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					faculty of behavioural sciences




            PROGRAMME
            GUIDE
            2011/2012
            (PRE-)MASTER
            EDUCATIONAL
            SCIENCE AND
            TECHNOLOGY
              Programme Guide 2011-2012

              Master of Science (MSc) programme
              Educational Science and Technology

                 (including Pre-Master’s programme)




                 Information for students and staff
               www.utwente.nl/master/international/est




2011.208 Programme guide EST 2011-2012                   Page 1
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 2
Contents

Preface ........................................................................................................................................................... 6


Part A: Educational Science as a Discipline............................................................................................... 8


1.         Educational Science............................................................................................................................ 9
     1.1            What is Educational Science? ...................................................................................................................... 9
     1.2            Importance of educational science ............................................................................................................. 10
     1.3            What isn’t educational science? ................................................................................................................. 11


2.         Educational Science and Technology (EST) at the UT................................................................... 12
     2.1            Characteristics of Educational Science and Technology ............................................................................ 12
     2.2            Master’s degree programme EST .............................................................................................................. 13
     2.3            Curiculum, Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA) specialisation .................................................... 14
           2.3.1        Introduction to CIMA ........................................................................................................................... 14
           2.3.2        CIMA programme 2011-2012............................................................................................................... 15
           2.3.3        CIMA specialisation options in the Departments CD&EI and IST....................................................... 17
           2.3.4        Career prospects of CIMA .................................................................................................................... 17
     2.4            Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment (EMEA) specialisation ........................................ 18
           2.4.1        Introduction to EMEA .......................................................................................................................... 18
           2.4.2        EMEA programme 2011-2012 .............................................................................................................. 19
           2.4.3        EMEA specialisation options in the Departments EOM and RMMD ................................................... 20
           2.4.4        Career prospects of EMEA ................................................................................................................... 21
     2.5            Human Resource Development (HRD) specialisation ............................................................................... 21
           2.5.1        Introduction to HRD ............................................................................................................................. 21
           2.5.2        HRD programme 2011-2012 ................................................................................................................ 22
           2.5.3        HRD specialisation options in the Department OP&HRD ................................................................... 24
           2.5.4        Career prospects of HRD ..................................................................................................................... 24
     2.6            Doctorate programme Learning in Educational and Training Settings ...................................................... 24
     2.7            EST in a part-time mode ............................................................................................................................ 26
     2.8            University of Twente characteristics .......................................................................................................... 27


Part B: Admission and Enrolment to the Master’s degree programme EST ......................................... 30


3.         Admission criteria ............................................................................................................................. 32
     3.1            Admission criteria for Dutch students........................................................................................................ 32
     3.2            Application procedures for Dutch students ................................................................................................ 34
     3.3            Admission criteria for international students ............................................................................................. 35
     3.4            Application procedures for international students...................................................................................... 37


4.         Pre-Master’s programme .................................................................................................................. 38
     4.1            Programme Outline .................................................................................................................................... 38
     4.2            Pre-Master’s programme in a part-time mode ........................................................................................... 39


5.         Costs .................................................................................................................................................. 41


Part C: General information ....................................................................................................................... 42




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                                                                              Page 3
6.         Practical issues ................................................................................................................................. 44
     6.1           Student Charter .......................................................................................................................................... 44
     6.2           Faculty introduction ................................................................................................................................... 44
     6.3           Communication and information ............................................................................................................... 44
     6.4           Student Card .............................................................................................................................................. 46
     6.5           Annual rosters ............................................................................................................................................ 47
     6.6           Lectures ..................................................................................................................................................... 47
     6.7           Attending courses ...................................................................................................................................... 48
     6.8           Finding your way at the University of Twente........................................................................................... 49
     6.9           Teaching facilities ...................................................................................................................................... 49
     6.10          Purchasing study materials ........................................................................................................................ 50
     6.11          Purchasing a laptop .................................................................................................................................... 51
     6.12          Examinations ............................................................................................................................................. 51
     6.13          Student activism......................................................................................................................................... 55
     6.14          Alumni association ToPoS ......................................................................................................................... 55
     6.15          Sports and cultural facilities on campus..................................................................................................... 55
     6.16          ICT Service ................................................................................................................................................ 56
     6.17          Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’ .................................................................................................... 56


7.         Student support and counselling services ..................................................................................... 57
     7.1           Study guidance........................................................................................................................................... 57
     7.2           Additional UT student support................................................................................................................... 58


8.         Quality assurance.............................................................................................................................. 60
     8.1           Internal quality assurance .......................................................................................................................... 60
     8.2           Consultative committees ............................................................................................................................ 61
     8.3           External quality instruments ...................................................................................................................... 62


9.         Faculty of Behavioural Sciences ..................................................................................................... 63
     9.1           Faculty organisational chart ....................................................................................................................... 63
     9.2           Programmes ............................................................................................................................................... 64
     9.3           Recruitment and Public Relations .............................................................................................................. 64


10.            Special regulations for students ................................................................................................. 65
     10.1          Transitional regulations ............................................................................................................................. 65
     10.2          Individual regulations ................................................................................................................................ 65
     10.3          Graduating abroad ..................................................................................................................................... 66
     10.4          Copyright ................................................................................................................................................... 67
     10.5          Student activism regulation........................................................................................................................ 68
     10.6          Support with entrepreneurship ................................................................................................................... 68




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                                                                                    Page 4
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 5
Preface

Dear students,

You have chosen the Master’s (MSc) degree programme Educational Science and
Technology (EST) at the University of Twente’s Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, probably
because you are inquisitive about how people learn and how you can offer them support or
research this. Welcome!

By national and international standards, the programmes offered by the Faculty of
Behavioural Sciences are of sound quality and developed in close collaboration with
researchers from all over the world. It is our aspiration to offer courses that are not only
intellectually challenging and which stimulate reflection on the domain, but that are also
intrinsically relevant to the field of study, complete with a style of working and concurring
literature that fit within the learning objectives of the subject.

However, a good programme is more than just a collection of separate courses. It comprises
subjects that are intrinsically coherent and that reinforce one another. In the degree
programme Educational Science and Technology, this intrinsic coherence is realised within
the specific specialisations that can be chosen:
    • Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment (EMEA);
    • Curriculum, Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA); or
    • Human Resource Development (HRD).

The contents of the various subjects within these specialisations are strongly linked to the
research domains of the lecturers.
This programme guide outlines the set-up and substance of the programme and its
specialisations. The guide also informs on adjacent topics, such as student supervision, and
methods and procedures for testing and quality assurance.
We constantly strive to offer you an interesting curriculum with sufficient challenges and
depth. We hope that this programme rouses your curiosity and is gratifying.
I wish you a pleasant time here!

Kind regards,

Irene Visscher-Voerman
Programme director of the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes Educational Science and Technology




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                         Page 6
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 7
Part A: Educational Science as a Discipline




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 8
1.      Educational Science
1.1     What is Educational Science?
The main focus of educational science is on the learning and development of people in a
diversity of contexts. This might be the instruction of young children at primary school, of
young adults during their vocational education, or adult employees in a company, such as fire
fighters or teachers receiving in-house training. Educational scientists study and research
learning processes, preconditions for learning, learning environments or teaching materials
with the aim of understanding, explaining or improving them. Educational sciences are
studied at different levels:

At learner level (micro level):
This concerns the research, development, introduction and/or evaluation of teaching and
learning processes, curricula and educational learning environments at the level of the
individual and the group/class. Think, for example, of the development of new teaching
materials, such as the digital blackboard. Educational scientists pursue such questions as:
Which learning processes are supported by using this? What is a good didactics for teaching
with a digital blackboard? How can teachers be prepared for working with such a blackboard?
How do we introduce it throughout a school and how can we find out if it functions
satisfactorily? And what are the right techniques for evaluating the results of the instruction?

At organisational level (meso level):
This concerns the research on and the development of the organisation, structure and set-up
of schools, institutes and business networks. Educational scientists occupy themselves with
such questions as: What are the exact implications of organising and setting up a so-called
‘technasium’ (pre-university school with a strong technological learning) within secondary
education? What are the effects of class size on the pupils’ learning achievements? What
subjects ought to be taught in the training for fire fighter? In which order should those subjects
be taught and what is the interrelationship between the contents of the subjects? How can we
stimulate, support and design the education and extra training of police employees?

At (inter)national level (macro level):
This is where educational policy and the relationship between education and society (career,
labour market) are studied and developed. Educational scientists pursue such questions as:
What are the core objectives of the area of ‘Orientation to yourself and the world’ for primary
education? What effects do educational reforms have on pupils’ learning achievements? How
do Dutch pupils perform in arithmetic compared with pupils from other European countries?
What is the influence of block grant funding (whereby the government grants schools freedom
of spending) on the educational infrastructure? Following pre-university education, what
knowledge and skills should be tested during the school-leaving examination?

As a scientific discipline, educational science has a strong multidisciplinary character and a
broad area of application. Both nationally and internationally, four main paths of study can be
distinguished:
  • Educational science programmes strongly embedded in the pedagogical sciences;
  • Educational design programmes that have emanated from developments in the area of
      educational media and technology and the systematic design of instruction;
  • Educational science programmes strongly embedded in policy and organisation studies;


2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                              Page 9
 •    Educational science programmes in the field of human resource development (HRD).

By explicitly opting for a design orientation as its main path of study, the Educational Science
programme at the University of Twente thus falls into the second category. The programme’s
target is to train educational scientists who, supported by their having acquired a systematic
and methodical method of working and scientific expertise, can develop solutions to
educational issues within a number of intrinsic (sub-)domains: Curriculum and Instruction
(C&I); Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment (EMEA); and Human Resource
Development (HRD).


1.2     Importance of educational science

Many educational scientists supervise or advise pupils/students, teachers and school teams
with learning difficulties, organisational problems or with the introduction of educational
reforms.
Societal developments call for a continuous need for people who can plan, set up, execute
and evaluate education. Please note that you need to interpret the word ‘education’ broadly: it
might mean education in a traditional school context but it could also mean instruction within
companies or adult education. In all of these situations there is a demand for specialists in
professionalisation and staff training.

Below are several examples of situations in which educational scientists can make an
important contribution:

Schools are given increasingly greater freedom in how they present themselves. In order to
realise a desired profile, an educational scientist might be called on to support both teaching
staff and management. As an educational scientist you can help contribute to the quality of
the education, for example by helping teachers to devise a new profile or by designing new
teaching material for this.

Testing seems to play an ever larger role in society. These days even children at infant school
are tested on their language skills. A couple of years ago the Dutch language and arithmetic
test was introduced at teacher-training colleges for primary education (in Dutch: PABO). Of
course it is essential that the test is of sufficient quality so that one can be certain as to
whether a person has the necessary knowledge and skills for fulfilling a job as a primary
education teacher. Educational scientists know how to develop tests for any target group or
situation.

Owing to both the rapid developments and scientific progress, knowledge is soon out-of-date.
Lifelong learning is important to stimulate the knowledge society and employment in the
Netherlands. Dutch trade and industry annually invests billions of Euros in education and
training. Large companies often have their own instruction department for developing and
offering training to their staff to improve their performance or further their education. As an
educational scientist you are able to develop and implement such trainings or assess their
quality. You might also engage in workplace instruction or in the rearrangement of the work
and the workplace so that learning becomes an integral part of work.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 10
1.3     What isn’t educational science?

Educational science is the science that strives to describe, comprehend and interpret
education with the aim of contributing to the improvement of the education system.
Educational scientists work in all the places of learning. Contrary to what many people think,
an educational scientist is not trained to be a school teacher, nor is this the right course to
obtain a teaching certificate. In your future profession you will not be standing in front of the
class as a teacher. For the greater part you will be working more behind the scenes and
contributing to making knowledge more appealing and accessible to people of all ages and
backgrounds. This might be by studying learning processes and situations (for example by
researching the effects of certain materials on pupils’ learning achievements) or by directing
them (for example by developing material that helps realise certain learning objectives). Good
educational scientists are able to combine both activities. In this way you contribute to the
educational process, whether that be for the school education system or for in-company
learning and development tracks




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 11
2.      Educational Science and Technology (EST) at the UT
Educational Science and Technology (EST) is a degree programme that is embedded in
pedagogy and educational science. There are several educational science programmes in the
Netherlands, both at Bachelor’s and Master’s level. What characterises our Master’s degree
programme Educational Science and Technology is the fact that:
    • there are three separate (sub-)domains of specialisation within educational science;
    • it is applied science;
    • ample attention is paid to academic training;
    • it has an international character;
    • it focuses on the use of technology, and
    • it has a design-oriented and problem-solving approach.


2.1     Characteristics of Educational Science and Technology

In-depth domain orientation
As an EST student you can choose one of the following specialisations: Curriculum,
Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA), Educational Management, Evaluation and
Assessment (EMEA) or Human Resource Development (HRD). Graduates have a firm and
broad knowledge of one of these specialisation areas, and specific expertise in one of these
areas that can be used productively and creatively in various related professional contexts.

Applied character
In various subjects during the programme you will address real-life educational issues. You
will thus be applying your knowledge in practice. This way you will learn how to ‘recognise’
the newly acquired educational theories in practice and also apply them in real-life situations.

Ample attention to academic training
Ample attention is paid in the curriculum to students’ academic training. The programme
broadens your research skills so, as well as learning how to conduct both qualitative and
quantitative research, you are also taught how to write scientific articles. And you put all these
skills into practice during your final project.

International character
The programme EST attracts students from various backgrounds: graduates from the
faculty’s Bachelor’s degree programme Educational Science, international students,
graduates from Dutch hbo (higher vocational education) undergraduate degree programmes,
and professionals who wish to broaden and deepen their knowledge and skills.

Attention to the use of technology
In our teaching we also pay attention to the role of technology in learning processes. For
example: To what degree does the kind and amount of light in a classroom influence the
learning achievements of pupils? And: What role can the computer play with test
development? And: What is the influence of digiboards in schools?




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 12
Design-oriented and problem-solving approach
The programme teaches how to analyse educational and training problems in a systematic
way and how to design good, workable solutions for those problems. To do so, you first need
to gain a clear picture of the issue in question. Your research will mostly be for the benefit of
design processes for organising learning tracks, the design of media applications, the
evaluation of real-life situations or the development of education policy. Graduates are able to
systematically frame up, fill in, augment, evaluate, and implement designs to support learning
environments in various education and training contexts.


2.2     Master’s degree programme EST

The Master’s degree programme Educational Science and Technology is oriented towards
the transference of knowledge and the instruction of people in schools and industry. It is a
programme that offers depth to those interested in anything that has to do with education,
learning and transfer of knowledge. The core questions that are dealt with concern the
analysis, design, development, evaluation and implementation of effective solutions. These
solutions concern topics about curricular and instructional problems, educational
management, evaluation and assessment and human resource development.

The main aim of the Master's programme in Educational Science and Technology is to deliver
competent researchers. Graduates are scientifically schooled, independent and critical
educational designers, decision makers and advisers. Graduates can contribute to the subject
area of education in general and to their chosen specialisation in particular.

Specialisations
The MSc programme Educational Science and Technology features three distinct
specialisations, each with its own programme of study and potential career opportunities.
   • Curriculum, Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA)
   • Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment (EMEA)
   • Human Resource Development (HRD)
Each of these specialisations has an entire one-year full-time programme (or two years if the
annual study load is halved).

Graduate School programme ‘Learning in Educational and Training Settings’
With its Graduate School, the University of Twente offers a growing number of integrated
Master’s-PhD programmes for talented research students who aspire for a career in scientific
research. These programmes are concentrated around core research projects of the research
institutes of the University of Twente and they are led by excellent UT researchers. EST
students, who consider a scientific career, may wish to consider the Master’s programme
‘Learning in Educational and Training Settings’. The Master’s Programme Educational
Science and Technology is one of the UT Master’s involved in this graduate research
programme. Students who are admitted to the Graduate School specialise during the
Master’s phase in their preferred area of research and can, during this time, already focus on
the subject of their PhD dissertation. This way they can transfer faster into a PhD track (see
paragraph 2.6).




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 13
Main structure EST Master’s
The academic year is divided into two terms (semesters). Each term consists of two blocks
(quartiles) of seven weeks with class sessions and subsequently 1 week in which as less as
possible lectures are planned, after that two weeks in which the examinations are scheduled.
The full Master’s degree programme consists of 60 EC (European Credits; 1 EC corresponds
with 28 hours of studyload). The main structure of all specialisations is identical. The first
semester (September to February) consists of core subjects and the second semester
(February to June) is the in-depth phase during which you carry out your final project.

Language of instruction in the Master’s programme EST
Every year students from all over the globe enrol. This is why the programme is fully taught in
English. Also the literature used is in English. So, in principle, the language of communication
is English except for an individual assignment or if there are no foreign students present.


2.3      Curiculum, Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA)
         specialisation


2.3.1   Introduction to CIMA

The specialisation ‘Curriculum, Instruction and Media Applications’ (CIMA) focuses on (the
interaction between) instructional design, curriculum design, teacher development, school
development, and ICT in a variety of educational contexts.

Curriculum, instruction and media take prominent positions in educational science; they
promote and support the educational core: learning. Next to this joint interest, each sub-
domain has its own particular emphasis:
    • Curriculum stresses planning, developing, and implementing innovative learning
        trajectories on several levels (‘from nano to supra’) and attempts to link these levels;
    • Instruction addresses teaching and learning processes on micro-level;
    • Media focuses on the full spectrum and functionalities of computer- and network-
        based tools and systems that are supportive to the learning processes on micro- and
        meso-level.

An intrinsic part of these subjects implies dealing with all kinds of curriculum and instruction
questions that play a role in (governmental) organisations, companies and educational
institutions. For instance, how can schools and teachers be supported in the design,
development and implementation of curriculum renewal at both school and classroom level?
How can learning environments focusing on learning by discovery with the use of educational
computer simulations be designed? The common theme running through this entire
specialisation is a systematic approach to design. Many of the modules begin with a design
assignment which draws upon your existing knowledge and skills. The study of relevant
literature adds depth and structure.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 14
2.3.2   CIMA programme 2011-2012

                    Curriculum, Instruction and Media Applications (CIMA)
                  Semester 1                                     Semester 2
      Quartile 1                 Quartile 2           Quartile 3               Quartile 4
   CIMA themes and           CIMA design *                  CIMA literature study *
     approaches *               191970360                        191970380
      19197030                     5EC                                5EC
         5EC
    Learning with games and simulations **             CIMA research Methodology *
                  191970320                                      191970390
                      5EC                                             5EC
Integrating technology in schools: from theory
                 to practice **
                  201000170
                      5EC
     Learning and performance support **
                  191970340
                      5EC                                    Final project CIMA *
          Learning with multimedia **                            191970500
                  191970350                                          20EC
                      5EC
 Pedagogies for flexible learning supported by
                 technology **
                  191970370
                      5EC
 Curriculum, teacher and school development
                       **
                  191970310
                      5EC
                     30EC                                            30EC
*       = compulsory course
**      = elective course

Semester 1: core phase
During the introductory module ‘CIMA themes and approaches’, your design know-how and
your prior knowledge on the key themes in curriculum, instruction and media will be
refreshed. After that you select four elective modules on topics such as curriculum, teacher
and school development support, the use of technology in support of flexible education, the
development of job aids and manuals, and the design or redesign of computer games and
simulations. You finish the first semester with the course ‘CIMA Design’. This course focuses
on an educational design project. You will work on a group-based assignment where you will
apply (as well as enhance) your knowledge and skills acquired in the elective courses.
Integration also pertains to the design itself in that curriculum, instruction, and the use of ICT
have to be treated as related rather than as isolated entities.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 15
Brief description of the elective courses
National policies on educational development often show a tendency toward increasing
autonomy of schools. Yet, there are still uncertainties about the extent of autonomy that
schools should get in decision-making, their capacity and the way in which schools, teachers
and support agencies should be organised. In the course ‘Curriculum, Teacher and School
Development’, several models and theories will be discussed. Several guest lectures will be
given by different experts.
Games and simulations are potentially powerful means to learn complex and difficult material.
In the elective course ‘Learning with Games and Simulations’ students collaborate to evaluate
the designs of existing games and simulations for their potential to promote learning and
motivation. Based on their outcomes students will re-design a game and simulation to further
improve its effectiveness, and write a report to why these changes yield the anticipated
effects.
In the course ‘Learning and performance support’ students engage in challenging design
tasks, namely to create effective instructions that enable people to quickly do things. For
example, design topics are instructions on: using a cash register, web searching and on
designing online help. Students can select their own topic and context for this task. Students
will be asked to adopt a systematic approach and report about the progress.
With the development and evolution of wikis, blogs, and social networking sites for learning
purposes, multimedia learning is relevant for a continuously growing field of application. In the
course ‘Learning with Multimedia’, students will be introduced to how multimedia learning
environments need to be designed in order to enhance learners knowledge.
In the course ‘Pedagogies for Flexible Learning Supported by Technology’ students will learn
how the use of technologies in higher education and technologies for e-learning and blended
learning in corporate contexts are rapidly emerging. Technologies such as course
management systems, electronic portfolios, simulations offer a large potential for increased
flexibility and new, more-active, pedagogies. Different scenarios for more-flexible learning will
be identified, along with characteristic pedagogical approaches and ways of using technology.

Do you want to know more about the content of these subjects?
Visit our course catalogue: osiris.utwente.nl/student/OnderwijsCatalogus.do

Semester 2: specialisation phase
The term starts with two compulsory courses: ‘CIMA literature study’ and ‘CIMA research
methodology’. Both courses are closely related to the CIMA Final Project. The Final Project is
an individual design or evaluative research project. It concerns a real CIMA problem in which
the student follows a systematic problem solving approach. The project entails a problem,
context and needs analysis, a literature search and analysis (theoretical embedding),
prototyping, construction, and evaluative and reflective aspects. In general, the final project is
closely linked to research that is being conducted in the Departments involved. Students may
also choose a project within an external organisation in close communication with the CIMA
programme coordinators. The final project results in a thesis. The CIMA programme is offered
under the responsibility of the Faculty’s Departments Curriculum Design & Educational
Innovation (CD&EI) and Instructional Technology (IST).




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 16
2.3.3   CIMA specialisation options in the Departments CD&EI and IST

Department Curriculum Design & Educational Innovation
The Department Curriculum Design & Educational Innovation (in Dutch abbreviated as C&O)
supports schools by means of various research projects to reform existing curricula and to
raise the quality of the instruction to a higher level. The research is primarily focused on the
concerted design of curricula by teachers and on its effects on the professional development
of teachers and on curriculum innovation. Much attention is paid to the role of ICT and new
media when designing a reformed learning environment. This is because new media offer
new possibilities to create stimulating teaching, such as via webquests. ICT and new media
are also used as tools, both when designing curricula and as a curriculum product.
Research staff collaborate with the Dutch National Expertise Centre for Curriculum Design (in
Dutch: Stichting Leerplan Ontwikkeling), Edith Stein University for Teacher Education, Saxion
University of Applied Sciences, regional elementary and secondary schools, and national
research and development institutions such as the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific
Research (NWO) and Kennisnet. Projects are also carried out under the auspices of the
Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. On international level the Department conducts
research into the cultural diversity of designing curricula and the role of teachers in this. This
implies working together with colleagues in Europe and the USA. The research programme
also includes international projects in Ghana, Tanzania, China, India and Kuwait.

Department Instructional Technology
Pupils (adults included) actively master knowledge with the aid of a variety of learning
environments, such as computer simulations, games, group assignments and class teaching.
The Department Instructional Technology (in Duch abbreviated as IST) pays attention to the
design of these learning environments. Do they evoke the correct learning processes? Are
they motivating, challenging and activating? The Department’s main focus hereby is on the
the process of ‘investigative learning’ (i.e. learning through experimentation), whereby
simulation and modelling tools are designed that support this process. Particular attention is
paid here to how this form of learning can be made accessible to young children.
In addition, the research focuses on how knowledge is made use of and extended in work
environments. The question is how one can shape independent-driven learning in the
workplace. How, for example, can organisations deploy tools for a more effective use and
management of knowledge, combined with experience in simulated learning environments?
The research is funded by e.g. NWO, SURF, Kennisnet and SenterNovem. Collaboration
takes place with a large number of both Dutch and international universities and
organisations. The market has shown a great deal of interest in the teaching methods and
learning environments of the Department Instructional Technology. Publishing houses adapt
these products, such as teaching materials, for deployment od and application in education
and learning environments in business and industry.



2.3.4   Career prospects of CIMA

The CIMA specialisation educates for a wide range of academic professions in the domain of
curriculum, instruction and media on local or regional as well as national and international
levels. As a graduate, you have a promising and varied future ahead of you. For example, you
could play a part in major educational and training innovation programmes as a designer,
researcher or consultant. Or you might design and develop multimedia products for

2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 17
companies wanting to do more in the field of e-learning. You are able to support organisations
in the development of learning policy and to consider the design of study environments in the
broad sense – both physically and digitally. Or you could investigate the possible use of the
latest media applications in education and training. Our graduates work in a wide range of
organisations, from government, publishing houses and educational support services to
universities, higher education institutes and multinational companies. A number of graduates
have even created successful consultancy firms.


2.4      Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment
         (EMEA) specialisation


2.4.1   Introduction to EMEA

The EMEA specialisation focuses on educational management, examination and assessment.
There are many fascinating aspects, which people who work in classrooms are often unaware
of. What are the consequences of government policies like decentralisation? How can
educational provision be better matched to demand? This specialisation provides you with a
wide range of know-how, from educational measurement and evaluation methods to
organisational structuring, quality, quality assurance and management.

Good course evaluation is essential in today’s world, but so too are structural monitoring and
assessment. It is more important than ever that these schools should be able to track the
quality and results of their teaching. Not just through pupil assessment, but also at the
management level. This means that schools and governments alike need experts in
educational management and evaluation. Schools are expected to become more effective
and efficient institutions, as well as more responsive to the needs of the local community. This
brings a broadened agenda for school management, and a much stronger engagement with
external and internal evaluation than was the case in earlier decades. It also requires full
efforts of everyone involved in implementing these reforms, including the national, regional
and local governments, principals/school boards (as managers of the schools) and external
consultants.

This programme provides you with a wide range of knowledge, from educational
measurement and evaluation methods to organisational structuring, quality assurance and
management. You can choose between modules focusing on evaluation and assessment or
on management and evaluation. The former concentrates on the pupil level, while the latter is
more directed towards educational administration.

Globalisation and accountability trends have created a huge market for services related to
certification, computerised assessment, cross-border recognition of degrees and diploma’s,
monitoring of educational outputs, and programme evaluation. Graduates of EMEA are
particularly qualified to work for testing agencies, examination, certification and accreditation
boards, as policy-planners and as evaluation researchers. The programme focuses on both
one-off programme evaluation as well as more continuous forms of monitoring and
assessment.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 18
2.4.2   EMEA programme 2011-2012

                 Educational Management, Evaluation and Assessment (EMEA)
                   Semester 1                                   Semester 2
       Quartile 1                Quartile 2          Quartile 3             Quartile 4
     Introduction             Organisational
     educational          structuring and quality
      evaluation                assurance *
    191960730 *                 191960710
          5EC                       5EC
     Introduction          Setting performance
     educational                standards **
    assessment *                191960720                  Final project EMEA *
      191960740                     5EC                         191960810
          5EC                                                      30EC
Item response theory       School performance
 and its applications *    feedback systems **
      191960660                 191960680
          5EC                       5EC
                             Linear models for
                           continuous variables
                                     **
                                197300140
                                    5EC
                       30EC                                        30EC
*        = compulsory course
**       = elective course

First semester: core phase
Systematic use of evaluation and assessment are core principles to guide education. For
educational organisations it’s increasingly important to continuously monitor and improve the
quality of the education. In the introduction courses: ‘Introduction Educational Evaluation’ and
Introduction Educational Assessment’ you will learn theories of educational evaluation and
assessment. In addition you will attend the research methodology course ‘Item Response
Theory and its applications’ as well as two of the five elective courses. You can choose
between modules focusing on evaluation and assessment or on management and evaluation.

Brief description of the elective courses
In the course ‘Setting Performance Standards’, theory about complex performance
assessments and setting performance standards will be discussed. The following techniques
are discussed: classical test theory, generalisability theory, item response theory, Angoff
method, policy capturing method, dominant profile method, examinee selection, holistic
booklet method, bookmark method, analytical method.
Internationally seen there is an increasing trend to publish and feed back information to
schools and teachers on their performance. School improvement is often the main objective,
however, accountability and the promotion of parental/student school choice, also play
important roles.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 19
In the course ‘School Performance Feedback Systems’, the following subjects will be
discussed: a thorough conceptualisation of school performance feedback as a performance-
enhancing mechanism; a typology of school performance indicators; an analysis of
international examples of school performance feedback systems (SPFSs); an analysis of the
prerequisites for utilising performance information back to individuals and to organisations;
evidence on the process, problems and impact of school performance feedback from an
international variety of contexts (Australia, The Netherlands, England, U.S.A.); and reflections
on these experiences within the theoretical framework, leading to recommended strategies for
school improvement via performance feedback. An important theory that will be discussed is
the feedback intervention theory.

The course ‘Linear Models for Continious Variables’ gives a general overview of popular
linear statistical models that are used for analysing complex experimental and observational
response data. Several model extensions for nonlinear settings are given. The statistical
methodology for specialised study designs is discussed which is needed to make
correct inferences given response data from complex (experimental) designs. The discussed
methods are typically applicable to data from school effectiveness research, cross-national
surveys or assessments, and longitudinal studies.

Second semester: specialisation phase
Once you have successfully completed all subjects in the core phase, you will then apply your
knowledge in the specialisation phase. You will carry out a design or research project
whereby you will focus on a topical issue in the area of EMEA. The project must include
evaluative and reflective aspects, be grounded in a theoretical framework, and must relate to
a stated design or research problem and an appropriate literature review. Rather than being a
separate project, the final project will involve synthesising the preparatory work done in the
framework of the previous courses and projects, and continuing it through a cycle of design,
implementation, evaluation and reflection. The EMEA programme is offered under the
responsibility of the faculty’s Departments Educational Organisation & Management – EOM -
(in Dutch ‘Onderwijsorganisatie en –management’, O&M) and Research Methodology,
Measurement & Data Analysis – RMMD - (in Dutch: ‘Onderzoeksmethodologie,
Meetmethoden en Data-analyse’, OMD). In general, the final project is closely linked to
research that is being conducted in these departments. Students may also choose a project
within an external organisation in close communication with the specialisation coordinators.
The final project results in a thesis.

Do you want to know more about the content of these subjects?
Visit our course catalogue: osiris.utwente.nl/student/OnderwijsCatalogus.do



2.4.3   EMEA specialisation options in the Departments EOM and RMMD


Department Educational Organisation and Management
Both the research and the courses of the Department Educational Organisation and
Management are focused on the effectiveness of education, school organisation and
management and school reform. The department addresses such questions as: Is it possible
to improve the performance of schools by giving them feedback on the level of their
performance? To what degree do school leadership, school culture and the teamwork


2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 20
between teachers influence the effectiveness of schools? Do schools perform better as a
result of education inspectorate or does this sooner lead to ostensible (i.e. apparent)
improvements?

The department carries out projects in collaboration with e.g. the Ministry of Education,
Culture and Science, the Primary Education Council, the Education Inspectorate and CITO
(Central Institute for Test Development). Much of its research is inspired by the many and
intensive contacts with such international organisations as the European Union, the World
Bank, UNESCO, IEA and the OECD. It also participates in international comparative research
that investigates the performance of schools in various countries (such as TIMMS, PISA and
TALIS).

Department Research Methodology, Measurement and Data analysis
The Department Research Methodology, Measurement and Data analysis conducts research
and advises in the area of methods and techniques of educational measurement, the data
analysis, the set-up and planning of research and the formalisation and creation and
simulation of models of educational knowledge and phenomena. The research focuses
particularly on the development of exams, assessments, surveys and psychological tests.
Which measurement models can be applied best and how can the ‘psychometric’ methods
and procedures be developed and improved further? Psychometric research is also applied in
educational science, whereby the emphasis is on evaluation and assessment.
The research, final projects and doctorate tracks in educational science are carried out in
collaboration with such organisations as CITO and the American testing institutes LSAC and
ETS. The Department of RMMD also works together with e.g. TNO (the independent research
organisation), the Department of EO&M of the University of Twente, Delft University of
Technology, the Institute for Educational Research of the University of Jyväskylä (Finland),
the Ministère de l’Education Nationale (MEN/DEP) (France) and the Westfälische Wilhelms-
Universität Münster (Germany).


2.4.4   Career prospects of EMEA
As a graduate of the EMEA specialisation, you are in a position to decide your own career
path. You could, for example, join a consultancy firm or become an expert with a testing body,
examination board or certification agency. Other possibilities include work as a policy maker,
assessor or researcher in the social sciences. But whatever path you choose, you are
equipped to tackle a wide variety of questions. What are the prospects for computer-adaptive
testing and virtual reality examinations? How do you implement school self-assessment?
What are the effects of bureaucratisation upon primary education?



2.5     Human Resource Development (HRD) specialisation


2.5.1   Introduction to HRD

This specialisation focuses on the development and training of employees of companies and
institutions. This specialisation introduces you to a variety of approaches to Human Resiource
Development (HRD). Key modules include for example ‘Psychology of Careers’ and ‘HRD



2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                         Page 21
Intervention & Consultancy Skills’. You will learn how people think, how they learn and how
they make career choices and how, for example, they respond in conflict situations.

The rise of the knowledge society means that knowledge productivity and the related learning
processes are becoming increasingly important. In order to stay in business, organisations
must analyse their corporate strategies and learn from their mistakes. Never before
organisational learning has had such a sense of urgency. Contemporary organisations in
business, industry and civil society implement their ideas on learning via competence
management and competence development. These strategies enable the vertical and
horizontal alignment of corporate policy processes and instruments. The Human Resource
Development specialisation plays a major role in this process. The HRD's approach
addresses the process of changing an organisation, its external stakeholders, internal groups
and employees, achieved by means of planned learning and training, so they possess the
knowledge and skills needed in the future. This specialisation emphasises three basic
components:
     • Training, for performance improvement
     • Education, for career development
     • Development for organisational change.
With the specialisation Human Resource Development (HRD), you will discover how
important knowledge is to companies and other organisations and why it is in constant need
to develop. How is quality guaranteed? How do clever innovations come about? These are
just a few of the many questions you will try to answer. The HRD specialisation serves as the
academic foundation for a career in HRD. Organisations need people who can approach
education and training issues with an academic mindset. Specialists capable of analysing
knowledge needs, creating effective solutions and facilitating a good learning climate.


2.5.2   HRD programme 2011-2012

                          Human Resource Development (HRD)
                 Semester 1                                Semester 2
      Quartile 1             Quartile 2         Quartile 3             Quartile 4
Theory & foundations      Effective HRD
      of HRD *            interventions *
     191950460              191950480
         5EC                   5EC
 HRD intervention &        Psychology of               Final project HRD *
 consultancy skills *        careers*                      191950160
     191950470              192903030                         30EC
         5EC                   5EC
  Research within       Research skills HRD
   organisations *               *
     192904010              191950450
         5EC                   5EC
                     30EC                                     30EC

*       = compulsory course




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                        Page 22
First semester: core phase
This semester consists of two quartiles, each comprising three subjects. In ‘Theory &
Foundations of HRD’ you will be introduced to several theoretical approaches of Human
Resource Development. You also study the elements of strategic HRD. In our perspective,
one of the main roles of the HRD professional is that of an organisational development
consultant.
Therefore, the next course ‘HRD Intervention & Consultancy Skills’ will provide you insights
into the theory and practice of consultancy work. You will work on practical assignments in
class and guest lectures will be given by several consultants. They will present and discuss
their cases with students. You will also have to interview a consultant and make a report of
the interview.
In the course ‘Research within Organisations’ different research designs and methods about
organisation research are addressed. For example: How to apply experimental design in
organisation studies? And how to conduct qualitative research on organisational issues? You
need to work in groups on a project by using a research method, and report your findings in
class.
In the course ‘Effective HRD Interventions’ you will become familiar with systematically
investigating the effectiveness of an organisation, to establish an effectiveness-gap, and to
design an intervention to increase the effectiveness. You will work in small groups (three
students) and write a research/intervention paper. You are supervised by appointment only.
In the course ‘Psychology of Careers’ you will get acquainted with learning in the context of
work and the characteristics of both younger and older employees. We will go deeper into the
subject of career psychology; and you will work on the design of learning interventions and
experiment with these interventions in practice. To finish this course you have to develop an
intervention to stimulate and shape career development within organisations and you make a
written examination with open questions.
The course ‘Research Skills HRD’ will discuss the functions of HRD research within an
organisation and research skills needed to carry out HRD interventions. Also HRD research
from others (external consultants, colleagues and scientists) will be discussed and judged.
Ways to plan and design HRD research will be discussed as well as several theories and
models, for instance the ROI (Return on Investment), development of competencies and
research methods.

Second semester: specialisation phase
Once you have successfully completed all subjects in the core phase, you will then apply your
know-how in the specialisation phase. You will carry out a design or research assignment
whereby you will focus on a topical issue in the area of HRD. Rather than being a separate
project, the final project will involve synthesising the preparatory work undertaken during the
previous courses and projects, and continuing it through a cycle of design, implementation,
evaluation and reflection. The HRD programme is offered under the responsibility of the
OP&HRD department. In general, the final project is closely linked to research that is being
conducted in these departments. The final project results in a thesis. You have to select from
the subjects at hand. In that way you will be participating in current research of the
Department of OP&HRD. In consultation with the department, it is also possible to graduate
on the basis of a research from an external organisation.

Do you want to know more about the content of these subjects?
Visit our course catalogue: osiris.utwente.nl/student/OnderwijsCatalogus.do



2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 23
2.5.3   HRD specialisation options in the Department OP&HRD

The scientific research in the Department of Organisational Psychology & Human Resource
Development (OP&HRD) focuses on the effects of HRM and HRD. In particular, on the
professional development of employees and on conflict management and negotiations.
Collaborations include the KPC Group (advice for educational institutions), GITP, De Haagse
Hogeschool, Carpe (Career Perspective Development & Research), Berenschot, RIVM and
the Nivel (Netherlands Institute for Healthcare Research). Internationalisation is highly
important for this department.

Twente Centre for Career Research
In 2008 the Department of OP&HRD set up the Twente Centre for Career Research (TCCR),
a research centre that focuses on research into the professional development of employees in
the education and healthcare sectors. The department and its research centre TCCR carry
out projects with various schools and healthcare institutions.


2.5.4   Career prospects of HRD

As a graduate of the HRD specialisation, you have excellent career prospects. You could
work, for example, in a corporate personnel department, or for a consultancy firm. Or you
might prefer to opt for an academic career. Whatever you choose, you can be sure that you
will have plenty of fascinating questions to tackle. How do people within an organisation learn
from one another? How can you encourage employees to share what they know? What effect
does that have on productivity? How do you create a good working climate? And what exactly
are the organisation’s knowledge needs? Graduates from the HRD programme will acquire a
variety of career options in the field of HRD, such as: HRD manager – HRD coordinator –
HRD consultant – learning specialist – course designer – telematics training manager –
training materials developer – HRD needs analyst and evaluator.


2.6     Doctorate programme Learning in Educational and Training
        Settings

Students who are admitted to the Twente Graduate School use the thesis period during their
Master’s degree programme as the initial step on their route to PhD research. In this way
students could graduate faster than in a regular PhD programme. After choosing one of the
EST specialisations, students will be awarded their Master’s degree in EST after completion
of the first year (i.e. the Master’s phase). Students in the Twente Graduate School are invited
to attend additional courses to broaden their perspective and to support their scientific career.
After the first year, and upon excellent academic achievement, students will be invited to
apply to available PhD positions in the Graduate School.

The programme Learning in Educational and Training Settings
This research programme Learning in Educational and Training Settings addresses topics
like: Which school factors promote high educational productivity and effectiveness? How to
model the mechanisms through which these factors have their impact? The actual research
on these questions is framed in a number of so-called core programmes:



2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 24
The core PhD programmes in ‘Learning in Educational and Training Settings’ which are open
to MSc EST students are:
    • Effectiveness of school and training organisations (headed by Prof.dr. Peter
        Sleegers)
    • Computerised testing of knowledge and skills (headed by Prof.dr. Cees Glas), and
    • Human resource development (headed by Prof.dr. Peter Sleegers).

The synergetic combination of these core programmes is expected to have an added value in
theory oriented and applied work, dedicated to the central theme of optimising student
learning. Important lines of connectivity are the rethinking of teaching models on the basis of
learning principles, the importance of adaptive educational testing for both the design of
technology based learning environments, and effective schooling, and finally the development
of an integral multi-level instrumental theory of education.

 Programme Year 1          • Coursework (compulsory and elective courses (30 EC)
 (MSc phase)               • MSc thesis project (30 EC)
 Programme Years 2-5       • Research proposal (40 EC)
 (PhD phase)               • Specialisation specific courses offered by national research
                               schools (ICO, IOPS, Kurt Lewin Institute (20 EC)
                           • International orientation (15–30 EC)
                           • Research and thesis (150–165 EC)
                           • Specialisation-specific courses, workshops, and summer
                               schools
The structure of the PhD programme Learning in Educational and Training Settings

The 2011-2012 coursework in the programme ‘Learning in Educational and Training Settings’
Being admitted to this Graduate School Programme in the Master’s phase means following a
specific sub-set of courses within the EST Master’s programmes EMEA and HRD, and
realising a specific research emphasis in the Master’s thesis. You will attend courses with
EMEA students or HRD students.

                              Specialisation within the programme
                          Learning in Educational and Training Settings
         Effectiveness of School     Computerised Testing of                  HRD
              Organisations            Knowledge and Skills
Sem.                                          Courses
         Educational Evaluation       Educational Assessment       Theory and Foundations of
  1
           191960730, 5 EC               191960740, 5 EC                     HRD
                                                                       191950460, 5 EC

        Educational Assessment         Educational Evaluation          HRD Intervention &
           191960740, 5 EC               191960730, 5 EC               Consultancy Skills,
                                                                        191950470, 5 EC

         Item Response Theory        Item Response Theory and           Research within
           and its Applications,           its Applications,            Organisations,
            191960660, 5 EC               191960660, 5 EC              192904010, 5 EC




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 25
        Organisational Structuring   Organisational Structuring          Effective HRD
         and Quality Assurance        and Quality Assurance               Interventions,
           191960710, 5 EC              191960710, 5 EC                 191950480, 5 EC

          School Performance              Linear Models for          Psychology of Careers
          Feedback Systems              Continuous Variables           192903030, 5 EC
           191960680, 5 EC            (incl. multilevel analysis),
                                          197300140, 5 EC
          Setting Performance           Setting Performance          Research Skills HRD,
               Standards,                    Standards,               191950450, 5 EC
           191960720, 5 EC               191960720, 5 EC


  2                                  MSc Thesis project, 30 EC


Applying to the Graduate School
If you intend to apply to the Graduate School, you need to keep in mind that selection criteria
will be applied. Please refer to Chapter 4.6.


 Interested in where our alumni are working? Read the Career Book!

 A distinguishing feature of the courses at the University of Twente, and particularly those of
 the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, is its applied character. Research is important but so,
 too, is the way it is translated into practice. To inspire both future and present students we
 have compiled a new Career Book (Carrièreboek) with stories of former students. This book
 comprises 29 interviews with UT alumi from the fields of communications, educational
 science, social scientific research, technological philosophy and university preparatory
 education. If you wish to receive a copy of this book, please fill in the form on the website:
 www.gw.utwente.nl/carriere

 Note: The Career Book (Carrièreboek) is only available in Dutch!


2.7     EST in a part-time mode

The one-year Master’s degree programme EST can be studied both in a full-time mode as
well as part-time. In the latter case the course lasts two years.

In this regard (particularly for facilitating this part-time mode) the following applies:
• All units of study in a specific master’s specialisation are scheduled on a maximum of two
     fixed days per week, e.g. on Mondays and Tuesdays.
• Classes of a specific unit of study (= course) always take place on the same day during
     the week, e.g. on Mondays.
• Imagine your studies imply that you have to take 4 courses. In that case the class
     sessions of 2 courses are always scheduled on Mondays, the other 2 courses are always
     scheduled on Tuesdays.

Thus, as a ‘part-timer’ you may timely arrange with your employer which day of the week you
will be spending on your studies. For example, in year #1 you may take classes on Mondays,
and in year #2 you will take the remaining courses on Tuesdays.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 26
For the 2011-2012 academic year the actual scheduling is as follows.

                                Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday
                   CIMA                               X               X
                   EMEA                X              X
                    HRD                X              X

For the most recent information, please visit the website www.master.utwente.nl/est
Please consider that during the 2nd semester you will devote your time on working on your
Final Project. There is no coursework offered which means even more flexibility in organising
and planning your studies.

Note:
The nominal study load in the part-time variant in the 1st semester of an academic year is not
always evenly distributed over a full semester. There is the possibility that you might follow 2
courses in block/quartile #1 and only 1 course in block/quartile #2.


2.8     University of Twente characteristics

Irrespective of which programme you will study at the University of Twente, all our Master’s
degree programmes strive to train entrepreneurial academics who are able to address and
solve social issues by conscientiously pinpointing problems, investigating possible solutions
or designing and developing new products or applications. We emphasise that our students,
next to knowing their way around in their own discipline, are capable of working together with
professionals from other domains. After all, many social issues demand a multidisciplinary
solution.

We aim at educating students to become excellent professionals who possess both scientific
as well as professional competences.

Therefore, the following characteristics apply

    •   Small-scale instruction
        Next to the more or less traditional lectures, instruction is particularly organised in
        small group workshops and practicals. In our opinion, small-scale and strongly-
        supervised (contact-intensive) instruction is of paramount importance to the
        development of professional and academic skills. Students carry out (individual and
        small-group) assignments where collaborative, evaluative and other social and
        communication skills play an important role.

    •   Strong connection between education and research
        The contribution of faculty members to the Educational Science and Technology
        programme is recognised and highly valued, both nationally and internationally. The
        Master’s degree programme is strongly linked to topical research that is conducted in
        the departments concerned, and lecturers draw many examples from their own
        research during their lectures. It also occurs that students actively contribute to the
        lecturers’ research, e.g. during their graduation phase. The subjects and assignments
        of the Master’s degree programmes are often linked to current research projects

2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 27
        within the research lines of the departments. In this way you will be initiated in the
        professional and academic field of action.

    •   Extensive student supervision
        The Master’s programme has been designed in such a way that you yourself are to
        some extent responsible for your study trajectory and your study progress and
        substantial freedom to make intrinsic choices yourself is offered. This could imply:
        independently devising subjects for assignments, choosing your specialisation, opting
        for spending study time abroad, and the theme of your final research project. It is
        important that your choices are made consciously and are well-considered. In this
        regard, you may count on a good tutor to help you making the right choices and be
        there for you.

    •   International possibilities for studying abroad
        We think it is important that students broaden their academic horizon during their
        studies. In this respect, we support ambitions that include spending some time abroad
        e.g. taking courses, participating in on-going research). Please feel invited to contact
        your study counsellor and/or the faculty’s Co-ordinator Internationalisation for
        discussing your ambitions and possibilities.

    •   Encouraging entrepreneurship
        For beginning entrepreneurs with innovative ideas the UT has introduced the so-
        called TOP regulation (Temporary Entrepreneurs Positions), which helps to bridge the
        first, usually most difficult year of a new enterprise with basic funding, support and
        advice.

    •   Encouraging student activism
        The University of Twente fervently encourages all kinds of student activism (ranging
        from membership of a committee or board, to assisting university staffance or starting
        a small husiness. It is the university’s firm belief that students will benefit from extra-
        curricular activities.

    •   Open and informal atmosphere between lecturers and students
        The programme’s atmosphere (educational climate) can be characterised as
        pleasant. Communication between lecturers and students is quite informal.

    •   Guest lectures by well-known researchers
        In recent years various (internationally) famous researchers have honoured the
        programme with a visit, in many cases delivering a lecture or a lunch seminar.


What does this mean to you?
Our students are enterprising, curious, dare to take risks, have self-knowledge and insight
into the tasks, functions and roles that a job entails. Characteristics such as self-discipline,
personal responsibility, using one’s initiative and independence are important to us. Our
students are open to the contributions made by people with other expertise, other
backgrounds, other methods.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                              Page 28
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 29
Part B: Admission and Enrolment to the Master’s
       degree programme EST




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 30
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 31
3.         Admission criteria
3.1        Admission criteria for Dutch students
In order to be considered for admission in one of the specialisations of the Master’s degree
programme Educational Science and Technology (EST), you have to meet formal as well as
content-related admission criteria, and upon meeting these criteria fully or partly, an number
of enrolment options apply.

Formal criteria
     • Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent1
     • A curriculum vitae/resume, summarising your educational and professional career.

Content-related criteria
   • the criteria of the content of the domain of EST
   • the design methodology criteria
   • the research methodology criteria
   • the research techniques, including the use of statistics for data analysis.
Note: for a detailed description of these content-related criteria, please refer to section 3.3.

Depending on your prior education, you can be admitted:
   a. to the Master’s degree (MSc) programme Educational Science and Technology (EST)
      directly and unconditionally, or
   b. to the full version (= 60 European Credits/EC’s) of the pre-Master’s trajectory, or
   c. (implying one or more exemptions) to some courses in the pre-Master’s trajectory

Note: full information on the pre-Master’s trajectory can be obtained from Chapter 4!


1
    Strongly recommended level of mathematics

    Legally speaking, we cannot make formal demands regarding your proficiency in mathematics, but we
    do strongly urge you to take a training course on this subject if you do not meet the required standard
    so as to prevent your having difficulties with the research methodology subjects.


Please be informed that a substantial level of mathematics is vital for both the pre-Master’s and the
Master’s degree programmes. If you have passed Math A, B or D at vwo level, or Math B or D at havo
level (subject clusters: Nature & Technology or Nature & Health), we will assume that you have
sufficient basic knowledge in this resepct. If, as an ‘HBO’ bachelor’s degree student, you do not comply
with this norm, you have the possibility to take a Math course at the University of Twente priot to your
studies at the UT. This course is offered 3 times a year (in Spring, Summer, and Fall) at the UT’s
Faculty of Behavioural Sciences .

    More information (in Dutch) on timing, costs, and teaching materials via:
    www.gw.utwente.nl/onderwijs/wiskundecursusinfo.doc
    You also may contact the Math course co-ordinator:

    Ms. Claudia van Dijken
    Phone: 053 4892964
    E-mail: wiskundecursus@utwente.nl




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                      Page 32
In detail the following options apply:
    1. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree from a (Dutch) university of
         applied sciences (in Dutch HBO-instelling) enrol in the full (60 EC’s) version of the
         pre-Master’s trajectory
    2. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Arts or Science (in Dutch: Alfa-
         or Beta opleiding) from a (Dutch) research university enrol in the full (60 EC’s)
         version of the pre-Master’s trajectory
               These students lack the required domain-specific (Educational Science)
                   knowledge. They therefore have to complete the domain-specific pre-
                   Master’s courses, plus
               (despite their assumed academic level in reasoning and doing research)
                   these students miss the social science competences in this regard. They
                   therefore have to complete the research methodological pre-Master’s
                   courses, including the course Academic Writing, and the so-called pre-
                   Master’s Final Project.
    3. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Social Sciences (in Dutch:
         Gamma- of Gedragswetenschappen) from a (Dutch) research university will,
         depending on their specific prior education, only take specific components of the pre-
         Master’s trajectory (with a max of 30 EC’s).
               In general, it is assumed that these students possess sufficient generic
                   academic and research methodological competences. They are exempted
                   from the pre-Master’s courses Data-analysis and Measurement 1, Data-
                   analysis and Measurement 2, Academic Writing, Research Methodology, and
                   the pre-Master’s Final Project. Therefore they subsequently, taking into
                   account specific prior domain-specific knowledge, will take a max. 30 EC’s
                   programme (i.e. the pre-Master’s courses: Educational Design, Design
                   Methodology, Curriculum Theory, Instructional Theory, HRD Fundamentals,
                   Assessment, Management of Education and Training).
    4. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree from specific – domain related -
         (research university) programmes (e.g. Educational Sciences, some sub-domains
         in Pedagogy or Psychology) are exempted from the pre-Master’s trajectory fully or
         partly. This is assessed in detail on a portfolio base where professional experience
         will be taken into account as well. Students in this category are invited to contact the
         EST programme’s co-ordinator, Mr. Jan Nelissen (e-mail: : j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl)
    5. Students with a bachelor’s or master’s social science degree from a University
         of Twente (UT) programme need to complete the pre-Master’s courses Design
         Methodology, plus the domain-specific courses Curriculum Theory, Instructional
         Theory, HRD Fundamentals, Assessment, Management of Education and Training




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 33
3.2      Application procedures for Dutch students

In this regard there are a number of ‘scenarios’:

    a. UT Bachelor’s students in Educational Science
       Having obtained your Bachelor’s degree in Educational Science (in Dutch:
       Onderwijskunde) at the UT, you automatically qualify for a direct and uncondional
       access to the Master’s degree programme EST. Formal registration for the Master’s
       degree programme EST must be submitted to the UT’s Central Student
       Administration (CSA). In practice, the staff of your Student & Educational Affairs office
       (in Dutch: BOZ) will contact you timely. In addition, they will inform CSA whether you
       have satisfied all the requirements for registering to the EST Master’s degree
       programme.

         Note:
         You have to renew your formal registration at the UT every year! CSA will remind you
         in this respect by sending you an e-mail message with a link to the digital re-
         enrolment form annually.

    b. Other UT Bachelor’s students
       As said before, this mostly implies that in that case you have to take the pre-Master’s
       programme in order to be prepare optimally for thea master’s degree rogramme in
       educational science. The Student & Educational Affairs office (BOZ) of your own
       programme will contact you in due course about which master’s degree programme
       you are interested in, and, if applicable, they will guide you to the staff of the EST
       programme. On the basis of your bachelor’s programme (and, if applicable, other
       study trajectories in higher education), the Admission Committee of the EST master’s
       degree programme will assess how your pre-Master’s trajectory will look like.

    c.   Other applicants
         Taking the pre-Master’s programme (or parts thereof) mostly applies.
         On the basis of detailed information on your prior education, the Admission
         Committee of the EST master’s degree programme will assess how your pre-Master’s
         trajectory will look like.
         In any case you have to apply online via: master.utwente.nl/inschrijven.

         Note:
         This means there is NO separate application procedure for the pre-Master’s
         programme. You simply apply via the master’s application website!

             Application deadline
             In order to facilitate a smooth start of your studies at the University of Twente,
             your application has to be submitted before 1 August.
             Please bear that you may apply even not formally obtained your bachelor’s
             degree (in this regard, we expect that you will obtain your bachelor’s degree
             officially before 1 September).




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 34
           If you have any questions regarding the application procedure and the application
           form, please contact:
           Universiteit Twente, Student Services / Admission Office (AO),
           Tel: 053 4894317
           E-Mail: studentservices@utwente.nl

           If you have any questions regarding the master’s or pre-master’s programme, please
           contact the programme’s co-ordinator:
           Jan Nelissen
           Building Cubicus, room: C104
           Tel: 053 4893588
           E-Mail: j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl


3.3        Admission criteria for international students

In order to be considered for admission in one of the specialisations of the Master’s degree
programme Educational Science and Technology (EST), you have to meet formal as well as
content-related admission criteria, and upon meeting these criteria fully or partly, an number
of enrolment options apply.

Formal criteria
   •   A relevant bachelor’s degree (or equivalent qualification) from a university or other
       accredited academic institution2
   •   A curriculum vitae/resume, summarising your educational and professional career.
   •   Sufficient mastery of the English language. Please read the detailed requirements in
       this regard (e.g. exemptions) on:
       www.utwente.nl/admissionoffice/master/internationaal/
   •   A grounded and focused motivation letter
   •   Two letters of reference (preferably from your employer and/or university), including
       full address, telephone number, fax number and e-mail address

Content-related criteria
   • the criteria of the content of the domain of EST
   • the design methodology criteria
   • the research methodology criteria
   • the research techniques, including the use of statistics for data analysis.

Explanation of the content-related criteria:


2
    Strongly recommended level of mathematics

    Please be informed that a substantial level of mathematics is vital for both the pre-Master’s and the
    Master’s degree programmes. Legally speaking, we cannot make formal demands regarding your
    proficiency in mathematics, but we do strongly urge you to take a training course on this subject if your
    prior (secondary and higher) education not contain Math. Please check the relevant pre-Master’s (see:
    Section: 4.1) course descriptions in our course catalogue:
    osiris.utwente.nl/student/OnderwijsCatalogus.do




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                        Page 35
Content of the domain EST
The content of the domain of educational science and technology can be characterised by the
following definition: the field encompasses the analysis of learning and performance
problems, and the design, development, implementation, evaluation and management of
educational and training processes, resources and arrangements intended to improve
learning and performance in a variety of settings, particularly educational institutions and the
workplace.
It is possible that you meet the domain-specific admission criteria if you possess a bachelor’s
or master’s degree in a domain that is similar or related to the domain of this definition, and/or
if you have substantial relevant work experience from which you could master the mentioned
conceptual kind of knowledge.

Design Methodology
This is a typical content characteristic of all educational science and technology bachelor’s
and master’s programmes in our faculty, aiming at educating scientific educational and
training designers. This methodology for systematic problem solving aims to support and
control science-based, systemic approaches and processes for the development, the
implementation and the evaluation of solutions for problems in education and training.
To give evidence that you basically master this methodology, you have to send us an
overview of courses you took in this respect, and/or reports of systematic design projects you
have intensively been involved in.

Research Methodology
This refers to the main concepts, procedures, and methods which are used in social science
research, and that aim at systematic conceptual (literature) analysis, modes of data collection,
data analytical schemes, and procedures for interpretation of findings, in order to better
understand social phenomena and processes, and/or to support all kinds and levels of
making choices in and for social reality. This methodology supports the systematic design,
execution and evaluation of research activities.
Your basic mastery of this methodology should be proven by courses you have taken in this
area, and/or reports of research projects or activities you have been involved in substantially.

Research techniques, including the use of statistics for data analysis
This area is dedicated to the skills and understanding of techniques for collection and for
analysis of data of both kinds, quantitative as well as qualitative data. If you master this area,
you understand and are able to apply descriptive statistics (distribution, correlation,
regression, cross tabling), theory of probability (calculation, expectation, variance, binomial
distribution), and aspects from inductive statistics (average based conclusions with known
population deviation). Experience with the use of SPSS or comparable computer-based
statistical packages is part of your mastery. Evidence about these aspects can be presented
by content review of courses you have done, and/or use of these techniques in research,
demonstrated by way of a report or an article. Send us detailed course outlines of the relevant
courses you took. Please enclose copies of the tables of contents of the used textbooks or an
overview of the topics that have been dealt with in these courses.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 36
3.4     Application procedures for international students

To be considered for admission, you must submit a completed application form which can be
found on our website: www.utwente.nl/master/international/admission/.
Via this website you will learn that, prior to actually completing the application form, you must
apply for an account via this webiste. You also will learn that, along with the application form,
you have to submit a set of documents to the University of Twente's Admission Office:

      • A CV/resume that summarises your educational career and relevant work
        experience (if applicable)
      • Certified copies of transcripts, grades, diplomas and certificates that prove the
        required entry level for the programme (including the concerned course
        descriptions!
      • A statement that comprehensively describes your motivation to participate
      • Evidence that proves sufficient fluency in the English language
      • Two letters of reference (preferably from your employer and/or university),
        including full address, telephone number, fax number and e-mail address
      • Clear copy of passport (if available)

        The address of the Admission Office is:
        University of Twente
        Admission Office – De Vrijhof
        P.O. Box 217
        7500 AE Enschede
        The Netherlands

The university’s Admission Office will convey your application package to the EST
programme’s Admission Committee. They will review the information and documents
concerning the content-related admission criteria which you have presented and they will
decide whether you meet the criteria sufficiently.

In case you do not meet the full spectrum of content-related criteria, your participation
in the Master’s programme EST will be upon successful completion of one or more
courses of our pre-Master’s trajectory, to be decided by the Admission Committee.



Deadlines
For the September 2012 enrolment (in the Master’s or pre-Master’s programme), please
make sure that the University of Twente receives all requested information timely.

The University of Twente applies the following deadlines:

      1 May 2012          Students requiring an entry visa
      1 June 2012         Students not requiring an entry visa but who do require housing
      1 July 2012         Students neither requiring an entry visa nor housing




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 37
 4.                    Pre-Master’s programme
 As said, many students wishing to be admitted to the master’s programme Educational
 Science and Technology (EST) will first have to complete (parts of) our pre-master’s
 programme. Whether you will have to take the full pre-master’s programme, a partial pre-
 master’s programme or no pre-master’s will depend on your previous qualifications (See:
 sections 3.1 and/or 3.3). All students will be evaluated by the programme’s Admission
 Committee on their own merits. The pre-Master’s programme has to 2 terms of enrolment
 (September and February.

 4.1                   Programme Outline

 The full (60 European Credits / EC’s) pre-Master’s programme comprises of both domain-
 specific (Educational Science and Technology) and courses which address generic academic
 and research methodological competences.

                       Generic academic courses: some of these courses will be offered simultaneously to students
                       from other pre-Master’s programmes (Psychology and/or Communication studies.

                       Domain-specific courses: students will take these courses together with students from the
                       bachelor’s programme Educational Science and Technology



                                                          Pre-master’s programme
                            Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan)                             Spring Semester (Feb-Aug)
                        Quartile 1 (1A)     Quartile 2 (1B)                   Quartile 3 (2A)      Quartile 4 (2B)
                        Data-analysis and       Research methodology*        Data-analysis and             Final project (pre-M)
                         measurement 1*              191960510               measurement 2 *                   191900269
                           191960550                    5EC                     191960560                          10EC
                               5EC                                                 5EC
                        Educational design          Design methodology
September enrolment




                           191975010                    191958200
                               5EC                         5EC

                                      Academic writing*
                                         192412240
                                            5EC

                           Workshop 4:                 Management of         Instructional theory          HRD fundamentals
                      assessment 191958360          education and training       191942080                   191924010
                              4EC                       191920160                    4EC                         4EC
                                                            4EC
                                                                             Curriculum theory
                                                                                191950380
                                                                                    4EC

                             16.5EC                        16.5EC                   13EC                          14EC
                                             33EC                                                   27EC
 * = compulsory course




 2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                                 Page 38
                          Spring Semester (Feb-Aug)                      Autumn Semester (Sep-Jan)
                      Quartile 3 (2A)      Quartile 4 (2B)            Quartile 1 (1A)    Quartile 2 (1B)
                     Data-analysis and     Research methodology*      Data-analysis and           Final project (pre-M)
                     measurement 1*                                    measurement 2 *                191900269
                        191960550                 191960510              191960560                        10EC
                           5EC                       5EC                     5EC
February enrolment



                                  Academic writing *                  Educational design          Design methodology
                                     192412240                           191975010                    191958200
                                        5EC                                  5EC                         5EC

                     Instructional theory          HRD fundamentals      Workshop 4:             Management of
                         191942080                   191924010           assessment           education and training
                             4EC                         4EC             191958360                191920160
                                                                            4EC                       4EC

                     Curriculum theory
                       191950380
                            4EC

                           15.5EC                      11.5EC               14EC                         19EC
                                            27EC                                           33EC
 * = compulsory course

 Do you want to know more about the content of these subjects?
 Visit our course catalogue:: osiris.utwente.nl/student/onderwijs.do



       Please note:
       •   The pre-Master’s courses are taught in English.
       •   All assigned pre-Master’s courses must be successfully completed in order to be admitted
           to the Master’s programme Educational Science and Technology!


 4.2                 Pre-Master’s programme in a part-time mode

 Basically the pre-Master’s programme is a full-time programme with a maximum of 60 EC that
 can be studied in one year. This implies the following: there is no formal part-time variant but
 it is possible to spread the pre-Master’s courses to be taken over a period of two academic
 years. In this regard we apply a generic recommended sequence of courses (see below), but
 we require that students who opt for this part-time mode first consult our study counsellor (Ms.
 Yvonne Luyten-de Thouars / e-mail: y.l.t.luyten-dethouars@utwente.nl) in order to draw up a
 detailed plan of study where a student’s particular situation will be taken into account.

 An example of a parttime variant of the premaster's programme is provided on the next page.




 2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                        Page 39
Year       Quartile 1                Quartile 2             Quartile 3              Quartile 4
  #1    Data-analysis and             Research           Instructional theory   HRD fundamentals
        measurement 1*              methodology*             191942080            191924010
           191960550                 191960510                   4EC                  4EC
              5EC                       5EC                       or

        Educational design                               Curriculum theory
           191975010                                       191950380
               5EC                                              4EC

                     Academic writing *
                        192412240
                           5EC
              12EC                        8EC                   9EC                     4EC

 #2        Workshop 4:          Design methodology       Curriculum theory      Final project (pre-M)
           assessment               191958200              191950380                191900269
           191958360                   5EC                      4EC                     10EC
              4EC                                                or
                                   Management of
                                education and training   Instructional theory
                                    191920160                191942080
                                        4EC                      4EC


              4EC                         9EC                   4EC                    10EC




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                       Page 40
5.         Costs
The University of Twente applies both statutory tuition fees as well as institutional tuition fees.
In this regard the tuition which has to be paid basically depends on:
      • the status of your enrolment (e.g. pre-Master’s or Master’s degree student, part-time3
          vs. full-time)
      • your nationality (Dutch and/or European Union (EU/EEA) vs. non-EU/EEA)

The exact amounts are indexed annually.
Full information can be obtained from: www.utwente.nl/master/international/feesfunding/

Next to the tuition fees, you need to bear in mind the following annual costs:

Teaching materials (approx. € 400 - € 500)




3
    Enrolment for the pre-Master’s programme is only possible as a full-time student. Students who opt for



2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                    Page 41
studying on a part-time base in the pre-Master’s programme have to pay the full-time tariff.
Part C: General information




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 42
2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012   Page 43
6.      Practical issues

6.1     Student Charter

Just like all higher education institutes, the University of Twente has its own Student Charter.
This has its statutory basis in Art. 7.59 of the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW).
The charter is law-making, which means that you can invoke the Student Charter in case of
problems or conflicts. The Student Charter comprises a programme-specific part (the OSS)
and an institute-specific part. The Charter’s institute-specific part is kept up to date and is
available              online             via            the            UT’s            website:
www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie/regelingen_statuut/studentenstatuut.

A printed version of the Charter can be obtained from the Student Counselling Desk (Bastille,
Red Desk, second floor.). The programme-specific part of the Student Charter (OSS), which
includes the Education and Examination Regulation (In Dutch: Onderwijs en
Examenreglement (OER)), comprises a general section applicable to all Behavioural
Sciences Master’s programmes and a section with appendices drafted for each individual
programme. The Education and Examination Regulation can be found on
www.utwente.nl/owk. The current OSS applies to students who started their study in
September 2010. Senior students are subject to the same regulation. Any deviating
conditions that may apply to senior students have been included in an appendix. The OSS is
available online on www.gw.utwente.nl. To get there, go to your programme’s website and
then click the onderwijs/regelingen link. The latest version is also available at the OSC.

6.2     Faculty introduction

In order for you to prepare yourself adequately for your pre-Master’s programme and meet
your fellow students, a one-day faculty introduction is organised in the week preceding the
programme (i.e. the last week in August). During this introduction, timetables (/rosters) will be
handed out and explained, books can be purchased, you will meet your lecturers and the
educational support staff, and you will be shown round the faculty building.

6.3     Communication and information
One of the first things you will notice when you decide to study at the University of Twente is
the multitude of means of communication the university, the faculty and your programme use
to communicate with you, be it directly or indirectly. It starts as soon as you pre-enrol for the
University of Twente. As an early registrant, you will be given your own e-mail address, user
name and password that allow you to surf the net via the university, as well as 400 MB disk
space on a central network computer, where you can save your documents and homepage, if
you have one. The Internet and e-mail are by far the most important means of communication
for both the programme and the faculty.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 44
E-mail
E-mail is used for rapid communication between the programme or an individual lecturer and
an individual student or small group of students. Only if absolutely necessary e-mail is used to
communicate with large groups of students, for instance if a lecture is suddenly cancelled or
an examination postponed. In that case, the OSC will not be able to reach all students in time
via the usual means of communication, i.e. the educational announcement. All e-mail sent by
the OSC should be read immediately.

UT students generally have <studentname>@student.utwente.nl as their e-mail address,
where <studentname> represents a student’s initials and last name, e.g.
h.j.pieters@student.utwente.nl (exceptions can be made for students with the same initials
and        last   name),      or     S<student        number>@student.utwente.nl,      e.g.
S0012345@student.utwente.nl. You can find a list of e-mail addresses of UT students and
staff on the UT’s web pages. Go to www.utwente.nl, click on phone book in the menu in the
bottom left-hand corner. In the search box, fill in the last name of the member of staff or
student you are looking for.

Student portal
my.utwente.nl is the portal for students from which students can easily log in to all systems of
the University of Twente.

Blackboard: the digital learning environment of the UT
Blackboard is the digital learning environment of the University of Twente and can be found at
blackboard.utwente.nl. It is a simple programme with which students and lecturers can
communicate with one another.

Osiris: the student information system
In Osiris students can consult a wealth of information: the list of addresses, your grades, the
teaching catalogue with information on e.g. courses and minors, and information regarding
your tutor or study advisor.
You need to register via Osiris osiris.utwente.nl/student/StartPagina.do for courses and
exams

Programme website
The website of the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences is: www.gw.utwente.nl. The intranet for
staff and students is: www.gw.utwente.nl/intra. Also each programme has its own website.
The website of the EST programme is: www.utwente.nl/est. Here you will find newsitems and
manuals concerning for example the master’s thesis.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 45
6.4     Student Card

The UT student card serves as both a valid ID (within the university campus) and proof of
enrolment. After your enrolment has been completed and you have had your passport photo
taken (for first-time UT entrants), you will receive your student card by regular post. You must
present this card upon request when you are using university facilities (e.g. taking classes or
exams, visiting the library, etc). The distribution of the card depends on enrolment form
processing, receipt of payment and availability of a digital photograph (must be taken at the
CSA).

Uses of the student card
Student card             The card serves as valid proof of enrolment for one academic year.
Library card             The card comes complete with a barcode, enabling its use as a
                         borrower’s card.
Union card               Upon enrolment, every student automatically becomes a member
                         of the Student Union.
Student Union Activity If you indicated that you want to use the campus facilities (sports
Card (also called: Xtra- and culture). More information: www.studentunion.utwente.nl.
Card)

What to do in case of:

Theft/loss
If your student card has been lost or stolen, you can request a new one for a fee. Please
contact the Blue Desk at the CSA for this (Building: Bastille).

Transfer to another degree course / termination of enrolment
Your enrolment data are printed on your student card. If you transfer to another degree
course during the academic year, you will receive a new student card. Your student card also
serves as proof of enrolment. If you terminate enrolment before the end of the year, you must
hand in your student card. If you wish to continue to use campus facilities (sports and culture),
you may request a separate Student Union Activity Card for the remainder of the year.

Still no student card?
If your enrolment has still been processed, no student card will be issued. Next to your
registration you also have to make sure that the CSA has your digital passport photo. You can
have your picture taken at the Blue Desk (Central Student Administration) on the first floor of
the Bastille (Student Services, office 213) every day between 12.30 and 16.00 hrs. NOTE:
You receive your student card together with a proof of your registration. Please make sure
that your current postal address has been submitted to the CSA. You can check and/or
amend your address in Osiris.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 46
6.5     Annual rosters

The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences operates with a term system, whereby each academic
year is divided into two terms. Each term consists of two blocks. A block is divided into seven
weeks of lectures, a subsequent week of study in which as few lectures are planned as
possible, and two exam weeks. For the rosters or timetable see EST’s teaching page at:
Master.utwente.nl/est. Printed rosters are also available at the Bureaus of Educational Affairs
(i.e. the so-called BOZ offices in the Cubicus building).


6.6     Lectures

Overview lecture hours
A typical lecture day has 9 periods. The 5th period, from 12.45 - 13.30 hrs, is the lunch break
(when no lectures are scheduled).

                  1st period:                08:45 - 09:30 hrs
                  2nd period:                09:45 - 10:30 hrs
                  3rd period:                10:45 - 11:30 hrs
                  4th period:                11:45 - 12:30 hrs
                  5th hour = lunch break:    12:45 - 13:30 hrs
                  6th period:                13:45 - 14:30 hrs
                  7th period:                14:45 - 15:30 hrs
                  8th period:                15:45 - 16:30 hrs
                  9th period:                16:45 - 17:30 hrs

The roster and the programme guide in Osiris indicate how each subject is taught. (N.B.
Officially speaking, we call a subject a ‘unit of study’. This term is also used in the Higher
Education and Research Act (the so-called WHW)).

Types of lectures
In the roster you can see per subject what type of lecture will be delivered. There are four
different kinds: formal lectures (whereby the lecturer presents a topic in oral form and the
students listen and take notes); tutorials (in which the students play an active role); a
combination of the two; and practicals. During a formal (plenary) lecture, a lecturer will
clarify/illustrate and/or supplement the subject matter. Usually such lectures last for 90
minutes, with a short break. Tutorials are usually just as long but are more interactive by
nature (students work in groups on assignments that help to digest the subject matter).
Practicals usually last an entire morning or afternoon (4 periods), during which students work
either in groups or individually on a certain project or with a specific computer program.
Attending practicals is compulsory. Attending formal lectures or tutorials is not compulsory,
unless stipulated as such by the lecturer. If attendance is obligated, this will be announced on
Blackboard.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 47
6.7     Attending courses

Enrolment for the courses via Blackboard
You must enrol for each unit of study via Blackboard (blackboard.utwente.nl). You will need
an account to access the courses. The university’s Department for Information Technology
(ITBE) will give you a username and password. The password will be the same as the one
you originally received for accessing the UT network. You were informed about this in a letter.
If you have not received a username and password for Blackboard, or if you have forgotten
your password, go to the FAQ on the Blackboard Start page: blackboard.utwente.nl. If you are
still having difficulties, contact the ICT Service Centre Helpdesk (ICT-S)(phone: 053 4895577)
with your student card or contact the Blackboard coordinator of the Faculty of Behavioural
Sciences: Huub Engbers (h.t.engbers@utwente.nl; telephone: 053 4894996; room: Cubicus
C102). Please consult the FAQ on the Blackboard Start page (blackboard.utwente.nl/) before
contacting either the ICT-S or Huub Engbers.

After logging in on Blackboard, you can enrol for all the courses that you will be attending in
the coming block.To do so, click on ‘Courses’, and then on faculties, after that you click on
‘Gedragswetenschappen’. To enroll, click on ‘Master Educational Science and
Technology’ (for master courses and some pre-master courses) or click on 'Bachelor
onderwijskunde' (for some specialisation specific pre-mastercourses). On Blackboard you will
find –per course- the button ‘Enrol’. To have access to the course on Blackbord, click on this
button. After a few minutes you have access to the course environment. Also via Blackboard
you will be able to see - per course - information on e.g. the contents, the exam subject
matter and the roster. Lecturers also use Blackboard as a means of communication during a
subject, just as you can communicate via a forum with students who are also attending the
course. Enrolment for work groups also takes place in the course environment.

N.B. When you enrol via Blackboard for a course or a unit of study, you will receive the
following message:
     • Participation in the unit of study may require specific prior knowledge;
     • In case the student does not possess the obligatory prior knowledge, he/she must
        withdraw from the unit of study before the final registration date;
     • If a student questions whether he/she is eligible to take part in the unit of study
        concerned, he/she should contact the study advisor;
     • Unauthorised participation in a unit of study will be penalised);
     • In the event of illicit participation in an exam component, any work handed in will not
        be graded;
     • In order to prevent unauthorised sitting for interim examinations, faculty staff will
        check whether a student has registered for participation through OSIRIS during the
        interim examination;
     • In order to prevent unauthorised sitting for interim examinations, faculty staff will
        check the identity of the students by their student identification cards during the
        interim examination.

In case you are unable to attend a seminar, practical or exam, you must report as soon as
possible (at the lastest on het same day of your absence!) to the relevant teacher and send a
copy to your study counsellor and the Bureau of Educational Affairs (BOZ).




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 48
Retrieving subject-related information
Via Osiris you can find all kinds of information on the subjects: contents, lecturer(s), literature,
etc. Go to www.utwente.nl/so/osiris for more information, including an explanation of the
system.

6.8     Finding your way at the University of Twente

Study locations
Instruction at Behavioural Sciences is offered in various rooms on campus. These rooms are
indicated by the abbreviation of the name of the building, followed by a room number, e.g.
SP1, RA5 or ZI-U3.

 Name             Abbreviation
 Carré            CR
 Capitool         CA
 Cubicus          CU
 Chalet           CLT
 Hogekamp         HO
 Horst            HR/ZH/HT/OH
 Langezijds       LA
 Nanolab          NA
 Ravelijn         RA
 Spiegel          SP
 Sportcentrum     SP
 Vrijhof          VR
 Waaier           WA
 Zilverling       ZI

6.9     Teaching facilities

The University of Twente has the following facilities:

Classrooms/lecture halls
The UT’s lecture halls and classrooms are allocated according to the number of students.
This method of allocation also enables tailoring the type of room to the needs of the lecturer:
‘movable furniture’ for tutorials, for example, the presence of a video player or equipment to
tape student presentations.

Computer and network facilities
In the UT’s instruction buildings are several computer rooms. In Cubicus there are two.
Cubicus is open on weekdays from 08.00 – 18.00 hrs. For access outside of these hours, you
must ask for special permission (application forms available from the porter). This will allow
you to enter the building with a chip card in the evening and at the weekend.

The computers in the Cubicus building are located in two rooms:
 B205C: PC-Room 1      (also called: study hall or, in Dutch studielandschap)
 B205D: PC-Room 2      (a PC room equipped for computer-based group teaching.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                               Page 49
For those approaching graduation who do not have a workstation at their disposal in the
department where they are graduating, extra study spaces have been created that can only
be reserved by them. There is also a number of observation rooms available for research. If
they are not being used for scheduled instruction, the computers in the study landscape are
available for private study/independent learning. Students may also use the computers in
B205, a room generally not used for classes/tutorials. The computers have all been equipped
with instruction-related software. For those students with permission, these computers are
also available at the weekend and in the evening.

Students can work on their notebook computer throughout the building, using the dense
network of notebook power sockets and wired Internet. In addition to this, wireless Internet is
available at the entire campus.

Support media facilities
The media facilities are managed and supported by three media specialists who are also
active as practical instructors. The instruction in the study landscape is technically supported
by the system managers of the faculty’s ICT Help Desk.

Library
The University Library is housed in the Vrijhof. Here you will find the collection of books and
journals specifically tailored to the components of educational science. Also the theses can be
found here. The library also houses a more standard collection of books and magazines, as
also a computer room with liberal opening hours for independent learning. More and more of
the journal collection is available electronically. You can also borrow books from other
libraries via Interbibliothecair leenverkeer (IBL). Opening hours on weekdays: 08.30 - 22.00
hrs, on Saturdays: 11.30 - 16.30 hrs, and on Sundays during exam periods: 09.00 - 17.00 hrs
(solely for the purpose of study). The Info Desk is open 08.30 – 17.00 hrs from Monday to
Friday. See also: www.utwente.nl/ub.

Cafetarias
A number of UT buildings house cafetarias where you can buy coffee, tea, soup, rolls, etc.
The cafeteria in the Cubicus building is open from 11.30 - 13.30 hrs. (N.B. Different opening
hours apply during holidays.) There you will also find vending machines selling sweets,
beverages and lunches. You pay at the cash desk or the vending machines with your chip
card, which you can upgrade at the upgrade machines (e.g. in the Cubicus lobby). In the
Waaier is a large cafetaria that also serves low-priced hot meals in the afternoon and
evening.

6.10 Purchasing study materials

You will need books and/or lecture notes/readers/syllabuses for almost every course. For
these please go to student association Dimensie and/or the UnionShop.

Buying books
You can order your text books via the bookstore, but it is easier and cheaper to place your
order with your student association Dimensie as you will often get a discount and you can
simply pick up your books from the student association before the start of the course or during
the introduction days. Henceforth you will receive an e-mail from the student association
informing you of the deadline for ordering books online. Occasionally, you can also buy


2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 50
second-hand books via www.studieboekentwente.nl – make sure that it is the right edition!
You can also resell your books via this site. Also the books that lecturers have designated as
‘compulsory literature’ can be found and looked at in a specially reserved part of the Central
Library.

Buying lecture notes, readers and syllabusses
The lecture notes, readers and syllabusses are sold from the beginning of each term in the
Union Shop. Via the website you can check if they are in stock:
www.studentunion.utwente.nl/unionshop
In the Union Shop you can also buy UT gifts and clothing, and there is a copy service.
Besides copying, the self-service section also has provisions for binding reports, cutting
flyers, etc. The Union Shop is located on the ground floor of the Bastille and is open every
weekday from 10.00 - 17.00 hrs.

6.11 Purchasing a laptop

During your studies, a computer is as good as indispensable. You can buy a laptop/notebook
via the UT’s Notebook Service Centre (NSC). Especially for students this centre has special
offers and excellent service conditions. The NSC moreover takes care of the financial
agreement, both flexibly and fast. More information on the offers and the NSC can be found
at: www.ncs.utwente.nl.

Of course you can also work on the PCs in the computer rooms in the Cubicus building.
However, owning or buying your own PC or laptop does have a number of advantages over
working on the UT’s PCs:
        • The computers at the UT are often occupied (particularly in peak periods, during
            lunch breaks and at the end of a term). Hence it is not always possible to use a
            computer when you want or need to, which can be stressful if you are working to
            a deadline.
        • You can work from home, during the evenings and weekends.

The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences offers all of its students the Microsoft Office package
free of charge.

6.12 Examinations

Exam roster
At the start of the academic year, all students will receive a hard copy of the roster for the first
term, indicating dates and times. Each programme presents its examination schedule on its
website. Changes in examination dates are announced via the Blackboard sites of the
courses in question and via educational announcements. The OSC will not publish a new
hard copy of the roster.

Compulsory registration for exams (Osiris)
If you want to sit an examination (or part of an examination), you need to register via Osiris.
You can also go to Osiris for an exam roster and view those exams for which you have
registered. As the roster does not mention where the exam will take place, you can consult
Osiris from 4 days prior to the exam for the exact location. Please note that if you have
enrolled for a course this does NOT automatically mean that you have registered for the

2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                               Page 51
exam! You must register separately for each exam! This can be done up to 8 (week)days
prior to the first Monday in the exam period. After that date it is no longer possible to register.
Being registered means entitlement to participation (on the condition that demands are met
regarding your prior knowledge). Students who have registered may be confident that there
are sufficient desks and chairs in the exam hall and sufficient copies of the exam.

N.B. A check will take place on the basis of the Osiris list of participants whether students
who have registered are actually eligible/authorised to sit for a certain exam. If a student is on
the list who is not entitled to participate, the examiner(s) will be notified of this. All regulations
concerning registration, cancellation and force majeure (i.e. circumstances beyond one’s
control) go via the Bureau of Educational Affairs (BOZ) and not via the lecturer responsible
for that specific exam.

 Note
 Each examination is entered into Osiris well in advance to allow you to register for it. Don’t
 wait until the very last moment! Should something go wrong, inform your Bureau of
 Educational Affairs as soon as possible, either by e-mail or by telephone so they can take
 action if necessary. Once the registration period has ended, the Bureau will not be able to
 help you. The examination schedule may change after you have registered, e.g. an
 examination may be moved to a different location. So, before the examination, consult the
 educational announcements, Blackboard or the examination schedule available on Osiris for
 any changes.




General rules

 If you wish to sit an exam, register in good time via the appropriate systems.
 De-register in time if you are unable to sit the exam after all.
 You only sit exams for which you are sufficiently prepared.
 With exams, assignments, projects, theses and any other kind of testing, you do not borrow
 or adopt work or ideas of others without mentioning the source (fraud!).
 You are aware that if you violate this code of conduct, the sanctions imposed by the exam
 committee will be severe.
 Lecturers will forward the marks to the Bureau of Educational Affairs within 20 (week)days.
 The Bureau of Educational Affairs will subsequently issue the marks within 2 (week)days by
 distributing the grade slips via the students’ mailboxes.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                 Page 52
Rules during the actual examination

 Start exam       A written examination has a maximum duration of four hours and begins
                  promptly at the scheduled time.
 Arriving late    Late arrival means that one can possibly still sit the exam if no other
                  examinee has meanwhile left the exam hall. This applies for the first 30
                  minutes after the exam has commenced. After that it is no longer possible
                  to participate.
 Aids             Desks may only hold materials that are absolutely necessary for you to
                  complete the examination. So you are not allowed to use your notebook.
 Filling in the   If exam slips are handed out before the session commences, please fill
 exam slip        these in in capital/block letters. In many cases, assessment lists are used
                  instead of exam slips. You will need to fill in your student number, name
                  and initial(s), address, postal code and city/town, subject name, subject
                  code, name(s) of lecturer(s) and the date of the exam. You must also
                  name the programme in which you are registered. If you are registered
                  with two programmes, then fill in the one that manages/is accountable for
                  the result of this subject.
 Presence    of   An examination monitor – usually a course lecturer – will be present during
 examination      the examination. You must be able to show your student card upon
 monitor          request. All pages of the work handed in must bear your name, initials and
                  student number in legible handwriting.
 Going to the     If you need to go to the toilet, you must ask for permission from the
 toilet           monitor. Only one person may go at a time. During the examination, you
                  may not contact anyone directly or indirectly, either inside or outside the
                  examination room.

Rules after the examination

 Period for marking   Except in instances of force majeure, examination results are
 exams                announced within fifteen (15) working days after the examination. If the
                      results are not known within one week before you are to resit an
                      examination, you may request the board of examiners to arrange the
                      possibility to resit an examination at a later point in time. If you have
                      been graded more than once for the same part of an examination, the
                      highest grade applies.
 Requesting to see    In principle your exam paper remains in the possession of your
 your exam paper      lecturer.
 Inspection of your   For a period of twenty (20) working days, starting on the day on which
 exam                 the results are announced, you may, upon request, inspect your own
                      graded work. If the examiner decides that the nature of the work allows
                      it, you will be entitled to make copies (costs of copy at your own
                      expense).
 Period of storage    The examiner sees to it that written examinations are kept for at least
 of exams             two years after the examination date.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 53
Oral examinations
An examiner may decide to hold oral examinations at a time to be determined by the
examiner or examiners in consultation with you. Normally this will be arranged within one
month following completion of the course (holiday months not included). An oral examination
will not exceed two hours. The examiner is allowed to examine more than one student
simultaneously, provided none of the involved students raises objections. An oral examination
is a public event unless the board of examiners or the examiner has decided otherwise, or the
student raises objections against publicity.

Retrieving examination results
Some courses still use examination notes (also called: grade slips). In this case, (and during
the examination) the invigilator will hand out examination notes to be completed by the
student completely prior to the start of the examination. If you have sat part of an
examination, some lecturers still will give you a so-called test card indicating the grade
received for that part. You will receive your final examination note upon final course
completion. Examination results are confidential and are treated as such by the Bureau of
Educational                                                                              Affairs.
N.B. In case a lecturer issues examination results lists of so-called assessment lists (in stead
of examination notes), you will receive via e-mail or Blackboard (anonymously) your result.
Although you may not derive rights from such e-mail messages, it is strongly recommended to
retain them! If the Bureau of Educational Affairs misplaces a result, you must be able to prove
that you successfully completed a unit of study. In that case we recommend you to contact
your Bureau of Educational Affairs as soon as possible.

Overview of grades
Via Osiris you can get an overview of e.g. all your exam marks or grades in a specific
academic year. Once an exam has been marked and processed by the Bureau of Educational
Affairs (BOZ), the results are made known to you as soon as possible. If you passed a subject
but detect that the mark has not been processed in Osiris, please contact BOZ as soon as
possible.

Resit exams
Every year it is possible to sit for an exam once during the instruction period of that subject,
with one chance to resit it during the exam period of the following block. For exam
components in the last block of the academic year, the programme offers you one resit
opportunity in August.

Period of validity of examination results
The validity of examination results varies: the examination results of units of study of the
Master’s programmes are five (5) years. With exam components that are graded separately
and for which individual marks are given, these marks have a validity until the end of the
following academic year, counting from the moment the exam component started. These
periods of validity also apply to assignments or papers. With regard to the faculty’s pre-
Master’s degree programmes, additional conditions apply, namely the maximum period of
enrolment for the pre-Master’s programma is two years and during this period you have a
maximum of 3 chances per exam component.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 54
6.13 Student activism

Activism possibilities within EST:
    • Board or committee member of student association Dimensie;
    • Student assistant: you assist the lecturers with the preparation and/or execution of a
        subject. For example, you carry out the groundwork and/or you are the person to
        whom students can turn if they have a question about the subject matter during a
        tutorial. It is also possible to be a student assistant in one of the departments of EST.
    • Student member of one of the quality committees of EST.




 Student association Dimensie
 Each programme has its own student association and for Educational Science and
 Technology that is Dimensie. Within Dimensie are various committees which organise all
 kinds of study-related activities, such as lectures, excursions and symposia. Dimensie also
 organises leisure activities, such as get-togethers and parties. Furthermore, Dimensie
 organises the sale of books, publishes an association magazine and compiles an annual
 almanak. For more information, see the website: www.dimensie.utwente.nl.



6.14 Alumni association ToPoS

ToPoS is the alumni association of EST graduates of the University of Twente. ToPoS is the
meeting place where professional skills are honed and where mutual relations and contact
with the faculty and current students are kept up. For more information, see: www.topos-
online.nl.

6.15 Sports and cultural facilities on campus

Of course you can also become a member of one of the UT’s cultural or sports clubs with or
without being active on a committee and/or board. You can choose from 20 cultural and 38
sports associations. Student Services provides the facilities and the instructors/teachers and
investigates the possibility of new areas and facilities. Student Services moreover supports
students with the organisation of events and sports games.

Vrijhof Cultural Centre
Anything to do with performances, cultural courses, exhibitions, art library and cultural student
associations can be found in the Vrijhof. For more information, see: www.cultuur.utwente.nl.

Sports Centre
Anything to do with sports at the UT, information on the 38 different sports associations,
facilities, courses, training and sports events can be found in the sports centre on the
Boulevard.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 55
6.16 ICT Service

Every student and staff member with a problem and/or question concerning ICT can go to the
Horst. The ICT Service Desk is open on weekdays from 08.30 – 17.00 hrs and can be
reached on phone number 5577. The Service Desk can be found in Horstring W122.

6.17 Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’

Children’s day-care centre ‘De Vlinder’ (in English: the butterfly) can be found on the UT
campus and takes children in the 0 - 4 age group. What makes the building special is its
shape: like a butterfly (hence its name). The main hall forms the body of a butterfly, with 8
group rooms branching off in the wings. Each group is named after a butterfly. Of course De
Vlinder is a centre for all children, not just for those who live on campus or whose parents
work at the UT.
For more information: www.catalpa.nl/vestigingen/1482,181,0,0,0
.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                        Page 56
7.      Student support and counselling services

7.1     Study guidance

During your EST programme you can count on sufficient supervision, with several staff
members playing a role. The study counsellor can offer support with your individual plans for
both the pre-Master’s and the Master’s, just as the programme coordinator can answer
intrinsic questions on your specialisation. With the UT also offering additional student
supervision and counselling, you can, if necessary, go to the Bureau of Student Psychologists
(BSP) and the student deans.




Study counsellor
Yvonne Luyten–de Thouars

As study counsellor, Yvonne Luyten–de Thouars offers advice on study-related issues and
can inform you of practical matters concerning your study, such as examination regulations
and legal status. You can contact her on individual study-related and personal problems. You
also may discuss with her your experiences, complaints, study choice, planning, delay,
graduation support, exemption and course and examination regulations. If necessary, she can
refer you to other support bodies in or outside the university.

Contact:
Cubicus, Room C110
E-mail: y.c.h.luyten-dethouars@utwente.nl
Phone: 053 489 1117




Programme coordinator
Jan Nelissen

As programme coordinator, Jan Nelissen provides policy support to the director of the EST
degree programme and is responsible for the organisational, procedural and intrinsic
coordination and harmonisation of the EST instruction. If you have a complaint or a question
about the programme or certain subjects, the education coordinator is the first person to see.

Contact:
Cubicus, Room C104
E-mail: j.m.j.nelissen@utwente.nl
Phone: 053 489 3588




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                         Page 57
Student Service Staff members
Maria Caliskan / Monique Davids (contactperson for international students)

Active student supervision also means that your attention is regularly drawn to your study
progress. Twice a year the Educational Affairs Office will send you your academic transcript
so far. Maria Caliskan is the student services staff member. She is responsible for providing
information to students and all administrative tasks related to the programme.

Contact:
Maria Caliskan (Tuesday – Friday)
Cubicus, Room C102
E-mail: m.caliskan@utwente.nl
Phone: 053 489 4314

For International Students!
Monique Davids
Cubicus, Room C107
E-mail: m.davids@utwente.nl
Phone: 053 489 8028




7.2     Additional UT student support

At the UT various services have been organised for students and have been combined to
form the Student and Educational Service Centre (the so-called OSC). Accommodated at the
Student Services Desk, the most important services are the following:

Student Information Desk (formerly the ‘Blue Desk’)
The Student Information Desk (formerly the ‘Blue Desk’) provides all kind of services. You can
go there to have your digital passport photograph taken for your student card, to enrol, to
register or to cancel enrolment. You will find the Student Services Desk in the Vrijhof, room
239 B (opposite the University Library). See also: www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie.

Red Desk (student counselling)
The Student Counselling Desk (the ‘Red Desk’) is in charge of individual and collective care
for and supervision of UT students at the co-ordinating level, supplementary to the faculties’
obligations vis-à-vis their own students in this area. The Red Desk provides such services as
a student psychologist, various training courses, (‘self-management’, graduating, job
interviews) and the student counsellor. You may contact the student counsellor for questions
on financial support, changing your studies, personal problems, admission exams, etc. The
Red Desk can be found on level two (first floor) of the Bastille building on the DiSC square.
Office hours: Tuesday 12.30 – 14.00 hrs; Thursday12.30 – 14.00 hrs and 14.00 – 15.30 hrs.
For further information, go to: www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie/en.
Student psychologist
You can go to the student psychologist if you need to talk about a personal problem, such as
an issue with your parents, friends or fellow students. You do not require a referral to see a


2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                         Page 58
student psychologist; you can make the appointment yourself. The Student Psychologists
Office strives to arrange a first visit within one week of the student’s having contacted them.

Student dean
You can go to the student dean with any questions on student grants and loans, financial
assistance by the UT, changing your choice of programme, problems concerning the
transition from hbo (higher professional education) to university, personal problems, appeal
procedures, foreign students, handicap and study, and enrolment exams (colloquium
doctum/university entrance exams). Meetings take place after being arranged via the the
secretariat. A meeting with the student dean is at the students’ own initiative.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 59
8.      Quality assurance
The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences sets great store by the quality of its education. Students
are generally appreciative of the education provided by the faculty, yet critical of certain
specific aspects. The programmes are extremely responsive to this and do their utmost to
improve quality.

Quality education requires the firm commitment of lecturers and students as well as proper
communication. The core of the internal quality assurance system is formed by the course
evaluations and the annual systematic feedback from students. The quality cycle comprises
the following internal quality assurance instruments.


8.1     Internal quality assurance

Evaluation of the courses
When you have completed a course, you are supposed to give our opinion on it by means of
an anonymous survey. The lecturer will integrate the results of this survey in preparing for the
next cycle of the course and curriculum. Your contribution as a student is essential, which is
why participation in evaluations is compulsory. The results of the course evaluations can be
found several weeks later on the Blackboard page course evaluation (in Dutch:
‘onderwijsevaluatie’).

Both the lecturer and the professor to whom he/she is accountable receive the results of the
course evaluations, which if necessary also can be discussed by the Programme Committee
or Exam Committee.

Student Satisfaction Survey
Each year the programme conducts an internal student satisfaction survey on the students’
assessment of all kinds of education-related issues, such as the content of the curriculum, the
quality of the lecturers, the quality of the teaching material, the communication between
programme and student, the relationship with the labour market, the options available in the
curriculum. This survey is an important source of information to faculty management and may
instigate amending the curriculum. Ultimately the faculty wishes to score above average on all
points. The results of this survey are discussed in the term evaluations, on the Programme
Committee and, if necessary, on the Exam Committee.

Guaranteeing the quality of the lecturers
The UT follows the rule that both novice and newly appointed lecturers must pass the Basic
Qualification in Education within two years. For more experienced lecturers a Task-oriented
Qualification in Education is currently being developed, which on the basis of their experience
and expertise will enable lecturers to develop further. Furthermore, the programme
management always discusses the results of the course evaluations with the lecturer(s)
concerned so that they are aware of which parts of the instruction according to students can
be improved.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                           Page 60
Internal evaluation
Once every five years, as with all university programmes, the programme is evaluated by an
external committee. Hence this is called the educational review. Prior to this, the programme
writes an internal evaluation. The items to be evaluated are: the objective of the programme,
the curriculum, the deployment of staff, the facilities, the internal quality assurance and the
testing and results.


8.2     Consultative committees

Examination Committee
The Examination Committee is responsible for all aspects of testing the instruction, e.g. the
procedures during exams, the quality of the exams and the regulations with which both
students and lecturers must comply. The Examination Committee also assesses applications
for a personal masterprogramme programme and the evaluation of requests voor exemption
from exam components during your studies (exams, practicals etc.). There is one
Examination Committee for the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programme. The Examination
Committee consists of three lecturers and is supported by a registrar. It moreover has three
advisors: the Programme Director, the Study counsellor and the programme coordinator. The
Examination Committee meets several times a year. You can find the actual dates of
committee               meetings                on                the                website
www.utwente.nl/owk/bachelorowk/contact/examencommissie.doc. If you have a request to
make, you will need to submit this at least one week prior to the date of the meeting to
ExamenCommissies-GW@gw.utwente.nl.

Programme Committee
EST has its own Programme Committee, which is applicable to both the Bachelor’s and the
Master’s degree programme. The Programme Committee occupies itself with all issues
directly related to the set-up and quality of the instruction, such as advising where necessary
to make alterations to the course. The Programme Director and the programm coordinator are
involved as advisors. In accordance with the law, the Programme Committee consists of
students and staff. On EST’s Programme Committee there are five lecturers and five
students. The members of both the Programme Committee and the (board of the)
Examination Committee are appointed by the Dean. The Programme Committee advises the
Programme Director and the Dean, the latter particularly with regard to educational affairs that
are addressed in the Faculty Council, such as the course and examination regulations (in
Dutch: the OER).

Term meetings
The programme management and the lecturers involved gather at term meetings. Topics of
discussion are: the course evaluations, the personal observations of lecturers with regard to
study load, time-related issues, the quality of lectures and teaching material, facilities, testing,
the coherence in the curriculum, evaluation of the instruction and the figures on students’
progress and pass marks per individual student. The desired content and set-up of the
courses are discussed as are the ways in which the interrelationship between
subjects/courses can be made (more) clear.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                               Page 61
8.3     External quality instruments

Educational review
With its accreditation the NVAO (the Dutch-Flemish Accreditation Organisation) gives official
approval to a programme that has stated that it has met all specified quality requirements. In
connection with this, the NVAO reviews each programme in the Netherlands and Flanders
once every five years. Both in the Netherlands and in Flanders, an accreditation is a condition
for the government’s funding/financing of a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme and for
the entitlement to award recognised/validated diplomas. In the Netherlands it is also a
prerequisite for issuing student grants and loans. The Master’s degree programme EST was
last accredited in 2006 and the conclusion was that the programme met all the criteria.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 62
9.      Faculty of Behavioural Sciences

9.1     Faculty organisational chart


Faculteitsraad        Decaan prof.dr. Erwin Seydel           Kamer van Hoogleraren




Diensten              Vakgroepen                             Opleidingen

Directeur             - Curriculumontwerp &                  - Communicatiewetenschap
bedrijfsvoering         Onderwijsinnovatie (C&O)               / Communication Studies
dr. ir. Verberne                                               (prof. dr. de Jong)
                      - Expertise-ontwikkeling,
- Arbo en Milieu        Lerarenopleiding, Aansluiting vo-    - Onderwijskunde /
                        ho, Nascholing in het vo (ELAN)        Educational Science and
- Bureau                                                       Technology
  Faculteitsdecaan    - Instructietechnologie (IST)            (dr. Visscher-Voerman)

- Communicatie &      - Media, Communicatie en               - Leraar VHO
  Media                 Organisatie (MCO)                      Maaschappijleer /
                                                               Science Education and
- Financiële          - Marketingcommunicatie en               Communication
  Administratie         Consumentenpsychologie (MCP)           (dr. Van der Veen)

- Onderwijs Service   - Onderwijsorganisatie en              - Philosophy of Science ,
  Centrum               -management (O&M)                      Technology and Society
                                                               (Prof. dr. Aydin)
- Human Recourses     - Onderzoeksmethodologie,
                        Meetmethoden en Data-analyse         - Pschology / Master of
                        (OMD)                                  Pyscholoy
                                                               (dr. Boer)
                      - Organisational Psychology &
                        Human Resource Development
                        (OP&HRD)                             Opleidingscommissies
                      - Psychologie, Gezondheid &
                        Technologie (PGT)
                                                             Examencommissies
                      - Cognitieve Psychologie en
                        Ergonomie (CPE)

                      - Psychologie van Conflict, Risico &
                        Veiligheid (PCRV)

                      - Technische en Professionele
                        Communicatie (TPC)

                      - Wijsbegeerte (WIJSB)




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                    Page 63
9.2     Programmes

In addition to EST, the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences offers the following Master’s degree
programmes:
         • Communication Studies (partly offered in Dutch)
         • Psychology (offered in Dutch).
         • Philosophy of Science, Technology and Society (offered in English)

In addition to these programmes, the Faculty’s Centre for Expertise Development in
Secondary Education (abbreviated to ELAN in Dutch) offers the following teacher training
programmes at Master’s degree level:
        • the one-year Master’s degree programme ‘Leraar Voortgezet Hoger Onderwijs
            Maatschappijleer’ (a top-up course to first-level teacher of Social Studies)
        • the two-year Master’s degree programme ‘Science Education and
            Communication’ (university teacher training programmes Mathematics, Physics,
            Chemistry and Informatics, and Science Communication)

The EST programme is managed by a programme director (Irene Visscher-Voerman). She
marks the contours of the programme and is responsible for the content of the curriculum and
its respective subjects. She is supported in this by the Study Advisor, the Education
Coordinator, the Communications staff member and the (student) Education Officer of the
student association Dimensie.


9.3     Recruitment and Public Relations

Within the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, the Department of Communication and Media is
responsible for the recruitment and public relations of several Bachelor’s and Master’s
degrees. The department organises open days, experience days with a current student, fairs
and information sessions at schools. The communication staff also takes care of all the public
relations materials (brochures, leaflets) and creates and maintains the websites of Bachelor
and Master programmes. However, information provision would not be possible without the
help of students. Student assistance is required for a lot of activities, for instance as hosts for
participants when experiencing a day with a student. A lot of students appreciate the
opportunity to attend lectures for a day, and they are accompanied by first-year Bachelor
students. The department also works together with students to organise the
Bachelor’s/Master’s open days. Most of the programme for these days is determined by the
students themselves. In addition to campus-based information activities, information days are
also held at pre-university education and higher vocational education institutes and student
fairs. If you want to be an external information provider, you can follow a presentation training
course at the university’s Communication Department. If you want to help out, send us an e-
mail! Of course, the information activities mentioned above will be amply rewarded.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                              Page 64
10. Special regulations for students
There are several special university-wide regulations governing transfers to another
programme, top sports and provisions for study delays that could occur for a number of
reasons. A summary description of these regulations is given below. For more detailed
information,     please     consult      the     Student      Charter      on      line     at:
www.utwente.nl/en/education/study_facilities/charter/index.html. This UT Student Charter
contains a wealth of information about students’ rights and obligations as well as other, more
general information.


10.1 Transitional regulations
If courses are drastically changed or cancelled, you will be informed of the consequences in
writing at the beginning of the academic year.


10.2 Individual regulations
UT students with certain special personal circumstances are eligible for the graduation
support regulation. Students may invoke this regulation if, during the period in which they
receive a combination of public and private financial assistance (granted by the IBG during
the course, consisting of a basis grant plus a possible additional grant and loan) have
suffered a delay in their study due to accepted special circumstances. The combination of
public and private financial assistance concerns the period for which part of the grant can be
converted into a gift, in other words, the period during which the student is entitled to the
basic grant. To apply for graduation support, contact the Student Counselling Desk in the
Bastille or check: www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie/beurzen_subsidies/afstudeersteunregeling
(in Dutch)

Top athletes
Studying at university level and performing at a top level in sports often causes problems.
Neither of the two activities can be postponed – studies as well as sports require the person
in question to show results in the short term. The UT understands this, which is why it has
drafted a policy and regulation for top athletes. For more information, see:
www.utwente.nl/studentenbalie/beurzen_subsidies/topsport (in Dutch)

Studying with a handicap
People with a handicap who want to study face many problems. The UT makes every effort to
facilitate studying for students with a disability. The Faculty of Behavioural Sciences has a
special dispensation regulation for students with a physical or sensory handicap and dyslectic
students. They are offered the opportunity to sit examinations individually adapted to their
particular needs wherever possible. Subject to this regulation, it is the study counsellor’s
responsibility to bring students to the attention of the Bureau of Educational Affairs and the
involved Behavioural Sciences lecturers. The students in question must report to the Bureau
of Educational Affairs, timely and identical to the regular registration procedure, requesting if
they can sit a customised examination. More information can be obtained from:
www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/counselling.         You      also   may      go    to
www.handicap-studie.nl (in Dutch).



2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 65
10.3 Graduating abroad

Several programmes within Behavioural Sciences maintain contacts with foreign universities,
institutes and companies. These contacts often imply that (within the framework and
conditions of such a contact) students may complete parts of their studies abroad. Remember
that preparations may take about a year, and you will have to inform your study counsellor or
graduation coordinator of your intended ‘departure’ well in advance. The extended period of
preparations is necessary as it often proves quite difficult to create the right conditions to
guarantee a good result. Having an approved research proposal and operational plan before
you travel abroad is highly recommended. In that case, you will also be able to inquire at a
faculty’s department whether it has contacts that are relevant to your chosen research.

You can also establish your own contacts with foreign institutes or companies, but always
consult the graduation/track coordinator and/or your programme’s graduation supervisor
about this. For more information about graduating abroad, contact the faculty’s International
Student Services Desk: Ms. Monique Davids, E-mail: m.davids@utwente.nl, Telephone: +31
(0)53 489 8028, Office: Cubicus C107.

Exchange programmes (particularly Socrates)
Under the EU student exchange programme Socrates, Behavioural Sciences has concluded
several contracts with other participating European universities. The primary objective of the
Socrates programme is to promote cooperation in education between participating countries.
It offers an excellent opportunity to study at a foreign university for a few months. All students
that meet the programme standards are entitled to apply for participation in the Socrates
exchange programme. Participating universities agree on the number of students eligible for
exchange. For the time being, that number is limited, as the Socrates scheme is based on the
concept of 'tuition waivers’ and, secondly, on limited grants. The University of Twente is trying
to have these rules changed in order to enable more students to study abroad in the future.
The grants awarded to students have been tabulated by the EC and are based on distance
and length of stay. CS and PSY have a maximum length of stay of three months; at
OWK/EST this is four months. For information on the universities with which Behavioural
Sciences has concluded a Socrates agreement, visit the UT Socrates programme website:
intoffice.utwente.nl/letsgoabroad.

University agreements
The University of Twente also has contracts with universities and faculties in Europe and
beyond. Under the terms of these agreements, students can complete part of their studies,
e.g. a minor, a traineeship or a graduation assignment, abroad without having to pay tuition
there. Also Behavioural Sciences has a number of agreements with faculties. The terms and
obligations differ for each programme, and students who want to apply must first contact their
study counsellor or supervisory lecturer of their programme. For more information on these
university agreements, contact Ms. Monique Davids, E-mail: m.davids@utwente.nl,
Telephone: +31 (0)53 489 8028, Office: Cubicus C107.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                             Page 66
10.4 Copyright

In general a student owns the copyright on any realised product within the framework of a
study programme. This implies that a student decides whether to make reproductions or
release the product publically. However, as long as a student has been registered officially in
a faculty’s study programme, the faculty is entitled to use the product internally without any
compensation to the student as long as its use fits the faculty’s goals. Using the student’s
product for educational purposes is seen as internal use. The same applies when a former
student is no longer registered as a student; however, it is understood that a former student
will be notified in writing before the product is used.

The following exceptions apply:
      •    If realisation of the product took place in the framework of a formal tenure at the
           faculty of the student, then the faculty holds the copyright.
      •    If the realisation of the product took place in the context of a graduation project or
           internship and classified information is involved, then the institute or company
           where the student did his/her project or internship holds the copyright. Therefore,
           the institute or company decides whether to make reproductions or release the
           product publically.
      •    If the realisation of the product took place in the framework of a group project or
           group assignment, then the faculty holds the copyright.
      •    If the realisation of the product took place in a context where the student has been
           substantially guided and instructed, then the student does not automatically hold
           the copyright. This exception requires explanation, and if unimpeded, it means that
           the faculty, in line with the general rules, is entitled to use the product. In this
           regard the following may apply:
             o An assignment and its report has been completed with strict directives from
                 faculty staff. The student has been informed beforehand that the staff
                 member intends to publish the report and mention the student as a co-author.
                 This situation may apply in the framework of a Bachelor’s degree programme
                 where the student plays a junior role. In that case the staff member mentions
                 the student in the acknowledgements.
             o In a collaborative setting, both student and staff member agree that,
                 depending on the quality, the product will be published. In that case the
                 nature and volume of the authors’ contribution to the publication will
                 determine which author will be mentioned first.
             o If it is clear that the student holds responsibility of the product and that the
                 staff member played the role of expert reviewer giving critical feedback, then
                 the student holds the copyright. The rules mentioned above illustrate that it is
                 necessary that in the context of copyright, aims and conditions need to be
                 explicitly described before realisation of the product.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                            Page 67
10.5 Student activism regulation

UT students with certain special personal circumstances are eligible for the graduation
support regulation. Students may invoke this regulation if, during the period in which they
receive a combination of public and private financial assistance (granted by the IBG during
the course, consisting of a basic grant plus a possible additional grant and loan) have
suffered a delay in their study due to accepted special circumstances The combination of
public and private financial assistance concerns the period for which part of the grant can be
converted into a gift, in other words, the period during which the student is entitled to the
basic grant. To apply for graduation support, contact the Student Counselling Desk in the
Bastille or check: www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/counselling


10.6 Support with entrepreneurship

Each year the University of Twente makes a limited number of TOPs (Temporary
Entrepreneurs Positions) available for beginning entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to help
them bridge the first, usually most difficult year of an enterprise. Also the commercial side,
one that often suffers during the first year, receives attention. The TOP regulation is open to
graduates and doctoral candidates of the UT, graduates from other universities (including
colleges of higher education and universities of applied sciences) and enterprising individuals
who wish to develop a product or service with the help of the UT. The condition is, however,
that your service or product is associated with one of the research groups of the UT. Your
enterprise must be able to stand on its own feet after one year. For more information on the
TOP regulation, visit www.utwente.nl/top. For more information, check: www.utwente.nl/top




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                          Page 68
Copyright:          Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, University of Twente
Copies:             350
As the information and data in this programme guide had to be supplied at a very early stage, it is based on
information then available and takes into account what is expected for the coming academic year. The programme
guide has been compiled with utmost care, but the authors are not responsible for any omissions or inaccuracies.
The formal rules as stipulated in the Education and Examination Regulation shall prevail. The reader can thus not
derive any rights from the contents of this programme guide.




2011.208 Programme Guide MSc degree programme EST 2011-2012                                           Page 69
STUDENT SERVICES

T +31 (0)53 489 3999
I www.utwente.nl/est

				
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