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					Conservation Areas Within areas of interest for hydraulic fracturing...Fracking
 The Knockmore Scarplands and surrounding areas are part of the Worlds first International Global
Geopark. A Geopark is an area recognised by UNESCO to have exceptional geological heritage and
natural landscape, which has a significant scientific value, is particularly rare or beautiful. What
makes a Geopark different from designations is that they have a commitment to benefit the local
economy. This is done by bringing tourists into the region, creating jobs and increasing the need for
new businesses, all of which help create an awareness and understanding of such a wonderful
natural resource. There are 57 geoparks throughout the world and every 3 years they undergo a
stringent auditing process which will mean they retain or loose their status.
UNESCO: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (1)
       Fracking areas include: Lough Navar Forest, Correl Glen National Nature Reserve,
        Conagher Forest, Big Dog Forest,Ballintempo Forest, Belmore Forest..check others lower
        down out.
       Within the Geopark area, there are 8 Special areas of conservation and at least 18 Areas of
        Special Scientific Area, all within the hydraulic fracking licence area.....


Special Area of Conservation: West Fermanagh Scarplands, Largalinny, Lough Melvin, Upper
Lough Erne, Monawilkin, Fardrum and Roosky Turloughs, Moninea Bog, Cuilcagh mountain.
    Special Area of Preservation: Upper Lough Erne
Area of Special Scientific Interest: West Fermanagh Scarplands, Largalinny, Monawilkin, Boho,
Cliffs of Mahgo, Glennasheevar, Braade, Galloon, Trannish, Crom, Belleisle, Fardrum and Roosky
Turloughs, Moninea Bog, Cuilcagh, Drumlisaleen, Garvros, Tullysranadeega, Lough Melvin.


    Special Areas of Conservation (SAC) (2)
Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) are strictly protected sites designated under the EC Habitats
Directive. The listed habitat types and species are those considered to be most in need of
conservation at a European level


The West Fermanagh Scrarplands is one of the Special Areas of Conservation (3) and an Area of
Special Scientific Interest (4),
West Fermanagh Scarplands has a diverse range of geological and physiographical features. These
support a range of habitats and associated vegetation communities of unparalleled significance in
Northern Ireland. The Limestone formations at Knockmore Hill are particularly significant. The
Knockmore area supports a range of surface karst topography including some of the finest
limestone pavement in Northern Ireland. Three major cave systems also occur.
The upper slopes of the area are dominated by large expanses of intact blanket bog which display a
diversity of structural features on the bog surface.
The area includes a number of rivers and upland lakes. Springs and flushes also represent a notable
feature of the area, especially "petrifying" springs, where calcium-rich water seeps to the surface
along the base of limestone cliffs.
The rich flora and fauna associated with this extensive and highly diverse area supports a large
number of rare and notable species. (4)
.
West Fermanagh Scarplands SAC(3)
Annex I habitats
     West Fermanagh Scarplands contains one of the most extensive areas of blue moor-grass
      grassland in Northern Ireland. West Fermanagh Scarplands is one of two sites representing
      Molinia meadows in Northern Ireland.
     Priority feature The limestone pavement within the West Fermanagh Scarplands occurs on
      Carboniferous limestone., it is the most extensive area of this distinctive habitat in Northern
      Ireland.
     Priority feature West Fermanagh Scarplands represents the largest area of Tilio-Acerion
      forests in Northern Ireland. The woods are particularly rich in species that are scarce in
      Northern Ireland, including toothwort Lathraea squamaria, bird’s nest orchid Neottia nidus-
      avis, Welsh poppy Meconopsis cambrica, wood fescue Festuca altissima, thin-spiked wood
      sedge Carex strigosa and the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria.
     Blanket Bogs


    The Knockmore and surrounding areas has records of Red list species such as red squirrell,
     red grouse, small blue butterfly, Daubenton's bat, cave dwelling water beetle Agabus
     biguttatus, Otter, Irish Damselfly, white clawed crayfish
        The woods are particularly rich in species that are scarce in Northern Ireland, including
       toothwort, bird's nest orchid, Welsh poppy, wood fescue, thin-spiked wood sedge and the
       lichen Lobaria pulmonaria. (5).
    The area is also full of caves, underground streams and waterfalls, rivers, loughs, blanket
     bogs and oak woodlands.
Also within the area, there are numerous other areas of SAC and ASSI


Largalinny ASSI (5) and SAC (6)
    The structure, plant community diversity and the rich flora collectively make Largalinny
     one of the most important old upland oak woodlands in Northern Ireland. It supports a
     number of rare plant species including.serrated wintergreen and the oceanic Tunbridge
     filmy-fern are found here.
    The geological interest of the site is centred on the silicified fossil fauna from the Glencar
     Limestone Formations at Carrick Lough,which are of international importance.


Monawilkin SAC (7) and ASSI (5)
    Monawilkin is floristically the richest example of blue moor-grass Sesleria grassland in
     Northern Ireland. (7)
    Monawilkin is also important for butterflies, including the only known locality for small
     blues in Northern Ireland. (5)


BOHO ASSI (8)
    The area of mixed woodland supports toothwort, wood fescue, bird's-nest orchid and thin-
     spiked wood sedge.
    A population of Daubenton's bat is present in the caves. Invertebrates include the troglobitic
     Collembolan Schaefferia emucronata and a large population of the common cave spider
       Meta menardi. The only modern Irish record of the cave dwelling water beetle Agapus
       biguttatus is from Boho caves.


The Cliffs of Magho ASSI (11)
    The lower slopes are covered by one of the largest semi-natural woodlands in Northern
     Ireland; it is very diverse and contains the highest number of woodland species recorded at a
     single site. Rare species within the wood include Welsh poppy, thin-spiked wood sedge and
     bird's-nest orchid. Wet heath and blanket bog, large mesotrophic lake with open waters,
     swamp and fen.
    There are hundreds of cave entrances and 30+ km of explored cave passage.


Similarly The Lough Navar and Ballintempo Uplands Landscape (9) contain
    Upland oakwood and a number of rare species, such as serrated wintergreen and the oceanic
     Tunbridge filmy-fern are found here. Correl Glen NNR is also an oak woodland
    The woods are particularly rich in species that are scarce in Northern Ireland, including
     toothwort, bird's nest orchid, Welsh poppy, wood fescue, thin-spiked wood sedge and the
     lichen Lobaria pulmonaria. (9)
    Blanket Bog
    The loughs and wetlands surrounding them are also important for insects including the Irish
     damselfly, and several Priority Species of moths and butterflies including argent and sable
     and the marsh fritillary. Lough Navar, Meenameen Lough and L. Achork have records for
     the white-clawed crayfish, which is also present in the Sillees River.


Glennasheevar ASSI is a large area of intact oceanic blanket bog. Relatively rare species recorded
for the blanket bog include oblong-leaved sundew and the hummock-forming bog moss Sphagnum
fuscum. In addition, because of the diversity and quality of the associated habitats present, a number
of notable species of Lepidoptera have been recorded. (9)
A number of notable species are recorded for the blanket bog including oblong-leaved Sundew and
the hummock-forming Sphagnum fuscum. In addition, because of the diversity and quality of the
associated habitats present, a number of notable species of butterflies and moths have been
recorded.(10)
 The LCA has a considerable number of lakes (9)
Big Dogs Lough is an example of eutrophic standing waters of a type that is confined to
Fermanagh and South Tyrone. (9). Extensive blanket bog, covers much of the area.
Lough Formal is a small mountain lake situated a in the Big Dog Forest.


Braade ASSI (12)
Braade is a scarp cliff in the middle of Lough Navar Forest, The area is of special scientific interest
because of its rare plants. The moss Orthodontium gracile has recently been recorded here at its
only known Irish site. This rare plant of sandstone rocks has only been seen recently at nine
sites in Britain.
In addition, Braade is the only known site in Northern Ireland for the arctic-alpine species,
holly-fern. (12)
Red grouse, curlew and golden plover are found in the plateau, and there is also a range of other
Priority Species including bullfinch, skylark, song thrush, reed bunting and spotted flycatcher. (9)
Caves
    In total, Western Fermanagh contains approximately 52 square kilometres of karst landscape
     . There are hundreds of cave entrances and 30+ km of explored cave passage. (9)
    The Knockmore area supports a range of surface karst topography including some of the
     finest limestone pavement in Northern Ireland. Three major cave systems also occur within
     the site, with over 14km of surveyed passage in total. (5)


Tullybrack Mountain (5)
The major underground karst features are developed on the eastern flank of Tullybrack Mountain
and in the Boho valley. They comprise four major cave systems: Pollaraftra Cave, Noon's Hole -
Arch Cave, the Reyfad System, and Boho Caves.
REYFAD-CARRICKBEG (ca 67%, the remainder in LCA 4)
One of the most important underground karst site in Northern Ireland. In a regional context, it
contains the most extensive system of passages, has the greatest volume of passage and attains the
greatest depth of passage from sink to the lowest explored point in the system.
NOON'S HOLE - ARCH CAVE
This small area (3.5 km2) contains some of the best underground karst in Northern Ireland and are
of national signicicence. The cave system has the deepest series of unbroken vertical shafts in
Ireland, and includes a major active stream passage.
KNOCKMORE - POLLARAFTRA


Major cave system. The impressive cliffs of Knockmore Hill form an dramatic backdrop to the
northern edge of the Tullybrack uplands. best example of a fault controlled cave in Northern
Ireland.


Boho (5)
Boho is the only example of a joint controlled maze cave in Northern Ireland. With 1.5km of
explored passage, it is the seventh longest cave system in NI. The site also contains karst rivers and
waterfall, a limestone gorge and a river bed with a series of bank risings.


The Cliffs of Magho
The bulk of these features are contained in two main belts of exposed upland limestone, the
Marlbank - Cuilcagh Mountain Region and the Belmore, Ballintempo and Tullybrack Uplands.
Almost the entire latter region occurs in this LCA. The major underground karst features are
developed on the eastern flank of Tullybrack Mountain and in the Boho valley. They comprise four
major cave systems: Pollaraftra Cave, Noon's Hole - Arch Cave, the Reyfad System, and Boho
Caves. Associated with this underground drainage are many classic surface karst features.



Lower Lough Erne (13)
    The lough has an international reputation in angling. Pollan, Northern Ireland’s only native
     species of whitefish, is found in Lower Lough Erne, which is one of only four locations on
     the island of Ireland. It is an important area for breeding birds.
    Despite the quality of its water, the Lough is sensitive to eutrophication and is monitered by
     the Erne Nutrient Management Scheme.
    Keenaghan Lough and Lough Scolban contain a higher proportion of nationally scarce and
     rare aquatic plants. This is an increasingly rare type of lake in Northern Ireland because the
     nutrient status of many is being increased . Lough Scolban is a particularly rare type
     (Isoetes-Lobelia) - a type that contains most of the Northern Ireland records for both type
     species; it also has the white-clawed crayfish.


Fardrum and Roosky Turloughs (14)
Special area of connservation and Area of Special Scientifc Interest.
    There are three Turloughs in this group, west of Lower Lough Erne, which are the only
     turloughs in Northern Ireland, and represent the most northerly occurrence of this habitat in
     Ireland and the UK. Green Lough supports the nationally rare fen violet Viola persicifolia.
    The turloughs are also home to a number of rare water and ground beetles. These sites have
     contributed nine new beetle records for Fermanagh. (15)
Upper Lough Erne (16)
is a special area of conservation and also a Special Protection area (21), which are strictly
protected areas. This one of the largest areas of semi-natural woodland remaining in Northern
Ireland. The area holds one of the strongest populations of otters in the UK. In addition the
surrounding countryside is rich in relatively unpolluted rivers and lakes supporting the otter
population within the site.
Upper Lough Erne - Trannish ASSI (17)
Upper Lough Erne - Galloon ASSI (18)
The nationally rare Frogbit occurs frequently along with other plants which also have a restricted
distribution nationally. Otters also frequent the area along with wintering wildfowl and breeding
waders.
Upper Lough Erne - Crom ASSI (19)
The area contains many vascular plants with a restricted distribution in the British lsles. In addition
it is also notable for its mammals, particularly bats, and the wide variety of habitat gives rise to a
wide range of bird species.
Upper Lough Erne - Belleisle ASSI (20)
The area contains many vascular plants with a restricted distribution in the British Isles. It is also
important for otters and breeding waders.


Moninea Bog a Special Area of Conservation (22) and Area of Special Scientific Interest
Moninea Bog is one of the best remaining examples of an active raised bog (23)


Sillees Valley, an Area of Special Scientific Interest (24), include Ross, Coolyermer, Carran and
Lankill Loughs. The Sillees and Screenagh Rivers have white-clawed crayfish populations. The
Sillees River winds around between the hills through Carran and Ross Loughs to Upper Lough
Erne.


Cuilcagh Mountain
Area of Special Conservation (25) Cuilcagh contains the second largest expanse of intact blanket
bog in Northern Ireland.
And Area of Special Scientific Interest (26) The summit also supports an area of Racomitrium
heath, a scarce vegetation type in Northern Ireland.A number of rare and notable plants have been
recorded for the area. Cuilcagh mountain is also the most important upland breeding site for golden
plover in Northern Ireland. Peregrine falcon regularly breed along the cliff faces and merlin are also
frequently seen.


Lough Mac Nean (27)
This is an increasingly rare type of lake in Northern Ireland because the nutrient status of many is
being increased through input of water from agricultural land that has had applications of fertilizers
and slurry. The white-clawed crayfish has been recorded from Upper Lough Macnean. Islands in
the loughs are also important for breeding


Lough Melvin (28)
Special Area of Conservation
 The Lough supports important native fish populations. Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus occurs here
at its only remaining Northern Ireland site and the Lough contains three distinct populations of
brown trout. Lough Melvin is one of two sites representing Molinia meadows in Northern Ireland.
Lough Melvin ASSI (29)
Plants with a restricted distribution in the British isles include lesser meadow-rue, chaffweed,
fragrant agrimony, upland enchanter's-nightshade, northern bedstraw, slender-leaved pondweed and
water lobelia.
Blue-eyed-grass and globeflower are of particular note and occur on Schedule 8 of the Wildlife
(Northern Ireland) Order 1985.
 The waters of the lough are unpolluted and in a relatively pristine state and support a unique
salmonid fish community which dates back to the end of the last Ice Age. Three distinct sub-species
of trout are found in Lough Melvin : sonaghen, gillaroo and ferox; providing one of the few
examples of a once widespread situation of sympatric populations.
There are also stocks of the rare Atlantic salmon which is listed in Annex II of the EC Habitats and
Species Directive and the Arctic charr, an Irish Red Data species.


Lough Melvin/Garrison Lowlands (30)
Drumlisaleen ASSI
Garvros ASSI
Tullysranadeega ASSI: The nationally rare melancholy thistle also occurs.

				
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