Engl 101 by mifei

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									Engl 101 Sample Syllabus English 101.xxx: Expository Writing______________________________
Instructor: Meeting Time & Place: Office: Ph: E-mail: Office Hours: Welcome to English 101, Expository Writing and Critical Reading. This course is designed to introduce you to academic writing, which is the kind of writing most often expected of college students. In this course we will challenge your ability to read and think critically, and your ability to present your own opinions in a persuasive manner. We‟ll begin by summarizing others‟ arguments and essays, critically thinking about issues and texts, and end the semester prepared to make your own arguments by building on the research and opinions of others. English 101 is an inquiry-based writing course. You‟ll use writing to investigate issues that are important to you, and in so doing develop habits of mind that are important for writers: assessing audience expectations; reading critically; engaging with others‟ ideas; developing control over surface features of your text; and discovering, cultivating, and being reflective about your own writing process. In short, we will investigate not only how writing may be used to communicate ideas, but how it may be used to discover and create them as well. Required Texts: Ramage, Bean, and Johnson. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, Concise Edition. 4th ed. Hacker, Diane. Handbook Other texts as assigned by the instructor and made available via e-reserves or hard copy. Access E-Reserves from the Zimmerman home page, find your instructor‟s name and enter the password Lobo101. To fully access all course materials you will need a UNM email address. You should also have a two-pocket folder for your final portfolio. Required Work and Grading Scale: Your grade will be assessed not only through the quality of your written work, but your attendance and participation as well. You will be expected to participate in peer review and attend conferences with your instructor for each major assignment. Here is the point distribution for the course: [The point distribution is approximate; you may vary somewhat in your number of assignments or how they‟re weighted, but do make sure that the final portfolio is worth 35 – 40 %]

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Point Distribution Assignment Points Portfolio Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4 Response Papers (6-8) Peer Reviews (3-4) Conferences (4) 350 pts. 65 pts. 85 pts. 100 pts. 130 pts. 120 pts. 60 pts. 40 pts.

Participation/Attendance 50 pts. Total Points Possible 1000 pts.

Grading Rubric Course Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CTotal Points 930 + pts. 900 – 929 pts. 870 - 899 830 - 869 800 - 829 770 - 799 730 - 769 650 - 729 Note: You must get a C or higher To pass English 101

Final Portfolio This is the biggie, the culmination of all you‟ve learned over the course of the semester, and it is graded accordingly. Worth approximately 40 % of your grade, it will consist of two earlier essays that have been extensively revised during the last several weeks of class. You will also write a reflection paper in which you will be expected to articulate how you were able to bring some of the techniques you learned during the semester to bear on a deep revision, and what benefits (we assume there will be some) this process afforded you. You cannot fail the portfolio and still pass English 101; while it is worth a bit less than half the total points, it represents the keystone, without which all your work throughout the semester will be for naught. Be afraid … be very afraid.  2

Outcomes All writing assignments are tied to specific learning objectives, or course outcomes – things that we expect you to be capable of performing by the end of the semester. You‟ll find the outcomes listed in the Hacker handbook. Look them over occasionally, and consider how your work has made you perform these outcomes automatically. Attendance All English 101 sections must follow the same rigorous attendance policy. This policy is enforced because we, as a department, understand the very intimate connection that exists between classroom attendance and writing performance, indeed student performance in general. The policy states that you may miss class five [5] times for whatever reason, but if there is a sixth absence you will be dropped from the course regardless of how late in the semester. You should arrive in class on time; I pass around an attendance log at the beginning of class, and if you are tardy you may be marked absent for that day. [N.B. The above is for a MWF class; a T/R class should read 3 absences with a drop at the fourth. You may choose to call roll rather than pass a log if you wish (we‟ll let you). You may address tardiness in any number of ways, but you should address it] Equal Access Accessibility Services (Mesa Vista Hall 2021, 277-3506) provides academic support to students who have disabilities. If you think you need alternative accessible formats for undertaking and completing coursework, you should contact this service right away to assure your needs are met in a timely manner. [N.B. the above section MUST appear in your syllabus exactly as written] Plagiarism Plagiarism is the using of another‟s language and/or ideas without acknowledging the source, and we get pretty snippy about it. The University considers plagiarism a serious form of academic dishonesty. Plagiarism in this course results in one or more of the following consequences: failure of the assignment, failure of the course, and disciplinary action by the University. Read the section on plagiarism in the course materials in Hacker. Cite sources religiously. Conferences During the semester we will periodically cancel classes so that I may meet with each of you individually to discuss your progress on the current assignment. These conferences are mandatory (see point values), and failing to attend will affect your grade. In addition, I encourage you to make frequent use of my office hours. During these times you have access to individual attention that is impossible in class. If you are unable to meet me during my posted office hours I will gladly schedule an appointment with you at another time; you have but to ask. Your Texts as Class Texts Almost every class period will include some discussion student texts – that is, the texts that class members produce. In fact, most of our time will be spent discussing your texts. A text from each of you will be used at least once during the semester.

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Class Participation Please note that [X] of 1000 points are earned through class participation. I define participation largely in terms of your contributions to class discussion, both quality and quantity. By discussion I mean both online and faceto-face venues. I will also take note of your active contributions to group activities. Writing Groups and Peer Review [Here is where you will detail exactly how you wish to group your students, whether they will remain in a stable group, rotate or be free to pick their own group members. You will also want to discuss your peer review format and expectations here] Late Papers For each day an assignment is late I will deduct 5 points. Extraordinary circumstances (such as those that involve police cars or ambulances) may excuse a late paper, but these are rare. To avoid an unpleasant crunch time, schedule your work well in advance and work on papers throughout the week rather than late the night (or morning!) before it‟s due. Courteousy and Cell Phones We will be covering some sensitive topics in this class, and you will be expected to behave in a mature way and be open to the opinions of others. Above all, be courteous to your fellow classmates. Part of this is controlling one‟s cell phone – when in class, you are not available to answer calls, and disruptions of this sort will not be tolerated. If there are repeat problems with cell phones you will be asked to leave the class and will take an absence for that day. Formats All assignments written outside of class should be typed, double-spaced in a suitable 12 point font, and use appropriate margins. All assignments should have your name, my name, and section number. Multiple page documents should be numbered and stapled.

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English 101 – Sample Syllabus Sample Sequences
Here are a variety of possible sequences for use with the A&B Guide – you should follow the first week‟s assignments and Sequence One as written. The material in the first week is designed to give students a basic overview of what they can expect and to provide some terminology of principles that will be built upon later. It also allows for the flurry of drop/add activity that invariably accompanies that hectic first week. Beyond the first sequence you are free to mix-n-match, plugging in sequences that appeal to you or that you think will fit the tenor of the class. You are strongly encouraged to utilize the argument sequence as your final sequence because it will help ease the student transition into Engl 102. As you plan your semester, consider the important dates below; paper due dates are approximate: Aug 22 Sept 2 Sept 5 Sept 23 Sept 30 Oct 13-14 Oct 17 Nov 4 Nov 23 Nov 24-25 Nov 28 Dec 9 Dec 5 – 9 Dec 12 – 16 Classes Begin! Registration Ends Labor Day, no class Monday Paper One Due End of 6th wk; last chance to drop Fall Break, no class R/F Paper Two Due Paper Three Due Paper Four Due Thanksgiving Holiday Portfolio Revisions begin Withdrawal Deadline Reading Week Final Portfolios Due

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Sample Sequences – MWF
Week One M 8/22 Introductions, syllabus, diagnostic essay HomeWork: Get books, read Ch. 1 pp. 3-15 W 8/24 “Problematizing” from Ch. 1; do Exercise 1 (p 11) in class. You might consider adding topics that will be addressed by later sequences here. HW: pp. 27-34 in Ch. 2 F 8/26 “Wallowing in complexity” – brainstorming and thesis development HW: ch. 3 pp. 43-61 Week Two M 8/29 Using the Lobo, magazine articles or similar, discuss the use of thesis, audience and how each article addresses complexity – do they wallow? HW: read remainder of ch. 1; do Option 1 of writing exercise on p 22 W 8/31 Introduction of Open/Closed forms. In groups, go over student responses to exercise and translate into Option 2 questions HW: First response paper – write an open form inquiry F 9/2 Audience, genre & style, relate to forms Response Paper One Due HW: A&B ch. 7 Week Three M 9/5 A&B Ch. 7 In class, ex. P 158 W 9/7 “An Exploration of … Violence” p 159 Exercise on p.164 F 9/9 Finish ch. 7, outline peer review requirements Handbook: Subj/Verb agreement pp. 24-28 Response Paper Two Due Week Four M 9/12 Rough Draft Due, discuss Peer Review 6 In Week Two we return to ch 1 and Open/Closed forms; having read about formulating a thesis in ch. 2 and audience concerns in ch. 3 they‟re ready to discuss the when & why of open and closed forms. The exercise on p 22 encourages students to use an open form, but also steers them toward a more definitive thesis, and this process ought to serve them well as they embark on an exploratory essay. Okay, here we go. This is a biggie, kind of The Mother of All Sequences, but fear not. The idea here is to read around the book for ideas that will serve us throughout the semester, then settle in for the first Response Papers and gearing up for Paper One. In this first week we‟re fairly zooming through the first three chapters, but only reading snippets, so the workload isn‟t too great.

W 9/14 Conferences – class cancelled F 9/16 Paper One Due

Okay, here we venture into more optional ground, and so I won‟t include dates, just days – do keep a weather eye on holidays, etc. so that you know if my nice three-week sequence is going to be thrown off by a break. Also, don‟t be afraid to expand on some, especially if the class (or you) really digs a certain topic. Since you won‟t be using each sequence, I do duplicate some readings now & again; unless you think a text is rich enough to return to it twice you‟ll want to substitute another. There is a wealth of readings on e-reserve, and we‟re adding more all the time. You should feel free to bring in outside essays, in fact we encourage you to do so, and if they work well for you we‟ll add them to our master list. I‟ve designed most of these sequences on a short, three week schedule with a paper due each Friday. I presume peer review on the Monday prior to the formal paper and conferencing on that Wednesday. For conferencing, there are several methods and formats. Generally TAs conference individually, and will schedule appointments the week prior. Sometimes TAs will conference in peer review groups to enliven the process and better engage the students. I include “grammar” or “handbook” days in each sequence, and suggest common errors to address through the handbook, but these are chosen rather randomly; feel free to adjust this to the needs of your particular students. To provide exercises which may prove helpful you can refer to our the free online support provided by A&B or other online sources like Purdue‟s OWL. CAPS will be having a series of workshops on grammar errors in the fall, and it would be slick to “double dip,” as it were, and follow their schedule so that topics are reinforced in a complementary way. These workshops will be repeated in consecutive weeks and will be held in Week 3/4, wk 5/6, wk 7/8, wk 9/10, wk 11/12, and wk 13/14. Do encourage your students to attend.

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Sample Sequence “A” – Gender M “The Story of an Hour” Chopin, e-reserve W “Gender and the Media” Sherwood, in Hacker F R.P. One Due “Flirting” and “Sexual Messages” A&B pp 66-67 M “Gay Marriage” A&B Student essay HW: Ch. 9 W “It‟s a Girl!” Discuss ads from ch. 9 F R.P. Two Due Handbook: Fragments/run-ons pp. 48-54 M Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due Sample Sequence “B” – Nature & Env M “Back to Nature” Snyder – e-reserve W “The Great Climate Flip-Flop” – Calvin – e-res. F R.P. One Due “The Nature of a Home” Leo, in Hacker M “Fable for Tomorrow” Carson – e-res. W “Can the World Sustain…” A&B p 23 F R.P. Two Due Huerta, “An Asphalt Road…” in Hacker. Handbook: confusing words/POV shifts & pronouns pp. 9-12 M Rough Draft/Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due Sample Sequence “C” – Race & Culture M “Mother Tongue” Tan – e-res. W “That Word Black” Baldwin – e-res. F R.P. One Due “Tradition”Bob, in Hacker M “On Seeing England…” Kincaid – e-res. W “School Days” Zitkala-Sa – e-res. F R.P. Two Due Handbook: active voice & stylistic issues pp. 3-9, 16-18 M. Rough Draft/Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due

In class discussion, consider using the ads found in ch. 9, pp 226-229. Ask how images of women have changed - If you can, consider taping pieces of a popular show that addresses gender roles (Average Joe, The Bachelor/Bachelorette or the like) and bring this in for discussion. Be aware of multiple sides of gender questions; gender roles are not always considered “bad,” and are often highly valued, even when they appear nonsensical.

This sequence asks students to think critically about the landscape around them and their place within it. This is useful opportunity to examine familiar locations anew, and this exercise capitalizes on the outcomes for critical thinking by asking students to re-evaluate familiar surroundings. It also has, of course, the possibility for a political edge to it and will work well in conjunction with the pop culture sequence in looking at the environmental cost of materialism and the First World‟s attempts to control natural phenomenon.

Living in such a diverse area as we do, this sequence offers a chance to investigate questions of racial identity, and these readings allow students to articulate their own positions and identities regarding their cultural heritage and get an introduction of literature of resistance. In a course designed to teach them to express themselves in the dominant prestige dialect, this offers a great opportunity to value their own contributions and the diversity of our student body. You might consider R.P.‟s that encourage students to discuss their own cultural backgrounds and experiences.

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Sample Sequence “D” – Critical Reading & Summation M A&B ch. 6 W “On Teenagers and Tatoos” Martin, A&B p116, exercise p. 119 F R.P. One Due Finish ch. 6, college reading, reading strategies M “Politics and the English Language” Orwell, eres. W “The Place Where I was Born” Walker, e-res. F R.P. Two Due Handbook: pronouns, adj/adv use pp. 36-48 M Rough Draft/Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due

This sequence might be best done early, perhaps second, since summation is such an important element to the 101 outcomes and so many students struggle with it. Week one focuses on the A&B text, then we put it to work in wk. 2. Orwell is tough, and students often don‟t like him. It‟s rich enough to do two days on, but students often resist this. You could choose a different essay, but do remember that a mass groan from the students is a universal sign of good teaching. 

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Sample Sequence “E” – Visual Rhetoric M A&B Ch 9 “Task 1” p211, before class, do “Task 2” in class W Ch. 9, ex. p. 216; cultural texts, ads on pp. 223229 F R.P. One Due Handbook: punctuation pp. 6378 M “Cigarette Advertisers…” Bean A&B p. 230 W Student ads, brought from home, analyze in groups. F R.P. Two Due “Composing your essay” p. 234 M Rough Draft/Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due Sequence “F” – Pop Culture M “Gender and the Media” Sherwood, in Hacker W “Paintball: Promoter of violence…” Taylor p. 260 F R.P. One Due Handbook: spelling, hyphens and abbreviations pp. 91-99 M “The Nature of a Home” Leo, in Hacker W “I‟d Rather Smoke Than Kiss” King, p. 142 F R.P. Two Due “Cigarette Advertisers…” Bean, p. 230 M Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due Sequence “G” – Argumentation M A&B Ch. 4 In class, do discussion on p77 W “The Case Against College” Bird e-res. Ex. P 82 in class F R.P. One Due. Hacker, Research pp. 100110~115 M A&B Ch. 10 W “School vs. Education” Baker, e-res. F R.P. Two Due M Peer Review W Conferences F Paper Due

Visual Rhetoric is fun and useful, though you may find you want to collapse some of these texts into other sequences, especially the „pop culture‟ sequence that follows, instead of doing it as a stand alone gig. This is certainly a more “102ish” in some respects, and it might serve you well just before the sequence on argumentation. But they will get this next semester, so if your little darlings are still struggling with complete sentences or can‟t summarize a written text reliably yet, don‟t go here. If they can, then by all means investigate visual texts, which will open up a world of possibilities for your students to examine the texts that surround them outside the English class. This has traditionally been the mainstay of our program, and so we‟ve got a mess of readings here; if something doesn‟t appeal to you, or if you‟d like to come at this a different way, you won‟t have to search far for alternatives. This has two student papers from the Hacker that are duplicated elsewhere; I think the Leo is perhaps a better fit in the env. sequence, but if you use it here you can address our fixation on consumer goods successfully. This sequence allows you to address current events and attempt to engage students with issues that they may already have opinions on, and this can make their class work more “real” to them. “Do me last!” Here you begin to drift into formal argumentation, and any number of alternate readings would work; the point is not its thematic content but that the essays explicitly argue a point. If there were hot essays in another sequence you might revisit them here, and like the pop culture sequence, the point is to get them thinking about real issues on which they have real opinions and genuinely have something to say. Practical application of the principles is the order of the day. Introduce citation, if you have not already done so, and require a bibliography. Don‟t require outside research, but make them go through the motions to begin to instill good habits for 102.

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Tuesday / Thursday Sequences The following sequences are designed for Tues/Thursday, or T/R, classes. The material is the same, as the contact hours are the same between MWF & TR sections, but you may have to alter how you approach some things slightly. For instance, while in a MWF section you might have them read before discussing a concept, in a TR section you may (particularly on Day One) introduce material and then ask them to review the material in the A&B. Readings tend to be heavy on Tues and lighter on “R,” but this is intentional: students have the weekend to read, and you can let textual discussion spill over into Thursday easily. I‟ve listed peer review days on Tuesdays with the final papers due Thursday and conferences in between. This system will likely not work for everyone every time, and you might consider making the final paper due on the following Tuesday at the beginning of the next sequence.

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Week One T 8/23 Introductions, syllabus, diagnostic essay. Begin discussion of “problematizing” and “wallowing in complexity.” You might consider adding topics that will be addressed in later sequences here. Homework: get books, read Ch. 1, pp. 3 –15, and Ch. 2 pp. 27 -34 R 8/25 “Wallowing” revisited; do exercise 1 in class. Also brainstorming and thesis development HW: Ch. 3 pp. 43-61 Week Two T 8/30 Using the Lobo, magazine articles or similar, discuss the use of thesis, audience and how each article addresses complexity – do they wallow? Introduction of Open/Closed forms. In groups, go over student responses to exercise and translate into Option 2 questions HW: read remainder of ch. 1; do Option 1 of writing exercise on p 22 – first Response Paper – write an open form inquiry R 9/1 Continued discussion of open/closed forms if necessary; audience, style & genre RP One Due HW: Ch. 7 & student essay on p. 159 Week Three T 9/6 Ch. 7 In class, ex. p. 158 & “An Exploration of … Violence” p. 159 Exercise p. 164 R 9/8 Finish ch. 7, outline peer review format & requirements. Handbook: Subj/Verb Agreement pp.24-28 Response Paper Two Due Week Four T 9/13 Rough Draft Due, Peer review Conferences R 9/15 Paper One Due

Okay, here we go. This is a biggie, kind of the Mother of all Sequences, but fear not. The idea here is to read around the book for ideas that will serve us throughout the semester, then settle in for the first Response Papers and gearing up for Paper One. In this first week we‟re fairly zooming through the first three chapters, but only reading snippets, so the workload isn‟t too great.

In Week Two we return to ch 1 and Open/Closed forms; having read about formulating a thesis in ch. 2 and audience concerns in ch. 3 they‟re ready to discuss the when & why of open and closed forms. The exercise on p 22 encourages students to use an open form, but also steers them toward a more definitive thesis, and this process ought to serve them well as they embark on an exploratory essay.

Here you may see how the class feels to determine how you want to schedule conferences and if you need to cancel a class period to do so. Because a class period is half again as long for TR as MWF we do not list a cancellation here, but this will depend largely on the particular needs of your class.

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Okay, here we venture into more optional ground, and so I won‟t include dates, just days – do keep a weather eye on holidays, etc. so that you know if my nice three-week sequence is going to be thrown off by a break. Also, don‟t be afraid to expand on some, especially if the class (or you) really digs a certain topic. Since you won‟t be using each sequence, I do duplicate some readings now & again; unless you think a text is rich enough to return to it twice you‟ll want to substitute another. There is a wealth of readings on e-reserve, and we‟re adding more all the time. You should feel free to bring in outside essays, in fact we encourage you to do so, and if they work well for you we‟ll add them to our master list. I‟ve designed most of these sequences on a short, three week schedule with a paper due each Friday. I presume peer review on the Monday prior to the formal paper and conferencing on that Wednesday. For conferencing, there are several methods and formats. Generally TAs conference individually, and will schedule appointments the week prior. Sometimes TAs will conference in peer review groups to enliven the process and better engage the students. I include a “grammar” or “handbook” day in each sequence, and suggest common errors to address through the handbook, but these are chosen rather randomly; feel free to adjust this to the needs of your particular students. To provide exercises which may prove helpful you can refer to our the free online support provided by A&B or other online sources like Purdue‟s OWL. CAPS will be having a series of workshops on grammar errors in the fall, and it would be slick to “double dip,” as it were, and follow their schedule so that topics are reinforced in a complementary way. These workshops will be repeated in consecutive weeks and will be held in Week 3/4, wk 5/6, wk 7/8, wk 9/10, wk 11/12, and wk 13/14. Do encourage your students to attend.

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In class discussion, consider using the ads found in ch. 9, pp 226-229. Ask how images of women T “The Story of an Hour” Chopin, e-reserve have changed - If you can, consider taping pieces of a popular show that addresses gender roles R “Gender and the Media” Sherwood, in Hacker, (Average Joe, The Bachelor/Bachelorette or the “Flirting” and “Sexual Messages” in A&B pp 66like) and bring this in for discussion. Be aware of 67. R.P. One Due HW: Ch. 9 multiple sides of gender questions; gender roles are not always considered “bad,” and are often T “Gay Marriage” A&B student essay. Discuss ads highly valued, even when they appear nonsensical. from ch. 9 Sample Sequence “A-TR” – Gender R “It‟s a Girl!” e-res. Handbook: Fragments/runons pp 48-54 R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review Conferences R Paper Due Sample Sequence “B-TR” – Nature & Env T “Back to Nature” Snyder, e-res. & “The Great Climate Flip-Flop” Calvin, e-res. R “The Nature of a Home” Leo, in Hacker R.P. One Due T “Fable for Tomorrow” Carson, e-res. and “Can the World Sustain…” A&B p 23 R “An Asphalt Road…” in Hacker. Handbook: Confusing Words/POV shifts & pronouns, pp 9-12 R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review, conf. R Paper Due This sequence asks students to think critically about the landscape around them and their place within it. This is useful opportunity to examine familiar locations anew, and this exercise capitalizes on the outcomes for critical thinking by asking students to re-evaluate familiar surroundings. It also has, of course, the possibility for a political edge to it and will work well in conjunction with the pop culture sequence in looking at the environmental cost of materialism and the First World‟s attempts to control natural phenomenon.

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Sequence “C-TR” – Race & Culture T “Mother Tongue” Tan, and “That Word Black” Baldwin, both e-res. R “Tradition” Bob, in Hacker R.P. One Due T “On Seeing England…” Kincaid, and “School Days” Zitkala-Sa, both e-res. R Handbook: active voice & stylistic issues pp 39, 16-18 R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review, conf. R Paper Due Sequence “D-TR” – Critical Reading & Summation

Living in such a diverse area as we do, this sequence offers a chance to investigate questions of racial identity, and these readings allow students to articulate their own positions and identities regarding their cultural heritage and get an introduction of literature of resistance. In a course designed to teach them to express themselves in the dominant prestige dialect, this offers a great opportunity to value their own contributions and the diversity of our student body. You might consider R.P.‟s that encourage students to discuss their own cultural backgrounds and experiences.

This sequence might be best done early, perhaps second, since summation is such an important element to the 101 outcomes and so many students T A&B ch. 6, “On Teenagers and Tatoos” Martin struggle with it. Week one focuses on the A&B A&B p 116, exercise p 119 text, then we put it to work in wk. 2. Orwell is tough, and students often don‟t like him. Still, it‟s R Finish ch. 6, college reading, reading strategies a good essay, and worth looking at. It‟s rich enough to do two days on, but students often resist R.P. One Due this. You might warn them of this, and assign the T “Politics and the English Language” Orwell, and Walker for Thursday, because you probably won‟t “The Place Where I Was Born” Walker, both get to it on Tuesday anyway, and some students e-res. will have read the easier of the two. You could choose a different essay than the Orwell, but do R Handbook: pronouns, adj/adv use pp 36-48 remember that a mass groan from the students is a universal sign of good teaching.  R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review, conf. R Paper Due

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Sequence “E-TR” – Visual Rhetoric T A&B ch. 9 assign „Task 1” prior to class, do “Task 2” in class. R Ch. 9, exercise on p 216, Handbook: punctuation pp 223-229 R.P. One Due T “Cigarette Advertisers…” Bean, A&B p230, and analysis of student or teacher supplied ads R “Composing your Essay” p 234; finish ad analysis R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review, conf. R Paper Due Sequence “F-TR” – Pop Culture T “Gender and the Media” Sherwood, in Hacker, and “Paintball: Promoter of Violence…” by Taylor, p 260 in A&B R Handbook: spelling, hyphens, and abbreviations pp 91-99 R.P. One Due T “The Nature of a Home” Leo, in Hacker, and “I‟d rather Smoke Than Kiss” King, A&B p 142 R “Cigarette Advertisers” Bean, A&B p 230 R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft, peer review, conf. R Paper Due Sequence “G-TR” – Argumentation T A&B ch. 4, do discussion on p 77. Also, “The Case Against College” Bird, e-res. Exercise p 82 in class, time permitting R Handbook: Research pp 100 – 110~115 R.P. One Due T A&B ch. 10 R “School vs. Education” Baker, e-res. R.P. Two Due T Rough Draft Due, peer review, conf. R Paper Due

Visual Rhetoric is fun and useful, though you may find you want to collapse some of these texts into other sequences, especially the „pop culture‟ sequence that follows, instead of doing it as a stand alone gig. This is certainly a more “102ish” in some respects, and it might serve you well just before the sequence on argumentation. But they will get this next semester, so if your little darlings are still struggling with complete sentences or can‟t summarize a written text reliably yet, don‟t go here. If they can, then by all means investigate visual texts, which will open up a world of possibilities for your students to examine the texts that surround them outside the English class. This has traditionally been the mainstay of our program, and so we‟ve got a mess of readings here; if something doesn‟t appeal to you, or if you‟d like to come at this a different way, you won‟t have to search far for alternatives. This has two student papers from the Hacker that are duplicated elsewhere; I think the Leo is perhaps a better fit in the env. sequence, but if you use it here you can address our fixation on consumer goods successfully. This sequence allows you to address current events and attempt to engage students with issues that they may already have opinions on, and this can make their class work more “real” to them.

“Do me last!” Here you begin to drift into formal argumentation, and any number of alternate readings would work; the point is not its thematic content but that the essays explicitly argue a point. If there were hot essays in another sequence you might revisit them here, and like the pop culture sequence, the point is to get them thinking about real issues on which they have real opinions and genuinely have something to say. Practical application of the principles is the order of the day. Introduce citation, if you have not already done so, and require a bibliography. Don‟t require outside research, but make them go through the motions to begin to instill good habits for 102. 16


								
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