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                                         county of santacruz                                               -’
                                                HUMAN RESOURCES AGENCY
                                          CECILIA ESPINOLA, ADMINISTRATOR
                                                  1000 EMELINE ST.. SANTA CRUZ, CA 95000
                                               (408) 4544130 OR 4544045   FAX: (4OS) 454-4642




BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
County of Santa Cruz
701 Ocean Street
Santa Cruz, California

March 29, 1999                                                                   AGENDA: April 13, 1999


                            FIRST YEAR REPORT ON CALWORKS
                          IMPLEMENTATION AND RELATED ACTIONS

Dear Members of the Board:

On December 16, 1997, your Board adopted the County’s CalWORKs Plan and directed the Human
Resources Agency (HRA) to report on a quarterly basis regarding the implementation of the California
Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program. The purpose of this letter is to
present the final CalWORKs First Year Implementation Report, and request approval for staffing
adjustments related to the CalWORKs program and a CalWORKs Plan Addendum.

CalWORKs First Year Implementation Report

Implementation of the CalWORKs program began in January 1998, and has proceeded as planned. The
attached report is the last in a series of CalWORKs implementation reports and builds on information
already provided in reports submitted to your Board over the past year. This report includes updates on
CalWORKs initiatives and service enhancements within the agency and in the community. Additionally,
program goals and objectives are evaluated, and program activity levels for the twelve month period from
January-December 1998 are presented. The report also explores emerging trends, changes in the
composition of the overall caseload, and upcoming challenges in the CalWORKs program.

CalWORKs Plan Addendum

As you know, the HRA CareerWorks Division recently received a Welfare-to-Work Formula Grant from
the U.S. Department of Labor to serve long-term welfare recipients with multiple employment barriers. At
this time, it is required by the California State Department of Social Services that the County submit a
CalWORKs Plan Addendum describing Formula Grant coordination efforts between CalWORKs and
CareerWorks. The attached draft Plan Addendum briefly describes the relationship between the JTPA and
CalWORKs Welfare-to-Work programs in serving welfare-to-work participants, and is recommended for
approval.
                                                                                                    330
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS                                                                                    2
Agenda: April 13, 1999
First Year Report on CalWORKs Implementation


Staffing Adjustments

As I-IRA proceeds with implementation of CalWORKs and program reorganization, a shift has taken place
in the program’s focus from merely processing benefits in a timely manner to preparing individuals to
enter the labor market in a time-limited, outcome driven environment. Caseloads in the cash aid program
are declining, however the need for skilled case managers to serve the.participants with multiple
employment barriers is increasing. At this time, additional employment and training staff are needed to
address the complex issues associated with successfully transitioning people from welfare to a family-
supporting wage. HRA is requesting the addition of 4.0 FTE CalWORKs Employment and Training
Specialist 11s and 1 .O FTE CalWORKs Employment and Training Specialist Supervisor to expand
Welfare-to-Work program operations. These positions will be funded by the CalWORKs single allocation
at no additional cost to the County. In addition, two vacant eligibility work positions are recommended
for deletion.

Delete
2.0 FTE Eligibility Worker II (SC5-5 10, SC5-532)

Add
4.0 FTE Employment and Training Specialist 11s
1 .O FTE Employment and Training Supervisor


IT IS THEREFORE RECOMMENDED that your Board:

1.      Accept and file the CalWORKs First Year Implementation Report;

2.      Approve an Addendum to the County CalWORKs Plan; and

3.      Approve the deletion of 2.0 FTE Eligibility Worker 11s and the addition of 4.0 Employment and
        Training Specialist 11s and 1 .O FTE Employment Training Supervisor.

Very truly yours,



CECILIA ESPINOLA
Administrator

CE:GG/cwrep399.bos
Attachments

RECOMMENDED:
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
Agenda: April 13, 1999
First Year Report on CalWORKs Implementation



c
County Administrative Officer

cc:    County Personnel




                                               52
     Santa Cruz County Human Resources Agency
              Cecilia Espinola, Administrator
                        March 1999




52
                                                          Contents


I. Introduction ................................................................................................................ 3
Background ..................................................................................................................... 3
CalWORKs Enrollment and Outcomes.. ......................................................................... .4
Goal 1: Move families and individuals from welfare to work ............................................ 4
Goal 2: Increase family income from work ...................................................................... 4
Goal 3: Increase service effectiveness ............................................................................ 5
II. Community Employment Initiatives ......................................................................... 5
Cabrillo College Fast Track to Work Program ....................... . ........................................ .5
Self-Employment Options.. ............................................................................................. .5
Paid Work Experience ..................................................................................................... 5
Employment Services for Non-Custodial Parents of CalWORKs Children ..................... .6
Community Service ......................................................................................................... 6
III. Supportive Services ................................................................................................. 6
Child Care ....................................................................................................................... 6
Children Receiving CalWORKs Child Care Benefits ...................................................... .7
Child Care Facilities Development ................................................................................. .7
Transportation ................................................................................................................. 7
Transportation Survey ..................................................................................................... 7
Transportation Service Enhancements ........................................................................... 8
 IV. Job Retention Services ........................................................................................... 8
V. Intensive Services ..................................................................................................... 9
VI. Innovations in Service Delivery ............................................................................ 10
 Integration of Family Support Services.. ....................................................................... .I0
 Home Visits, Work-Site Visits & Neighborhood Services ............................................. .I0
 JTPA Welfare-to-Work Pilot Project .............................................................................. IO
 Public Information Campaign ....................................................................................... .I1
 Expanded Appraisal & Career Exploration .................................................................... 11
 VII. Challenges ............................................................................................................. 11
 VIII. Conclusion ........................................................................................................... 12




                                                                                                                                2
                                     CalWORKs First Year
                                     Implementation Report
                                     January-Decem bet- 1998

                                     Human Resou rces Agency
                                     County of Sanita Cruz

     I. Introduction
          ISREPORTISTHETHIRDANDLAST        in aseries of   of workshop graduates have successfully entered
     T year CalWORKs implementation reports
          first                                            employment.
     to the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors. It         The passage of the federal Personal Responsi-
     summarizes CalWORKs initiatives and service           bility and Work Opportunity and Reconciliation
     enhancements with a special focus on the new          Act of 1996, followed by the California Welfare-
     community-based employment services. Addit‘ion-
     ally, CalWORKs program goals, objectives, and
                                                               Welfare to Work Program Enrollment
     outcomes are evaluated and program activity
     levels for the twelve month period from January
     through December 1998 are presented. Finally,
     this report discusses how the local CalWORKs
     population is changing and considers some critical
     issues that are emerging as welfare reform is fully
     implemented in Santa Cruz County.

     Background
         In 1994, the Santa Cruz County Human Re-
     sources Agency (HRA) began shifting the empha-
     sis of the Greater Avenues to Independence                 1198   ma   3198   4198   a/98   6198   7198   8198   9/9a   10198   11198   12/98

     Program (GAIN) toward employment outcomes
     and expanding service capacity. Based on encour-
     aging individuals to take responsibility for them-    to-Work Act of 1997, brought about the most
     selves and their children, and recognizing the        radical change in state welfare policy in sixty
     temporary nature of welfare, the Self-Sufficiency     years. These legislative actions fundamentally
     Program of job search workshops was established.      changed the nature of public assistance for fami-
     The agency received funding for the Job Training      lies with children from a cash aid entitlement
     Partnership Act Welfare-to-Work Pilot Project in      program to a time-limited assistance program, with
     1996, a collaborative effort between GAIN,            strong work participation mandates. As a result,
     AFDC, JTPA, and the Employment Development            the State of California established the CalWORKs
     Department (EDD). Since that time, more than 800      Program to replace AFDC and GAIN. In Decem-
     welfare recipients have participated, and over 70%    ber 1997, after completion of a comprehensive
                                                           community planning process, the Santa Cruz
                                                           County Board of Supervisors approved the



52
                                                                                                              335
CalWORKs Plan, and CalWORKs program                     Goal 1: Move families and individuals
operations began on January 1, 1998. As of              from welfare to work
December 3 1, 1998, all 1,600 adult CalWORKs            Outcome I: Decrease CalWORKs caseloads.
recipients who are required to work have been           Objective: Achieve at least a 15% caseload
enrolled in Welfare-to-Work activities.                 reduction between January 1, 1998 and January 1,
                                                         1999 as indicated on the CA 237.
CalWORKs Enrollment and Outcomes                        Status: Objective has been exceeded by 5%. The
      Santa Cruz County has achieved full imple-        number of cash aid families in Santa Cruz County
 mentation of CalWORKs with an array of new             has decreased by 20% in the last 12 months.
 services in the community designed to support          Outcome 2: Increase the number of welfare-to-
 families who are becoming self-sufficient. Full        work placements.
 enrollment in the Welfare-to-Work Program has          Objective: Increase placements 25% between
 been achieved through heroic efforts by agency         fiscal year 1996-97 and 1997-98.
 staff, who continue working with participants to       Status: Placements increased by 19% in 1997-98.
 further develop their welfare-to-work plans and        Outcome 3: Increase the number of Welfare-to-
 assist them in entering the labor market. New staff    Work participants.
have engaged in training sessions related to their      0bjective:Increase the number of CalWORKs
new functions, as the population remaining on           participants 10% each month between January 1,
welfare has entered employment services and              1998 and January 1, 1999.
begun to take advantage of new work-related             Status: Over all program enrollment grew from
 mental health, substance abuse, domestic violence,     400 participants in January 1998 to over 1600
child care, and transportation services. Increas-       participants as of January 1999. In all months,
 ingly, staff have encountered participants who         program growth exceeded the 10% target.
 self-identify their needs for such services in order   Outcome 4: Increase the number of Welfare-to-
to work.                                                Work employment related grant terminations.
     These real barriers to obtaining and retaining     Objective: Increase the number of grant termina-
jobs are broadening the mandate for employment          tions by 25% over the 1996-97 final grant termina-
counselors, social workers, and eligibility staff,      tion count as reported on the GAIN 25.
and increasing their need to partner with commu-        Status: Grant terminations increased by an over-
nity-based services. Additional community ser-          whelming 85% in fiscal year 1997-98, far exceed-
vices are still under development, and some are         ing the 25% target.
seeking additional volunteer support and funding
to respond effectively to new CalWORKs clients          Goal 2: Increase family income
and emerging needs.                                     from work
     This section revisits the goals outlined in the    Outcome I: Increase the total amount of earned
CalWORKs Plan, which was approved by the                income for CalWORKs recipients.
Board of Supervisors in December 1997. The goal         Objective: Increase number of families reporting
of the CalWORKs program is to increase the              earned income.
number of participants working, retaining employ-       Status: The percent of families on aid with re-
ment, and progressing toward economic indepen-          ported earnings increased. Furthermore, the
dence.                                                  amount of earned income per family increased by
                                                        94% from $377 to $733 per month. This clearly
                                                        shows that a greater percentage of participants are
                                                        working more hours per week and earning more
                                                        income that twelve months previously.

                                                                                                         4
Outcome 2: Increase in the number of Welfare-to-       II. Community Employment Initiatives
Work grant reductions.
Objective: Increase the number of grant reduc-
tions by 25% over the 1996-97 final grant reduc-       Cabrillo College Fast Track to Work
tion count as reported on the GAIN 25.                 Program
Status: Grant reductions increased by an over-         For the past year, the mission of the Fast Track to
whelming 100% between fiscal year 96-97 and            Work program has been to provide short-term
fiscal year 1997-98.                                   intensive training that leads to work that pays
Outcome 3: Increase in the average number of           family-supporting wages. Support services avail-
work hours per family.                                 able to Fast Track students include financial aid
Objective: Increase the average number of work         advising, personal and academic counseling,
hours from 18 hours per week to 25 hours per           CalWORKs student employment, funding for child
week by July 1, 1998.                                  care and tutoring. Currently the program serves
Status: Data is not yet available to track the         450 students, the majority of whom are affiliated
number of hours per week per person, however the       with CalWORKs and/or JTPA, although the
increase in family earnings clearly indicates that a   program is open to all interested students attending
high percentage of participants are working more       Cabrillo.
hours and receive more income from earnings than           Plans for the coming year include refining
in the previous years.                                 course sequences, enhancing job placement
                                                       services, developing new retention and advance-
Goal 3: Increase service effectiveness                 ment strategies and developing a work-based
Outcome I: Job Seeker Satisfaction.                    learning program. Fast Track to Work will con-
Objective: Achieve at least a 70% positive re-         tinue building capacity and collaborating with
sponse rate on workshop evaluation forms.              community service programs and other depart-
Status:94% percent of participants rated the           ments within the college to enhance employment
workshop experience positively. Over 70% of the        outcomes for students.
participants obtained employment through the One
Stop Career Centers.                                   Self-Employment Options
Outcome 2:Increase the number of participants              Recently, Welfare-to-Work has enrolled a
attending/ completing up front job service activi-     number of participants who have earnings from
ties                                                   self employment, but who are not earning enough
Status: Up-front job services participation in-        to leave cash aid. Many, if not all, self-employed
creased by 26% by June 1998. However, in the           participants appear to be highly committed to their
coming months the number of participants moving        chosen profession and are often motivated to learn
directly into the workforce, without additional        new skills so they can increase their earning
training or intervention services is expected to       potential. In response to this service need, staff are
decline, as the needs and characteristics of the       working individually and in small groups with
CalWORKs population change.                            these participants to re-assess their occupational
                                                       and business goals based on market demands and
                                                       economic trends. Once a self- employment ap-
                                                       proach is agreed upon as a viable occupational
                                                       goal, the staff will assist the participant to arrange
                                                       additional training and supportive services. Wel-
                                                       fare-to-work Plans for this group will incorporate
                                                       the objectives of a business plan and often com-
                                                       bine small business development activities such as
                                                                                                            5
                                                                                                                 33 ?
those offered by the Small Business Development           search workshops by the end of March 1999.
Center with self- employment work hours.                  Workshop activities will take place at the Mid-
                                                                           County One-Stop Career Center
                      CalWORKs Declnirg FamilyCaseloads
                                                                           in Capitola, and will be facilitated
                                                                           by specialized Job Services staff.
                                                                           A Family Law facilitator from the
                                                                           Santa Cruz County Courts will
                                                                           provide information and answer
                                                                           questions about the legal aspects
                                                                           of child support. Additionally, the
                                                                           CalWORKs Social Work Supervi-
                                                                           sor will facilitate group activities
                                                                           which focus on the emotional
 CalWORKs caseloads have declined tnore than 40%          aspects of family separation and non-custodial
 during this 18month period and according to recent       parenting.
 information provided by the Call$omia Department of
 Social Services, Santa Crux County ranks 14 in the
 state for caseload reduction over the past two years.    Community Service
                                                              CalWORKs legislation mandates community
                                                          service in exchange for benefits after a participant
Paid Work Experience                                      has engaged in 18-24 months of Welfare-to-Work
    Beginning in February 1999, HRA created               activities. It is anticipated that no CalWORKs
limited-term paid work experience positions for           participants will reach this point until April 2000.
CalWORKs recipients who have not yet found                However, HRA is currently researching a number
employment. In addition, HRA provides opportu-            of alternative approaches for Community Service,
nities for on-the-job training, classroom training        including a program which converts benefits into
combined with paid employment, and job place-             wages. The plan will be developed with the advice
ment services for participants who need this              and guidance of the Community Service Advisory
service after their work experience assignment is         Group, composed of representatives from labor,
completed. Additionally, paid work experience             education and the public and private sectors. This
positions for CalWORKs participants have been             group will assist in the determination of appropri-
created by the Connections Shuttle and the Santa          ate placement sites leading to unsubsidized em-
Cruz Regional Transportation Commission.                  ployment.

Employment Services for Non-Custodial                     Ill. Supportive Services
Parents of CalWORKs Children
    In a new program under development since fall
1998, HRA has initiated job readiness and job             Child Care
placement services for unemployed, non-custodial          Child care is provided as a supportive service for
parents of CalWORKs children. The goal of the             all participants who are enrolled in CalWORKs
project is to motivate and strengthen the ability of      Welfare-to-Work activities. It is also provided as a
the non-custodial parent to meet their child support      transitional benefit for participants who have
obligations, through employment and increased             successfully moved off aid, for a least two years
connection with their children. The project is            after their CalWORKs case has closed. Over the
screening and enrolling non-custodial parents             past few months, the increased demand for child
referred by the courts and will begin offering job        care, due to soaring Welfare-to-Work enrollment,
                                                          has challenged the HRA Child Care Unit, local
                                                                                                            6
                                                                                                    338
child care providers and the Child Development        Child Care Facilities Development
Resource Center (CDRC) to keep pace with the             HRA works closely with the Local Child Care
increasing demand for services and benefit pay-       Planning Council (LCCPC) to address growing
ments.                                                service demands by encouraging the development
    To help participants locate and select a child    of new child care facilities in areas where they are
care provider, CDRC provides child care consumer      needed, and supporting the expansion of existing
education and referral services for CalWORKs          faculties. LCCPC has prepared a detailed work
families at the One-Stop Career Centers. CDRC         plan for increasing child care capacity through the
staff attend CalWORKs orientations to explain         Child Care Facilities and Business Development
their services to first time aid applicants who are   Project, and currently is in the process of conduct-
preparing to re-enter the workforce. Thus far, no     ing a needs assessment to identify service needs by
parent has been unable to participate in Welfare-     age group and geographic area. In addition this
                                                      year, the Child Care Fees Loan Program, adminis-
                                                      tered by HRA, supported the creation of 3 1 new
                                                      child care slots and prevented the loss of 52
                                                      existing slots.

                                                      Transportation
                                                          In focus groups, CalWORKs participants
                                                      indicated that their need for reliable, affordable
                                                      transportation was one of the two most significant
                                                      barriers to working, second only to child care.
                                                      Although the Welfare-to-Work program can assist
                                                      with bus passes and mileage reimbursement, the
                                                      transportation needs of participants and their
                                                      children are typically more complex and require a
                                                      variety of solutions. In order to develop effective
                Child Care Funding
                                                      transportation solutions, the Human Resources
           stage 1        stage   2   0 stage 3
                                                      Agency continues to work with the Transportation
                                                      Task Force, a subcommittee of the Coalition for
to-Work activities due to the inability to find a     Workforce Preparation, to craft transportation
qualified provider.                                   initiatives for CalWORKs participants.

Children Receiving                                    Transportation Survey
CalWORKs Child Care Benefits                              In order to gather more detailed information to
   From January through December 1998, more           use in transportation planning, the Transportation
than 1,000 children were enrolled in CalWORKs         Task Force conducted a survey regarding the
Stage One child care, a program for parents who       transportation needs and usage of CalWORKs
are first entering Welfare-to-Work s employment       participants; 424 responses were received and
programs. During this time, over 400 children         results show that a surprising number of
were enrolled in Stage Two child care, which is for   CalWORKs families own a car. The survey also
families established in long term training programs   revealed that the cost of car repairs is a major
or transitioning off aid. Finally, 48 children were   expense for most families and that the public bus
enrolled in Stage 3, which is for low income          system is the most preferred transportation alterna-
families who no longer qualify for Stage One or       tive. Additionally, results suggest that an emer-
Two benefits.
                                                                                                            7
                                                                                                         339
gency ride home program would allow respon-              of bike racks/lockers at all HRA sites, and a
dents to take full advantage of alternative transpor-    subsidized vanpool program for CalWORKs
tation options. Results included the following:          participants who find work.
. 58% of CalWORKs participants own a car
l    42% of CalWORKs participants do not own a car       Transportation Service Enhancements
l    77% of those cars need repairs l-6 times a year        The following transportation benefits are
l    59% of respondents reported that repairs cost       expected to be available for CalWORKs partici-
them $100-500                                            pants by April 1999: .
l    24% of respondents reported that repairs cost          .     Connections Shuttle - an on-call shuttle
them $500- 1,000 or more                                    service to provide transportation for
l    Factors which prevent driving include expired          CalWORKs participants and their children
 license (14%), suspended license (7%), no insur-           when they cannot use the public bus system for
ance (38%), too many tickets (5%), or registration          all or part of their trips to and from the work
not current (19%)                                           site.
l    71% of CalWORKs parents must make l-2                  .     Neighbors Helping Neighbors - a special
 stops on the way to wor, and 80% of CalWORKs               ride-matching and carpool program for
 parents must make l-3 stops on the way home                CalWORKs participants, designed to increase
 from work                                                  the number of available carpool options.
l    The main purpose of the stops was to drop off
 or pick up children                                        Other transportation initiatives in development
l    Other stops were made to buy groceries (76%),       or under consideration include a proposal submit-
 go to the post office (33%), or bank (38%)              ted to the Federal Transit Administration to create
l    Most CalWORKs parents go to work between            a Guaranteed Ride Homeprogram for participants
 6:00 am and 12:00 noon                                  using transportation alternatives. This proposal
l    Many CalWORKs participants work Tuesday-            also requests support for a Car-pool Incentives
 Saturday; fewer on Monday or Sunday                     program and funding to acquire additional vans for
l    76% of CalWORKs participants who work               the Connections Shuttle program.
 commute 15 miles or less (one way)                          Also under consideration are development of a
l    One unexpected outcome of the survey was that       subsidized auto repair service to repair vehicles
 a significant number of female respondents in           used by CalWORKs participants and to train
 Watsonville have never learned to drive                 CalWORKs participants as mechanics, the creation
l    76% of CalWORKs participants would be very          of a bicycle repair and donation program for
 likely to use a door-to-door shuttle service            CalWORKs parents and their children, and fund-
l    Transportation alternatives preferred by partici-   ing auto insurance through community reinvest-
  pants included the bus (55%), car-pool (48%),          ment by insurance companies. HRA is also explor-
 vanpool (23%), bicycle (34%), walking (45%),            ing installation of bike racks and lockers at ail
 telecommuting (28%), and taking the train (16%)         HRA sites, and a subsidized vanpool program for
l    A Guaranteed Ride Home program was the              CalWORKs participants, and former participants
  most significant service that would encourage          who have found work.
  respondents to use alternative methods of transpor-
 tation (67%)                                            IV. Job Retention Services
      Funding is still being sought for some of the
  new services. Other services which are under
  development include a subsidized garage to repair
  the vehicles of CalWORKs participants and train
                                                         W      elfare Reform legislation specified that
                                                                former cash aid recipients can receive
                                                         continuing case management services as well as
  mechanics, a bicycle repair and donation program       limited supportive services for up to twelve
  for CalWORKs parents and children, installation                                                          8


                                                                                                               52
months after becoming employed and leaving the        able to access appropriate counseling, intervention
cash aid program. This new flexibility has pro-       and treatment services.
vided Welfare-to-Work program staff with addi-            The Intensive Services component has been
tional resources to “bridge the gap” between          partially operational since April 1998, and was
welfare dependency and self sufficiency.              fully staffed in December 1998. More than 250
    In August 1998, HRA was awarded a                 participants have been served in the past eight
Governor’s Discretionary Grant to provide job         months. Goals of the Intensive Services Compo-
retention services. Participants who become em-       nent are to:
ployed now have the following services available:         .    Promote self sufficiency and family well-
                                                          being by assisting participants to overcome
   .    The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) :           employment barriers related to behavioral
   A 24-hour Jobkeeper hotline and free in-person         health problems, and ensure that participants
   counseling, tax and legal information and help         connect with appropriate treatment and inter-
   with family issues related to child care. This         vention services.
   program is operated by the Santa Cruz Commu-           .    Provide technical assistance and clinical
   nity Counseling Center.                                expertise for staff to help identify behavioral
   .     Work-Related Emergency Payments:                 health issues and effectively work with partici-
   Providing immediate cash grants for child care,        pants with domestic violence, substance abuse
   transportation and housing emergencies which           and mental health problems.
   impact the parent’s ability to remain employed.
   This program is operated by the Community
   Action Board.                                            Intensive Services - Identified Needs
   .    Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention            70%


   Services: Includes support groups and indi-        MI%
   vidual intervention services, as needed, to keep
   participants on the job. It is operated by the     50%

   Santa Cruz Community Counseling Center -
                                                      40%
   ALTO program.
   .    Mental Health Relapse Prevention Ser-         30%

   vices: Support groups and counseling for
                                                      M%
   working parents provided by Community
   Connections in coordination with the County        10%
   Health Services Agency.
   .    Intensive Non-Medical Substance Abuse          0%

   Treatment: Outpatient services provided by
                                                                      n dainty         i    Sa.dhComty
   Janus Recovery and Fenix Services for working       The graph above shows the identified needs ofparticipants
   participants.                                       who have been referred IO Intensive Services over the past
                                                       several months. At the end of 1998, mental health issues
                                                       triggered the most Intensive Services referrals. However,
V. Intensive Services                                  social work staff report fhat mental health issues are often
                                                       linked to substance abuse or domestic violence problems.

W      elfare reform legislation has funded mental
       health and substance intervention services
and established treatment as an approved activity           .    Incorporate approved treatment and
for CalWORKs participants. Therefore, HRA has               intervention activities into Welfare-to-Work
created an Intensive Services component to ensure           Plans and coordinate, as appropriate, interven-
that participants with behavioral health issues are         tion activities with Child Protective Services
                                                                                                                      9
                                                                                                        341
    (CPS), Families in Transition (FIT) and other         .    Greater customer choice, so that families
    treatment providers.                                  can choose the content, intensity and type of
    Intensive case management services address the        service they need to meet their occupational
complex, multifaceted problems presented by such          goals
families. Once the family is stabilized, other            .    A holistic, family-focused model
members of the case management team follow                .    Providing a single case manager to
through with Welfare-to-Work activities.                  coordinate employment services and serve as
CalWORKs social workers contact Child Protec-             the primary contact person for the job seeker.
tive Services (CPS), and all Welfare-to-Work
services are integrated into the CPS service plan.     Integration of Family Support Services
    There is also a reciprocal working relationship        Effective July 1998, the Family Support
between CalWORKs and Families in Transition            Division of the District Attorney’s Office has out-
(FIT) to maximize positive outcomes for the            stationed two full time case managers at
families. Social workers from CalWORKs, CPS            CalWORKs offices to assist single parents to
and FIT meet monthly to discuss the needs of           establish child-support orders. Family Support has
participants involved with two or more of these        become an active partner in planning the non-
programs.                                              custodial parent employment program, which is
    In addition, a Behavioral Health Specialist from   described more fully in another section of this
the Health Services Agency works with partici-         report. Finally, Family Support is currently devel-
pants with severe substance abuse or mental health     oping a specialized training program for
problems to ensure that they receive appropriate       CalWORKs Eligibility Workers regarding child
treatment services.                                    support issues.

VI. Innovations in Service Delivery                    Integrated Services and Co-Enrollment
          is in the process of reorganizing its        in JTPA Programs
w     CareerWorks Division to create an integrated        CalWORKs participants now have more
workforce development service delivery system          opportunities to access JTPA training programs
for all job seekers, including Welfare-to-Work         and specialized welfare-to-work services due to
participants. The result of the reorganization will    increasing integration of services between the
be the formation of a new Employment and               programs. When a participant first enters the
Training Division to include JTPA, CalWORKs,           Welfare-to-Work program, they may choose to
and the Child Care Unit. It is expected that the       apply for vocational training programs supported
enhanced CareerWorks Division will streamline          by the JTPA. Additionally, participants who may
One-Stop Career Center operation and better serve      have initially decided to seek employment, but
the public by fully integrating HRA employment         who have not yet found employment, are encour-
services at all levels. Restructuring is expected to   aged to determine what type of training approach
be complete by July 1999.                              would best help them achieve their occupational
   The integrated service delivery system is based     goal.
on the One Stop Career Center vision of seamless
employment services and the following principles:      Home Visits, Work-Site Visits &
    .    Universal access to core services, regard-    Neighborhood Services
    less of program eligibility, performance stan-         CalWORKs eligibility staff have been
   dards and funding targets                           outstationed at Cabrillo College, Families in
                                                       Transition and the Valley Resource Center. These
                                                       off-site services are not only more convenient for
                                                                                                       10
the participant, but demonstrate staff willingness      project is a campaign to promote the federal
to step outside the traditional office setting to       Earned Income (Tax) Credit for low-income
insure that participants benefit. On a limited basis,   workers with children.
CalWORKs staff also go to the work place or
meet with working participants outside of the           Expanded Appraisal & Career Exploration
CalWORKs office to develop a Welfare-to-Work                As mandated participants with more severe
Plan or to arrange for supportive services. In          barriers are engaged in Welfare-to-Work program
addition, social workers and employment staff           activities, it is expected that many will be unpre-
make pre-arranged home visits when parents are          pared to move directly into a job search compo-
not in compliance with Welfare-to-Work require-         nent and will need additional time to consider their
ments in order to encourage them to comply.             options. In response to this need, a five-day Career
                                                        Exploration curriculum is in development and will
JTPA Welfare-to-Work Pilot Project                      become operational by June 1999. This new
    This project, which involved JTPA, EDD, and         component will expand the current Welfare-to-
CalWORKs staff in collaborative welfare-to-work         Work appraisal process.
services, extended from September 1996 through
September 1998. The project served a total of 349       VII. Challenges
CalWORKs participants and achieved a 70% job
placement rate. Program graduates earned an                    e reasons that some families remain on aid,
average $6.78 per hour starting wage. Services          Twhile      others are able to achieve economic
initially provided through this project are now         independence, are varied and complex. Often,
fully incorporated into ongoing One-Stop Career         parents still on aid are described as “hard to
Center activities.                                      employ.” Many parents have limited English
                                                        speaking skill, and a significant number of parents
                                                        have less than an 8” grade education. Also, partici-
Public Information Campaign
                                                        pants working in agriculture and the hospitality
    Since October 1997, the Information Task
                                                        industry are employed and unemployed cyclically,
Group has published the CalWORKs Bulletin,
                                                        working in the spring and summer, then reapplying
which is distributed to all CalWORKs households,
                                                        for aid after the harvest or the tourist season has
community agencies, and HRA employees to keep
                                                        ended. A number of issues are emerging as
them informed of the changes instituted as part of
                                                        CalWORKs enters the second year of implementa-
CalWORKs implementation. Topics have included
                                                        tion. To ensure that the CalWORKs program
information on: child care subsidies, enhanced
                                                        remains responsive to the needs of local partici-
transportation services, the affect of time limits
                                                        pants, it will be important to recognize these issues
and new participation requirements, new child-
                                                        and take appropriate steps to ensure the success of
hood immunization and school attendance require-
                                                        CalWORKs families. Challenges include:
ments, tax credits, and answers to frequently asked         .     Child Care Supply - Despite local
questions about CalWORKs. The Task Force
                                                            capacity building efforts, it is continually
includes representatives from the Community
                                                            necessary to assess whether the supply of
Action Board, the Welfare and Low-Income
                                                            quality child care will suffice as the Welfare-
Support Network, Second Harvest Food Bank,
                                                            to-Work program continues to expand and
JTPA, and CalWORKs. The group continues to
                                                            more participants enter the labor market. Child
identify problem areas in communication between
                                                            care accessibility is a critical issue for families
CalWORKs participants and HRA staff, reviews
                                                            living in remote areas, for parents working
publications that will be distributed to program
                                                            nights or weekends, and for children who
participants, and advises HRA on other
CalWORKs outreach issues. Its most recent
                                                                                                            11
cannot attend school or child care due to a           literacy services before they can progress to
temporary illness (sick care).                        English-as-a-Second-Language and basic skills
 .    Transportation-Welfare-to-Work partici-         or vocational classes.
pants have complex transportation needs that          .     Potential Impact on Child Welfare Ser-
are not being met by the existing fixed route         vices- One ongoing concern is whether there
transportation system. Participants who live in       will be an increase in the need for Child
rural areas beyond the reach of bus lines,            Welfare Services as parents lose their
participants working nights and weekends,             CalWORKs eligibility for cash aid and child
participants who cannot drive, and participants       care benefits. Parents may lose benefits by
with two or more children have the most               exceeding their 18,24 or 60 month time limit,
difficulty arranging transportation. Often,           or by being sanctioned for failure to comply
parents must often make several stops on their        with program requirements. While children will
way to work, especially if their children must        continue to be aided, there is still the concern
go to different locations. Finally, many welfare      that financial stress on the family could result
recipients cannot afford to repair older, high        in an increase of abuse or neglect. For this
mileage cars. Local transportation initiatives        reason, HRA continues to strengthen linkages
described in this report address many of these        between its Children’s Services and
complex and challenging issues, however, it           CalWORKs programs so that families involved
will take continued local, state and federal          in both service systems are identified early and
support to successfully to resolve the transpor-      receive appropriate intervention services.
tation issues that make it more difficult for
welfare-to-work participants to achieve eco-       VIII. Conclusion
nomic independence.
.     Affordable Housing - Adequate afford-
able housing options for low income families       C     alWORKs implementation has provided this
                                                         community with an opportunity to re-evalu-
                                                   ate, redesign, and greatly improve services for
would significantly reduce the number of new
CalWORKs applications and would also allow         disadvantaged families working to better their life
more working families to go off aid as they        circumstances. The service enhancements and
move toward self sufficiency. As with transpor-    initiatives described in this report have already
tation and child care, state and federal time      produced positive outcomes for families, and have
limits still apply while a family is homeless or   prepared the agency and community partners to
at risk of homelessness. A long term solution to   take on the challenge of serving families with
this problem will require considerable effort      complex and multiple employment barriers.
and support from local, state and federal              In the coming year, the Welfare-to-Work
welfare reform partners.                           program, the JTPA program, and other HRA
.     Services for the Seasonal Worker- A          programs providing services for CalWORKs
significant number of CalWORKs parents in          participants will continue to integrate and shift
Santa Cruz County are employed seasonally.         resources to the harder-to-employ population. In
Staff and program planners are still working to    partnership with the community, the Human
determine the best approach for serving this       Resources Agency plans to respond to the chang-
population. Effective programs must be flexible    ing needs of families served by the CalWORKs
enough to allow participants to continue           Welfare-to-Work Program by:
working while acquiring new skills. Recent             .     Developing comprehensive, individualized
data suggest that over 125 Spanish-speaking            Welfare-to-Work Plans in partnership with
CalWORKs participants are unable to read or            every parent required to participate in Welfare-
write in Spanish or English and need basic             to-Work activity. These plans address sub-
                                                                                                    12
                                                 34 4
stance abuse, mental health and family issues
that interfere with parents achieving their
occupational goals
.     Working in partnership with the commu-
nity to develop and implement employment,
education and training programs tailored to
participants with limited education, limited
work experience and few job skills
.     Strengthening job retention and skill
upgrade services for working participants so
that they remain employed and continue to
increase their earning potential
.     Continuing to work in partnership to
develop community services in the areas of
child care, transportation, and affordable
housing
.     Integrating employment and social work
services within the agency to better serve the
existing CalWORKs participants
.     Continuing to serve CalWORKs partici-
pants who become employed and former
CalWORKs participants who are working, but
low-income, and at risk of returning on aid
.     Carefully monitoring the reasons why
families are leaving aid.




                                                  13
                                                                                                    34 5
          Proposed Addendum to the Santa Cruz County Calworks Plan
                                              April 1999

Addendum to section (a) Collaboration with Public and Private Agencies to Provide Training and
Supportive Services

The Human Resources Agency administers both CalWORKs and JTPA-CareerWorks, which is a Service
Delivery Area (SDA) for local Department of Labor funded programs. Both the CalWORKs program and
the CareerWorks program operate out of the One-Stop Career Centers in Santa Cruz County. Program
staff have been continuously working to integrate employment services at all levels. Coordination efforts
related to identifying and referring participant for JTPA Welfare-to-Work 85% Formula Grant services
include:

.       Providing Formula Grant Program overview training for all CalWORKs Eligibility Workers and
        Employment and Training Staff from both CalWORKs and CareerWorks.

.       Development of a Services Referral Form, to be completed by CalWORKs eligibility Workers to
        certify length of time on aid and to refer potentially eligible participants to Formula Grant
        services.

.       Completing JTPA and Formula Grant Welfare-to-Work eligibility screening for all new
        CalWORKs participants who attend Welfare to Work Orientations.

.       Training Formula Grant Intake Workers to access and use case information from CalWORKs data
        systems in order to verify Formula Grant eligibility and identify potential program candidates.

.       Incorporating Formula Grant screening and assessment with existing CalWORKs Welfare-to-
        Work appraisal, job search, and assessment activities.

								
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