Secure Interaction Design

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Secure Interaction Design Powered By Docstoc
					Secure Interaction Design
Kami Vaniea

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Overview



Designing secure interfaces
 Design

principles

Firefox extensions
 Cookies  Phishing  Tracking

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Overview
 

Designing secure interfaces
 Design

principles

Firefox extensions
 Petname

 Add

N Edit Cookies  Cookie Culler  Cookie Button  Distrust  X Paranoia
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Secure Interaction Design


Designing a computer system to protect the interests of its legitimate user

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Problems
Viruses  Spyware  Phishing  Online tracking  Unintentional disclosure of information


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Mental Models


For software to protect its users interests, its behavior should be consistent with the user’s expectations.
What is really happening What the user thinks is happening

What is shown in the interface

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Designation vs. Admonition


Security by designation
 When

a user designates an action, take appropriate security related actions  Double clicking a Word document


Security by admonition
 Provide

notifications that the user looks at and takes appropriate action from  Display a warning when the user tries to do something dangerous
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Design Principles
Know your audience  Think like your audience  Eliminate clutter  Eliminate complexity  Create just enough feedback  Be a customer advocate when usability and competitive pressure collide

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Know Your Audience
Who are they?  What skills do they have?  If you don’t know who they are you can’t think like them  If your product doesn’t match your audience then it will not do as well as it could have

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Think Like Your Audience
Present your design to other people to get feedback  Think of a representative of your audience and design for them

 Could

my mother use this?

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Eliminate Clutter
Think about the tasks the user needs to perform  If a word or button is not necessary to those tasks then remove it
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Eliminate Complexity
Again what are the tasks the user needs to perform  Dose your design allow them to complete these tasks in the simplest manner  Design for the common tasks, don’t sacrifice usability of common tasks for usability of rare or unlikely tasks

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Create Just Enough Feedback
Users just want it to work  If it can be done safely without their involvement do it  They want to be reassured it is working in unobtrusive ways
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Be a Customer Advocate When Usability and Competitive Pressure Collide
Its your job to make sure that customers don’t suffer from poor design  Be willing to compromise with developers if it gets a better interface


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Questions

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Overview
 

Designing secure interfaces
 Design

principles

Firefox extensions
 Petname

 Add

N Edit Cookies  Cookie Culler  Cookie Button  Distrust  X Paranoia
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Firefox
A free web browser  “Browse the Web with confidence - Firefox protects you from viruses, spyware and pop-ups. Enjoy improvements to performance, ease of use and privacy.“3  www.getfirefox.com


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Firefox Extensions


“Extensions are small add-ons that add new functionality to Firefox. They can add anything from a toolbar button to a completely new feature. They allow the application to be customized to fit the personal needs of each user if they need additional features, while keeping Firefox small to download. “2
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Firefox Extensions

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Firefox Extensions

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Anti-Paranoia


Takes all your doubts and gives you confidence.
Especially if you are working on security, you might get the feeling that your part of something really big and maybe even evil.

How can your extension help me? It will pop up calmative messages for you to feel relaxed while browsing the web.
No, this extension will not spy and destroy your personal data, remember: Everything is good!

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Petname


“Need help avoiding phishing and spoofing attacks? The petname tool can help you avoid online fraud by clearly distinguishing your online relationships.
Using the petname tool, you can save a reminder note about a relationship you have with a secure site. The petname tool will then automatically display this reminder note every time you visit the site. After following a hyperlink, you need only check that the expected reminder note is being displayed. If so, you can be sure you are using the same site you have in the past.” 1

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Petname

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Petname

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Petname

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Cookies


A cookie is a small file downloaded by your web browser that is used to identify you to a website.

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Cookie Examples


Doubleclick.com
 id80000060da01136doubleclick.net/10243237

9712029957155287164811229736878*


Sun
 SUN_ID128.2.141.103:49701134167353sun.

com/15362447927680312265458641687682 9752592*

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Cookies


Convenient
 Automatic

login  Personalization  Session information


Not so Good
 Usage

tracking  Targeted ads  Unwanted logins
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Firefox Cookie Settings

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Add N Edit Cookies


Cookie Editor that allows you add and edit "session" and saved cookies.

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Add N Edit Cookies

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Add N Edit Cookies

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Design Principles
Know your audience  Think like your audience  Eliminate clutter  Eliminate complexity  Create just enough feedback  Be a customer advocate when usability and competitive pressure collide

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Cookie Culler


Extended Cookie Manager-protect/unprotect selected cookies

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Cookie Culler

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Cookie Button in the Status Bar


Button for easy access to cookie permissions in the status bar. For those who have been asking for cookie button in the status bar.

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Cookie Button in the Status Bar

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Cookie Button in the Status Bar

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Distrust


Hide surfing trails that the browser leaves behind. AKA Private Browsing. Once turned on this extension monitors FireFox for its activities. Once turned off Distrust will remove history items cache and cookies that were used during the distrust session.
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Distrust

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Distrust

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X Paranoia


Adds a paranoia button to the toolbar (clear your history, saved form information, passwords, download history, cookies, and/or cache with as little as two clicks).

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X Paranoia

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Design Principles
Know your audience  Think like your audience  Eliminate clutter  Eliminate complexity  Create just enough feedback  Be a customer advocate when usability and competitive pressure collide

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Bibliography
1.

2.

3.

Petname Firefox Extension: https://addons.mozilla.org/extensions/mo reinfo.php?id=957&application=firefox Firefox Extensions (https://addons.mozilla.org/extensions/?a pplication=firefox) Firefox (http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/)
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