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Holding the Mouse

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					Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

Outline for Mouse/Keyboard Class  Holding the Mouse  Mouse Actions Left click: Double Click: Right Click: Scroll: Drag and Drop: Radio Buttons Check Boxes Drop Down Menu Scroll Bar Highlighting Copy and Paste  Keyboard Typing Keys Numeric Keypad Function Control Keys Keyboard Maintenance

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Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

Mouse/Keyboarding 101 Holding the Mouse Use this method to hold the mouse: 1. Rest your hand on the end of the mouse where there is no wire, so that your palm rests on the mouse pad. 2. Make sure your thumb is against the computer side of the mouse, against both the mouse and the mouse pad. 3. Position your little finger in a similar way on the other side of the mouse. 4. Rest your index finger on the left button, and rest your next finger on the right button. If you read the above closely, you will see that your hand is touching the mouse pad in three places: palm, thumb, and little finger. That keeps the mouse steady. When you click a mouse button, if you get something other than what you expected, you are not holding (controlling) the mouse properly. Position the mouse and mouse pad far enough away from the edge of your desk so that your arm has some support. Your fingers should be flat on the top surface of the mouse. You do not get frequent flyer miles for having fingers in the air. When you click on a mouse button, there should be only the slightest movement of the finger that is pressing the button. You should not see jerking or jumping motions in your wrist, arm, shoulder, or neck. If you have a tendency to keep a finger in the air or have movement in your hand or arm when clicking, try the following exercise. Before turning on the computer, practice holding the mouse and spend five minutes each day clicking with both buttons. Concentrate on hand position: Keep it flat, all fingers touching, and use slight movement when clicking. Which Button Do I Use I refer to the left mouse button as the I Work button. When you want to activate a command, make a selection, or get results, use the left mouse button.

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Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

When you want help (access to shortcut menus), use the right mouse button. I call it the I Help button. The typical mouse has buttons on the top and a rubber ball on the bottom. You slide the mouse around on the desk surface. The mouse you are using today has a scroll wheel in the middle that lets you scroll your documents without using the scroll bar on the screen. Mouse Actions
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Left click: Place the pointer over the icon or the command you want to activate and click once on the left mouse button. In instructions, you will just be told to click. That means to left click. Think of clicking once is just selecting. Clicking once with the left mouse button will select an object. You can tell it is selected because it will be highlighted, usually with a different color. If it is a picture, you will see a box outlining it with little squares (handles) around it on the corners. These are for resizing. If you place the tip of your mouse pointer on any of these handles you should see the pointer become a double ended arrow. Hold the left mouse button down and drag in or out, up or down to resize. Buttons are meant to be clicked on only once to make something happen. These are usually found within the application you are using. This also applies to the menu words at the top of your application window. When you click on a menu word like File, Edit, or Help, other options will drop down for you to choose from. Double click: Click twice in quick succession on the left mouse button. Think of clicking twice or double clicking is selecting and opening. Icons are meant to be double clicked to make an application start, or open the file they represent. Icons can be found on your Windows desktop, and look like pictures representing the application they are supposed to open. They can also represent shortcuts to favorite files or other programs. Right click: Place the pointer over the icon or highlighted material or in the work space and click once on the right mouse button. A single click with the right mouse button will usually give you choices. Make your final choice by clicking once with your left mouse button. Drag: Left click on the item, hold down the left button, and then move the pointer from where you are to where you want it to be. Then let go.

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Radio Buttons: The circles below are radio buttons. Button 2 Button 3

Button 1

Only one radio button can be "on" at same time.  Check Boxes: The squares below are check boxes.

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Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

Checkbox 1

Checkbox 2

Checkbox 3

Checkbox 4

Clicking an empty box puts a check mark in the box. Clicking a checked box removes its check mark. All check boxes can be selected at one time unlike radio buttons.  Drop down menu: This is an example of a Drop down menu. If you click on the drop down arrow the list drops down.

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Scroll Bar: There are three ways to use the scroll bar. To move one line at a time, click on the arrow at the bottom of the scroll bar or the arrow at the top. To move one screen at a time, click on the space within the scroll bar above or below the darker grey scroll button. To move anywhere within the document, place the mouse pointer over the scroll button. Hold down the left mouse button and move the scroll button up or down the bar. Release the mouse button when you have reached the desired location. Text Boxes: This is an example of Text Boxes, to move from one text box to the next you would use the tab key on your keyboard. Boxes that look like information can be typed in them are called Text Boxes. You can only type in them when you see the blinking cursor.

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First Name: Last Name:

Address: 4

Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

As you move your mouse around a screen, you have probably noticed that it changes occasionally. When it looks like a pointer, you can select something. When it changes to an I, you are in an area that text can be typed into. A blinking cursor will indicate the place any typing you do will show. Moving the I with your mouse and clicking someplace else will move the blinking cursor. Anything you type will be at that point. Boxes that look like information can be typed in them are called Text Boxes. You can only type in them when you see the blinking cursor. Highlighting turns backgrounds into a different color. Here is how to highlight: 1. Place the tip of the arrow in front of the words to highlight. 2. Hold the left mouse button down. 3. Drag arrow across the words. When the backgrounds behind words are a different color, they're highlighted. When words are highlighted, the computer is looking at those words. We can then change the words: make corrections by retyping, enlarge or reduce the type, delete words or move words or copy and paste. To Copy and Paste 1. Select the item you want to move or copy. Highlight it as instructed above. Look at the top of the screen, click "Edit." 2. Move mouse down to "Copy" and click 3. Move pointer where you want to paste the item 4. When arrow becomes a vertical line click 5. Go back to top of screen choose Edit and choose paste, click. We are now ready to practice mouserobics the Link is below (you must be on the internet to access this page) http://www.ckls.org/~crippel/computerlab/tutorials/mouse/page1.html Keyboarding Links (must be on the internet to access the address) http://www.crews.org/curriculum/ex/compsci/keyboarding/fingerkeys.htm http://www.ckls.org/~crippel/computerlab/tutorials/keyboard/page1.html http://northville.lib.mi.us/tech/tutor/moving.htm

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Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

Correct technique is the most important skill any beginning typist can learn. Speed and accuracy are all built around good technique. (This is just an example; you may use your keyboard anyway that is comfortable for you.) I. II. III. Memorize the letters by not looking at your hands while typing. Feet flat on floor, hips touching back of chair, back straight and sitting up tall. Fingers curved arms close to body. Wrist straight and not touching keyboard Strike keys with proper finger & then returns fingers to home row keys.

The typing keys are the section of the keyboard that contains the letter keys, generally laid out in the same style that was common for typewriters. The Numeric Keypads are laid out in the same configuration used by most adding machines and calculators. Function and control keys. The function keys, arranged in a line across the top of the keyboard, could be assigned specific commands by the current application Control keys provided cursor and screen control. Four keys arranged in an inverted T formation between the typing keys and numeric keypad allows the user to move the cursor on the display in small increments. The control keys allow the user to make large jumps in most applications. Common control keys include:
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Home End Insert Delete Page Up Page Down Control (Ctrl) Alternate (Alt) Escape (Esc)

Keyboard Maintenance When it comes to their computers, many people take their keyboards for
granted. However, the keyboard is an integral part of your computer so some care must be exercised when using it. The following are some helpful hints for basic keyboard care, as well as some common troubleshooting problems and possible solutions.

Keyboard Is Dirty 6

Junie

Mouse/Keyboarding

Decatur Public Library

Keyboards should be cleaned with "spray-n-wipe" cleaner and a cloth or tissue on a monthly basis. Ensure that computer is not powered up while cleaning the keyboard. Compressed air can also be used to clean between the keyboard keys. Another tip: clean the keys with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol.

"Keyboard Not Found" Message
Your keyboard is not plugged into the computer securely. Unplug it and plug it back in and the problem should go away. If this doesn't work, follow procedure: “Computer isn't taking inputs from keyboard” (below).

Key Is Stuck
1. If a key does not work or is stuck in the down position, you may try to remove it with a CPU "chip puller" tool. These simple "L" shaped tools are great at pulling out keys. Once you've pulled out the stuck key, you can try to stretch the spring to "reanimate" its action.

I spilled a drink on my keyboard!
1. If you spill any liquid in the keyboard, turn it upside down ASAP. Drain all the water out of the keyboard, shaking it if necessary. If you've spilled water into the keyboard, just let it dry. You may use a hair dryer to dry out area under the keys (remember, too much heat and you could damage the electrical components). 2. If you've spilled a soda into the keyboard, completely rinse it in warm water. No soap please! You may use a hair dryer at this point or just let it dry for 2 days. Ensure the keyboard is perfectly DRY before you attempt to use it again. Don't plug a wet keyboard into electrical equipment. Think safety.

5. If the keyboard still doesn't work, replace the keyboard. Only Types Capitals
USUALLY THIS IS CAUSED BY THE "CAPS LOCK" KEY BEING LEFT ON. PRESS "CAPS LOCK" KEY ONCE to fix this problem.

Page Up/Page down Keys Are Locked
Your "Scroll Lock" function may be engaged. Press the Scroll Lock Key once.

Letters on Keyboard Don't Work
Check to see if there are any obstructions to the keys. If other keys work, then your keyboard is going bad and needs to be replaced.

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