Depression - Ohio Academy of Family Physicians by zhouwenjuan

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									                                                            A Public Information Service of the

4075 North High Street          Columbus, Ohio 43214-3296                  614.267.7867           www.ohioafp.org

   Date: December, 2002                                                Contact:           Heidi M. Gordon
                                                                                          Director of Communications
                                                                                          hgordon@ohioafp.org

                    DEPRESSION CAUSES LOWER QUALLITY OF LIFE
                FAMILY PHYSICIANS PROVIDE GUIDANCE AND TREATMENTS

   (COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Though many people only visit their family physicians for a specific pain, it is
   equally important to make an appointment if your thoughts and behavior are changing the quality of life.

   Do you feel tired, uninterested or unmotivated? Do you have constant negative thoughts? Are you
   overeating or have little appetite? These are just a few symptoms that might signal a diagnosis of
   depression.

   According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), in any one-year period about, 19 million
   American adults suffer from a depressive illness. Most people do not seek treatment. Without treatment,
   symptoms can last for weeks, months or years.

   In recent years, researchers have shown that physical changes in the body can be accompanied by mental
   changes as well, according to NIMH.

   Although depression occurs in men and women, it affects nearly twice as many women (12 percent) as
   men (7 percent).

   A serious loss, difficult relationship, financial problem or any stressful change in life patterns can trigger
   a depressive episode.

   If you do not feel like yourself, seek your family physician’s advice. Once fully evaluated, your
   physician will recommend the best course of treatment. Treatments include but are not limited to
   antidepressant medications or psychotherapy.

   The Ohio Academy of Family Physicians is a statewide professional association with more than 4,400
   members, including practicing physicians, family medicine residents and medical students. The scope of
   family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes and every disease entity. Family physicians provide
   comprehensive, continuing care to all members of the family.

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                                                     A Public Information Service of the




                                       FACT SHEET
Date: December 2002                                                     Contact: Heidi M. Gordon
                                                                                 Director of Communications
                                                                                 hgordon@ohioafp.org

                 DEPRESSION CAUSES LOWER QUALLITY OF LIFE
             FAMILY PHYSICIANS PROVIDE GUIDANCE AND TREATMENTS

Symptoms of Depression:
      •   Persistent sad, anxious or "empty" moods
      •   Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
      •   Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
      •   Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed
      •   Decreased energy, fatigue, being "slowed down"
      •   Difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions
      •   Insomnia, early-morning awakening or oversleeping
      •   Appetite and/or weight loss
      •   Overeating and weight gain
      •   Decreased sex drive
      •   Thoughts of death or suicide; suicide attempts
      •   Restlessness, irritability
      •   Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive
          disorders and chronic pain
Symptoms can vary by person and can range from a few to many symptoms

Once Diagnosed and Treatment has Begun:
      •   Set realistic goals
      •   Break large tasks into small ones
      •   Be with other people and confide in them
      •   Participate in activities that make you feel good
      •   Exercise
      •   Expect your mood to improve gradually, not immediately
      •   Postpone major or important decisions until the depression has lifted
      •   Take it day-by-day, people rarely "snap out" of depression
      •   Remember, positive thinking will begin to replace the negative thinking
      •   Let family and friends help


Source: National Institute of Mental Health

								
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