Approved by Presidential Decree

Document Sample
Approved by Presidential Decree Powered By Docstoc
					Approved by Presidential Decree No 1471 of November 10, 2004

Republic of Kazakhstan E-Government Development Programme, 2005-2007

Astana 2004

2/20

Table of Contents
1. Programme ID ............................................................................................................................ 3 2. Background ................................................................................................................................. 6 3. Analysis of IT Penetration of Government Agencies ................................................................. 8 4. Programme Mission and Objectives ........................................................................................... 9 5. Main Programme Components and Implementation Arrangements ........................................ 10 5.1. Refining Legal Framework and Methodology ................................................................. 10 5.2. Ensuring Access to E-Serivces and Bridging the IT Gap ................................................. 10 5.3. Government Agencies' E-Services Development ............................................................. 12 5.4. Developing Basic Components of E-Government Infrastructure…………………….12 5.4.1. E-Government Portal and Gateway Development ........................................................ 13 5.4.2. Payment Clrearing Gateway Enabling Interfacing with Bank Networks ...................... 13 5.4.3. National System of Identification ................................................................................. 14 5.4.4. Unified Transport Medium for Government Agencies ................................................. 15 5.5. Development of Inter- and Intra-Agency Information Networks ..................................... 15 5.6. Information Resources and Systems at the Sub-National Level ...................................... 16 5.7. E-Government Infrastructure Protrection ......................................................................... 17 5.8. Winning Public Support for Programme Implementation ................................................ 17 5.9. Programme Implementation Procedures .......................................................................... 18 6. Required Resources and Sources of Financing ........................................................................ 19 7. Projected Outcome and Programme Indicators ........................................................................ 19 Annexes I-VI

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

3/20

1. Programme ID Title Republic of Kazakhstan: Programme, 2005-2007 E-Government Development

Justification Drafting

for President’s of Kazakhstan State of the Nation Address of March 19, 2004, Toward a Competitive Kazakhstan, a Competitive Economy, and a Competitive Nation. Informatization and Communication Republic of Kazakhstan Agency of the

Drafting Entity

Programme Mission

Providing the citizenry with fast and quality access to public services; raising public agencies’ effectiveness through widespread use of communication and information technology. Developing the legal and methodology framework necessary to enable individuals, businesses and agencies to function in an information society; Development of government agencies’ e-services; Ensuring access to e-government services, mending the digital divide, and providing the necessary educational and training opportunities; Development of the basic infrastructure of e-government; optimization of the existing information technology infrastructure of government agencies; Providing internationally harmonized levels of protection to e-government infrastructure. 2005-2007

Programme Objectives

Implementation Period Required Resources Sources Financing

Under the heading of programme implementation in the and period from 2005 to 2007 the Central Budget will allocate of KZT 51.9 billion (including KZT 31.9 billion to be channeled into the development of a unified transport medium for government agencies), of which KZT 4.5 is to be made available in 2005, KZT 25.3 billion in 2006, and KZT 22.1 billion in 2007; sub-national budgetary allocations totaling, indicatively, KZT 150 million per annum; equity capital, grants provided by international and

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

4/20

national financial organizations. Projected Outcome In the aftermath of programme implementation the and Programme following targets will be reached: Output Indicators - Public agency activities optimized with a concurrent integration of the information networks and resources of government bodies; - A unified protected multi-service transport medium for government agencies developed. It is anticipated that any investments made will have been recouped by the end of year 8; - Public agencies’ IT expenditure optimized; - By the end of 2005 a full 15% of government services will be offered on-line; - Provision of public services sped up; - By the end of 2006 a unified system of document processing and data flow for government agencies established; - Basic components of e-government infrastructure, i.e. egovernment portal and gateway, payment gateway, national identification system, unified transport medium, backbone databases, will be made available; - Transition to a system of single registration numbers accomplished, with the registration numbers offered in lieu of a host of currently required identification details, such personal ID No, taxpayer registration No, Social Individual Code, etc.; - Equitable access to e-government services and resources ensured through the establishment by the end of 2007 of at least 50 public access facilities spread around the nation; - Public services accessible electronically, by the end of 2007, no less than 25 kinds of interactive and transaction services available; - 25 government services offered in an interactive format, propitious conditions for providing transaction services developed, the number of individuals and entities having access to, and actively using e-government services increased 2-3 fold; - Government information systems and resources effectively secured and protected; - A nation-wide identification system developed and operational, 15% to 18% of the economically active population issued by the end of 2007 new pieces of personal identification developed with the use of smart technology; - Tax collection rates increased subsequent to a streamlined
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

5/20

interaction platform between tax payers and internal revenue agencies; - Computer literacy rates increased by 26.5% on 2004, measured as the proportion of computer literate adults to the total adult population; - Special favourable rates for public access points offered, with a subsequent two-fold decrease, pursued as part and parcel of the Telecommunication Sector Development programme, 2003-2005, approved by the government resolution No 168 of February 18, 2003; - Telephony services offered to all communities having more than 50 residents numbering 7,523 in total in an effort to reach a telephone density of 9 per 100; - School internet connectivity levels reaching 100% by the end of 2007; - The ratio of students per computer in schools decreased from the current 54 to 36, the proportion of sub-tertiary education establishments connected to satellite distance learning networks increased from 8.7% to 20.8%.

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

6/20

2. Background The E-Government Infrastructure Development programme, 2005-2007, (hereinafter referred to as Programme) has been drafted pursuant to the Presidential State of the Nation Address of March 19, 2004, Toward a Competitive Kazakhstan, a Competitive Economy, and a Competitive Nation, and received government approval (Minutes of Meeting No 9, Cabinet Meeting of 08-06-04). The Programme is geared toward creating, through adopting e-government models, a progressive and information savvy Kazakhstan. Among other things, adopting e-government will mean for Kazakhstan speeding up the provision of government services, providing access for the public to databases and information, and, in a more remote future, optimizing the quality and quantity of the civil service. As top priorities, the implementation of e-government will strive to achieve universal internet connectivity, improving computer literacy rates, and modernizing the public management edifice. In addition, e-government will open up opportunities for continuous upgrading of public management, since management process reengineering lies at the very core of e-government solutions. E-government implementation will proceed in Kazakhstan along the lines established by the best international experience, divided into three phases. Phase I calls for the development of e-government infrastructure, which implies making available such e-government components as portal, gateway, payment clearance gateway allowing interfacing with bank systems, national unified identification system, unified transport medium for government agencies, inter-agency and standard intra-agency systems for national and sub-national governments, providing access to e-services, mending the digital divide and reducing computer illiteracy. This phase will see a number of on-line and interactive services offered. Phase II envisions the development of e-government services which would satisfy the many needs of the public, including individuals and entities and wholesale management process reengineering. Transaction services will be offered during this phase. Phase III will witness the emergence of an information society in Kazakhstan, which will transform all facets of public activities. Under the broader effort, numerous upshots will be pursued, such as e-medicine, e-education, eculture, e-democracy, etc. As Phase I draws to a close, the decision will be made whether to pursue developing a policy document that will delineate further measures for the implementation of the e-government agenda. This Programme centers on nurturing the development of e-government and effective use of the opportunities offered by it and, in particular on: 1) Developing a legal framework that would regulate egovernment activities and its users. As such, adoption of egovernment entails a comprehensive analysis of the rules and
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

7/20

procedures for public service provision, which is incidentally a cornerstone of management process reengineering, 2) Encouraging the population to actively use e-government services and take avail of its opportunities, that is, providing equitable access to the services, mending the digital divide, improving computer literacy rates; 3) Bringing government agencies on-line, a process that implies standardization and formalization of management process and procedures at all levels and the development of a coherent single information management policy suitable and applicable for all government agencies. The task of developing e-government infrastructure maybe viewed in terms of two interconnected yet functionally self-contained circuits. The inner circuit deals with government to government interactions and consists of the enabling networks required to service such interactions. The outer circuit canvasses the relations between government, on the one hand, and citizens and non-public agencies, on the other, and includes all the components of the information interactions necessary for this type of interfacing. The Programme dully incorporates the major provisions of the National Information Technology Infrastructure Development programme enacted as per Presidential Decree ID No 573 of March 16, 2001, and is a multi-sector undertaking at its core. Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations: E-service a service rendered through the use of information and communication technology; E-government A modus operandi of government agencies that is service-oriented to the maximum extent possible and geared toward greater use of information and communication technology; Public service Services offered by government agencies to individuals and incorporated entities and directed at executing management processes in accordance with Kazakhstan legislation; ICT Information and communication technology; On-line banking On-line access to bank account operations; Digital divide Inequitable access to information and communication services and technology among different social strata due to differing educational opportunities and access to information; E-service provider Government agencies, public entities and other businesses acting as service providers and employing to that end the power of ICT; E-service consumer Individuals, public agencies and entities and businesses; E-service procedure A schedule of consecutive actions triggering procedural
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

8/20

and other processes which result in the e-service provider’s being able to discharge its functions. 3. Analysis of IT Penetration of Government Agencies When this Programme was drafted, Kazakhstan was in the midst of efforts spearheaded toward the development and wide-spread and broad-scale application of information and communication technology. The National Information Infrastructure Development programme provided the needed impetus and an added momentum to the process of acquisition of information systems by government agencies. Ensuring the automation of government agency interactions will necessitate the establishment of unified ICT infrastructure which has at is basis a mutually compatible electronic system of document exchange and recognition. Several data bases are being developed, such as a natural persons one, a legal entities one, a unified address registry, an automated national land registry, a real estate registry, a national taxpayer and tax entity registry, alongside with a pioneering National EProcurement Centre. In the age of information and the Internet, making information available means having a proprietary web site, which is of special importance for public agencies, of which 32, out of the total number of 42, have Internet sites. Having undertaken an analysis of some 170 types of public services it has been possible to compile a list of 85 basic e-government services which are slated for development and provision under the Programme. A handful of government agencies have gone even further and ventured into provision of interactive services, with some measure of success, such as it is already possible to submit tax return forms electronically and check on whether tax payments have cleared the system or whether there any tax liabilities outstanding in real time through the use of digital signatures, which sets Kazakhstan apart among its FSU peers. A welfare recipient database is being built, and an automated welfare benefit eligibility and payment clearing system is under construction. Along side these new developments, the building of an IT system for tracking pension fund contributions and their accrual and social insurance/person with disability databases is being pursued. Several more advanced sub-national governments already sport some egovernment features. The government (akimat) of Alma Ata has developed a unified computerized on-line system designed to liaison and cross-reference data from various city agencies in charge of individual domicile (abode) registration, real-estate, vehicle, migration registration, etc. These positive developments notwithstanding, there are still evident shortcomings, such as: Less than ideal legal and statutory framework for an en-mass IT penetration of government agencies;

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

9/20

Absence of clear lines of responsibility for the development of inter-agency on-line systems; Dearth of IT services in many government agencies; insufficient knowledge of IT applications by their employees. One of the most pressing, however, is the problem of the digital divide, which presents a major obstacle for the formation of an information-age society. Under the National Information Infrastructure Development programme, approved by presidential decree No 573 of March 16 2001, Kazakhstan has successfully built the necessary foundation upon which the e-government edifice would be erected, which features, among other things, a legal framework comprising such acts as The Information Act, The E-Document and Digital Signature Act, statutory acts and bylaws, and backbone information systems, in particular: Databases: Natural Persons, Legal Entities, Address Registry, Real Estate Registry Electronic data processing systems, electronic archiving; Government web-portal; Agency information systems featuring some e-government components – integrated internal revenue information system, taxpayer and tax entity registries, automated customs information system, automated pension (social security) payment system, etc; Activities scheduled for implementation under the National Information Infrastructure Development programme will be implemented instead under the aegis of this Programme, since their main objective is to put in place the infrastructure components required for a successful functioning of e-government. 4. Programme Mission and Objectives The Programme’s mission aims to provide the citizenry with a fast and quality access to public services; raising public agencies’ effectiveness through widespread use of communication and information technology. Turning this mission into reality will require that the following steps be taken: Developing the legal and methodology framework necessary to enable individuals, businesses and agencies to function in an information society; Ensuring access to e-government services, mending the digital divide and improving computer literacy; Developing a range of e-government services by public agencies Development of the basic infrastructure of e-government; optimization of the existing information technology infrastructure of government agencies; Providing internationally harmonized levels of protection for e-government infrastructure;

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

10/20

5. Main Programme Components and Implementation Arrangements Programme implementation centers on the following areas: 1) Refining the existing legal, statutory and methodology framework; 2) Developing and offering of e-services by government agencies; 3) Ensuring access to e-government services, bridging the IT gap, and improving computer literacy; 4) Putting in place the basics of e-government infrastructure, i.e. an egovernment portal and gateway, a payment clearing gateway to enable interfacing with bank networks, a unified national identification system, and a unified transport medium for government agencies; 5) Developing inter and intra-agency information networks; 6) Developing IT resources and systems at sub-national levels Providing an internationally harmonized protection for e-government infrastructure; 7) Providing an internationally harmonized protection for e-government infrastructure; 8) Winning public support for programme implementation. 5.1. Refining the Legal, Statutory and Methodology Framework All and any activities conceived to refine the legal, statutory and methodology framework will be directed at effectively regulating all aspects of information society, i.e. meeting legitimate demands in IT services, e-service consumer protection, establishing lines of responsibility for multifarious government agencies acting under the umbrella of an e--government. All of the above activities will be holistic and objective at their core and will conform to Kazakhstan legislation. An analysis of the existing legislation will provide a foundation on which the edifice of a future legal framework for egovernment will be built, which will outline rules and conditions for a successful functioning of e-government. In order to ensure that all approaches undertaken by various government agencies are mutually compatible a unified e-government methodology, incorporating either the development of brand-new national standards or adopting, by fiat, international standards, or both, will provide a common juncture enabling data and service integration across many agencies. 5.2. Access to E-Services, Bridging the Digital Divide, and Improving Computer Literacy Unbalanced access to information resources and unequal opportunities among different social strata create a major predicament for a successful introduction of e-government initiatives. Digital inequality should be recognized as a pressing social concern that cries out for measures to remedy it. Investing in human capital, especially in upcoming generation, by providing opportunities to acquire professional IT knowledge and expertise should be at the top of the to-do list for anyone willing to rectify the insalubrious socio-economic situation.
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

11/20

A national computer literacy policy will be developed encompassing such measures as: Reviewing academic curricula at all educational levels in order to introduce new subjects and majors geared toward satisfying the needs of an information society; Introducing e-government interaction courses into academic curricula at all educational levels; Developing a range of electronic reference materials and teaching aids in the field of information and communication technology for secondary schools in accordance with the national standardized curriculum; Drafting regulatory, legal, and methodology documents to speed up the process of brining the educational system into the information age; putting emphasis on distance learning and instruction. Another center, an e-government competency center, will be established entrusted with the functions of scientific, methodological, analytical and training support, conducting computer literacy workshops and courses for civil servants. Bridging the digital divide will be accomplished through the following means: Establish a distance-learning center providing tutorials on how to access and interact with government agencies on-line through the e-government portal; Developing a network of computer literacy facilities easily reachable to the public, including consultancy centers and computer courses; Providing educational establishments with reliable and inexpensive Internet connectivity. The fledgling e-services will lean in their development on the existing public information and communication infrastructure, the postal service in particular. Depending on category, users may use a network of access sites providing pay, free, and subsidized access to e-government services, which should ensure as wide an involvement as possible. Public access sites will be primarily established at KazPost and KazakTelecom branches, schools, libraries, community centres, internet cafes; Proposals will be formulated aiming to increase volumes of production and bring down the cost of computers and their lease rates and reduce Internet access rates and provider costs; inexpensive computer equipment will be produced at the IT Park economic zone established by the presidential decree No 1166 of August 18, 2003. Another aspect of the drive to ensure internet connectivity is the establishment of a digital transport medium that go deep to the level of county seats. A public regulatory system ensuring provision of quality services to rural users will be developed, alongside efforts to develop the telecommunication sector as mandated by the National Telecommunication Sector Development programme, 2003-2005, approved by the government resolution No 168 of February 18, 2003. Bridging the IT gap will also be accomplished by providing computer equipment to educational establishments, providing internet links and e-textbooks to as many schools as possible, and connecting them to satellite distance learning
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

12/20

networks. A good start would be to donate to schools, as a matter of course, the computer equipment of government agencies when the latter upgrade their hardware. The steps enumerated above will be jointly implemented under this Programme and under the National Telecommunication Sector Development programme, 2003-2005, approved by the government resolution No 168 of February 18, 2003 and the National Educational Excellence programme, 20052010, approved by the presidential decree 1459 of October 11, 2004. In order to monitor the implementation of the “bridging the digital divide” agenda regular polling and surveys will be conducted tracking information society indicators that will be developed at a later date. Moreover, attempts will intensify to benefit through exchange and transfer from the relevant international experience in the field of IT applications. 5.3. Development of E-Services by Government Agencies Venturing into the brave new digital world would spell for government agencies a break from the exclusive orientation toward internal needs to catering to those of individuals and businesses. As agency information systems develop and mature more and more e-services would be brought on-line by government agencies. Public e-services will developed and made available subject to an ex-ante analysis of the rules and procedures for provision of public services and management processes. The analysis will then, in its turn, illuminate suggestions on how to modernize the systems of public management and management process execution. With the process gathering momentum, requirements for agency information systems will be prepared stressing provision of e-services and interoperability with the basic elements of e-government infrastructure. The initial step along that road will be the development of rules and procedures for the preparation, approval, packaging, refining, and documenting/recording e-services. Offering e-services on a wide scale would mean overhauling the existing agency information systems or developing new ones from scratch to ensure greater interoperability. Under the aegis of the Programme, high priority e-services catering to the most basic needs of individuals and businesses will be developed and offered through the use of agency information systems, totaling 85 types of services (of which 70 are on-line and 15 interactive). Transaction services will be offered once the payment clearance gateway enabling interfacing with banks becomes operational 5.4. Putting in Place the Basic Components of E-Government Infrastructure An e-government will function provided that its basics are in place and primed, such as e-government portal and gateway, payment clearing gateway, national system of identification, and unified transport medium for government agencies.
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

13/20

Terms of Reference will be prepared for the basic components above, which together will weave the general architectonics of a future e-government. A brand-new server facility will be built and furnished to house the equipment of inter-agency information systems and that of intra-agency systems’ backup centres. 5.4.1. E-Government Portal and Gateway Ensuring that e-government functions properly will require integration of the information systems of government agencies with the e-government portal and gateway. The integration primarily rests on the availability of a single communication format necessary for data exchange. The portal will act as an intellectual link in the chain of the information exchange between e-consumers and providers. The portal’s interface will be based on the single window principle, which will ensure a unified interface for e-services provision, a user-friendly navigation, and a wealth of search options putting at fingertips all available information resources. Unified rules for the drawing up and processing of messages circulating in egovernment systems as digital documents will be developed to ensure compatibility and integration. Data integrity and security will be assured through centralized archiving, widespread sue of backup equipment. Integrated information systems, existing as well as the ones being created, should have, or be retrofitted with, integration interfaces built with the use of standard exchange mechanisms. An e-government gateway will also be built to ensure mutual recognition and integration of the information systems of various government agencies. As part and parcel of the ongoing drive to create a single registry of information resources and systems a standardized e-service registry will be compiled, with the necessary computer applications updated. A nationwide system of classifications and reference materials will get a forward push in its maturation. As government agencies’ e-services become available, they will be brought on-line through the egovernment portal. 5.4.2. Payment Clearance Gateway Enabling Interfacing with Banks A standardized access for e-services consumers to various banking payment systems, in the form of a payment clearing gateway, will be ensured, which would accord the consumer a choice in the selection of banks, and provide the possibility of making e-payment transactions through the means of on-line banking. This option will precipitate a warp-speed development of on-line banking by commercial banks to be used by both individuals and legal entities. By far the most effective means to effectuate e-payments in on-line banking is the debit card/insured credit card with an imbedded smart chip. The smart chip technology provides an acceptable level of protection and security for payment

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

14/20

transactions in open access systems subject to limitation by the available account balance. The payment clearance gateway, routing payment authorization requests it receives from open access networks to protected bank ones, will be housed at the National Processing Centre of the Central Bank and function in accordance with Kazakhstan legislation. Commercial banks’ involvement in the endeavour will be voluntary. The best way to ensure that the system of e-payments for government agencies’ e-services using debit cards takes off is to tie it with the implementation of the National Unified Bank Card System, whose development was approved by the Government resolution ID NO 713 of July 2, 2003. 5.4.3. National Identification System Identification and authentication of e-service consumers is another major direction in the development of e-government. The absence of a unified single mechanism of identification of individuals and legal entities in their interactions with government agencies has prodded the latter to develop a multitude of identification devices, such as legal entity registration number, taxpayer registration number, individual social code, etc. As a result, individuals and legal entities have had to endure multiple registrations in various agencies, such as judiciary, statistics, internal revenue, - all prompting citizens to have several pieces of registration documentation. Any changes in an individual’s registration details will be hard to track to due to the time lag it takes the change to appear in the system, and the lack of communication among registration agencies. To remedy the situation, attempts at the completion of individual and legal entity databases will be pursued with renewed vigor, with the databases acting to generate and assign registration numbers to individuals and businesses. An address registry will be created in order to standardize address processing and handling and ensure that address information is machine readable and processable, with the registry generating and assigning registration numbers to each address. All of which is being and will be accomplished with the aim of streamlining registration procedures, guaranteeing that future e-services will be pin-point targeted providing a forward impetus to the development of digital information systems, fostering cooperation and integration among the disparate systems on the basis of the use of unified registration numbers. To make this happen, changes will need to be introduced to the existing legal framework governing the process of assigning registration numbers to individuals and businesses and the treatment of address information. Authentication of e-service consumers will proceed through the means of employing public key systems, which would allow, in a chain of trusted relationships, use digital signatures at the time of information exchange. Public key systems make use of registration certificates tying the individual private keys of users with their respective public keys. An effective public key
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

15/20

system goes hand in glove with the establishment of a national digital signature authentication center. A suggestion may be hazarded that the best means to generate and store identification data and digital signature keys would be through the use of smart technology. The Authentication Centre will act as a certifying body, whose functions will be separated from registration and issue, which will be entrusted to specialized registration centres. Thus, establishment of a nationwide identification system will ensure strictly authorized access to the information systems and resources of government agencies. 5.4.4. Unified Transport Medium for Government Agencies Government agencies at present are developing their own information and communication systems independently from one another, guided exclusively by their own needs and priorities. As a result, a lot of financial resources are being spent with no benefit in sight in terms of guaranteeing network security and vertical and horizontal interoperability. Agency systems are isolated from public ones, with no provision for secured direct interfacing with the private sector, nonpublic bodies and individuals. In order to tackle this problem head on there is a need for the developing of a unified multi-service transport medium for government agencies, which is a sine qua non prerequisite for the establishment of the e-government infrastructure that would accord the users a high level of protection from unauthorized entry, support all type of traffic, and provide on a systematic basis a broad spectrum of telecommunication services. Laying down rules and procedures for the development and operation of the unified transport medium will require making the necessary changes in the legal and statutory framework. On the upswing, an efficient and cost-effective unified transport medium should mean the ability to: Develop and enforce standardized data protection policy; Ensure interoperability of the existing agency information systems; Provide for the integration of the existing telecommunication systems of government agencies; Develop secured virtual network for government agencies enabling the latter to provide high quality data transmission services; Provide Internet access to government agencies through a singe secure gateway. 5.5. Development of Inter- and Intra-Agency On-Line Systems Achieving integration and interoperability of the on-line resources and systems of government agencies will be a twofold process enveloping the development of inter-agency and standard intra-agency on-line systems, such as: Intra- and inter-agency electronic document exchange and transfer, archiving, online management systems, taxpayer & tax entity registries, government web-portal.

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

16/20

Ongoing efforts to automate document exchange and transfer will continue, a task that includes preparation and feeding into the system of documents, their registration, routing, and sending to appropriate addressees, editing and amending, operational storage and archiving, searching and reviewing, retrieving and displaying, tracking, access authorization, retrieving data from documents and its analysis. Work will continue in the direction of developing a Digital Signature Verification Centre for government agencies, creating an Intra-Agency Document Exchange and Transfer Centre serving all government bodies, both of which will be equipped with the latest in IT equipment. Under the Programme, a scalable automated on-line internal management system will be developed catering to the internal management needs of government agencies, such as: Human resources management, payroll, financial planning and accounting. Such a system, built with the help of cutting edge technology, would enable government agencies to adapt quickly to the ever-changing environment and become cost-effective in discharging their duties. A web portal, designed along the state-of-the-art principles and Internet technology protocols providing regulated access and serving all government agencies will enable them to better manage the information already compiled and stored by intra- and inter-agency networks, respond rapidly to new developments, and assemble employees of several agencies to work as part of joint task forces. An automated national land registry system and a real estate registry will be constructed under intra-agency system development efforts. 5.6. Information Systems and Resources at the Sub-National Level Aside from the central or national tier, individuals and incorporated entities interact with government agencies on the sub-national level, as well. The information systems of local governments should provide to the individuals leaving in their catchments areas up-to-date information on the region’s economy and vital statistics, public procurement, act as a virtual suggestions and comments box to handle and track inquiries and complaints, provide access to digital boilerplates/pro-formas, as well as providing such services as licensing public transportation operators, city planning and development, etc. Any information system solutions that will be developed at the sub-national level should be agreed with the competent appointed information & communication authority in an effort to avoid creating a hodgepodge of mismatching regional systems and ensure compliance with national e-government architectonics. It is incontrovertible that the goal of establishing a coherent regional egovernment policy will be best served by pooling the financial and intellectual resources of local governments in order to develop a range of standardized solutions. On-line interactions between the citizenry and sub-national governments will be routed through a single unified e-government portal and gateway. However, it will up to the sub-national governments to develop and make available sufficient resources in order to provide the range of e-services required. Nevertheless it is
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

17/20

clear that the ability of the sub-national governments to provide e-services is directly linked to the level of development of intra-agency information systems, a fact that unambiguously spells the necessity of developing solutions and technical regulations enabling them to interface with their national counterparts. In order to provide the much-needed positive reinforcement to those regions that excel at the implementation of e-government and ICT, competitions will be held which will determine the best sub-national government in the nation in terms of e-government performance and penetration and computer literacy among its population. 5.7. Protecting E-Government Infrastructure It is paramount that e-services be offered in a format that complies with standard protection requirements if the inchoate e-government system is to provide information security and protection and win public trust. That will require developing an information protection concept designed to incorporate stringent technical requirements to basic components and the information systems of government agencies. The concept will also canvass such issues as capacity building and training, both if which are vital for the security and protection of public information systems. Under the umbrella of the Programme, it is planned that either national security and protection standards will be developed, or their international counterparts adopted outright, which will then in turn provide a blueprint for building a secure system. As each e-government infrastructure component gets developed a regulatory document will be prepared laying down security and protection policy requirements. In order to avoid redundancy, standard protection solutions will be developed, thus enabling to incorporate security requirements early on in the process of designing an e-service. Any and all protection solutions will be based on open source technologies allowing users free access to applications in modifying and adjusting them to effectuate new tasks. Each component and solution will be certified as to its conformity with regulatory, concept, and security policy requirements. A unified approach to agreeing and approving Terms of Reference for the tasks of providing security and protection to public information systems is also in the making. Government oversight of the Kazakhstan Internet domain will be ensured by measures taken to create a unified domain distribution protocol and establishing a KZ domain management center. 5.8. Winning Public Support for Programme Implementation Any programme if it is to be slated for successful implementation must enjoy some measure of popular support. To ensure this, a wide awareness and publicity campaign should be unleashed in all the media available, including on the web. The main activities that should be undertaken in this regard are as follows:
Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

18/20

Creating the right mix of stimuli to ensure development and support of public e-services; Ensuring an unebbing public interest in public e-services their use. Attracting and sustaining public attention to the Programme and its activities and ensuring a high level of support and commitment from government agencies will transpire through the means of a wide media campaign, i.e. participating and organizing IT fairs and exhibitions, public town hall style meeting of high profile government agency and business representatives and researchers, publishing analytical reviews, and disseminating advertisement materials. Under this heading, annual workshops on programme implementation will be held, as well as sectoral compliance competitions to determine the sector that has gone the farthest down road of e-government penetration. A dedicated website will be designed and maintained highlighting programme implementation activities. Regular monitoring is planned to track programme implementation and the acceptance of services by the public. 5.9. Programme Implementation Arrangements Programme implementation will go along the lines of an Action Plan and sectoral and regional information programmes. A National Information Infrastructure Coordinating Commission established by government resolution will, within the scope of its vested authority, coordinate programme implementation and oversee all measures pertaining thereto. Programme implementation and oversight on the national level will be delegated to the competent appointed information and communication authority, and regional and sectoral ones will be supervised by relevant public agencies. A unified technical policy geared to the needs to programme implementation will require entrusting the national information operator with the function of systematically integrating e-government infrastructure, project management, technical support and assistance to inter-agency information systems, and running the unified public transport medium. The competent appointed information and communication authority will provide institutional home for a council of heads of the information departments of government agencies, which will deal with organizational, and methodology problems. National information operator staff will be posted to those agencies having insufficient IT capacity, with the specialists concentrating on insuring that brining a government agency in question up to standards will go along national policy lines, and if required, on active management of the existing systems and providing network technical support.

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

19/20

6. Required Resources and Sources of Financing Funding for the Programme will be rolled out by the central and local budgets, as well as extra-budgetary funds. Estimates and projections suggest that: The Central Budget will allocate KZT 51.9 billion (including KZT 31.9 billion for the unified transport medium), of which KZT 4.5 billion will be rolled out in 2005, KZT 25.3 billion in 2006, and KZT 22.1 billion in 2007; Sub-national budgets will provide KZT 150 million per annum; Private investments, grants offered by international and national development organizations. Moreover, a pilot unified transport medium project will be launched for the municipality of Astana, for which KZT 1.06 billion will be disbursed. A comprehensive expenditure breakdown by activity will be included in the Programme Action Plan to be approved by government resolution. Any necessary amendments to the Programmes in terms of changing volumes of funding provided by a budgetary source in question will proceed pursuant to Kazakhstan legislation. 7. Projected Outcome and Output Indicators As part of programme implementation, individuals and businesses will be provided with a fast and user-friendly connection to public services, on top of hiking up the efficiency of public agencies as they set to fulfill their myriad of functions through greater use and stronger emphasis on communication and information technology. In the aftermath of programme implementation the following targets will be reached: - Public agency activities optimized with a concurrent integration of the information networks and resources of government bodies; - A unified protected multi-service transport medium for government agencies developed. It is anticipated that any investments made will have been recouped by the end of year 8; - Public agencies’ IT expenditure optimized; - By the end of 2005 a full 15% of government services will be offered on-line; - Provision of public services sped up; - By the end of 2006 a unified system of document exchange and transfer for government agencies established; By the end of 2007: - Basic components of e-government infrastructure, i.e. e-government portal and gateway, payment gateway, national identification system, unified transport medium, system databases, will be made available; - Transition to a system of single registration numbers accomplished, with the registration numbers offered in lieu of a host currently required identification

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme

20/20

details, such personal ID number, taxpayer registration No, Social individual code, etc.; - Equitable access to e-government services and resources ensured through the establishment of at least 50 public access facilities spread around the nation; - Public services accessible electronically, no less than 25 kinds of interactive and transaction services available; - 25 government services offered in an interactive format, propitious conditions for providing transaction services developed, the number of individuals and entities having access to, and actively using e-government services increased 2-3 fold; - A nation-wide identification system developed and operational, 15% to 18% of the economically active population issued by the end of 2007 new pieces of personal identification developed with the use of smart technology; - Tax collection rates increased subsequent to a streamlined interaction platform between tax payers and internal revenue agencies; - Government information systems and resources effectively secured and protected; - Computer literacy rates increased by 26.5% on 2004, measured as the proportion of computer literate adults to the total adult population; - Special favourable rates for public access points offered, with a subsequent twofold decrease, pursued as part and parcel of the Telecommunication Sector Development programme, 2003-2005, approved by the government resolution No 168 of February 18, 2003; - Telephony services offered to all communities having more than 50 residents numbering 7,523 in total in an effort to reach a telephone density of 9 per 100; - School internet connectivity levels reaching 100% by the end of 2007; - The ratio of students per computer in schools decreased from the current 54 to 36, the proportion of sub-tertiary education establishments connected to satellite distance learning networks increased from 8.7% to 20.8%.

Kazakhstan: E-Government Development Programme