and a variety of software emphasizing the
manipulation of digital works. Students will create presentations, videos, photo lay-outs and digital publications in
an attempt to better understand the world of media.

Information Technology 8
This course begins the process of exploring the realm of computing technologies. The topics being covered will
include: computer architecture (what’s inside a computer), digital image manipulation, animation (flash & step-
motion), and web design.

Information Technology 10
An introductory computer course that covers a broad spectrum of computing technologies (topics and projects will
differ from Computer Technology 8). The topics being covered will include: computer architecture (what’s inside a
computer), digital image manipulation, communications (internet & email), animation (flash & step motion), video
game design, web design and computer programming.

BA Media Studies 10A
This course emphasizes knowledge and skills that will enable students to understand media communication in the
twenty-first century and to use media effectively and responsibly. Done entirely in the computer lab, students will
analyze a variety of media works and audience responses to them. They will also create their own media works
such as advertisements and movie trailers, as well as developing critical thinking skills and ethical judgment. They
will also use skills in viewing, representing, listening, speaking, reading and writing.

ICT - Digital Media Development 11
ICT - Digital Media Development 12
Pre-requisite: Digital Media Development 11
The aim for the Digital Media Development curriculum is to help students develop the attitudes, skills and
knowledge needed to live, learn and work effectively in an information-rich technological society. Students in
Digital Media Development will work in 4 modules that build on the Information and Communications Technology
strand developed by the BC Ministry of Education. The 4 modules include; Desktop Digital Video, 2D Graphic
Design and Publishing, 3D Design and Animation, and Web Publishing. Students will be exposed to a variety of
experiences that will encourage them to enjoy and value information and communications technology.

ICT – Modular Survey Course 11
This course covers a broad spectrum of topics: computer architecture, digital editing, networking, flash animation,
web design and programming.

ICT – Modular Survey Course 12
Pre-requisite: Modular Survey Course 11
This advanced computer science course focuses upon advanced web design, networking, careers in Information
Technology, and advanced programming (VBG, C++ & Java).

Drama - Film & Television 11
Drama - Film & Television 12
Pre-requisite: Film & Television 11
Film and Television 11 and 12 provide opportunities for students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes
they need to respond to and create film and television works. In Film and Television 11 and 12, students gain
practical experience in some of the major areas of the industry, including acting, scriptwriting, and production.
This experience introduces students to the standards of the film and television industry. Students also examine
the important roles that film and television play in society. As they explore and critically analyze the industry within
various social, cultural, and historical contexts, students gain understanding of how these contexts influence and
are influenced by film and television works. In Film and Television 11 and 12, students have opportunities to:
explore and manipulate artistic components to create meaningful film and television works that reflect their own
individuality and creativity. Students will develop an appreciation and understanding of the process of film and
television production, while exploring career options related to film and television, and develop skills useful in
pursuing them.

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Digital Photography 11
This course will teach students to understand and leverage the manual controls on a digital camera to produce
clear, well-exposed, and interesting photographs. Students will learn to experiment with composition and lighting
to change the look of their pictures. Digital photography allows exciting possibilities for colouration, HDR, and raw
image processing. Working with our photos in Adobe Photoshop will be a part of learning to fix, enhance and edit
photos. Students will learn to problem solve ways of achieving different effects and improve their ability to critique
photos. Photography and photo editing can become a career skill or simply an enjoyable past time.



Dance
Dance 10
Dance history, creative, modern, hip hop, social and folk dance are possible topics for this active, participation
based course. Students will explore technical and compositional skills and analyze the cultural context and
evolution of different genres of dance. Principles of movement and health and fitness (alignment, balance,
flexibility, strength, and breathing) will be applied to dance.

Dance - Choreography 11
Students will learn a variety of dance forms and will create dances based on the elements presented in the class.
The course will focus on participation, student creativity and personal exploration through dance. Students will
examine the value of dance and its historical roots within North American culture.

Dance - Choreography 12
Pre-requisite: Dance/Choreography 11
Students will build on and extend the knowledge, skills and attitudes developed in Dance 11. The course will
focus on participation, student choreography, personal exploration and performance. A component of this course
will be to learn and explore multicultural dance, its history and value.




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English
Humanities 8
The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ writing, reading, listening and speaking skills while
exploring the development of world civilizations from 500 C.E. to 1500 C.E. Students will study the social, political,
economic and religious evolution of European and Middle Eastern civilizations and learn about the various types
of literature. Students will study vocabulary, grammar and language concepts to develop a stronger sense of the
way the English language works.

English Language Arts 9
Students will continue to develop the communication skills introduced in English 8. They will explore more
challenging works of literature and in doing so; develop their ability to draw inferences from written and spoken
work. They will further develop their ability to write using the writing process.

English 10
Skills of reading, writing, speaking and visual communication are extended and developed. This has a mandatory
provincial exam.

English 10 First Peoples
This course is academically equivalent to English 10, and as such, students are expected to write the English 10
First Peoples provincial exam in order to meet BC’s graduation requirements. English First Peoples is intended
for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal teachers and students. It represents an invitation to all learners to explore
and discover First peoples’ worldviews through the study of literary, informational and media text with local,
Canadian and International First Peoples’ content. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

English 9 & 10 Honours
Students will be selected for these honours courses based on their marks in the preceding English course. The
courses will cover all the requirements of English 9 and 10 at the appropriate grade level plus some topics in more
depth or breadth than the regular program. Students with an aptitude for language arts who plan on pursuing a
university degree and a career in this area are encouraged to maintain marks and work habits to meet the
selection criteria.

English 11
It is strongly recommended that students who take this course have achieved a mark of C or improving English 10
and have good work habits. Increasingly sophisticated activities and materials are used for critical study and
literary appreciation of novels, short stories and drama, and may include Shakespeare. Students will develop
proficiency in writing creative, expository and persuasive essays. Vocabulary development, oral presentations and
class discussions are integral to the course. Homework completion is required.

English 11 Honours
Designed to interest and challenge students who have strong English capabilities. Students are exposed to
increasingly sophisticated activities and materials used for critical study and literary appreciation of novels, short
stories and drama, including Shakespeare. Essay writing, on-going vocabulary development, oral presentations,
and class discussions are integral to the course.




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English 12
Pre-requisite: English 11
Students will continue to refine language skills and develop the ability to form well-reasoned judgments,
expressed in both written and oral forms, and engage in a wide range of genres and authors. The reading lists
include work by Canadian, American, British and European authors. Drama is read, analyzed and dramatized.

English 12 First Peoples
Pre-requisite: English 11
This course is academically equivalent to English 12, and as such, students are expected to write the English 12
First Peoples provincial exam in order to meet BC’s graduation requirements. A key feature of this course is its
focus on texts that present authentic First Peoples perspectives through the inclusion of historical and
contemporary texts created by or with First Peoples. Students examine literature that represents a wide range of
themes including First Peoples connection with the land, the role of Elders, the experience of colonization, the
land question, residential schools and the role of humour in First Peoples’ Literature.

Communications 11
Pre-requisite: Recommendation from Grade 10 English teacher
This course is designed for students who have found earlier English courses challenging. Various literary pieces
and the role of advertising and media will be analyzed and discussed. Students will engage in activities that will
improve those written and oral communications skills necessary in the work place, including resumes, letters of
application and power point presentations.

Communications 12
Pre-requisite: Communications 11 or English 11
Students will continue to develop practical writing and communications skills through the study of various literary
genres as well as through a study of the effects of media and technology. Students will also study those writing
and other communication formats useful in the workplace or in trades programs. Communications 12 is accepted
in most post-secondary trades courses and is a requirement for a BC Dogwood certificate.
This course is academically equivalent to English 12, and as such, students are expected to write the English 12
First Peoples provincial exam in order to meet BC’s graduation requirements.

English Literature 12
Pre-requisite: English 11
LIT 12 allows greater freedom for both the teacher and students to explore the works of a number of writers. A
quarter of the course is devoted to "core studies," a survey of representative works from several literary periods.
For the remainder, students choose three of the following options for further in-depth study: prose, poetry, drama
or independent studies. This course is recommended for students who enjoy literature and who are planning to
continue English studies beyond high school.

AP English Literature & Composition (12 Credits possible, yearlong)
Pre-requisites: A “B” average in English 11, Honours English 11 recommended
This enriched two-semester course in senior English will engage students in the careful reading and critical
analysis of college level literature in order to deepen their understanding of the ways in which writers use
language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. Students will write the English 12 provincial
exam in January, the Advanced Placement exam in May, and the Literature 12 exam in June. The Literature 12
component of the course (spring semester) is a survey course of English poetry, drama, and prose dating from
the Anglo-Saxon period to the twentieth century.
English 12 – 4 credits, Literature 12 – 4 credits, AP English – 4 credits

Writing 12 Pre-requisite: English 11
Designed for students with both an interest and aptitude in creative writing. It gives students the opportunity to
read and write traditional and experimental works, to participate in writers’ workshops and to seek publication.




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Food and Textiles Studies

                                 Cooks Training 11 - Industrial Foods
                                 Pre-requisite: a desire to work in a fun and informative full-scale
                                 commercial kitchen.
                                 This course covers Commercial food studies and practice at the pre-apprentice
                                 level. Basic and fundamental techniques of a commercial kitchen are developed.
                                 This course leads to Level 1 Cook Trade (1994), with an introduction to hospitality
                                 foods management functions and cost control. Food safety and kitchen sanitation
                                 are stressed.

Cafeteria Training 11 – Commercial Cooking
Pre-requisite: a desire to work in a variety of areas in a full-scale commercial kitchen in a way that will introduce
the students to the possibilities inherent in the cooking trade.
The emphasis in this course is quantity food preparation and service skills development. Students will learn about
menu planning through ingredient selection, receiving, storing, preparing, presenting and serving food. Catering
skills are developed through on-going catering functions in addition to catering to the school population. As with all
food services courses sanitation and food safety are emphasized.

Cooks Training 12 – Industrial Foods
Pre-requisite: Cooks Training 11
This course is a continuation of Cooks Training 11. Students will be expected to expand on knowledge gained in
Cooks Training 11. Students will also develop the ability to problem solve, individually and in group situations.
Commercial food studies and practice at the pre-apprentice level. This course leads to Level 1 Cook Trade
(1994), with an introduction to hospitality foods management functions and cost control. Students will be given the
opportunity to spend a day at CNC Culinary Arts department. These steps help obtain journeyperson status as a
cook, leading to the position of Chef.

Cafeteria Training 12 – Commercial Cooking
Pre-requisite: Cafeteria Training 11
This course is a continuation and expansion of Commercial Cooking 11. The emphasis is on quantity food
preparation and service skills development. Students will learn about menu planning through ingredient selection,
receiving, storing, preparing, presenting and serving food. Also the ability to problem solve, individually and in
group situations, is developed. As will all food services courses sanitation and food safety is emphasized.

Cooks Training 11/12 – Culinary Arts
Pre-requisite: successful completion of Cafeteria Training 11 and 12.
This course is for the serious student interested in a career in the Food Services Industry. Emphasis will be
placed on preparing students for entry level vocational school program or kitchen position. Costing, menu
planning and supervision skills will be emphasized. Students will be given the opportunity to explore potential food
services choices in the Prince George area.

Home Economics 8 - Foods
This course is an introduction to foods and nutrition. Students will gain knowledge and learn basic food safety
and food handling practices while participating in preparing and sampling a variety of easy-to-prepare recipes.

Home Economics 10 - Foods & Nutrition
This course provides students with the knowledge of basic cookery techniques which will enable them to prepare
and serve delicious and nutritious food products. Students will create from a wide range of recipes and will gain
knowledge of safe food handling and healthy eating.

Food & Nutrition 11
This course will give students an opportunity to work with a variety of baking and cookery techniques and
seasonal favourites such as gingerbread creations and cake decorating. Students will gain knowledge and skills
in preparing foods such as pasta, salads, soups, yeast breads, and pastries in preparation for living on their own.
The provincially recognized certificate program “Food Safe” will be offered as part of the course. The certificate is
recommended for all people employed in the food industry.



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Food & Nutrition 12
Pre-requisite: Food and Nutrition 11 highly recommended
This course is intended to provide students with expanded knowledge of cookery techniques and nutrition.
Emphasis is based on students working independently in planning labs, therefore previous culinary experience is
essential. During this course students will have the opportunity to work with special equipment used in food
preparation, use cookery techniques to prepare gourmet and foreign foods, create specialty holiday foods, and
plan and prepare foods for special diets.

Home Economics 8 - Textiles
This course introduces students to basic sewing skills, safe and proper use of the sewing machine and
equipment, and construction of simple projects. Sewing projects may include a tie-dyed frog, pencil case, pillow
case and a pair of pajama pants. Students are required to do all practical work at school. Students are expected
to provide their own project supplies for the pillow case and pajama projects.

Home Economics 10 - Textiles
This course is intended to develop knowledge and skills in clothing construction and selection. Practical projects
may include a drawstring bag, a pair of cargo style pants, a fleece zippered jacket, and a small quilted project or
project of choice (as time permits). Students are required to do all practical work at school. Students are
expected to provide their own project supplies

Textiles 11
This course provides     students with knowledge and experience in the selection, design, and construction of
clothing and practical   projects. Specific requirements will be outlined by the teacher while allowing students
choice in patterns and   fabrics which appeal to their interests and personal style. Practical projects may include a
stuffed animal, a pair   of pants or skirt, a shirt or unlined jacket, a small quilted project, and a final project of
choice. Students are     required to do all practical work at school. Students are expected to provide their own
project supplies.

Textiles 12
Pre-requisite: Textiles 9 or 11 highly recommended
This course will expand on the student's knowledge and experience in clothing construction, design, and
technology. Students will be required to meet specific requirements outlined by the teacher allowing students
choice in projects, patterns, and fabrics. Practical projects may include a quilted bag, a lined garment (jacket or
dress), a project using a specialty/problem fabric, and a project embellished with the embroidery sewing machine
or specialty stitches (as time permits). Students are required to do all practical work at school. Students are
expected to provide their own project supplies.

Textiles Arts & Crafts 9
In this course students will be introduced to a variety of craft and textile design techniques. Students will make
projects which will teach them such techniques as cross stitching, fabric painting, hand embroidery, weaving,
quilting and sewing. Students are required to do all practical work at school. Students are expected to provide
some of their own project supplies.

Fine Arts & Applied Skills 11
In this course students will design quilt blocks using a variety of textile design techniques, which will then be
constructed into a quilt. The quilt blocks will be done following a chosen theme and colour scheme. Students are
required to do all practical work at school. Students are expected to provide their own fabric, notions and quilt
batting.




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Health and Human Services

BA Peer Tutoring 11
Open to all grade 11 and 12 students with a C+ or better in all courses. As well, peer tutors must have
Satisfactory or better work habits as well as excellent attendance. If interested in Peer Tutoring, please see a
counsellor or the Peer Tutor teacher.

BA Peer Tutoring 11 – Math
This course gives you the opportunity to tutor math students at Prince George Secondary as well as students in
an elementary school setting. If you are a people person and enjoy math, this is the class for you! Once a week
you will be visiting a cooperating elementary school and helping students with math as well as organizing math
centered group activities.

BA Peer Helping 12
Pre-requisite: Peer Tutoring 11
Peer Tutoring/Helping provides the opportunity for grade 11 and 12 students to work with younger students in a
classroom environment. Peer Tutors/Helpers will support the classroom teacher by helping with individual
students on an ‘as needed’ basis. Credit for these courses also give you the 30 required volunteer hours for your
Graduation Transitions, and is practical experience that is helpful in your resume, scholarship applications, and
applications for college or university. A Peer Tutor/Helper is a mature, responsible student who is able to be a role
model for all students in the class.
**Peer Tutors/Helpers are expected to meet every lunch hour with the Peer Tutor teacher for the first two
weeks, and will be given a spare for that first two weeks as compensation. It is vital that you commit to
attending these lunch sessions, as this is when all the pre-learning occurs before you enter your sponsor
classroom to be a Peer Tutor/Helper**

BA Leadership 10 & 12
Participants in the Leadership class will enhance their leadership skills through school & community service as
well as self assessment & growth. Topics include: event planning and organizing, assessing team strengths and
weaknesses, organizing and chairing meetings, and implementing problem solving and decision making solutions.
This course will fulfill scholarship application requests for the demonstration of leadership and volunteering.

Family Studies 11 & 12
The Family Studies course for 11 & 12 includes 4 modules: 2 modules for each grade level. Students will get
credit for Family Studies 11 after completing 2 modules and for Family Studies 12 after they have completed all 4
modules. The modules are:
                 - Adolescent Development                   - Adulthood
                 - Child Development & Parenting            - Interpersonal and Family Relationships

BA Psychology 11
Introductory psychology presents students with current topics in psychology, and through reading the text,
completing lecture notes, creating journal entries, and by reviewing chapter content and related projects students
become familiar with the focus of psychology and its application to daily life. Topics include Defining Psychology,
Methods of Research, The Brain and Behaviour, Sensation and Perception, Consciousness, Learning, Memory
and Language and Thought.

BA Psychology 12
Psychology 12 is a continuation of BA Psychology 11 and includes topics such as: Intelligence, Human
Development, Motivation and Emotion (why we do what we do), Personality, Social Behaviour, Abnormal
Psychology, Therapies, and Psychology and Health.




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Languages
French 8
Prerequisite: None
Step into the French-speaking world. Learn one semester of standard French in a vibrant and social classroom
setting. Explore themes including: sports, food, pastimes, and travel.

French 9
Prerequisite: French 8
Continue your exploration of French. Build on the skills mastered in French 8. Learn how to speak and write in the
past, present, and future tenses. Explore themes including: world festivals, sports, retro culture, and community
spirit.

French 10
Prerequisite: French 9
Expand your French knowledge. Focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening in the past, present, and future
tenses. Explore themes including: tourism and travel skills, career futures, natural disasters, and urban legends.

French 11
Prerequisite: French10
Consolidate your French skills with extensive written and oral proficiency development. Continue work in the past,
present, and future tenses. Explore themes including: fitness and self-care, relationships, and francophone school
culture. This course is the language 11 entrance requirement for many universities and is intended for the serious
student of French.

French 12
Prerequisite: French 11
Master more advanced structures in French. Increase and improve oral French ability through regular immersion
experiences. Enhance reading, writing, and listening skills through a variety of activities. Explore themes
including: travel and tourism, protecting our planet, and legal and criminal justice.

Introductory Spanish 11
Prerequisite: None
If you have taken Spanish 9 and 10, you cannot take this course. This is an intensive, fast-paced course for
beginners at the senior level. Experience the Spanish-speaking world. Explore all the themes of Spanish 9 and
10, including: pastimes, friendships, Hispanic school culture, the classroom, food, community, the family, and
celebrations.

Spanish 11
Prerequisite: Spanish 10 or Introductory Spanish 11
Consolidate your Spanish skills with extensive written and oral proficiency development. Continue work in the
past, present, and future tenses. Explore themes including: the home, childhood, shopping, travel, community
spirit, and media entertainment. This course is the language 11 entrance requirement for many universities and is
intended for the serious student of Spanish.

Spanish 12
Prerequisite: Spanish 11
Master more advanced structures in Spanish. Increase and improve oral Spanish ability through regular
immersion experiences. Enhance reading, writing, and listening skills through a variety of activities. Explore
themes including: childhood memories, reporting the news, Hispanic cuisine, and travel through Latin America.

Introductory German 11
Prerequisite: None
Welcome to German! This is an intensive, fast-paced course for beginners at the senior level. Explore language
and culture through themes including: the family, pastimes, the city, shopping, food, and travel.



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German 11
Prerequisite: Introductory German 11
Consolidate your German skills with extensive written and oral proficiency development. Continue work in the
past, present, and future tenses. Explore themes including: friendship, fashion, the home, German school culture,
and careers. This course is the language 11 entrance requirement for many universities and is intended for the
serious student of German.

BA Language For Travel 11
Prerequisite: None
Explore four exciting European languages and cultures in this Board-Approved Course. Speaking, listening, and
reading are the main focus points. Grammar, verbs, and major writing are not taught. Learn travel skills (like
reading menus, asking for directions, greeting people) in French, Italian, Scottish Gaelic, and Spanish. Find out
more about the 6000+ languages in the world and choose one to explore at the end of the course. You will also
learn about endangered languages, and why they are important. You will also learn more about your own
background. This course does not fulfill the Language 11 entry requirement for universities. There is no final
exam.

PGSS Languages Department Journey


           French                                Spanish                                    German
                                          Open to grades 9 and up                   Open to grades 10 and up
               FRENCH 8

                                                  INTRODUCTORY
                                                    SPANISH 11
               FRENCH 9                                                             INTRODUCTORY
                                                                                      GERMAN 11
               FRENCH 10                            SPANISH 11



               FRENCH 11
                                                    SPANISH 12
                                                                                        GERMAN 11
               FRENCH 12


                                               Language For Travel 11
                                               Open to grades 10, 11, and 12


                                                        LANGUAGE
                                                       FOR TRAVEL
                                                           11




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Mathematics
                                           NEW MATHEMATICS
                                               PATHWAY


                                                 Mathematics
                                                    8&9


  Apprenticeship and Workplace                                       Foundations of Mathematics
         Mathematics 10                                                 And Pre-Calculus 10



  Apprenticeship and Workplace
                                                 Foundations of Mathematics 11               Pre-Calculus 11
        Mathematics 11



  Apprenticeship and Workplace                                                               Pre-Calculus 12
        Mathematics 12                           Foundations of Mathematics 12




Math Pathways
The pathways that have been present over the last few years have been altered. Each new pathway is designed
to provide students with the mathematical understandings, rigor and critical-thinking skills that have been
identified for specific post-secondary programs of study and for direct entry into the workforce. The content of
each pathway has been based on the Western Canadian Protocol (WNCP) which governs curriculum in the
Western Provinces and Northern Territories.

There are three math pathways. Students and parents need to be aware that success (C+ or better) in a math
course is a critical foundation for the next course.

Please consult with your child's Math teacher or a school counsellor if you require more information.

Mathematics 8 & 9
The Mathematics 8 and 9 curricula provide all students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills and
attitudes necessary to be numerate. To be numerate, students need to develop the ability to calculate, reason
logically, employ quantitative and spatial information and apply a variety of mathematical methods to solve
problems and make decisions. These courses provide the basis of preparing students for higher level courses in
mathematics. In 2012/13, Math 8 will be a minimum of three terms.

Foundations of Mathematics & Pre-Calculus 10 Honours
Students will be selected for these honours courses based on their marks in the preceding Math course. The
courses will cover all the requirements of Principals of Math 9 and 10 at the appropriate grade level plus some
topics in more depth or breadth than the regular program. Students planning on entering Mathematics or
Sciences at University are strongly encouraged to maintain marks and work habits sufficient to meet the selection
criteria with an aptitude for Math.

Apprenticeship & Workplace Mathematics
This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills
identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include algebra,
geometry, measurement, number, statistics and probability.



                                                                                                               24
Foundations of Mathematics & Pre-Calculus
This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills
identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical calculus like Arts or
Humanities. Topics include financial mathematics, geometry, measurement, number, logical reasoning, relations
and functions, statistics and probability.

Pre-Calculus
This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills
identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of theoretical calculus like Sciences or
Engineering. Topics include algebra and number, measurement, relations and functions, trigonometry,
permutations, combinations and binomial theorems.

Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10 (AWM10)
Prerequisite: Math 9 or Math 9(core)
Topics of study include: proportional reasoning including unit pricing; formula manipulation and application; types
of income; spatial puzzles and games; Pythagorean theorem; similarity of convex polygons; SI and imperial units
and conversions; linear, area, volume, capacity, mass and temperature measurements; primary trigonometry
ratios. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 11 (AWM11)
Prerequisite: Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10 or Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10
Topics of study include: proportional reasoning including unit analysis; formula manipulation and application;
numerical puzzles and games; personal budgets; compound interest; financial services including credit cards and
loans; two and three right triangle problems; scale; representation of 3-D objects; exploded views and component
parts of 3-D objects; surface area, volume and capacity in SI and imperial; slope; bar graphs, histograms, line
graphs and circle graphs; Cosine Law and Sine Law excluding the ambiguous case.

Foundations of Mathematics & Pre-Calculus 10 (FMP10)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 9
Topics of study include: relationship between data, graphs and situations; slope; linear relations and
characteristics of their graphs; function notation; systems of linear equations; factors of whole numbers; irrational
numbers; powers with integral and rational exponents; multiplication of polynomial expressions; common and
trinomial factors; SI and Imperial units and conversions; surface area and volume of 3-D objects; primary
trigonometry ratios. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

Foundations of Mathematics 11 (FOM11)
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics & Pre-Calculus 10
Topics of study include: application of rates; scale factors, areas, surface area, volume; proofs for the properties
of angles and triangles; spatial puzzles and games; inductive and deductive reasoning; systems of linear
equalities in two variables; quadratic functions; historical event or area of interest involving mathematics; normal
distribution, standard deviation and z-scores; confidence intervals, confidence levels and margin of error

Foundations of Mathematics 12 (FOM12)
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11
Topics of study include: numerical puzzles and games; compound interest; analysis of renting, leasing or buying;
investment portfolio; logic puzzles and games; application of set theory; conditional statements; fundamental
counting principle; permutations and combinations; odds and probability statements; mutually exclusive and non-
exclusive events; probability of two events; polynomials of degree less than or equal to three; exponential and
logarithmic functions; sinusoidal functions; current event or area of interest involving mathematics

Pre-Calculus 11 (PREC11)
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics & Pre-Calculus 10
Topics of study include: absolute value; radicals and radical expressions; rational expressions and equations;
polynomial factoring; graphs of absolute value functions; quadratic functions; linear-quadratics and quadratic-
quadratic equations; linear and quadratic inequalities; arithmetic sequences; geometric sequences; reciprocal
functions; primary trigonometry ratios; Sine Law and Cosine Law including the ambiguous case




                                                                                                                  25
Pre-Calculus 12 (PREC12)
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 11
Topics of study include: fundamental counting principle; permutations and combinations; binomial expansion;
operations and compositions of functions; Stretches and translations of functions; Reflections of functions; Inverse
of relations; exponential and logarithmic functions; polynomial factoring; graphs of polynomials of degree less than
or equal to five; radical functions; rational functions; angles in degrees and radians; unit circle; six trigonometric
ratios; Sine, cosine and tangent functions; first and second degree trigonometric equations; trigonometric identity
proofs.

AP Calculus AB 12 (12 credits possible - year long)
Designed for students who will be enrolling in Math and Science courses at the post secondary level. In addition
to the topics in Pre-Calculus 12, students will study limits and continuity, derivatives, integration, transcendental
functions, volumes of solids of revolutions, and areas under the curve. The course is two semesters long.
Students will write the Advanced Placement Calculus AP Exam in May.
Pre-Calculus 12 – 4 credits, AP Calculus Exam – 4 credits, Calculus – 4 credits.

Please consult with your child's Math teacher or a school counsellor if you require more information.




Montessori Program
The Montessori program at PGSS is an enriching alternative and effectively bridges the transition from elementary
to high school. Students spend their mornings in the Montessori classroom studying their core courses (English,
Math, Science and Social Studies), while in the afternoon they join mainstream classes for their chosen electives.
The program includes:
                A three year age span, offering an early high school entry option and continues through grade 9
                Curriculum and instruction based on Montessori philosophy
                An emphasis on independent, self-directed and experiential learning
                Integration of subjects
                A strong, supportive community
                Appreciation for the greater world they live in through the study of environmental themes and
                global issues
                Service to the community as a fundamental element




                                                                                                                   26
Music
Band 8
Music 9 - Concert Band
Music 10 – Concert Band
The primary goal of this course is to learn to play a concert band instrument, or improve your skills on one you
have already begun learning. These include flute, clarinet family, saxophone family, trumpet, trombone, baritone,
tuba, and basic percussion (not drum set). Please note that piano and guitar are not concert band instruments.
Students will be exposed to music theory, a wide variety of music in different genres, and learn to work together.
Students will learn performance-based skills and play at least once in front of an audience. Students may provide
their own instrument or use one from a limited school supply.

If students have an instrument or access to one, they are more guaranteed of being able to play the one they
want. There is no pre-requisite for Concert Band 8 or 9, however, it is recommended that students in Grade 10
have played for at least a year previously.

Guitar 8
This is an introduction to Music Appreciation and Guitar. Each course runs for one term.
Music appreciation introduces the major themes, influences and personalities that shaped most of western
cultural heritage. The focus will be on listening to music from each historical period, from Ancient to Modern, and
examining what characteristics apply to each style and period.
After completing the course students will be able to identify and define the basic elements of music, recognize and
describe the major characteristics of various styles of music, indentify examples of outstanding music from a
variety of historic periods and cultures, and recognize and describe the role/influence of music on other areas of
life throughout history.

Instrumental Music 11 - Concert Band
The primary goal for this course is to refine and improve instrument skills learned in the junior grades. Grade
11/12 students are expected to play at a senior level, and are not beginners. See Concert Band 8/9/10
requirements for junior players. Higher expectations are in place for senior students.

Instrumental Music 12 - Concert Band (X block – yearlong)
Pre-requisite: Concert Band 11
This is a Sequential course, developing performance skills and knowledge of many styles and forms.

Instrumental Music 11 - Guitar
Many students who take this course have no or little experience with guitars. Beginning with the basics of music
theory and guitar terminology, students will develop basic skills in plucking, strumming, note reading, chords, and
tablature. Students do not require a guitar at home, and will be evaluated in class on the above skills.

Instrumental Music 12 - Guitar
Pre-requisite: Guitar 11 or equivalent experience
This course is essentially identical to grade 11, but evaluated with higher expectation. If possible students should
try for a block with a different teacher than their grade 11 year, to be exposed to a different approach and possible
different assignments.

Choral Music 11 & 12 and Concert Choir 11 & 12
This course invites students to develop and refine their singing abilities in both composition and ensemble
performance. Students will explore a range of musical genres with the emphasis being on preparing for several
shows in which they will perform contemporary songs for a live audience (ideally, they will be accompanies by a
live band).




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Physical Education
Physical Education 8, 9, & 10
Students will participate in a variety of physical education activities including team sports and individual sports. A
sample of the activities that may be offered: basketball, volleyball, soccer, track and field, dance, gymnastics,
wrestling and minor games (i.e. floor hockey, dodge ball, capture the flag, and indoor kickball). PE Theory will also
be included. Along with an emphasis on participating to one’s best ability, students will be assessed on skill
improvement, knowledge of the rules and personal and social responsibility. In addition to the above, grade 10
students may have the opportunity to participate in a curling unit. A minimal field trip fee is required for the curling
unit. As well some Grade 10 classes may take CPR (Cardio Pulmonary resuscitation) during the PE theory unit.

Physical Education 11
Physical Education 11 introduces leadership skills and advances development of traditional sport skills. The focus
is to prepare students to become active, healthy and productive young adults and prepare them for more
advanced skills in PE 12. The course allows students to explore a small variety of recreational and leadership
activities in and around the community. Introduction to refereeing, teaching minor games and taking a St John
Ambulance First Aid course may also be included.
As community facilities and services are utilized to offer various activities, there are facility and travel charges
associated with these activities. Students will be transported by school bus / taxi (if not within walking distance) to
and from community facilities. Off campus community activities may include; Billiards, Bowling, Curling, Golf,
Martial Arts, Racquetball, XC Skiing, Squash, Swimming, and Tennis.
Total user facilities / travel charges usually range from $75 to $90 per student for the semester which is paid at
the beginning of the course.

Physical Education 12
Pre-requisite: Physical Education 11
Physical Education 12 is an activity-based course that utilizes leadership theory and skill development to promote
various leisure and lifetime sports as well as some of the traditional sports. This course allows students to explore
a wide variety of recreational and leadership activities using many of our community facilities. Students will learn
how to organize and teach a lesson to their peers, as well as build on the physical / mental sport skills developed
in PE 11. Advanced Refereeing and taking a St John Ambulance First Aid course may also be included.
Advanced units may include: Soccer, Badminton, Golf, Volleyball, Basketball, Racquetball & Squash, Tennis,
Lacrosse, Rugby, Softball, Ultimate and Weight Training.
As community facilities and services are utilized to offer various activities, there are charges associated with these
activities. Students will be transported by school bus / taxi (if not within walking distance) to and from community
facilities. Examples of off campus activities may include: Billiards, Bowling, Curling, Golf, Martial Arts,
Racquetball, Cross Country Skiing, Squash, Swimming, and Tennis.
Total user facilities / travel charges usually range from $100 to $120.00 per student for the semester which is paid
at the beginning of the course.
PE 12 students may also plan for the challenges of a major field trip. Trips done in the past have included hiking
Mt Robson, downhill skiing at Marmot Basin, Jasper or Big White / Silver Star in the Okanagan. These trips are
planned and run by the students and have an additional cost to the User Facilities / Travel cost discussed above.

Personal Fitness 11 &12
This course offers students an individualized opportunity to learn and apply the various aspects of personal fitness
available to help maintain personal health and well being throughout their lives. Topics will include resistance
training, cardiovascular health, group fitness and personal program design.




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BA Volleyball & Wellness 11
Pre-requisite: Physical Education 10
This course is primarily designed to develop volleyball skills to an intermediate level. It will review in depth all the
fundamentals of play including: passing, setting, serving, spiking, defensive techniques, rules of play, block
coverage, rolling/diving, doubles play and 4-2, 6-2 and 5-1 offenses. Students will learn the advantages and
benefits of cross training and developing and maintaining a personal fitness program. In addition, this course will
provide an understanding of the impact physical activity and the lack thereof, has on one’s health. The course will
promote physical efficiency, fitness, personal growth and development, sportsmanship, and positive, safe lifestyle
choices.

BA Volleyball & Wellness 12
Pre-requisite: Volleyball & Wellness 11
This course is primarily designed to develop an increased ability to process the game of volleyball. Students will
continue to demonstrate, with consistency, the fundamentals of play and will display an increased growth in the
area of systems and advanced plays. Through leadership and modeling students will have an opportunity to apply
both the practical skills and theoretical knowledge they acquired in Volleyball and Wellness 11. In addition, the
course will assist students in developing an understanding of the importance of: team building, exploring different
coaching styles, and implementing the coaching style that best suits the personalities and learning styles of those
you are working with. There will be a course fee (approximately $60 to $80) with this course running in the regular
timetable.

BA Outdoor Recreation 08
Outdoor Education 8 is a practical hands-on course which will give the students an opportunity to explore the
outdoor wilderness. It can cover outdoor safety, including shelter and fire building, SOS strategies, navigation in
unfamiliar settings (compass and map) and Bear awareness. It can also teach personal and social responsibility
including Leave No Trace principles and personal safety procedures.

BA Outdoor Recreation 12
 Recommended Prerequisites: PE 10 or 11 with a C+ or better.
Note: This course is considered an “X” Block course
Outdoor Recreation 12 is a full year, activity oriented course, geared towards the outdoors and taught outside of
the timetable (largely after school, with some mornings and weekends).
The course content may include: General Camping skills; Backpacking; Canoeing; Multi-day trip preparation;
Wilderness survival; White water rafting; Snowshoeing; Cross-country skiing; Avalanche awareness; Clothing
selection; Food selection; First-aid; Map, compass and GPS use; Geocaching; Mountain / Road biking and basic
bicycle maintenance; Animal awareness and Safety; Environmental appreciation; and the Interpersonal skills
associated with a course of this nature.
Total fees for those completing all activities will be approximately $200-450 to be paid at various times
throughout the school year.




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Hockey 8/9
Hockey 8/9 is an entry level course - No hockey or skating experience is necessary! Students selecting this
course will receive in depth instruction on the technique of skating. Students will learn balance, edge control,
striding, and basic skating stance. Once students have established skating proficiency the basic skills of hockey
will be introduced. Skills in puck control, stick handling, passing, shooting, and general hockey rules will be
taught. Students will participate in non-contact hockey games to refine their basic hockey skills. Students
registering for this course must have their own equipment.

BA Hockey 10
Hockey 10 is an entry level course - No hockey or skating experience is necessary! Students selecting this
course will receive in depth instruction on the technique of skating. Students will learn balance, edge control,
striding, and basic skating stance. Once students have established skating proficiency the basic skills of hockey
will be introduced. Skills in puck control, stick handling, passing, shooting, and general hockey rules will be
taught. Students will participate in non-contact hockey games to refine their basic hockey skills. A complete set
of hockey equipment is required for this course. Please contact your counsellor if you require equipment as
PGSS has limited quantities available for student use.
There is a cost recovery charge of $30.00.

BA Hockey 11
Hockey 11 is a course offered to any student who is a proficient skater. Hockey 11 offers the opportunity to
enhance the basic skills of skating, stick handling, passing, shooting, and game play. Hockey 11 drills have been
designed to be primarily individual and fast paced in nature. The drills have been selected to challenge each
student to perform individual skills, as quickly as possible, so that he/she can perform hockey skills at a higher
level with success, and confidence. Non-contact hockey games will also be used to enhance, and refine skill
proficiency. The students will learn to analyze a component of ‘game play’, as well as learn and demonstrate
knowledge in running a practice. A complete set of hockey equipment is required for this course. Please contact
your counsellor if you require equipment as PGSS has limited quantities available for student use.
There is a cost recovery charge of $30.00.




BA Soccer 11
Pre-requisite: Physical Education 9
This course is designed to develop individual soccer skills from introductory to advanced. It will review in depth all
of the fundamentals of play. These include footwork, dribbling, ball control, passing, shooting and goalkeeping as
well as the laws and etiquette of the game. On-field instruction will be augmented with classroom theory sessions
as well as alternative training sessions and strength and conditioning sessions. In addition, students will learn the
laws of the game, soccer formations, ethics in sport, as well as the cultural beginnings of the world's most popular
sport.
There is a cost recovery of $40 per month for transportation and facility rentals during winter months when outside
fields cannot be used.




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Sciences
Science 8
Science 8 is an introductory science course that introduces students to the following disciplines of science:
biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science. Students also build lab skills and learn how to apply the scientific
method in the analysis of data. Students will build the foundation for safe, skilled laboratory behaviour.

Science 9
Pre-requisite: Science 8
Science 9 is a continuation of the scientific learning students begin in grade 8. Disciplines studied are: biology,
chemistry, physics, and astronomy. Students continue to build lab skills and apply the scientific method in the
analysis of data.

Science 10
Pre-requisites: Science 9
In Science 10 students continue to study the disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science. In
combination with prior learning students develop a clear picture of what the study of each of these disciplines
entails. Students can then make informed decisions as to their future study within the senior science courses
offered at PGSS. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

Biology 11
Pre-requisite: Science 10
This is an introductory biology course in which students will learn about evolution and how evolutionary theory
serves to link the six Kingdoms of classification (Archaebacteria, Eubacteria Protista, Fungi, Plant, and Animal)
together. Completion of this course will enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the living world.
This course is an excellent choice for those students interested in a career in the life/health sciences.

Biology 12
Pre-requisite: Biology 11
This biology course is designed to introduce university bound students to the anatomy and physiology of the
human body. Students will learn how the body functions at both a cellular and macroscopic level. Students will
study cell biology, biochemistry, digestive system, circulatory system, respiratory and excretory systems, nervous
system, and reproduction. This course is an excellent choice for those students interested in a career in the
life/health sciences.

Chemistry 11
Pre-requisites: Science 10 and Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 (recommended)
Through the study of chemistry, students will see how it affects their everyday lives. The physical and chemical
properties of matter will be explored: atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and organic chemistry.
Methods of communicating scientific measures will be utilized.

Chemistry 12
Pre-requisite: Chemistry 11
Chemistry deals with the properties and reactions of matter as seen in the world around us and how it affects our
everyday life. Chemical kinetics, equilibria, solubility, acids and bases, and electrochemistry will be studied.
Laboratory activities will be used to reinforce concepts covered in the class. This course is designed for university
bound students.




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Earth Science 11
Pre-requisite: Science 10
The focus of earth science is to introduce students to: geology, plate tectonics, oceanography, meteorology
(weather predicting), and astronomy.

Sustainable Resources 11
Pre-requisite: Science 10
This is a general, introductory course on the topics of sustainability in the areas of: Fisheries, Agriculture, Mining
and Forestry, with a focus on energy and alternatives available. We will be studying how we can maintain our
current way of life and balance the needs of the environment. A choice of research projects in 2 or 3 of the above
areas will be provided. A mandatory school final exam worth 20% of the final mark will be written by all students.

Sustainable Resources 12 - Mining
Recommended Courses: one of Earth Science 11 or Sustainable Resources 11
Sustainable Resources 12 is a course that dives into greater detail in the areas of Mining and Energy. This course
looks at how we are going to sustain our standard of living and protect the environment at the same time. An
excellent course for those pursuing further education in the areas of: Environmental Sciences, Forestry,
Fisheries, Mining, Engineering, Agriculture and Energy/Alternative fuel sources. There is a school exam worth
20 % of the final mark that must be written by all students.

Physics 11
Pre-requisite: Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10 and Science 10 (if possible Pre-Calculus 11 or
Foundations of Mathematics 11 taken concurrently)
This introductory physics course enables students to learn about physical theory through the study of kinetics,
dynamics, universal gravitation, vectors, work, energy, power, and momentum. It is strongly recommended that
students have a solid math background with a minimum 67% and strong work habits in order to register in this
course.

Physics 12
Pre-requisite: Pre-Calculus 11, or Foundations of Mathematics 11 and Physics 11
This course enables students to continue their learning of physical theory through the study of kinetics, dynamics,
universal gravitation, vectors, work, energy, power, equilibrium, circular motion, electrostatics, electromagnetism,
and momentum. It is strongly recommended that students have a strong math background with a minimum 67%
and strong work habits.

Science & Technology 11
Pre-requisite: Science 10
SciTech 11 studies how science affects the world through technology, from basic food and shelter to computers,
space and defense technology.

Geology 12
Pre-requisite: Science 10
Recommended: Any one of Biology 11, Chemistry 11, Physics 11 or Earth Science 11
The study of the Earth and all the major processes that affect the planet including: minerals, rocks, geological
time, plate tectonics, mining, glaciers, weathering, volcanoes, earthquakes and erosion. This course goes into
much more detail than Earth Science 11.


BA Health Science 12A
Pre-requisite: Science 10
This course is designed for students interested in a career in the health field. It provides a solid foundation in
human anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology. It provides an introduction to the fields of Health and Wellness,
specifically Nutrition and Exercise management. Depending on cost and time, students may be given an
opportunity to complete their CPR C and Occupational First Aid Level One courses. There is a cost recovery
charge for field trips and community courses. Health Science 12 is a provincially recognized course. Health
Science 12 is not a science credit.




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Social Studies

Humanities 8
The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ writing, reading, listening and speaking skills while
exploring the development of world civilizations from 500 C.E. to 1500 C.E. Students will study the social, political,
economic and religious evolution of European and Middle Eastern civilizations and learn about the various types
of literature. Students will study vocabulary, grammar and language concepts to develop a stronger sense of the
way the English language works.

Social Studies 9
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 8
The Social 9 program involves the study of Europe in the Age of Revolutions. Students examine the English,
French, and Industrial Revolutions, and how each changed the modern world. The course then shifts to Canada
to examine the lives of the First Nations people prior to contact the French regime in Canada, and the beginnings
of British North America to 1815.

Social Studies 10
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 9
This course focuses on Canada from 1815 to 1914: society and culture, politics and law, the economy, the
environment and technology as well as the changes that occurred in all aspects of life in Canada up to the First
World War.

Social Studies 11
Pre-Requisite: Social Studies 10
This course looks at Canadian issues in the last 100 years through many approaches – it looks at Canada’s
social, cultural, political (national and international), economic and environmental issues and what you need to
know about your country to help you become a participating citizen in our democracy. Highlights include WWI,
WWII, the Great Depression, the FLQ Crisis and many others. It is a foundation course for future studies in the
humanities and social sciences. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

Social Studies 11 Honours
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 10
This course is designed to interest and challenge students who have strong Social Studies capabilities. An
integrated approach to Canadian and global issues- social, cultural, political, legal, economic and environmental.
A foundation course for future studies in the humanities and social sciences. This has a mandatory provincial
exam.

BC First Nations Studies 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 10
This course focuses on the diversity, depth and integrity of cultures among BC’s Aboriginal peoples. It offers an
opportunity for all students to increase their knowledge and understanding of First Nations’ traditions, history,
challenges and opportunities. This has a mandatory provincial exam.

Comparative Civilizations 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 11
Comparative Civilizations 12 enriches student’s awareness of, and sensitivity towards different cultures. It
compares the civilizations of ancient India, China, Japan, Aztecs, Mayans, Vikings, Celts, Africa, Egypt, Greece
and Rome. There is an emphasis on “hands-on” activities (for example, an ancient Mediterranean banquet is
held). Location, religion, social status, tradition, art and genders are all examined. Students will also expand
specific areas of interest within each topic during integrated self-guided research projects.

BA History & Appreciation of Film 12
This is a study of ground breaking films from the silent film era through to the blockbuster films of today. Different
genres of film will be examined including Westerns, Science Fictions, Thrillers and Independent Cinema.
Students will then take this historical knowledge and review films that they see in the class and the theatre.


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Geography 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 11
This course is split into 2 parts. First it looks at the world around us, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, climate,
weather, glaciers, river systems, maps and biomes. Then it looks at how humans are changing the earth, such as
climate change, acid precipitation, ozone depletion, over population, sewage treatments, and problems with
landfills, mining, forestry, and fishing. This thought provoking course not only helps students understand their
world better but is a stepping stone to dozens of careers.

Law 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 11
A survey course covering criminal law, civil law, family law, labour law, human rights and torts. A case study
method is used to provide a high level of student interest and involvement.

History 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 11
Using the traditional methods of history to analyze and evaluate historical evidence to determine its reliability and
significance; applying those methods to a study of the world after 1919, with its varying periods of conflict and
collaboration.

Social Justice 12
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 11
A project/seminar based, hands-on course that deals with the following current topics: poverty, aboriginal peoples
and the law, examining LGBT issues, women and social justice, genocide and globalization. This is a project
based course that revolves around study, discussion and action. There is a final project. This course is highly
recommended for students who are concerned about human rights issues, want to make a difference and are
looking for a competitive edge when applying to post-secondary institutions and need community service hours to
fulfill their graduation transition plan.




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Theatre

Drama 8
Students in Drama 8 are introduced to the theatre through games and exercises, and other activities. Students
focus on developing performance skills such as teamwork, voice, gesture, facial expression, and movement.

Drama 10 - General
Emphasis on utilizing and developing performance skills in more challenging performances.

Theatre Production 11 & 12 (yearlong)
Introduction to stagecraft and theatre’s technical aspects: stage lighting, live sound, make-up, set design and
construction, costume, properties, publicity and management. Students in stagecraft create the sets and props
required for the Acting 11, Acting 12, and after school theatre productions. This course will be offered outside the
regular timetable at 7:27 to 8:37 am, please see the teacher for further information.

Theatre Production 12 – Theatre Management
Pre-requisite: Theatre Production 11
Advanced study of theatre’s technical aspects: lighting, make-up, set design & construction, costume, properties,
publicity and management. This course will be offered outside the regular timetable at 7:27 to 8:37 am, please
see the teacher for further information.

Theatre Performance 11 - Acting
Pre-requisite: A previous acting/drama course is recommended
This course offers an introduction to some of the other aspects of successful production, such as make-up,
costuming, properties, etc. Students in TPA 11 perform in a large theatrical production. Although rehearsals take
place during class time, students must be willing to commit to several evening performances.

Theatre Performance 12 - Acting
Pre-requisite: Acting 11 or a previous drama course is highly recommended
This course offers an Introduction to some of the other aspects of successful production, such as make-up,
costuming, properties, etc. Students in Acting 12 perform in a large theatrical production. (Acting 12 is more
challenging than Acting 11.) Although rehearsals take place during class time, students must be willing to commit
to several evening performances.

Theatre Performance 11 – Directing/Script
Pre-requisite: Acting 11, and/or Theatre Production 11 or 12 is highly recommended.
Students should consult with the teacher/director before selecting this course. Directing and Scriptwriting students
work with the Acting 11 students to create the stage production. These students are responsible for modifying or
adapting scripts, creating advertising scripts for radio and newspaper, and managing the stage during rehearsal
and show. One student is typically selected from this class to work as the assistant director.

Theatre Performance 12 – Directing/Script
Pre-requisite: Acting 11 and 12, and/or Theatre Production 11 or 12 is highly recommended.
Students should consult with the teacher/director before selecting this course. Directing and Scriptwriting students
work with the Acting 12 students to create the stage production. These students are responsible for modifying or
adapting scripts, creating advertising scripts for radio and newspaper, and managing the stage during rehearsal
and show. One student is typically selected from this class to work as the assistant director.




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Trades and Technology
Technology Education 8
Students will build small projects based around the design process; some of these projects may include key
chains and/or locker magnets with use of plastic materials and machine tools as well. Art metal which will include
necklaces or bracelets using enamel torching.

Technology Education 10 - General
                                                                                2
This is a project based course. Some project examples include: building CO cars, ring making and art metal,
bridges, hot air balloons and small engines. These projects will introduce students to a wide variety of technology
applications. Project development will take place through a variety of machinery and tools.

Cooks Training & Cafeteria Training 11 & 12
For complete details see Food & Textile Studies Section on page 18.

Automotive Technology 11
Pre-requisite: Tech Ed General 10 recommended
This is an introductory course designed to give the student problem solving skills in the area of mechanics. The
course will cover six strands: Self and Society (developing the skills required in an Automotive Technology
working environment), Safety (safe work practices and procedures), Shop Practices (develop the ability to access
and use technical information and proficiency in the correct and safe use of told, equipment, etc.), Power Train
(operation, service and maintenance of engine and engine support systems), Body and Chassis (minor body and
trim maintenance), and Electrical and Electronic Systems (automotive electrical and electronic systems).

Automotive Technology 12
Pre-requisite: Automotive Technology 11
This is an advanced mechanics course. The course will cover six strands, expanding on the materials introduced
in Automotive Technology 11: Self and Society (skills required in an Automotive Technology working environment,
exploring career opportunities in the field), Safety (safe work practices and procedures), Shop Practices (develop
the ability to access and use technical information and proficiency in the correct and safe use of tools, equipment,
etc.), Power Train (operation, service and maintenance of engine and engine support systems), Chassis
(operation, service, and maintenance of chassis systems), and Electrical and Electronics Systems (automotive
electrical and electronic systems).




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Technology Education 8 - Electronics
Students will build projects such as Light Boards, U.F.O.’s, and Copper Models. While building projects students
will learn how to solder and de-solder components, and use solar energy. Students will enjoy exploring basic
electronics, and its applications in our lives.

Technology Education 10 - Electronics
In this course students will learn about basic electronic components, as well as learning about their function and
application through projects and lab assignments. Students will design, build and race projects such as Robo-Car,
the Cyborg, Electric Boats, Electric Drag Cars, and the Fork-Chop. We may also explore the Electronic Art-Board
as another option.

Electronics 11
Pre-requisite: Electronics 10 recommended
Students will design and build projects including an amplifier to boost your MP3 and car stereo performance, plus
an optional electric race car. Students will learn about basic electronic components, as well as learning about
their function and application through projects and electronic lab assignments.

Electronics 12
Pre-requisite: Electronics 11
Students will design and build home and car stereo amplifiers as well as exploring robotics with Sumo Bot and
Mousey. Students will continue in their use and application of electronic components through projects and
electronic lab assignments.

Electronics 12 - Robotics
Pre-requisite: Electronics 12
This course will introduce students to the world of robotics. Students will conduct labs using Lego Mindstorm to
accomplish a series of tasks involving robotics and controls. The major project is the building of a Beam robot to
be used in a line-following challenge maze.




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Technology Education 8 - Woodwork
This course will introduce students to the use of wood for small projects. Hand tools will be used most frequently
but some common power tools (band saw, drill press, hand power drill) may also be used. The experience gained
in this class will guide students in exploring their interest in taking more advanced studies in woodwork.

Technology Education 10 – Woodwork                        (Charge for materials used)
This course is intended to develop knowledge and skills in basic woodshop practices and projects. Students will
gain experience with hand tools as well as stationary power tools. Projects include a carving project, a lathe
project, a required project, and a small student selected final project. Project materials can be purchased from the
school or brought in from another source.

Carpentry & Joinery 11                  (Charge for materials used)
Pre-requisite: Woodwork 10 recommended
This course provides students with knowledge and experience in general woodworking and the construction
industry. Students will work safely in a shop environment to produce projects using hand tools and stationary
power tools. Topics include machining wood, tool I.D. and maintenance, wood technology, cabinet construction
and wood finishing. Projects include a hand tool project, a mandatory project, a lathe project, and a final project.
Project materials can be purchased from the school or brought in from another source.

Carpentry & Joinery 12              (Charge for materials used)
Pre-requisite: Carpentry & Joinery 11
This is an advanced woodworking and construction course building on the skills and knowledge obtained in
Carpentry & Joinery 11. Students will work safely in a shop environment to design and produce projects using
hand tools and stationary power tools. Students will also participate in a contracted carpentry project which
promotes field procedures and construction methods. Project materials can be purchased from the school or
brought in from another source.

Technology Education 8 - Metalwork
Students will learn to measure, to read drawings, and to use many types of hand tools and some power tools to
construct projects. Projects will include some aluminum casting projects and other small hand fabricated projects.

Technology Education 10 – Metalwork (Charge for materials used)
Students will learn to construct projects using both hand and power tools. Projects will include lathe work,
threading, drill press, aluminum casting, wire feed, and welding. Many projects are fabricated.

Metal Fabrication & Machining 11 (Charge for materials used)
Students will learn to design and construct many projects using both hand and power tools.
Projects will include lathe work, threading, drill press, aluminum casting, oxy-acetylene, wire feed, arc welding,
precision measuring using venire dial calipers and micrometers.

Metal Fabrication & Machining 12 (Charge for materials used)
Students will learn to design and construct many projects using both hand and power tools.
Projects will include precision measuring using venire dial calipers and micrometers, lathe work, milling machine
work, threading, drill press, aluminum casting, oxy-acetylene, wire feed, and arc welding.




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BA Transition to Trades 11A                   (Charge for Certificates)
No prerequisites: Students should demonstrate success in a variety of courses in Grades 8-10.
This is an introductory course designed to provide students with job ready skills related to industry and trades.
Topics include: identification of various trades, WHMIS, Work Safe, use of common tools, and machine operation.
Students should be prepared to visit work sites to see trades people in action. This course should be taken at the
end of Grade 11 or 12 to allow for summer work experience and summer employment. Steel toe boots are
recommended.

Technology Education 10 - Drafting & Design
This course will introduce students to the language of technical communication. Students will gain experience in
reading and drawing two and three dimensional technical drawings. This assignment will start with manual
drawing techniques and will move to Computer Aided Drawing and Design (AutoCAD LT).




Drafting & Design 11
 This course will introduce students to the language of technical communication. Students will gain experience in
reading and drawing two and three dimensional technical drawings. Lessons will explain the processes of two
and three dimensional drawing. Assignments will explore manual drafting techniques and Computer Aided
Drawing and Design (AutoCAD LT).




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Enriched Program
What is Advanced Placement (AP)?
Advanced Placement (AP) is a program of college/university level courses and exams for students while they are
still in high school. There are approximately 13,000 high schools in Canada, the United States, and overseas that
offer AP programs. In BC, as of 2001, 136 schools and 3,085 students were involved of whom 79.5% received a 3
or higher standing (out of 5) on the internationally written exams. Worldwide, about 3,000 colleges and
universities grant credit and advanced placement based on AP exam results. AP courses are recognized by BC’s
Ministry of Education and are widely recognized by BC’s post-secondary community.

English Language Arts 9 Honours
English 10 Honours
Students will be selected for these honours courses based on their marks in the preceding English course. The
courses will cover all the requirements of English 9 and 10 at the appropriate grade level plus some topics in more
depth or breadth than the regular program. Students with an aptitude for language arts who plan on pursuing a
university degree and a career in this area are encouraged to maintain marks and work habits to meet the
selection criteria.

English 11 Honours
Designed to interest and challenge students who have strong English capabilities. Increasingly sophisticated
activities and materials used for critical study and literary appreciation of novels, short stories and drama,
including Shakespeare. Essay writing, on-going vocabulary development, oral presentations, and class
discussions are integral to the course.

AP English Literature & Composition 12                   (12 Credits possible - year long)
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (APELC12)
Pre-requisite: English 11 or Honours English 11 recommended
This enriched two-semester course in senior English will engage students in the careful reading and critical
analysis of college level literature in order to deepen their understanding of the ways in which writers use
language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. The Literature 12 component of the course
(spring semester) is a survey course of English poetry, drama, and prose dating from the Anglo-Saxon period to
the twentieth century.
English 12=4 credits, Literature 12=4 credits, AP English 12=4 credits

Mathematics 9/Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 Honours
Students will be selected for these honours courses based on their marks in the preceding math course. The
courses will cover all the requirements of Mathematics 9 and Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 at
the appropriate grade level plus some topics in more depth or breadth than the regular program. Students
planning on entering Mathematics or Sciences at University are strongly encouraged to maintain marks and work
habits sufficient to meet the selection criteria with an aptitude for Math.

Pre-Calculus 11
Designed for students who will be taking the two semester Foundations of Mathematics 12 / APCalculus Course
in Grade 12. Students will have achieved a mark of 80% or higher in Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-
Calculus 10 and possess good work habits. In addition to the topics covered in Foundations of Mathematics 11
(refer to Foundations of Mathematics 11 course description), students will study transformations, conics and
exponents/logarithms.

AP Calculus AB 12 (yearlong)
Recommended for serious Math students who have achieved a grade of 80% or higher in Pre-Calculus 11 with
good work habits. Designed for students who will be enrolling in Math and Science courses at the post secondary
level. In addition to the topics in Pre-Calculus 12, students will study limits and continuity, derivatives, integration,
transcendental functions, volumes of solids of revolutions, and areas under the curve.




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Social Studies 11 Honours
Pre-requisite: Social Studies 10
Designed to interest and challenge students who have strong Social Studies capabilities. An integrated approach
to Canadian and global issues- social, cultural, political, legal, economic and environmental. A foundation course
for future studies in the humanities and social sciences.



Writing AP exams:
Students write an AP exam in each course in May. Students also write the BC Ministry of Educations course
exam. For example, a student taking AP Calculus/PREC 12 would write the AP exam in May and the PREC12
government exam in June.

The College Board prepares and marks exams and forwards transcripts to post secondary institutions for each
exam written. In School District No. 57, the exam charges, levied by the College Board, are heavily subsidized.
Students pay only $30.00 for the first exam and $20.00 for each additional exam. These costs are subject to
change without notice.




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