; Post Inspection Ltr for Food Safety _without notices_
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Post Inspection Ltr for Food Safety _without notices_

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									Mr Chao Chiang Yao Golden Dragon 302 Caledonian Road Islington N1

West Team – Commercial Public Protection and Development Management 222 Upper Street London N1 1BX N1 1RE T 020 7527 3230 F 020 7527 3057 E ahmet.kemal@islington.gov.uk W www.islington.gov.uk Please reply to: Ahmet Kemal Our ref: Your ref: AKE 126906 Date: 27 September, 2007

Dear Mr Chiang Yao THE FOOD HYGIENE (ENGLAND) REGULATIONS 2006 RE: Golden Dragon 302 Caledonian Road N1 I refer to the food hygiene inspection of the above premises on 10th September 2007, carried out in the presence of You. I would draw your attention to the following report of matters discussed with you at the time of inspection. The report is divided into the following sections: 1. Details the contraventions of the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 and Regulation (EC) 852/2004 together with the remedial works required in order to comply with the legislation. Lists recommendations. Whilst these are not specific requirements of the legislation, they detail advice aimed at ensuring good practice and standards in your business. It is strongly recommended that this advice be followed.

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All contraventions of the legislation must be satisfactorily rectified within the following timescales: Item 1, 2 and 3 must be completed within 3 Months Should you wish to discuss these timescales, please contact me on the above telephone number. It is my intention to revisit the premises in order to determine whether the contraventions have been satisfactorily rectified in December 2007. You must ensure that you have addressed all the identified legal requirements prior to this time. You should advise me within 28 days of the action you have taken or intend taking to remedy the contraventions. Any outstanding matters or any contraventions, found to exist at the time of the next inspection, may result in formal action being taken.

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Should you feel that any items specified in this report are unjustified, you may make representations to my line manager, Doreen Russell, at the above address on telephone number (020) 7527 3191, within two weeks from the date of this letter. In the meantime, if you wish to discuss any of the matters raised in this report, please get in touch with me. Yours sincerely

Ahmet Kemal Senior Environmental Health Officer Enc.

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RE: Golden Dragon 302 Caledonian Road Islington N1 SECTION 1. CONTRAVENTIONS OF: REGULATION (EC) 852/2004 REGULATION (EC) 178/2002

1. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points
Food safety management is not new and much of it has in fact been a requirement since 1995, the only difference now is that your system for ensuring safety of food relevant to your business along with associated routine monitoring records needs to be documented. You will need to do this to show compliance with ‘HACCP principles’ that are now a requirement under the new hygiene Regulations which apply to your business. HACCP involves you identifying those things that could make the food unsafe for your customers. You then need to think through and write down [steps] [particular things you do] in your food handling procedures for example (depending on your business) cooking or chilling, that are critical to food safety. You must be able to show what you do to make sure that food made or sold at your premises is safe to eat. You need to monitor important things which ensure the food you produce is safe, for example the temperatures of high-risk perishable foods, and foods which have just been cooked to make them ready to eat. As discussed for monitoring temperatures this won’t always need a thermometer (for example where foods clearly change colour when cooked). The important thing is that you can show that the food is at or has reached the right temperature, and these checks are recorded by writing a temperature down each time they are checked, or by recording in some other way that on a particular day everything was satisfactory. Whichever method you use to provide evidence of temperature checks that ensure the food you produce is safe, it is very important that the person taking the temperature knows what the right temperature should be. It is also very important that they know what to do if there is a problem, a note of any ‘corrective actions’ should be recorded. Once your Food Safety Management Procedure is in place, it is important for you to regularly review your control measures and take any necessary steps to take account of future changes in your operations. In many areas you may well find that this will just involve putting a structure around what you are already doing, however I suggest you should focus your attention particularly on the areas discussed at the time of the visit and outlined in Section 2 Recommendation Items 1, 2 and 3. As discussed with You, you should be able to explain how you have carried this out on my next revisit.

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2. Traceability
As a food businesses operator you should be able to identify the person or business that supplied you with food that is to be sold to others or used as an ingredient in foods that you then sell. The aim of the Regulations is to establish a system of traceability within food and feed businesses which allows targeted and accurate withdrawals can be undertaken or information given to consumers or control officials, thereby avoiding the potential for unnecessary wider disruption in the event of food safety problems. As a minimum the traceability records should include, name and address of customer or supplier, the products purchased or supplied and the date of transaction or delivery.

3. Waste Oil Requirement
At the time of the inspection you could provide no evidence on how waste cooking oil was removed and correctly disposed of from the premise. Since you produce waste cooking oil as part of your catering business, then you must ensure that it is stored properly, that none is allowed to spill and that it is collected by an authorised collector who will take your waste to an authorised site for recovery or disposal. You will need to provide documented evidence to show how the waste cooking oil is removed from the premise. (See also Recommendation Item 4).

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SECTION 2. RECOMMENDATIONS OF GOOD HYGIENE PRACTICE The basic procedures outlined below will support your duty to manage food safety adequately: 1. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)  Receiving deliveries of food from your suppliers. The delivery should be checked for quality, temperature, date labels and condition of wrapping. Outline how checks are to be made and what records are to be kept. Delivery sheets or invoices can be marked to show food has been checked. (see also point 2(a) below) Temperature monitoring of all chillers should take place. Outline when and how checks should be made and what records are to be kept. Food that is to be kept under chilled conditions should be outside these temperatures for the minimum time possible during preparation or service. Food held at chill temperature should be below 8ºC (preferably between 1ºC and 5ºC). (See also point 2(b) below). Describe how food should be arranged in the chillers so that the risk of crosscontamination is reduced (cooked foods and ready to eat foods should be stored above raw food). Cooling of cooked foods that will be refrigerated should be carried under controlled and hygienic conditions. Outline how cooling should be done and in what time cooling should be achieved (guidelines state a maximum time of 90 minutes). Such precooked foods are high risk and setting a maximum keeping time is good practice, normally 3 days is considered suitable for most products. The re-heating of high-risk foods is important to ensure any bacteria present have been killed. The centre of food should be reheated to above 75ºC. Regular checks should be made to ensure that the time and temperature set for the equipment used for reheating is achieving the required temperature. Any temperatures recorded below 75ºC should lead to corrective action such as a review of the re-heating procedure (the time and temperature) and whether the equipment used is operating satisfactorily. Chopping boards should be designated to one food type and only used for that food. Information should be displayed so that all staff are aware of this system. Boards should be properly cleaned and hygienically stored (not laid flat on top of each other), preferably in a proper board rack (not left on food preparation surfaces) so they can dry properly. Outline how cleaning should be carried out e.g. wash down food preparation surface with hot water, detergent and cloth and finally spray with an anti-bacterial cleaning product (sanitiser) and wipe off with paper towel. Cleaning schedules will ensure all parts of the kitchen are cleaned on an on-going basis and enable monitoring to take place. Personal hygiene should be emphasised at all times. Clean and suitable work clothes should be worn (no outside clothes). Hands should be clean, nails short and no jewellery worn. Hand washing procedures should be outlined so that all staff are aware of the standards expected. Hand washing is extremely important to ensure food safety, especially for staff handling open food.

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Any person suffering from certain medical conditions (such as carrying a disease likely to be transmitted through food or has any infected wound, skin infections, sores or has diarrhoea or vomiting) and is likely to directly or indirectly contaminate any food shall report their knowledge, suspicion or affliction to the proprietor of the business. All staff should be briefed on the ‘fitness to work’ policy and their responsibilities in this regard. I would recommend that staff sign a declaration that they understand and agree to report such illnesses before working with food. (Such a declaration is contained on the web site (*) detailed below). General documentation that is useful to have on the premises for inspection includes: hazard analysis and food hygiene procedures, a suppliers list, copies of training records for all staff, pest control records, a fitness to work and training policy

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I highly recommend that the procedures outlined above that are relevant to your business are written down and form part of a procedures manual that will give staff clear and specific instructions on how they should be doing their work and the standards expected. A procedures manual will also help support new staff to learn the way the business operates. In order to comply with this requirement I suggest that you follow the guidance issued by the Food Standards Agency Safer Food Better Business (England) which will guide you through how to comply and provide the necessary documentation required.

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2. Actions to be taken to Maintain HACCP. (a) The key issue when deliveries are checked is that the checks are actively carried out. Simple and practical ways can be used when checking deliveries of chilled and frozen food. For chilled goods touching the food to feel whether it is cold is the easiest way. An important back up procedure to have in place if you are not sure the food is cold enough is to check the food with a probe thermometer, if above 8ºC then the food should be rejected. For frozen food the food can simply be checked to see if it is hard. (b) I recommend you monitor the temperature of your refrigeration units using a temperature probe and putting a small container of water (such as small plastic bottle) or jelly in the refrigerator. If you measure the temperature of the water or jelly this will give you a more accurate picture of the temperature the food is held at as opposed to the air temperature which fluctuates and doesn’t provide you with as much meaningful information. This is best done first thing every morning and the temperatures recorded so that they can be reviewed regularly. This practice enables you to see how efficiently your refrigeration units are operating and identify any adjustments required or developing faults that need to be corrected. This may prevent loss of stock and possible damage to equipment. (c) At present you defrost food outside the refrigerator. This practice may lead to a higher growth of bacteria on the outside of the food, which may increase the likelihood of causing food poisoning. I would recommend that all frozen food be defrosted in the refrigerator as this practice controls the growth of bacteria to acceptable levels that reduce the risk of causing food poisoning. (d) I recommend the use of paper towels for hand drying, cleaning and drying food preparation surfaces and chopping boards. This will reduce the use of cloths that are more likely to carry bacteria, which will contaminate equipment and food preparation surfaces, increasing the risk of causing food poisoning.

3. Temperature control
I strongly recommend that you monitor the temperature of your refrigerator units by using a temperature probe, which you place into a small container of water, which you then place into the fridge. If you measure the temperature of this water it will give you a far more accurate picture of the temperature the product is held at as opposed to the air temperature which fluctuates wildly and doesn’t provide you with any meaningful information. This above-mentioned procedure is best done first thing every morning with the temperatures being recorded (i.e., Documented) so that they can be reviewed regularly. This enables you to see how efficiently your refrigeration units are operating thereby identify any developing faults so they can be corrected as quickly as possible. This prevents loss of stock and possible damage to your equipment and most importantl y reduces the likelihood of the food products being Out of Temperature Control. This procedure can also be used as part of your Hazard Analysis procedure

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5. Waste Collection
In order to effectively comply with waste oil removal requirements. I have included a few Licensed waste oil collectors. This list is not exhaustive and is not endorsed, its is just a guide you can obtain further details from the Environment Agency, Yellow Pages or from the councils ICSL waste collection service (Tel 020 7527 2000). 1. O’Hara Edible Oil Services Durham House Farm, Hollybush Lane Denham UB9 4HB Tel: 01895 833 626
WASTE OIL CARRIER REGISTRATION NUMBER: BKM/090573; EXPIRES MAY 2010

2.

Edible Oil Direct Moore Lane Westfield East Sussex TN35 4QU Tel: 01797 225552
WASTE OIL CARRIER REGISTRATION NUMBER: SSU/878081; EXPIRES: JULY 2010

3.

Grays Waste Services Ltd 8 Barbers Road Stratford London E15 2PH Tel: 0208-555-0131
WASTE OIL CARRIER REGISTRATION NUMBER: GTL/361367; EXPIRES MAR 2010

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