HUD s New Consumer Incentive Restrictions - Respro

Document Sample
HUD s New Consumer Incentive Restrictions - Respro Powered By Docstoc
					 




                                                                             
                         HUD’s New Consumer Incentive Restrictions 
                                         Fact/Comment Scenarios 
 
The following are Fact/Comment Scenarios involving how HUD’s new RESPA rules on “required use”
(scheduled to take effect January 16, 2009) may affect real estate broker/homebuilder incentives to
consumers who use their affiliated mortgage, title, and other settlement services. The comments are
provided by RESPRO®’s legal counsel, Jay Varon, Esq. of Foley & Lardner, LLP. Please keep in mind that
these are generic comments that could change depending on individual facts, circumstances, or
developments. They are not intended to replace consultation with your own legal counsel familiar with
RESPA.
                                                        
1. Economic  Incentives By Real Estate Brokers:  A real estate broker offers any of the following services if 
   a buyer uses its affiliated mortgage, title, and/or other settlement service company:   
        
   • Payment of the 1% mortgage origination fee 
   • A $500 Lowes or Home Depot certificate 
   • A  buydown of the buyer’s closing costs or interest rate 
   • Downpayment assistance 
   • A free home warranty 
   • Free moving services 
            
   Comment:  The RESPA final rule would permit each of these kinds of incentives as long as the buyer can 
   separately purchase the various settlement service provider services and the cost of the incentive 
   offered has not been made up by raising the prices of the settlement services. 
 
2. Service Guarantees By Real Estate Brokers:  A real estate broker offers any of the following if a buyer 
   uses its affiliated mortgage, title, and/or other settlement service company:   
        
   • A guarantee that it will pay the difference if closing costs on the HUD‐1 Settlement Statement 
       exceed those on the Good Faith Estimate 
   • A guarantee that it will pay the buyer $250 if the title commitment is not delivered within ten 
       business days from the date the title order is received 
   • A guaranteed payment of $250 if the HUD‐1 Settlement Statement is not be delivered five days 
       prior to settlement 
   • A guaranteed payment of $500 if closing occurs later than the date mutually agreed upon 
             
   Comment:  Unlike its proposed rule, HUD’s final rule appears to permit real estate brokers to offer 
   service guarantees as long as the offer is optional and there are not higher costs elsewhere in the 
   transaction to compensate for costs associated with the guarantee.  This is because the final rule 
   expressly provides that a settlement service provider will not be considered to have “required the use” 
   of settlement service providers if it offers a combination of bona fide settlement services ‐‐ net of the 
   value of the discount, rebate, or economic incentive being offered— at a total price lower than the sum 
                                                       1 
 
 


    of the individual settlement services in the combination.  That should be the case if the services in the 
    combination are not priced differently when the consumer chooses not to use them and the only thing 
    that differs is the value of the economic incentive—here the service guarantee.  Indeed, as long as the 
    guarantee is worth something ( even as little as a penny or a dollar) when that value is deducted from 
    the net price of the services in the package, it would be lower than the sum of the market prices of the 
    individual settlement services in the package. 
 
3.  Economic Incentives By Homebuilders:  A homebuilder offers any of the following if a buyer uses its 
   affiliated mortgage, title, and/or other settlement service company: 
 
    •   Payment of the 1% of mortgage origination fee 
    •   A buydown of the buyer’s closing costs or interest rate 
    •   Downpayment assistance 
    •   $10,000 off the price of the home 
    •   A free swimming pool 
             
   Comment:  HUD appears to have written the new “required use” provision in the final rule so as to 
   preclude the builder from directly offering these incentives.  The rule says that a “required use” will 
   exist when a person’s access to some distinct service, property, or incentive is contingent upon the 
   person using a referred provider of settlement services. Thus, the builder’s offer would appear to be a 
   “required use” that would disqualify it from using the affiliated business exemption.  While HUD’s new 
   “required use” provision has an exception for settlement service providers offering a combination of 
   bona fide settlement services (net of the discount, rebate, or economic incentive), this exception would 
   not apply to the builder because it is not viewed as a settlement service provider.  This does not appear 
   to make economic or legal sense, but it is what the rule appears to provide. 
         
4. Builder‐Affiliated Company’s Discount Off Its Own Services:  A lender or title company has an affiliate 
   relationship with a builder and offers that builder's customers a bona fide discount on its fees.   
      
   Comment:  This would appear to fall within HUD’s general rule permitting affinity programs and 
   consumer rebates. In other words, this may be no different than permitting a lender to provide an 
   incentive to borrowers who are employees of a particular company, members of an alumni 
   organization, or customers of a particular retailer.  Here, the affinity program could involve all 
   employees, customers and family members of employees or customers of Builder X getting a discount 
   from lender Y when they use Lender Y’s services. This would be consistent with HUD’s other rules on 
   affinity programs and seemingly would not be a “required use” because the lender or title company 
   would not be making a person’s access to a service, discount, rebate or incentive contingent upon the 
   persons use of a referred provider of settlement services; it would be contingent upon the person 
   having some described relationship with a particular organization or company. 
 
5. Discount Off Home By Builder’s Affiliated Company:  A mortgage lender that is affiliated with a builder 
   offers buyers of that builder’s homes who purchase its mortgage $20,000 off the price of the home. 

    Comment:  This was probably not intended by HUD to be permitted, but literally may not be prohibited 
    in that the lender is not conditioning a person’s access to the benefit based on the use of a referred 
    provider of settlement services.  Nevertheless, this scenario would appear to have some level of 

                                                      2 
 
 


    uncertainty because there may be no valid business reason for the lender to pay $20,000 and in that 
    circumstance could give rise to various creative legal claims, especially if it appeared that the builder is 
    supplying the funds to implement the program. 
 
6. Discount Off Home By Multiple Builder‐Affiliated Companies:  A mortgage lender that is affiliated with 
   a builder offers buyers of that builder’s home $20,000 off the price of the home if the buyer purchases 
   its mortgage and title services from the builder’s affiliated mortgage and title companies. 
 
   Comment:  The issue would be whether HUD would think that the $20,000 discount off the price of the 
   home is in effect being made up elsewhere in the settlement process – e.g., by making the price of the 
   home higher than it was intended to be in the first place.  Query whether the price of the home is part 
   of the “settlement process”, but HUD may say that it is.    
         
7. Builder Incentives for Use of Preferred Multiple Companies:  A builder pays an incentive to consumers 
   who choose to use one of a “preferred” list of service providers.  The preferred list of service providers 
   includes an affiliated business. 
         
   Comment:  RESPRO® understands that HUD officials initially said this would be permissible, although 
   we had noted at that time that regulators could still have questions about whether the unaffiliated 
   lenders were competitive in terms of price and/or quality to ensure that the choice consumers make is 
   really legitimate.  In fact, we now understand that HUD appears to have changed its initial position on 
   this issue and now is saying that having the incentive available in connection with the use of multiple 
   lenders, one of which is affiliated with the builder, is not permitted under its new "required use" rules. 
   We have been told that HUD may issue some further clarification of its position on this issue and 
   perhaps related issues in the near future.  But at least for now, it has changed its mind on this question. 
    
8. Builder Rate Buydowns:  A builder purchases a forward commitment with its affiliated mortgage 
   company so the mortgage company can offer a long term lock/below market rate to the builder’s 
   customers.   
         
   Comment:   Although it does not make sense, the new rule’s language seems clear that this would not 
   be allowed in that it defines “required use” as “a situation in which a person’s access to a distinct 
   service . . . or other economic incentive is contingent upon the person using . . . a referred provider of 
   settlement services.”  Offering the consumer the result of the forward commitment (i.e., a buy down of 
   the rate) is a distinct service or economic incentive, and the consumer would need to use the affiliated 
   mortgage company from whom the buy down was purchased. 
         
9. Builder Promotion of Affiliated Incentives:  A builder says to its customers: “If you purchase a home 
   from us you will receive X, if you use our mortgage company you will receive Y, and if you use our title 
   company you will receive Z.”  The respective companies pay for their promoted incentive and it is 
   stated in the promotion material that the consumer is not required to use all services to receive the 
   discount on one.  
 
   Comment:  It would be preferable for the builder to say:  “If you purchase a home from us you will 
   receive X, moreover, MMM mortgage company in which we have an ownership interest is offering Y 
   and if you use it you will receive that benefit; in addition, TTT title company in which we have an 
   ownership interest is offering Z and if you use it you will receive that benefit.”  This is allowable because 

                                                        3 
 
 


    each provider is permitted to offer its own incentives to consumers and nothing prevents a builder 
    from promoting those incentives, though it should provide the affiliated business disclosure form.




                                                     4 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:4/19/2013
language:Unknown
pages:4