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Fall 08 newsletter frontai Powered By Docstoc
					RISKMANAGEMENT
ADVISORY
SAFETY PRACTICES
There are many things you can do to be proactive in making a safe working environment. The University has done a great job of improving lighting, adding door locks, addressing hazardous walkways and providing 24/7 emergency response. Please do your part by staying alert, reporting suspicious activity, informing Risk Management about areas that appear hazardous and looking out for the Pacific community.

SIXTH EDITION FALL 2008

WHAT IS E-WASTE?
Many types of electronic products used in the workplace contain hazardous substances like lead and mercury. When these products reach the end of their useful lives or become obsolete, some are considered hazardous waste. In general, hazardous waste may not be discarded in the regular trash. Instead, it must be sent to a facility that has a permit for treatment (including recycling), storage, or disposal. Proper management and recycling of e-waste poses lower risks than managing many industrial hazardous wastes. Contact Risk Management if you think you have E-waste that needs to be disposed of.

INSIDE
Safety Practices..................................... pg.1 What is E-waste.................................... pg.1 Safety Sue Column.............................. pg.1 Avoid Hazards Related to Holiday Decorating..............................................pg. 2 Repairing/adding shelving...............pg. 2 Evacuation Plan.................................... pg. 3 Hazard Reporting.................................pg. 3 Vehicle Insurance.................................pg. 4 University Policy................................... pg. 4

SAFETY SUE COLUMN
Dear Sue: “I know about the new law mandating use of hands-free cell phone devices while driving. I have purchased a hands-free Bluetooth device and am getting really comfortable using it. I do have a question about something else having to do with my phone and driving: Even though text messaging is allowed while driving for drivers 18 and above, does the University have any sort of policy against me texting while driving?” Dear Driver: Thank you for your timely question. We have been keeping a close watch on this law. Our policy is very clear on distracted drivers; do not engage in any distracting behaviors while driving. Simply put, our vehicle safety manual indicates to pull over to a safe area to use a cell phone. That hasn't changed. Something else you should note, do not walk and text at the same time. We have heard reports of people tripping, slipping, and bumping in to objects because they were paying attention to their cell phone text messaging rather than where they are walking. The American College of Emergency Physicians warns of the danger of more serious accidents involving oblivious texters. According to the warning, one woman was killed in San Francisco when she stepped into the crosswalk without looking to make sure it was safe to cross. These are unfortunate and avoidable incidents. Be Safe!

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

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AVOID HAZARDOUS HOLIDAY DECORATING
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission lends a hand in giving us tips to Avoid Hazards Related to Holiday Decorating. Holiday decorations, like lights and Christmas trees, add to the festive mood of the season; but when decorations are not used properly, they can result in fires, injuries and death. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that during November and December of each year, about 10,000 people are treated in hospital emergency rooms as a result of falls, cuts, shocks and burns related to holiday decorating. “Consumers can keep holiday decorating traditions from becoming tragedies by following a few simple safety tips,” said Acting CPSC Chairman Nancy Nord. Use the following safety tips when decorating this year: • Indoors or outside, use only lights that have been tested for safety by a nationally-recognized testing laboratory, such as UL or ETL/ITSNA. Use only newer lights that have thicker wiring and are required to have safety fuses to prevent the wires from overheating. • Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Throw out damaged sets. • If using an extension cord, make sure it is rated for the intended use. • Never use electric lights on a metallic tree. The tree can become charged with electricity from faulty lights, and a person touching a branch could be electrocuted. • Only Physical Plant can install lights outdoors. • Turn off all holiday lights when you go to bed or leave the house. The lights could short out and start a fire.

GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING
General housekeeping is the basic practice of keeping a safe environment for us to work in. Things like making sure isleways are clear and fire equipment is free from blockages can make a huge impact in times of emergency. The University has a policy of 30” of clearence in front of electrical panels, fire pulls, and extinguishers. Call Risk Management if you need help to determine clearance guidelines.

REPAIRING AND ADDING SHELVING
There are numerous areas in the University that contain asbestos (and other circumstances) which make it unsafe to hang shelves without the assistance of Physical Plant. Please submit a Service Request to Physical Plant via FAMIS. If you don't have access to FAMIS, please contact Physial Plant (x62541) and they will assist you with the procedure. Hanging shelves with certain types of brackets (e.g. single contact point) is unsafe and will likely cause injury or loss. Please contact Risk Management if you are unsure about the types of shelving that you wish to use.

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RISK MANAGEMENT IS UPDATING EVACUATION PLANS
Preparing for an emergency increases the likelihood that you and those you work with will exit the work area without injury. One of the best ways to prepare for an evacuation is to know your building or worksite’s layout. This includes exit routes, fire pulls, fire extinguishers and phones. Determine in advance the nearest exit and alternate routes from your work location. If you have an evacuation leader determined in advance, make sure that person has communicated what is expected during and immediately following an evacuation. There are certain steps the evacuation leader may ask you to take: 1) Walk -- do not run, push or crowd towards the exit 2) Assist people with disabilities 3) Move to your assembly point 4) Assist evacuation leader in post evacuation duties Faculty and instructors are responsible to identify any student(s) with a disability that would need consideration and assistance during an evacuation. Whenever the fire alarms/strobes are activated, occupants MUST evacuate the building and reassemble at your designated assembly point. Occupants on floors above the ground floor must use emergency exit stairwells to leave the building. DO NOT USE ELEVATORS!

HAZARD REPORTING
Risk Management provides mandatory Injury Illness Prevention training and instruction on general and job specific safety and health practices within 30 days of being hired. This training is also provided when any of the following conditions are present: When the Injury Illness Prevention (IIP) Program is first established. When an eminent hazard exists which cannot be immediately abated without endangering employee(s) and/or property, we will remove all exposed workers from the area except those necessary to correct the existing condition. Workers who are required to correct the hazardous condition shall be provided with the necessary protection.

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DRIVE WITH SAFETY IN MIND
Vehicle I.D. Card for rental: University leased and rented cars have the same coverage as University owned vehicles. However, the coverage limit is $50,000. Be sure to carry a University insurance card with you when renting a vehicle for University business. Contact Cheryl Sloup at csloup@pacific.edu or ext. 62908 if you need an insurance card.

UNIVERSITY POLICY
It is a policy of the University of the Pacific to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees, contractors, students and visitors. It is the responsibility of every supervisor to assess his/her workplace, educate employees on the hazards of chemical substances and implement proper personal protective measures in order to reduce the risk of occupational injury or illness. Contact Larry Sydnor, Ash Chaudhry, or Sean McNally to set-up appropriate training. lsydnor@pacific.edu achaudhry@pacific.edu smcnally@pacific.edu
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posted:11/8/2009
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