THE NORMAN FAMILY

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					THE NORMAN FAMILY
1.1.1.1. BENJAMIN ALBERT NORMAN (George and Sarah) 1842 - 1907 ............................................................................................... 3 1.1.1.1.1. George Norman,1863 - c.1872 of Benjamin Albert .................................................................................................................. 5 1.1.1.1.2. Albert Norman, 1865 - 1939 of Benjamin Albert ...................................................................................................................... 5 1.1.1.1.2.1. Edith Shirley Norman, of Albert and Betsey...................................................................................................................... 6 1.1.1.1.2.2. Doris Norman, 1901 - of Albert and Betsey ...................................................................................................................... 6 1.1.1.1.2.3. Florence Norman, 1905 - , of Albert and Betsey ............................................................................................................... 7 1.1.1.1.3. Herbert Norman 1870 - ???? of Benjamin Albert ..................................................................................................................... 7 1.1.1.1.4. Susan Jane Norman 1873 - 1938 of Benjamin Albert ............................................................................................................... 7 1.1.1.1.5. Henry Norman, 1869 - 1955 of Benjamin Albert ...................................................................................................................... 7 1.1.1.1.5.1. SIR Charles Norman .......................................................................................................................................................... 9 1.1.1.1.5.2. Donald Hayes Norman, of Charles & Dorothy ................................................................................................................ 15 1.1.1.1.5.2.1. Arthur Charles Norman, of Donald and Peggy ......................................................................................................... 15 1.1.1.1.5.2.1.1. Richard Charles Norman, of Arthur and Lucy .................................................................................................. 15 1.1.1.1.5.2.2. Heather Katrina Norman, of Donald and Peggy ....................................................................................................... 15 1.1.1.1.5.3. Michael Hayes Norman, of Charles & Dorothy ............................................................................................................... 15 1.1.1.1.5.3.1. Nicholas Graham Norman, of Michael & Margaret .................................................................................................. 15 1.1.1.1.5.3.2. Phillip Geoffrey Norman, of Michael and Margaret ................................................................................................. 16 1.1.1.1.5.4. Helena Dorothy Marion Norman, of Charles & Dorothy ................................................................................................. 16 1.1.1.1.5.5. Henry Norman, 1895 - , of Henry & Rhoda ..................................................................................................................... 16 1.1.1.1.5.5.1. Gerald Norman, of Henry and Olive ......................................................................................................................... 16 1.1.1.1.5.6. George Norman, 1896 - 1921, of Henry and Rhoda ........................................................................................................ 16 1.1.1.1.5.7. Gladys Florence Norman 1898 -1984, of Henry and Rhoda ............................................................................................ 16 1.1.1.1.5.8. James Norman, 1900 - 1983 ............................................................................................................................................ 16 1.1.1.1.5.8.1. Geoffrey Norman, of James and Dorothy ................................................................................................................. 16 1.1.1.1.5.8.1.1. Carole Norman of Geoffrey and Marjorie ......................................................................................................... 16 1.1.1.1.5.8.1.2. Jane Norman of Geoffrey and Marjorie ............................................................................................................. 17 1.1.1.1.5.9. Elsie Ruby Norman .......................................................................................................................................................... 17 1.1.1.1.5.10. Reginald Arthur Norman, - 1967, of Henry and Rhoda ................................................................................................ 17 1.1.1.1.5.10.1. David Norman, of Reginald and Judy,.................................................................................................................... 17 1.1.1.1.5.10.2. Wendy Norman, of Reginald and Judy ................................................................................................................... 17 1.1.1.1.5.11. Frank Norman, - 1987, of Henry and Rhoda.................................................................................................................. 17 1.1.1.1.5.12. Percy Norman of Henry and Rhoda ............................................................................................................................... 17 1.1.1.1.5.13. Peter Norman, 1913 - 1995, of Henry and Rhoda.......................................................................................................... 17 1.1.1.1.5.14. Joan Norman, 1924 - , of Henry and Edith .................................................................................................................... 18 1.1.1.1.6. William George Norman ,1875 - 1946, of Benjamin Albert .................................................................................................. 18 1.1.1.1.7. Florence Norman, ???? - 1953, of Benjamin Albert ................................................................................................................ 18 1.1.1.1.8. Benjamin Arthur. 1880 - , of Benjamin Albert ....................................................................................................................... 19 1.1.1.1.9. Frederick Norman, of Benjamin Arthur and Beatrice.............................................................................................................. 19 1.1.1.2. HERBERT NORMAN of George and Sarah 1846 - 1894 ........................................................................................................... 20 1.1.1.3. WILLIAM NORMAN of George and Sarah 1852 - ???? .............................................................................................................. 20 ANNE MARIA NORMAN of George and Sarah 1854 - 1892 ...................................................................................................................... 21 1.1.1.4. JANE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1858 - 1937 ..................................................................................................................... 23 1.1.1.5. WALTER NORMAN of George and Sarah 1860 - ???? ............................................................................................................... 24 GEORGE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1850 - ???? ................................................................................................................................. 24 THOMAS NORMAN of George and Sarah ???? - ???? .................................................................................................................................. 25 1.1.1.6. SARAH ANNE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1863 - 1928 ..................................................................................................... 25 1.1.1.7. HENRY NORMAN of George and Sarah 1848 - 1865 ................................................................................................................. 25

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GEORGE‟S OTHER RELATIVES ? .....................................................................................................................................26

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Revision dated 06/11/2009 TABLE OF FIGURES TABLE 10 COPENHAGEN STREET 1881 MOUTH OF THE NILE ...............................................................................................................20

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1.1.1.1.BENJAMIN ALBERT NORMAN (George and Sarah) 1842 - 1907
The eldest son of George and Sarah,. He and his fiance witnessed the marriage of his next brother Alfred to Mary Fudger on September 21 . 1862 and then on: Saint Andrew‟s Church 5 July 1863 Benjamin Norman 21 b Jane Knight 21 s George Norman and David Knight Iron Moulder Horsehair weaver Hound Lane Hare lane George, a labourer David, a labourer
st

Jane had been born in May 1841 and was a horse hair weaver by trade at her marriage. This may have been at the large Factory in Copenhagen Street. In 1871 they were living at 19 Canal side in St. Peter's Parish in Worcester. He was a moulder and his wife a gloveress - the four eldest sons living with them. He made his will from 5, St. Martin's Street on November 27th. 1907 and left everything to his wife Jane. He had to make his mark, and was therefore illiterate. He died 9th. December 1907 and administration was granted to his wife on January 7th. 1908. He was basically an Iron Moulder by trade.

23 April 1865 BIRTH 4 Dec 1870 BIRTH 7 Feb 1869 BIRTH
St

Saint John‟s Parish Saint Peter‟s Parish Saint John‟s Parish

Albert of Benjamin & Jane Herbert Henry

Father a Moulder Iron Moulder A moulder

of John‟s Parish Dent Street St of John‟s PArish

St

Census 1871 Peter the Great Parish at 19 Canal Side Benjamin Norman h mar 29 Moulder Jane w mar 30 Gloveress George s 7 Scholar Albert s 6 Scholar Harry s 2 Herbert s 1

Born Worcester Born Worcester Born Worcester Born Worcester Born Worcester Born Worcester

Jane was still living in 1923 at 5 St. Martin's Street where se was registered as an Elector, along with her daughter Florence Norman who died in 1953. She had informed the Registrar of Alfred's death n 1896. Benjamin Albert Norman did not divulge his second Christian name when he married Jane the youngest child of the large family of David and Susannah Knight. The wedding took place on 5th July 1863 at St. Andrews in the city of Worcester. Peggy Norman continues:1 “The groom was 21, a bachelor and a moulder of Hound's Lane. Jane was also 21, a spinster and horsehair weaver of Hare's Lane. Horsehair was used for petticoats to be worn under crinolines, in tailoring and in the upholstery trade. Braids of synthetic horse hair is still used to give theatrical costumes bounce. The couple were married by banns, Benjamin made his mark Jane was able to sign her name, Benjamin's father George signed as a witness, the other witness Caroline Daniel made her mark. Both the fathers George Norman and David Knight were given as labourers. Benjamin would have served an apprenticeship, he spent his working life at Hardy and Padmore's Iron Foundry. Work started at about 8 a.m. , there were carriers to carry molten iron and two boys to do the unskilled work. His grandson recalled that Benjamin left work and was home by about 4 p.m. leaving the others to clear up and prepare for the next day. His wages were £2 a week. A master craftsman indeed. The following generations held very different views of Benjamin and Jane. Their daughter-in-law 'Lal' when asked for her reminiscences obviously held them in great awe if not fear, all she could bring herself to say was that they were very strict but very fair. 'Lal' was in her 80's, perhaps with a better known relative and given more time she could have enlarged on her memories. Their grandchildren gave a very different picture of Benjamin and Jane. When Charles, their first grandson was born, Benjamin was said not to have worked or been sober for a week. Every Sunday the children would go to ST. Martin's Street, their
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In her history distributed around the family. “Trunk, Boughs Branches and Twigs”

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Revision dated 06/11/2009 grandfather was always seated and basting the Sunday joint in front of the fire, their grandmother always gave them lumps of sugar loaf from a jar in the cupboard. Benjamin has been described as a big, powerful, upright man with a white beard. He had meat three times a day, bacon for breakfast, hot chop or steak and vegetables carried to the foundery in a basin with a plate on top often by Charles who then spent the afternoon playing in the black sand used for casting. At 8 in the evening Benjamin called for his meal, more steak or chop and beer brought from the cellar by Jane. The family kept pigs which were taken by Matt Andrews a butcher. The pigs were killed in October for Christmas and salted to last until the next summer. Years later Charles worked for Matt and rubbed salt into the carcases. When Benjamin was going out he called 'Mother, my hat, my cane' and Jane brought them to him. He wore a box hat like a low, wide top hat. He liked taking his grandson out but always looked to see that the child had clean hands, brushed hair and polished shoes, then Charles walked slightly behind his grandfather. When Charles was very small he was taken into the best tailors and Benjamin had him measured from top to toe for a suit. In the summer they sat through innumerable cricket matches, Charles had to sit still but was given an apple or an orange every time the vendors came round. Once at Pitchcroft annual fair his grandfather gave him one of the first bananas imported. Grandmother Jane was sure it would poison the child and there was a 'bust up' but Charles had the banana. At Christmas time Benjamin and Charles visited Mr Arthur Underwood's butchers shop. One after another the birds were lifted from the rails and inspected, finally Benjamin chose a 20 lb bird for which he was charged a sovereign and the shop keeper was called names for swindling and charging so much. P boy was to be sent to deliver it but Benjamin insisted that the boy walked behind them with the turkey over his shoulder so that the butcher had no chance of switching it for an inferior bird. A more usual walk was to the 'Turks Head' down Silver Street to 'The Plough', then 'The Angel', along the Shambles to 'Butcher's Arms' to the 'Mouth of the Nile', 'The Pack Horse'. 'The Alma'. and home for dinner. At each Benjamin stopped and had a drink, paying with a penny from his waistcoat pocket. Anyone he knew was also treated to a drink.There wasn't ten mimutes walk between any of the pubs and he was always being saluted 'Good morning Ben' (touch their caps') by everyone. Because of their work foundry workers were notoriously heavy drinkers, beer cost one penny for half a pint. His wife did not mind Benjamin drinking but did not like him paying for all his friends, he could go for weeks or months without over indulging. Once a sovereign was inadvertently thrown into the fire, it was hastily raked out and Benjamin hurried to the inn to test if the coin was acceptable. Misunderstandings arose, or maybe Benjamin enjoyed telling tall stories to watch the amazement on the lad's face. The coat of arms on Foregate Street railway bridge was the Norman family coat of arms and had been stolen from them. In fact it is a combination of London and Bristol coat of arms, the stations at each end of that railway line.It is not known when the shield was put on the bridge, could Benjamin have been involved in it's iron moulding and felt he was underpaid? The clock that now hangs in Worcester High Street was made by Benjamin. Close inspection reveals that the clock was presented in 1849 when Benjamin was a child of 7 years, and erected 2 years later. However at some later date Benjamin may have done some work on the clock or the ornate brackets that support it. The Norman family were the owners of a castle thought to be in Dorset, which would remain a ruin until claimed by it's rightful owners. A friend of Charles made a list of all the castles in Dorset for him. On retiring from work Benjamin fretted unnecessarily that he would be unable to afford the turkey for the family Christmas dinner.He died on 9th December 1907 at 5 St. Martin's Street, the family felt from a broken heart. The coffin was brought across the yard on a cold dark evening and Harry, a son, had the men turn it up to see that it was all oak and that they had not put an elm base in.” Twelve days before his death a will was drawn up. "I Benjamin Albert Norman of 5. St. Martin's Street, Worcester do hereby give and bequeath all I possess whatsoever and wheresoever to my wife Jane Norman for-her use and benefit, and at her death the residue to be equally divided between all my children. As witness hereto I make my mark this twenty-seventh day of November One Thousand Nine hundred and seven Witnessed by us in the presence of us and in the presence of each other. Jane Norman 1 St. Martin's Street 4

Sarah Norman St. Martin's Street " Administration was granted to Jane Norman on 7th January 1908. Jane was said to have come from a family of 'junk merchants and money lenders' although this is not verified on her marriage certificate when her father was classed as a labourer. She and her husband are known to have had ten children . At times Jane acted as an unqualified midwife , no doubt she was more capable than many of her neighbours and any money or gifts in kind she received would prove useful with so large a family to feed and cloth. When Benjamin died she bought black velvet dresses for her two grand daughters to wear on Sundays. In later life Jane kept her sovereigns and half sovereigns wrapped in separate pieces of paper in a box under many other boxes in her bedroom. There was a great palaver when any money lending business took place. During the 1914 18 war if Jane felt in any danger she sat on the front doorstep with her money safely on her lap. As a great grandmother she was a frightening figure, very wrinkled, wrapped in shawls and in a bed in the corner of a room. She treated Donald kindly and gave him half a crown, a very large sum for a child in the 1920's. Jane died in February 1928 aged 86 years.” Photographs exist of her on a Quaker outing to Hindlip Hall, as an old lady with her children and at her son‟s wedding in 1891.
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1.1.1.1.1.George Norman,1863 - c.1872 of Benjamin Albert
Was born 3/1/1864 at Hounds lane and possibly drowned, according to family tradition in the Worcester Canal in 1872 whilst carrying his father‟s lunch to work at the Iron Works in a pudding basin along the tow path.

1.1.1.1.2. Albert Norman, 1865 - 1939 of Benjamin Albert
Was born 5/4/1865 in St. John‟s and christened at
St

. John in Bedwardine aged 18 days.

When contact was made his daughter Edith wrote that as a boy he had sung in Worcester Cathedral Choir About 1886 he became a coach builder, and left Worcester, moving first to Liverpool then to Newton le Willows and eventually settling in Leigh, Lancashire. As a coachbuilder he painted family coats of arms on coachdoors and was regarded as a skilled craftsman in the rest of the family. He always wore a box hat and arrived by coach when visiting his mother - said his nephew, Sir Charles Norman 3 He married 28/8/1895 to Betsey Shirley. when he was 30 he married Betsy Shirley of Leigh who had been born on 18 th April 1862. Albert became a Baptist, he did much work for Leigh and District Council, for the Free Churches, was a deacon and treasurer of Leigh Baptist church and Superintendent of the Sunday school for 40 or even 50 years, instituted the Primary, Junior, and Intermediate classes and laid the foundation stone of a new building for the Intermediate and Senior departments. Every year he visited his mother in Worcester, arriving by coach (!) always wearing a box hat. For church on Sundays he wore a frock coat and a silk hat. “A bit of a toff.” Albert had told his daughter Edith that his father Benjamin Albert when younger had lived in Kent, rarely spoke of his early life except that his people owned a big house in Kent. Benjamin Albert was born in Worcester in 1842, was a scholar there in 1851, an iron moulder in 1861, married there in 1863 and all his children were born in Worcester. It was Albert‟s grandfather George who was born in Kent, left there by the age of two and surely only knew of the big house from his father the earlier Benjamin (1782-?) the great grandfather of Albert. Albert left Worcester in 1886 when he was 21. His grandfather George did not die until 1889. Thus the story could have been handed down by grandfather to his eldest grandson. Aged 74 Albert died on 10th April 1939. At Leigh in Lancs. His widow Betsey (born 18/4/1862) became deaf but retained an interest in everything. At 94 and a week before she died she had written a letter to her daughter Edith. And and died herself 23/9/1956.

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In possession of Mrs. Peggy Norman of Long Lane Ickenham Peggy Norman letter 18 June 1981

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Revision dated 06/11/2009 They left children listed below.

1.1.1.1.2.1.Edith Shirley Norman, of Albert and Betsey
married 5.8.1926 to William Bullough born 16.5.1901. He was a schoolmaster and died January 1961.
Edith Shirley Norman was born on 5th July 1897 the daughter of Albert and Betsy. She attended Leigh Grammar School and became an elementary teacher. William Bullough who was three years her junior at school read German, French and History at Manchester University, in 1921 won a travelling scholarship to Zurich and then to Heidelberg where with her father‟s encouragement, Edith joined him for a month during the next school summer holiday. William was appointed to teach German at Orme Boy‟s Grammar School, Newcastle-under-Lyme from 1922. He became interested in the Society of Friends not long before he married Edith Shirley Norman on 5th August 1926 and eventually both became members. In 1949 William became deputy head of the grammar school, a position he held until his death in January 1961 at the age of 59 from cancer. Edith returned to teaching English and History in Secondary Modern schools. She had had two sons, Donald Auberon Bullough born on 13 th June 1928 and Robert Keith Bullough born 21 st November 1929. Both boys went to Newcastle Boy‟s High School. At 16 Donald gained a scholarship in History going up to St John‟s College, Oxford at 17. At 18 he joined the Royal Artillery for his two years National Service being commissioned in his second year. Returning to Oxford he took 1st class honours in Mediaeval history.Following that he spent 2 years at the Academia Britannica working in the Vatican library, then a term in Pavia university. He became a lecturer at St. John‟s and Merton Colleges, Oxford followed by 10 years lecturing at Edinburgh University. When they were both 35 years old he married Belinda Turland and they both spent 9 months in Rome where he lectured at the university. Their daughter Caroline was born on 21st June 1965 and in September Donald was appointed visiting professor to the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. In April 1966 he flew back from Chicaso for an interview and was offered the chair as Professor of Mediaeval History at Nottingham University Their second daughter Elizabeth was born in March 1968. „The Age of Charlemagne‟ by Donald Bullough, photographs by Edwin Smith, was published by Elek Books Ltd. in 1965. Robert Keith Bullough was called Robin by the family, when 16\ he won a scholarship to Emmanuel College, Cambridge but had to do his military service first, serving in the R.A.F. Three days before his demobilisation, when putting a rawl plug into a wall at Coltishall a piece of steel from a chisel flew into his left eye and he was hospitalised. Having practically lost the sight of his eye he went up to Cambridge late and in the spring suffered an eighteen week breakdown. He graduated in Physics and Maths 3 years later, spent 2 years at Leeds University gaining a Ph.D, Two years with the British Rayon Research Association and then became a lecturer in maths at the College of Science and Technology, Manchester University. He met his wife Ane Louise Huve from Aalborg, Denmark when he was holidaying in the Austrian Alps with his parents.Ane Louise‟s friend had been ill and unable to accompany her. Robin spent Christmas with the family in Aalborg. He and Ane Louise were married on 21st March 1959 at the Friend‟s Meeting house in Newcastle, their sons Per Andrew and Patrick Esben were born on 1 st September 1962 and 25th October 1965 respectively. Robin was given a board on which his grandfather Albert had painted various crests for coaches. In her later life Edith attended Church of England services as she enjoyed the music. Suffering from rheumatoid arthritis she appreciated lifts by car of friends.

Donald Bullough bn 13.6.1928 who married Belinda Turland 14.12.1963. Caroline Bullough bn 1.6.1965 Elizabeth Bullough bn March 1968 Robert Keith Builough bn 21.11.1929 married Anne Huve of AALBERG DEN 21.3.1959 Per Andrew Bullough bn 1.9.1962 Patrick Esben Bullough bn 25.10.1965

Doris Norman bn 11.9.1901 marr 5.7.1929 to Sidney Cunningham who died in 1942

1.1.1.1.2.2.Doris Norman, 1901 - of Albert and Betsey

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was the second child of Albert and Betsy. She was born on 11th September 1901, married Sidney Cunningham also of Leigh on 5 th July 1929 and their only child, a daughter Lesley was born on the 20 th June 1938. Doris and Sidney worked in the health department at the Town hall. For war service Sidney joined the navy. On his first voyage his ship was torpedoed; not badly injured he spent some time in Halifax, Canada. His heart was affected and he was discharged but called up again, joined the NAAFI, went to Cane in the early hours of 23 rd May 1945 and died of heart failure. His daughter was seven years old. Doris returned to work. Lesley married Edward Gregory on 20 September 1958, a son Martin Gregory was born on 2nd October 1961 and a daughter Janet Gregory on 19 th August 1966.

Jean Lesley Cunningham mbn 20.6.1938 mar to Edward Gregory Martin Gregory born 20.10.1 961 Janet Gregory born 19.8.1966

1.1.1.1.2.3.Florence Norman, 1905 - , of Albert and Betsey
bn 24.8.1905 marr 8.4.1944 Eric Kirkland born 14.4.1 905
Albert and Betsy Norman‟s 3rd child was born on 24th August 1905 and named Florence Vera, she went into trade and became a buyer of women‟s clothing and furnishing materials for a large shop. After a broken romance she moved to Leicester and was buyer for a children‟s clothing shop. In 1946 she married Eric Kirkland, they had no children.

1.1.1.1.3. Herbert Norman 1870 - ???? of Benjamin Albert
born 4th. December 1870 at Dent St. in Worcester and known as "Turp". His wife was named "Pem" They also left children listed below.
He was Christened at St. Peter the Great on 4 th December 1870 and among the family was known as “Turp”.On 6 th April 1891 he was 20, an iron moulder and living in St Martin Street with his parents. He married “Pem” and they had two children, “Bert” who was killed in the 1914-18 war and Eva who died in 1960. At some date unknown Herbert had moved to Rugby

1.1.1.1.4. Susan Jane Norman 1873 - 1938 of Benjamin Albert
born 28/4/1873 and married Harry Bradley 25/2/1899. She died 28/4/1938 at Barnsley in Yorkshire. Her husband Harry had died 17/12/1933. They also left children listed below
Susan Jane, known by the family as Jenny was born on 28 April 1873. After 10 years of marriage and 4 sons Benjamin and Jane had a daughter. Jenny was not at the family home when the 1891 census was taken. On 25 th February 1899 she married Harry Bradley who had been born on 27th September 1875. Their only child Harold was born on 26 th May 1900. Harold was remembered for playing the church organ and the piano. He married Alice (?) who had been born on 6 th May 1904 Harry Bradley died on 17th December 1933, Jenny died at her son‟s home in Barnsley on 28th April 1938.
th

Harold Bradley bn 26.5.1 900 Alice Bradley bn 6.5.1904

1.1.1.1.5.Henry Norman, 1869 - 1955 of Benjamin Albert
All this information comes from Mrs. P. Norman. He was born 7/2/1869 at St. John's. There appears to be a gap of nearly four years after the birth of Albert before Benjamin and Jane had
another son, Harry born at Bransford Road, St. John‟s on 7 th February 1869, and Christened on 28 March 1869 at St John‟s Bedwardine. Jane made her mark when she had registered her small son on 2nd March although Harry told his daughter that by 11 years he had two daily jobs, working for a butcher in the mornings and for a baker in the afternoons.
th

A paper with a two shilling and sixpence stamp has been kept. It is addressed: Hill Evans & Co. Harry Norman - Certificate of Service. We the undersigned Thomas William Hill, Edward Walleye Evens and Edward Henry Hill, trading as vinegar makers and British Wine Manufacturers, under the style or firm of Hill Evens and Company Hereby certify that Harry Norman entered our service on or about the ninth day of June eighteen hundred and eighty four, for the purpose of learning and being instructed in the trade of 7

Revision dated 06/11/2009 Cooper. And we further certify that he has faithfully served our firm in such trade for the term of Six Years to our entire satisfaction and has become proficient therein, and this certificate is given in lieu of the ordinary Indentures of Apprenticeship Dated this 11th day of June one thousand eight hundred and ninety. T.W.Hill For Hill Evan‟s & Co. Witness. Chas Saml Newth (?) 18, Bridge Street, Worcester. He married twice. Saint Martin‟s Church 3 September 1891 Henry Norman 22 b Cooper Rhoda Lee 23 s Benj. Norman, Albert Norman, Fannie Lee. A photograph exists of this wedding. 5, Saint Matin‟s Street 4 George Street

Benj. Iron Moulder William a Carter

They lived in Mayfield Road Worcester. He worked for the Co-operative Insurance Agency. Rhoda was petite and very dressy. She and Harry once visited some of his relations in Somerset one of whom worked in a shoe shop and was able to sell Rhoda a dainty pair of size l ladies shoes. Five years later she sent for another pair of the same size and make. To everyone‟s surprise the shop was able to oblige her although they had had only 2 pairs of that size when she had made her first purchase. Rhoda and Harry had ten children and brought them up to be industrious; until they left school at 14 the boys had after school hours and Saturday jobs. Rhoda was up at 5 a.m., she bought vegetables by the sackful , reselling the surplus to neighbours and so reckoned to have her own at no cost. When her children did not want to resell the vegetables to poorer neighbours she would say “A lazy tongue is as bad as lazy hands”. She had an eye for a bargain; she once bought a very large grand piano for five shillings, it took three of her children to lift one leg and they man handled it along the street, but it was too big to go in any room. Harry wanted to cut it up to make a bookcase but the next day they had to carry it back and pay the vendors 2 shillings and sixpence to take it back. Most of Harry and Rhoda‟s children were born in number 39 Mayfield Road where they lived for 17 and a half years in one of two houses built on a plot of land they had bought. There are different versions of their move to Rainbow Hill. In May 1912 Rhoda was slowly recovering from the February birth of her 10 th child when she and Harry passed two houses with sale boards. Curiosity took them into the sale room. Harry did not realise that his wife was bidding until the auctioneer told him that the bid of £475 was with Rhoda. The next day Harry‟s younger brother Will and someone else both offered £400 for one of the houses but at first Rhoda would not sell. The family moved into 51 Rainbow Hill and sold the house in Mayfield Road to the next door neighbour for what it had cost Harry to build. Mr John Stallard the solicitor in the case bought an expensive pair of gloves for 10 shillings and 6 pence for Rhoda as a compliment to her business ability. The other version is that during a thunderstorm Harry and Rhoda took shelter in the auction rooms and bought two houses in Rainbow Hill for £350. As they left Harry told the estate agent that he would have to borrow all the money but the next day he sold one of the houses at a profit, apparently to his brother Will. 51 Rainbow Hill had two cellars , one was used as a playroom with boxing gloves etc.; in the other a barrel of cider and a barrel of beer was stored. In July 1913 for the 21st birthday of Charles their eldest son a marquee was erected on the lawn and guests charged a shilling a head. Rhoda endeavoured to provide Charles with a girl friend ! Rhoda was not to see the effects of the Great War on her sons, she died of pernicious anaemia in April 1914. She was just 46. Her daughter Gladys, just two months short of her l6th birthday took over the housekeeping. After 1918 Harry was said to have sold number 53 Rainbow Hill to his sister Flo and his mother, they did not live there but resold it. This does not seem consistent with the previous account of the sale. 1 Harry and Rhoda‟s children were Charles, Harry, George, Gladys Florence, James, Elsie Ruby, Reginald Arthur, Frank, Percy, and Peter. The elder boys were called up for war service , a stressful time for all the family.

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He married again on Whit Saturday 1923 to Mary Mills nee Pugh. 1923 Electoral Records have him living at 51 Rainbow Hill, with Edith (?) and James,his son. For 9 years Harry remained a widower, working at his trade making barrels for the vinegar works. Those of his children who were still living at home must have been aware of his increasing friendship with a widow, Mary Mills. On Whit Saturday 1923 his sister-in-law Lal and his daughter Gladys in Lowesmoor had thought he was going to Shrub Hill station to check train times. Jim, Harry‟s son had already been sent to the station with their cases. Harry Norman, aged 54 and a widower married Edith Mary Mills a widow, formerly Holmes/Pugh by special licence at Holy Trinity church. Harry‟s youngest sister Flo was the only member of the Normans to attend, his own family had not been informed of the day or time the wedding would take place. The couple went straight from the church to the station and Gladys received a card from Minehead after the bank holiday post. The situation must have been very difficult. Gladys married William Law on 9 th June and Elsie Ruby (Cis) married Robert Curnock on 18th August within a short time of their father‟s second marriage. The children from Harry‟s first marriage referred to their step-mother as “The Mater”. Joan, Harry‟s eleventh child was born in 1924. After his retirement as a cooper, Harry became an insurance agent for the Co-op, he was a founder member of the Worcester Labour Party, a Worcester City councillor and a Justice of the Peace. The Mater was present when the family gathered at 51 Rainbow Hill to celebrate Harry‟s eldest son Charles having been made a Commander of the British Empire in the New Year‟s Honours List of 1951. At the time she seemed to be somewhat remote, her health deteriorated and she spent the rest of her life in hospital. Harry moved to live with his youngest son Peter and wife Sybi1. Slowly he became senile and in need of nursing care. He was 86 when he died on 2nd March 1955 at Ronkswood hospital. His will was proved on 28 th March.

1.1.1.1.5.1.SIR Charles Norman
born 22.7.1892 married Dorothy Hayes, KB 1964 Charles was the first born of Harry and Rhoda. He was born on 22 nd July 1892 and always asserted that he had not attended school after he was twelve years old. At some stage he worked for Matt Andrews being given the task of salting the pork. Working in a cellar he recalled developing chilblains up to his elbows. THE WORCESTER NEW CO-OPERATIVE & INDUSTRIAL SOCJETY LIMITED St Nicholas Steet, Worcester. Mr H. Norman Dear Sir, I am desired to say that the committee are willing to teach your lad Charles the Grocery and Provisions trade. The scale of wages he will receive is as follows, age 15 years 5/- per week, 16 7/-,17 9/-, 18 11/-, 19 14/-, 20 20/ and at 21 if services retained 24/- per week. Yours truly Chas. A.Santon Sec. From delivery boy Charles worked his way up, he attended evening classes and as a prize won a set of Grocery encyclopedias. It was when serving behind the bacon counter that he met his future wife. To celebrate the 21st birthday of her son, Rhoda had a marquee erected in their garden. Friends were invited and asked to pay 1/(one shilling) for the priviledge of attending. Rhoda had also chosen a prospective bride for her son but Charles had other ideas. Thirteen days after Charles 22nd birthday war with Germany was declared. Wishful thinking by the general public initially predicted the war would be over by Christmas 1914 but it continued with much loss of life for over four years. Like that generation of men Charles was called to serve his country. He was enlisted to serve in the Territorial Force of the County of Worcestershire on 15th day of February 1916. He became No. 3794 Gunner Norman, A Battery No.397 Artillery Training School.

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Revision dated 06/11/2009 ARMY SCHOOL OF COOKERY Weymouth , May 1st 1916 I hereby Certify that No. 3794 Gunner Norman C. 3/2nd S. Mid RFA has undergone a Modified Course of Instruction in Cooking at the above named School for 21 days, and at the examination held on conclusion of the Course obtained 92 per cent of marks. (Signed) J Batchelor. Capt Commandant , School of Cookery. ****** CHARACTER CFRITFICATE No.-I Rank Gunner Name Charles Norman „A‟ Battery No. 327 Artillery Training School. Born in the Parish of Holy Trinity near the town of Worcester in the County of Worcestershire on the date 22/7/1892. Trade as stated by him on enlistment Grocer‟s Assistant. DESCRIPTION ON LEAVING COLOURS Height 5ft 5\ in. Identification Marks Complexion Medium Eyes Grey Hair Brown This is to certify that No. 3794 Rank, Gunner Name Charles Norman has served with the Colours in 3/2 nd South Midland Brigade RFA and „A‟ Batttery, No. 327 Artillery Training School for 151 days during which time he was always found to be honest, sober and trustworthy, and always carried out his duties to the best of his ability. Signature ****** Lt Col Date 14th July 1916 RFA Commanding „A‟ Battery No. 8 Artillery Training School 28 1 PARTICULARS OF SERVICE DATE OF ENLISTMENT 15th February 1916 Proceeded on Furlough pending transfer to the Army Reserve or Discharge on Passed medically fit for the Army Reserve Due for transfer to the Army Reserve on Due for final Discharge on 14th July 1916 Cause of Transfer or Discharge being considered Medically unfit for further Military service vice Para 392 iii Kings Regulations. ****** Certificate No R. 140510 WARNING If you lose this Certificate a duplicate cannot be issued . Certificate to be issued to a man in the Army Reserve who has been found by a National Service Medical Board to be permanently and totally unfit for Military Service. Region No. 345678 Full Name and Surname Charles Norman of 51 Rainbow Hill, Worcester. A member of the Army reserve was on the 13 th day of August 1917 found by the National Service Medical Board at Bodmin to be permanently and totally unfit for any form of Military Service, and is hereby certified that he is discharged from liability to be called up for Military Service. Dated this 25th day of March 1918 Signed ---- Assistant Director of Recruiting for Minister of National Service. Description of above named man on 13 th day of August 1917 Age 25 Height 5ft 5\ ins Weight 112 lbs Marks or Scars Signature of above named man Charles Norman. ****** : If this certificate is lost or mislaid no duplicate of it can be obtained. DISCHARGE CERTIFICATE OF A SOLDIER OF THE TERRITORIAL FORCE This is to certify that No. 3794 Rank Gunner Name Charles Norman (Unit) „A‟ Battery No. 327 Artillery Training School who was enlisted to serve in the Territorial Force of the County of Worcestershire on the fifteenth day of February 1916 is discharged in consequence of being considered Medically unfit for further Military Service vice Para 392 iii cc King‟s Regulations and that his claims have been properly settled. 10

His total service in the Territorial Force is - years 151 days including - years 151 days embodiea service Service abroad, vis, in years - days. Medals, Clasps, and decorations (Signature of Officer Commanding Unit) **** Lt Col RFA Commanding „A‟ Battery No 8 Artillery Training School. (Place and Date) Bulford 14th July 1916. ON REVERSE NOTI CE The attention of soldiers who have taken their discharge on termination of engagement, but who are physically fit for service, is drawn to the great need for trained men with the largely expanded Armies which have been called into being since the outbreak of War. It is hoped that such men will decide to return to the Colours with as little delay as possible, and so add to the services they have already rendered to their Kiny and Country. The Penzance Co-op manager had been called up. Charles was given the position on a temoorary basis. On receiving his final army discharge from Bodmin Charles sent his future wife a telegram. On 15 th August 1918 , for his wedding the firm presented him with a „handsome time piece‟, a marble clock. Charles returned to Worcester to marry Dorothy Mary the daughter of Thomas and Lucy Harriet Hayes at St. John the Baptist church, Claines, on 27th August 1918. Their first marital home was at 18 Barwis Hill, Penzance , a very different market town from Worcester, by the sea and with vastly different local customs and dialect. Having been employed for 2\ years in Penzance Charles was to move to the Co-op branch in Paignton. At a piano recital and evening of musical entertainment in April 1919 his wife was presented with a Goss china teapot decorated with the Borough coat of arms and he received two Viennese vases. W.~.Trehair merchant and commission agent sent Charles a congratulatory letter on his appointment to Paignton. The couple were living at 80 Winner Street in Paignton when their eldest son was born on 24th June 1919 and given the na.mes Donald Hayes. The home adjoined an alleyway leading to a slaughter house. Understandably, although a country girl Dorothy disliked seeing calves being driven up past her kitchen window to their death. The house was infested with rats, no doubt because of its close proximity to the slaughter house. Dorothy must have missed the close relationship of family and friends she had left behind in Worcester. Mrs Crocker, whose husband was in charge of the Co-op horses became a great help and a lifelong friend. Donald always regarded her as a honorary grandmother. On 31st March 1920 within a year of their move Charles was elected a member of the Paignton Urban District Council. Houses were built close to the eastern end of the sea front; by then as chairman of the council NORMAN ROAD was named in his honour. As the wife of the manager , Dorothy was given the priviledge of laying the foundation stone for the new Coop bakery. She was presented with an ornate silver trowel inscribed „Presented to Mrs Charles Norman by Mr Herbert Drew (contractor) for the purpose of laying the stone in commemoration of the erection of a new Bakery for the PAIGNTON GO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED Sept 11th 1920‟ For a brief period vhen Donald was about two years old Charles moved his family to Glasgow where they lived in a tenement apparently owned by two spinsters the Misses McNichols who continued to send them a box of mixed sweets every Christmas until the 1939 war broke out and sweets were rationed. A letter written tth Nov. 1921 was received regarding an interview that had taken place the previous day for a position with Ranks. References were to be taken up, the salary for the first six months would be based on £450 rising to £500 per annum if satisfactory. The work would be in connection with the London branch with the possibility of a move elsewhere. Eight days later the appointment was confirmed. It may have been on the journey south that Donald half remembers changing trains at Crewe, it was cold and dark, he made a fuss because a ham sandwich he was given contained mustard. His father produced a pen knife and removed the offending condiment. A photo exists of young Donald sitting in a luggage case labelled‟ passenger from Glasgow‟. Charles was continuing with the hobby he had begun in Worcester when he had used a greenhouse as a studio and the cellar of his home to print photographs he had taken. On 5th December 1921 Charles began working for Joseph Rank the miller. 11

Revision dated 06/11/2009 Their London abode was a large room in a big house with a very large garden. The house was in Ampthill Square and owned by an Italian family the Vincencettis. When their daughter Mary married she chose Donald to be her page boy. Mary remained a friend keeping in touch with the family for the rest of her life. Once Donald was taken by his father to the Peterkin factory where jelly sweets were being made. The firm also made jellies and custard powder. Dolls dressed as Dutch boys were used to advertise the products. From an article in 'John Bull' 3rd August 1946 under the heading 'Movie Miller' Rank's grandfather, a Yorkshire yeoman, bought a windmill and made it pay. Rank's father introduced steam driven machinery, became a millionaire and declined a peerage with the words 'I was born plain Joe Rank and I intend to die plain Joe Rank' J. Arthur Rank left school at sixteen and was put to work for thirteen hours a day as a junior clerk. In good time he became manager of a subsidiary firm Peterkin Self-Raising Flour, and lost money fcr it heavily. Plain Joe chalked it up to his son's education. The lesson was not wasted.That son has increased the family fortune many times over ~nd now directs more than sixty companies. The factory was in Battersea. At some time Dorcthy remarked that her husband had gone to help dismantle the factory machinery. Charles had his bank account in Battersea and for some reason was sufficiently grateful that he left his account with that branch for the rest of his life. Charles and J.Arthur Rank worked well together and became close friends. The next family home was 44 Chalfont Avenue, Wembley, bought for £825 and Charles ,Dorothy and Donald moved in on 5th February 1923. Michael Hayes was born on 30th April the following year and a daughter Helena Dorothea Marion, known among the family as Marion, on 28th August 1926. Donald had attended lessons given by an elderly lady in a room of her house before ~oining Wembley Hill school on the day it opened . Peggy Gill was another of the new infants and put into the same class, she had previously attended the infant's department of a school where her father taught senior boys. The young Normans were 9, &, and 2 years old when their parents bought 'Kinssthorpe' 57 Oakington Avenue, Wembley Park, a larger detached house with a very large garden for £1500. They moved in on 20th October 1928. The house in Chalfont Avenue was finally sold for £750 in January 1930. Both Michael and Marion began at Park Lane infants and juniors completing their schooling at Preston Manor Grammar school. Wembley Hill school was sc overcrowded with up to 50 in some classes that children moved into the senior department at an early age. From there Peggy went on to Brondesbury and Kilburn High school and Donald to Acton Technical school. On 29th September 1938 a letter headed 'FOOD(DEFENCE PLANS) DEPARTMENT was sent to Charles at the address of Jos. Rank, Ltd, 107 Leadenhall Street, E.C.3. 'SECRET' Dear Mr Norman Following on the 'precautionary letter' sent to you yesterday I have to inform you that a telegram similar to the enclosed had already been sent to all concerned in other trades before your letter was sent out. You are therefore to take this enclosure as if it had been sent you in the ordinary way and to consider it still effective. Yours faithfully Charles never spoke of the activities he undertook during the second world war. It transpired that he was'in charge' of animal food stocks for the whole of the Country, had England been invaded he was to take charge of supplies of food for London. Having lived through the depression of the 1920's and 1930's Charles was more than keen for his children to work in the medical profession since people would always be sick and in need of treatment.

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In October 1937 Donald began to train in Dentistry at Guy's Hospital; in due time Michael became a medical student at St. Bartho]omew's and Marion trained as an occupational therapist. Years later she took a teaching diploma but has always retained her feeling for the handicapped. Donald and Peggy met when, as students on summer vacation, a war time Women's Institute fund raising event to buy wcol to knit for the forces was held in Kingsthorpe garden. It rained and a great deal had to be carried to a nearby Scout hut. A 'Travel Identity card for Great Britain, Eire and Northern Ireland, also the Channel Islands' was issued to Charles on 14th January 1946. Restricted travel and limits to the amount of money taken out of the Country were still in force. At least once Charles flew to Ireland on business. In the 1951 New Year's Honours List Charles was made a Commander of the British Empire (C.B.E.) for valuable services to the cereals division of the Ministry of Food 1939-45. His wife and daughter went with him to the palace to see him receive the insignia. Family members including his small grandson were waiting outside to share the great moment. In February a great family gathering was held at 51 Rainbow Hill, Worcester, the home of his father. Charles had been a General Manager for Joseph Rank Ltd,. In May 1952 he was elected a Director, a position he held until 1965. The following year: “Charles Norman, Citizen and Farmer of London was admitted into the freedom aforesaid and made the Declaration required by Law in the Mayoralty of Sir Rupert De la Bere, Kt., M.P., Mayor and Irvin Blanchard Cane, Esquire, Chamberlain and is entered in the book signed with the letter V2 relating to the purchasing of Freedoms and admissions of freedoms (to wit) the 18th day of February in the second year of the reign of QUEEN ELIZABETH 2nd and in the year of our Lord 1953. In Witness whereof the Seal of the Office of Chamberlain of the said City is hereunto affixed Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall of the same City the day and Year above said. Three months later: London ) Charles Norman, Kingsthorpe, 57 Oakington Avenue, To wit ) Wembley Park, in the County of Middlesex, into the rivery of the Worshipful Company of Farmers by Redsemption during the Mastership of the Rt. Hon. Lord Courthope P.C., M.C.,T.D., D.L. on the 7th day of May in the second year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth 2nd and in the Year of our Lord 1953. In Witness wherefore the signatures of the Master and Clerk are attached Courthope(master) Gordon Sund(Clerk)

The Corn Exchange Benevolent Society held a Coronation Dinner in the Banquetting Hall of the Savoy Hotel on the 6th October 1953, as president Charles and his wife greeted the guests and he replied to the Toast to the Society proposed by the Rt. Hon. Sir Thomas Dugdale Bt, T.D., M.P. After 10 years as director of Animal Feeding Stuffs Division of the Ministry of Food Mr H.R.Humphries retired. A dinner was given in his honour at Claridges Hotel on 30th November 1953. As chairman of the dinner Charles presented Mr Humphries with a silver salver. A working party on Barley and Wheat was formed in 1954 with Charles as chairman, annual luncheons were held at the Dorchester hotel. the following year he was president of the National Association of Compound Manufacturers, later becoming Treasurer. The day before his 66th birthday Charles accompanied by his wife and daughter attended a garden partey at Buckingham Palace. Over the years luncheons and dinners abound at Claridges, the Dorchester, the Savoy, and hotels in Liverpool and Southampton. Lord Rank's birthday, his golden wedding were celebrated all wiith Charles, known as as Mick or Mickey to his friends in the trade, taking a leading part in the organisations.

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Revision dated 06/11/2009 Dorothy and Marion accompanied Charles to the Centenary Dinner of the Corn Exchange Benevolent Society held at the Mansion House on 26th February 1963. Charles proposed the toast to the guests and the response was from his friend the Rt. Hon. Christopher Soames, CBE , and at that time the Minister of agriculture, Fisheries and Food. On the evening before the 1964 Birthday Honours were published Charles alerted his children to look through the next day‟s list. To everyone's delight Charles was to be made a Knight Bachelor for his services to Agriculture. Following the anouncement the Post Office made a special delivery of a sack full of congratulatory letters and telegrams. The investiture took place at the Palace on 22nd July, Charles 72nd birthday. after investing him with the accolade the Queen wished him a happy birthday! His wife and both sons were able to accompany him to the palace and witness the ceremony. The rest of the family including many from Worcester greeted him as he left the palace, returning to Kingsthorpe to continue the celebration. Charles gave a luncheon at the Star Hotel, Worcester for his family and friends. An extract from Who's Who 1965 reads: NORMAN Sir Charles, Kt 1964; C.B.E. 1951: Director of Joseph Rank Ltd. since 1952; b 22 July 1892; e s of late Harry Norman, J.P., City of Worcester; m Dorothy Mary, 2nd d. of Thomas Hayes, Worcester; two s one d. Chairman C.I.F. Buyers (London) Ltd. and Chm C.O.M.P.R.O. Ltd., 1939-45; Chm Working Party on Millable Wheat and Feeding Barley, 1954 . Pres. Nat. Assoc. of Compound Manufrs.,1955-56 (now Hon. Treas.) Liveryman of worshipful Company of Farmers. Address: Kingsthorpe, 57 Oakington Avenue, Wembley Park, Middlesex, T. Arnold 2853 Club: Farmers. The College of Arms granted and designed a Coat of Arms: TO ALL AND SINGULAR to whom the Presents shall come , Sir Anthony Richard Wagner, Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order, Principal King of Arms and Sir John Dunamace Heaton-Armstrong Knight Member of the Royal Victorian Order, Clarenceux King of Arms, send greeting! Whereas Sir Charles Norman of Oakington Avenue in the Parish of Wembley in the County of Middlesex, Knight Commander of the most Excellent Order of the British Fmpire hath represented unto The Most Noble Bernard Marmaduke, Duke of Norfolk, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order, Earl Marshal and Hereditary Marshal of England and One of her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, that Her Majesty the Queen having been graciously pleased to advance him to the dignity of a Knight Bachelor he is desirous of having Armorial Bearings duly assigned to him with lawful authority and hath requested the favour of his Grace's Warrant for Our yranting and assigning such Arms and Crest as may be proper to be borne and used by him and his descendants accoraing to the Laws of Arms. And foreasmuch as the said Earl Marshal did by Warrant under his hand and Seal bearing date the Twenty-sixth day of October last authorise and direct Us to grant and assign such arms accordingly. Know Ye therefore that We the said Garter and Clarenceux in pursuance of his Grace's Warrant and by virtue of the Letters Patent of Our several Offices to each of us respectively granted do by these Presents grant and assign unto the said Sir Charles Norman the arms following:- Perctnevron Vert and Gr two parcels of Corn each composed of a stalk of Barley between two Stalks of Wheat Or in a base a Red Carnation Flower stalked and 1eaved proper between a stalk of Wheat ana a stalk of Barley Or a Cornucopia proper the Horn Or as the same are in the margin hereof more olainly depicted to be borne and used for ever hereafter by him the said Sir Charles Norman and by his descendants with due and proper differences according to the Law of Arms. In Witness whereof We the said Garter and Clarenceux Kings of Arms have to these Presents subscribed Our names and affixed the Seals of Our several Offices this First day of September in the fourteenth year of the Reign of Our Sovereign Lady Elizabeth the Second by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith and in the year of Our Lord One thousand nine hundred and sixty-five. Anthony R. .Wagner Garter J.D.Heaton Armstrong Clarenceux The arms include FOR GOD AND EMPIRE also DISTRIBUENTUR FRUCTUS TERRE. The wheat and the barley signify Charles's work with cereals, the carnation his hobby of gardening and in particular nis love of carnations.The cornucopia of fruits and Distribuentur Fructus Terre denote his life work of marketing the products of the earth. Through his work Charles met those who served as Ministers of Agriculture (later Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food), at one function he was introduced to Prince Philip. He organised an exhibition 'The World Of Wheat' at the Stoneleigh Show and was awarded a cup for the best Trade Stand. As well as being chairman of the Working Party on Barley and Wheat he was deputy chairman of the Home Grown Cereals Association.

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This all seems an unlikely life style for a man, his diet restricted because of mild diabetes and who avoided any food that might have caused his frequent attacks of migraine. For relaxation Charles tended his garden with it's fruit and vegetable plot, wiae flower korder, long flower bed and extensive lawn. In one greenhouse he grew tomatoes and in another carnations and various seedlings. He was almost possessively interested in the welfare of his children and the progress of his much loved grandchildren. The years were taking their toll, contempories had retired or died, younger men were jostling to take up senior positions. In April 1971 Charles wrote a letter resigning as deputy chairman of Home Grown Cereals Association.The Minister replied with a letter of regret and the Fermanent Secretary appointed Charles a consultant. Probably the last of Charles's official engagements fell on the day before his 79th birthday, a Home Grown Cereals Association luncheon given for James Prior the Minister. The impression remains, the City had been Charles's life blood. His garden became too much, developers were pestering to buy Kingsthorpe and adjoining property aiming to demolish them and build a cul de sac. Marion already had a home in Worcester, Dorothy's heart was in that city, an excellent house was found and just before his birthday the move was made to a most appropriate named address: 21, Cornmeadow Lane, Worcester. A housewarming party was held for his 80th birthday. Marion gave up her home to care for her parents. With Charles's brothers and sisters, younger relatives and friends living nearby and visits from their sons and their families the years passed. In November 1976 Charles was taken to Eversham hospital, he died on 9th December exactly 69 years after the grandfather he had admired. Obituaries were published in The Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Birmingham Post, Worcester papers and trade magazines. Dorothy outlived her husband, retiring to bed on 29 th September 1979, she felt ill, Marion called a doctor to no avail. The last thing Dorothy had done was to walk down the garden to look at her cyclamen.

Charles and Dorothy had issue. of :

1.1.1.1.5.2.Donald Hayes Norman, of Charles & Dorothy
bn 24.6.1919 at Paignton in Devon, and by 1924 living Wembley.and who married 24.7.1943 Peggy Gill at Hendon Registry Office. bn 16.11.1919 resident Long Lne Ickenham. He is LDS Rcs Eng. BDS London, DDPH.

1.1.1.1.5.2.1. Arthur Charles Norman, of Donald and Peggy bn 19.11.1947 at Wembley, bpt 14.2.1948 . Asaph Hayes Mddx., PHD Cantab. Md at Cambridge 15.4.1972 to Lucy Dunn bn 3.7.1950 - on 15.4.1972 at Triinty Coll. Chapel, Cambridge. A lecturing fellow of Trinity Cambridge 1.1.1.1.5.2.1.1. Richard Charles Norman, of Arthur and Lucy bn 5.7.1974 Mt Kisco NY baptised 10.11.1974 Trinity College Chapel Cambridge.
St

1.1.1.1.5.2.2. Heather Katrina Norman, of Donald and Peggy bn 24.8.1951 Ickenham md 25.7.1979 David A Chalk. She is B.Ed and had children Natalie Margaret Chalk bn 9.3-1983, Gabrielle and Oliver

1.1.1.1.5.3.Michael Hayes Norman, of Charles & Dorothy
bn 30.4.1924 Anaesthetist - Luton and Dunstable Hospital. married 14.9.1955 at Petwrth in Hants. Mary Harding. Live in Luton 1996 1.1.1.1.5.3.1. Nicholas Graham Norman, of Michael & Margaret bn 20.9.1958 md Karen James 30/3/1991 Luton 15

Revision dated 06/11/2009

1.1.1.1.5.3.2. Phillip Geoffrey Norman, of Michael and Margaret bn 24.9.1961

1.1.1.1.5.4. Helena Dorothy Marion Norman, of Charles & Dorothy
bn 28.8.1926 Schoolteacher of Cornmeadow lane Worcester 1996

1.1.1.1.5.5.Henry Norman, 1895 - , of Henry & Rhoda
bn 5.8.1895 Of Harry and Rhoda's other children , their second son Harry who had married Olive Burridge died of sleepy sickness and endemic disease or of sleeping sickness possibly contracted during the 1914-18 war. Olive outlived her husband and son, she died in 1967. 1.1.1.1.5.5.1.Gerald Norman, of Henry and Olive Their only son Gerald was killed when flying with the R.A.F. in the 1939-45 war. His body was never found.

1.1.1.1.5.6.George Norman, 1896 - 1921, of Henry and Rhoda
bn 1896/7 died 17.3.1921

1.1.1.1.5.7.Gladys Florence Norman 1898 -1984, of Henry and Rhoda
bn 10.6.1898 md 9.6.1923 to William Law, Both of Kevin Norman's grandmothers and his mother knew Gladys Law without realising that her maiden name was Norman. Gladys bravely nursed her daughter Noreen who had developed T.B. without the benefit of modern antibiotics the battle was lost. Noreen was only 20 when she died in Newtown Hospital, Worcester. Malcolm was just 17 when his sister died. She died 1/3/1984 Astwood Rd Worc. Separated from her husband. Noreen Law, bn 15/6/1924 - died 6/3/1945 TB 4 Malcolm Law, bn 29/2/1945, marr Shirley Russell bn 30/9/1945.

1.1.1.1.5.8.James Norman, 1900 - 1983
bn 10.4.1900 married Dorothy and living Gillam Street 1984 1923 51 Rainbow Hill. Died August 1983 James , known as Jim, is thought to have been a carpet salesman. He lived in Leominster with his wife and their son Geoffrey. 1.1.1.1.5.8.1.Geoffrey Norman, of James and Dorothy md 6.8.1951 Mayor of Leominster 1977 marr Marjorie Woodward bn 1928

1.1.1.1.5.8.1.1. Carole Norman of Geoffrey and Marjorie bn 28/2/19..

4

Known by Mrs. Jean Norman whilst at school and livivng opposite in Astwood Road Worcester.

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1.1.1.1.5.8.1.2.Jane Norman of Geoffrey and Marjorie bn 16.4.19..

1.1.1.1.5.9.Elsie Ruby Norman
bn 7.11.1901 married 18.8.1923 Robert Curnock who died 1975. She died 7/3/1986

Elsie Ruby-'Cis'- married Robert Curnock whose working life was spent on the railway. Their son Norman entered the nursing profession and rose to be Tutor. Before her marriage to Reginald Craig, an insurance agent, their daughter Pat was a hairdresser. Norman Curnock (gen7) bn 31/7/1924. Md Evelyn Hill 6.12.1949 & Gertrude . Had children (Gen8) Elaine Curnock bn 25/2/1953 who md John Paulson 31/8/1974 and then remarried Paul Rigler 23/10/1993. Her children (Gen 9) are Louise Paulson and Alexander Paulson Cis‟s daughter Patricia Heather Curnock (Gen 7) bn 15/10/1928 md Reginald Craig 25/8/1949 and had (Gen 8) Sara Jane Craig bn 3/9/1950 B.Ed and Simon Alexander Craig bn 26/9/1950 Barrister.

1.1.1.1.5.10.Reginald Arthur Norman, - 1967, of Henry and Rhoda
died 1967 in Bristol. Married Judy who died 1981 in Bristol. Reginald Arthur was employed on the catering staff of the railway, he became manager of the restaurant at Temple Meads station, Bristol.

1.1.1.1.5.10.1.David Norman, of Reginald and Judy, marr Margaret

1.1.1.1.5.10.2. Wendy Norman, of Reginald and Judy bn 9/10/19.. married Terence Pow and had (Gen8) Sean Pow bn 1963

1.1.1.1.5.11.Frank Norman, - 1987, of Henry and Rhoda
bn 16.4.19?? married 7.5.1963 to Margaret Hiam bn 10.11.1905. He dd 1987 Frank lived in Birmingham and was a compositor on the Birmingham Evening Post.

1.1.1.1.5.12.Percy Norman of Henry and Rhoda
bn 1908 died 9/2/1910 aged 2 and a half . Percy was only a toddler when he died.

1.1.1.1.5.13.Peter Norman, 1913 - 1995, of Henry and Rhoda
bn 20.2.1913 married Sybil Sanders who died 30.9.1980. He died 25/9/1995. He lived in Gillam Street in 1981. 17

Revision dated 06/11/2009 Peter was Rhoda's youngest son, he was born on 20th February 1913, his mother died when he was 14 months old. For nine years his older sisters acted as substitute mother and housekeepers until when he was ten he had a step-mother, 'The Mater'. He was 27 when on 13th May 1940 he married Sybil Sander. Called to serve in the R.A.F. for the duration of the war he worked in maintenance command at one time enduring a dental inspection by his nephew Donald who was touring camps towing a dental caravan. Peace was declared and once demobbed Peter returned to work for Lee and Perrin the Worcester Sauce firm.When his father's Will was proved in the spring of 1955 Peter's occupation was described as maintenance charge hand. Sybi1 died on 30th September 1980, Peter moved to sheltered accomodation, he lived on for 5 days short of 15 years, the last months of his life as a patient in hospital and then in a rest home. He died on 25th September 1995.

1.1.1.1.5.14.Joan Norman, 1924 - , of Henry and Edith
bn 27.6.1924 of Father and second wife, married 4.11.1950 to Lesley “Bert” Harris. Joan is the only child of Harry and his second wife Mary. Younger than her nephew Donald she was 11 years younger than her half brother Peter though remaining closely attached to him. Her other half brothers and sisters were more of the age of uncles and aunts. She married Bert Harris, who worked on the canal system, on 4th November 1950. Their first home was in Diglis Avenue, near the river, an area subject to flooding. After some years they moved to Watchet in Somerset where Joan had other relatives and Bert set up his own business in the building trade. Their only son Paul Norman Harris , bn Worcester 11.6.1964, and his fiancee travelled to Las Vegas for their marriage on 10th November 1993. Joan and Bert's grandaughter was born on 28th December 1994 and given the names Paige Nevada.

1.1.1.1.6.William George Norman ,1875 - 1946, of Benjamin Albert
born 1875 , He died January 1946, and had married Caroline Collins “Great Aunt Lal” who had been born in 1875. It was thought that her sister was the famous Lettie Collins of Music Hall fame. 5 City register of Electors has them in 1923 at 15, Mayfield Road. Littlebury's Directory has William as an insurance Salesman at 15 Mayfield Road. She herself died 11/9/1970. They left no children and are both buried in Astwood cemetery close to Alfred and Mary Norman in a marked grave. Benjamin and Jane‟s sixth child, another boy was called William. He was 16 and a glover when the 1891 census was taken so he had been born between April 6th 1874 and that date in the following year. He married Carrie Collins & they lived at 15 Mayfield Road where she had already been living with her mother. Carrie was always known as Lal, perhaps both were abbreviations for Caroline. It has been suggested that in some way she was related to Josie Collins the famous music hall artiste. This has never been proved nor disproved. William rose to be a foreman at Moreley‟s glove factory. He was 71 when he died on January 1946. His widow had lived on beyond the spring of 1951.

1.1.1.1.7.Florence Norman, ???? - 1953, of Benjamin Albert
Was living 1923 with Mother at 5 St. Marti'n Street and registered as an elector. Died 28/2/1953 and married a man named Teague. Florence, a sister for Jenny, was born circa 1878. She was 13 in the spring of 1891. In 1923 when she was about 45 she
5

Charles Norman : quoted by Peggy Norman letter 18 June 1981

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attended her brother Harry‟s second wedding. She became the third wife of (?) Teague, outlived him and for some time served in a sweet shop near Foregate Street station, a fact remembered by her great nephew. She died on 28th February 1953.

1.1.1.1.8. Benjamin Arthur. 1880 - , of Benjamin Albert
Benjamin Arthur was Jane‟s last baby, born on 2nd November 1880 and regarded as rather delicate. Like so many of the th family he went to work at the iron foundry and on 20 September 1919 joined the Federated Society of Iron Founders”never expelled or claimed on funds” Saint Martin‟s Church 26 December 1904 Benj. Arthur Norman 24 b Iron Moulder Beatrice Maud Hartland 20 s M.Hartland, W.G.Norman, Alb. Norman,& Flor. Norman He was an Iron Moulder, and died after 1946 in Birmingham.

5 Saint Martin‟s Street. Upper Wylds Lane

Benj. Alb, Iron Moulder Wm. Printer/Stationer

1.1.1.1.9.Frederick Norman, of Benjamin Arthur and Beatrice
They had a son Fred who was thought to have worked in the electrical business and died after 1946.

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Revision dated 06/11/2009

1.1.1.2.HERBERT NORMAN of George and Sarah 1846 - 1894
Herbert was the third child of George and Sarah Norman. He was Christened at St. Andrew's on 27th September 1846 at the same time as his brother Alfred. From the same source. Elizabeth Norman aged 61 died on 4th February at 43 Copenhagen Street of Neurosis and Cirrosis of liver, widow of Herbert Norman, the informant B.H.Spencer. In 1861 Herbert had been a 15 year old iron moulder, Table 1 Copenhagen Street 1881 Mouth of the Nile 1881 Census:"Mouth of the Nile" Public House in Copenhagen Street Herbert Norman H Elizabeth w Ben.Hen. Spencer Alice Sanders Servant 36 Innkeeper Worcester 45 Kidderminster Stepson 16 Clerk Worcester 26 Domestic Serv. Worcester

A 1888 directory he was the licensee of Porter's Stores. 15.01.1890 Elizabeth's will of 43 Copenhagen Street made her son Benjamin Spencer as Executor and sole legatee. 4th February 1894 Elizabeth died of Bright's disease (eirrosis of the liver), at 43 Copenhagen St . aged 61 yrs of age. Probate was granted 07.03.1894. Deaths from the Registrars office: Herbert Norman age 49 died 8th June 1894 at 1 St. Martin's Street (the address given for his sister Jane on their brother Benjamin Albert Norman will) from Bright's disease , his occupation, Iron moulder, the death registered by Jane Norman, sister. Did he hold two jobs? Could Jane who had become a Quaker so disapproved of the demon drink that she gave the wrong answer for his occupation? Was she too upset? In any case he was known as the black sheep of the family 6 Herbert died of the same disease at his sister Jane's House at 1 St. Martin's St. four month's later in June 1894 aged 48.

1.1.1.3.WILLIAM NORMAN of George and Sarah 1852 - ????
William was the 6th son of George and Sarah. Born in 1852 he lived with his parents and became a painter. He died on 27th April 1889 aged 37 at 1 St. Martin's Street of Aneurism and Bronchitis, his occupation, carriage painter and his death being registered by his brother Benjamin Norman. He was buried 2 May 1889 in Astwood Cemetery in Plot 20284 . He married Anna Maria Boleen and had children Maria and Ernest (born 1882). She died 9 th July 1888 in St . Martin‟s Street, of Tuberculosis and was registered by her daughter Maria.

6

Letter from Mrs Peggy Norman 18 June 1981

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ANNE MARIA NORMAN of George and Sarah 1854 - 1892
Mr. Neat's Norman ancestor was born on 5th February 1854 at Hound's Lane. On 9th March Sarah registered her daughter as Maria, a daughter of George Norman, a labourer of Hound's Lane and the baby was baptised Ann at St. Andrew's on 23rd November 1854. For a long time this caused confusion until Mr. Neat was convinced that his paternal grandmother was sometimes known as Ann, and sometimes Maria and sometimes Annie Maria. On 9th March 1870 when as a 16 year old Gloveress she married Railway Labourer John Edward Greening (bn 15.1.1852 of St. Albans) at the Countess of Huntingdon's chapel, Worcester. She was 16 and 3 months pregnant. This may later account for the naming of Arthur Greening Norman who was born in 1902. Their daughter Alice was born on 26th October 1870 in Fish Street, Worcester. John died 2/5/1902 and Annie Maria died on 17th October 1892 in Withington, Manchester. In 1881 Alice visited her Grandmother in Worcester during an illness - so relations were not all that strained. 7 John‟s death in 1902 may well account for Alfred Greening Norman‟s own middle name given at his birth in Worcester in 1902. According to sources she was disowned by her family as a result of her age at birth - and she died at such an apparently early age - 38 - because of a gynaecological problem.8 In 1892. See Legacy file for an 1881 Census entry for this family. 1901 Census entry: 1, St Martin‟s Street, Worcester 1901 Jane Norman Sarah Norman Arthur Greening Hannah Murphy Head Sister Nephew Boarder Unm Unm Unm Unm 42 37 25 21 Brushdrawer Brushdrawer Plumber Brushdrawer Worker Worker Worker Worker Worcester Worcester Lancs, Manchester Wicklow Ireland

Steph Carter 9, in E Mails in May 2004 says : “John Greening and Ann Norman had 9 live children Alice, William H., Jane, Winifred Annie, Florence Emily and George W. info on any of then except my g’mother, Jane and that is from I have remembered. She died in 1961.She told me that she was and that one of her brothers (Austin?) had Spina bifida. Elizabeth, Arthur, I have very little anecdotal evidence the youngest of 13

As to the reason for your grandfather's middle name of Greening, I wonder if this could be the reason. 1901 census gives Arthur's residence as 1 St Martin's St Worcester, living with his aunts, Sarah Anne and Jane Norman. I would suggest that the Greening comes from him rather than John who, I think may have been a bit of an outcast from the two families. I have some anecdotal evidence from Jane who died in 1961. John was a nurseryman, went out early and returned late. Jane was expected to look after Austin. In 1900 the family was living at 104 Burton Rd Didsbury Manchester. On this particular day John told Jane not to let the fire go out. Austin had been particularly crotchety and the fire had gone out. John went mad, throwing a large clay plant pot at Jane's head. It missed but Jane ran from the house into the arms of a young man who had been running up the road waving a newspaper and shouting "Mafeking's relieved!" This man was John Pownall who became her husband. Jane never returned to the house and went to live with her brother George until her marriage in 1903. Incidentally, George gave both his children the middle name of Norman.

7 8

Letter from Peggy Norman December 1981. Letter from Mrs Peggy Norman 18 June 1981 9 jandscarter-carlton@tiscali.co.uk

21

Revision dated 06/11/2009 I have John/Ann marriage certificate which states that both were aged 19 in 1870. John could write but Ann made her mark. Their witnesses were Thomas Ratcliff and Elizabeth Webb. I will send you copies of anything you haven't got. Hope that's interesting” Alice Greening married Charles George Neat at St Martin's Worcester and their son Charles Philip Guy Neat was born in Worcester Wylds Lane in 1906, was employed as an accountant and became a genealogist. His parents moved to Cheltenham and lived here until their deaths , in 1953 for Alice and 1959 for Charles. Mr. Neat married Nelly Cariss in York where their sons John David and Kenneth Philip were born in 1940 and 1944. John gained a degree in Civil Engineering at Newcastle University and is a member of the Institute of Civil Engineers. He was in charge of the Aire and Calder Division of the River Ouse and Humber Authority in 1970. He married Margaret Beresford and they had daughters Ruth Margaret in 1967 and Elizabeth in 1969. Kenneth gained a B.Sc in Physics at Imperial College, did post graduate work for a Ph.D and completed 2 years research on Cosmic rays at Moscow State University. On his return in the autumn of 1970 he translated Russian scientific papers.

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1.1.1.4.JANE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1858 - 1937
Jane Norman was born on 15th January 1858 at Hound's Lane and baptised on 2nd February at St. Andrew's, her father George a labourer, mother Sarah. At 13 Jane was a scholar, at 23 a brushmaker, and 10 years later she was described as a brush drawer. Like gloving brushmaking was an occupation generally undertaken in the home. The younger generation knew her as 'Lame Jane'. It is not known whether she had been lame from birth or as the result of an accident. In 1889 at 1, St Martin‟s Street she witnessed the death of her Father George, and in 1892 did the same for her Mother Sarah at the same address. The sisters Jane and Sal became Quakers, they had remained spinsters living with and in later years caring for their parents at the home in St Martin's Street. The 1891 census taken on 6th April lists Sarah their mother as widow, head of household , aged 72 and a charwoman. It also showed that Sarah, Jane and Sal had taken in two boarders, Jack Griffin a 20 year old plumber and painter who had been born in Worcestershire and Kate Shackill a child of 8 who had also been born in the County. Was this child boarded out by the workhouse? Who paid for her? According to the census this house had four rooms. The 1896 Littlebury‟s Directory , Saint Martin‟s Street - a Brushmaker. She also looked after her brother Herbert in his last illness, ending in death on 8th June 1894 at 5, St. Martin‟s Street. In 1896 she was listed in the Littlebury‟s directory of Worcester as ............, 1901 Census of St Martin‟s Street: 1, St Martin‟s Street, Worcester 1901 Jane Norman Head Unm Sarah Norman Sister Unm Arthur Greening Nephew Unm Hannah Murphy Boarder Unm

42 37 25 21

Brushdrawer Brushdrawer Plumber Brushdrawer

Worker Worker Worker Worker

Worcester Worcester Lancs, Manchester Wicklow Ireland

On 27/11/1907 she witnessed her Brother Benjamin Albert‟s will. In 1923 she appeared on the City Electoral Roll, still of 1, St. Martin‟s Street. She was again in Littlebury‟s directory in 1930. At 1, Saint Martin‟s Street. She died in November 1937 aged 79. She may have been one of the pair of terrifying Aunts Arthur Alfred Norman was taken to see somewhere near Lowesmoor perhaps St. Martin‟s Street - when he was a child (4 years old at her death)

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Revision dated 06/11/2009

1.1.1.5.WALTER NORMAN of George and Sarah 1860 - ????
Walter was born on 30th May 1860 when his father was classed a Town labourer. On the 1861 census form he was 11 months, his name barely legible, in 1871 with his sister Jane and a younger sister he was a scholar. Even if the fee was 2d a week not every family could afford to send their children to school and education was not compulsory until 1870. In April 1881 Walter was approaching 21, unmarried and living with his parents, brother William the painter, sisters Jane and Sal and 14 year old Eliza, a grand daughter of George and Sarah, the daughter of their second son Alfred. Walter was an iron moulder. He married Selina Harrison and had a daughter Clara born 26.2.1900 in 2, Sansome Fields.

GEORGE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1850 - ????
The next child of George and Sarah was another boy, born in 1850 and named George. In 1861 he was a scholar but he was not with his parents when the 1871 census was taken. He trained as a glover, married 'Liz'(?) and they went to live in Milbourne Port, Somerset where he became the manager of a glove factory. Various Histories of Dorset and Somerset tell that Milborne Port was a centre of the glove making industry. Figure 1 - Census of 1871 Milborne Port. Census of 1871, Kingsbury, Milborne Port, Somerset Stockwell William Head Marr Elizabeth Wife Marr Frederick Son Henry A Son Norman George Boarder Unm 40 43 13 7 21 Glover Scholar Scholar Glovecutter Milborne Port Milborne Port Milborne Port Milborne Port Worcester

Milbourne Port is about 2 miles from Sherborne and Yeovil, a noted gloving town is some further 5 or 6 miles away. Figure 2 - Census of 1891 North Street, Milborne Port Census of 1891, North Street, Milborne Port, Somerset Norman George Head Marr 39 Elizabeth Wife Marr 38 Alice Dau 16 Leather Glover Glover Glover Worcester Milborne Port Milborne Port

1893 Electoral Roll. “Milborne Port, Division 1, East Somerset, 244 Norman George, North Street, Dwelling House”

Steph Carter 10, in E Mails in May 2004 says : “John Greening and Ann Norman had 9 live children Alice, William H., Jane, Winifred Annie, Florence Emily and George W. info on any of then except my g’mother, Jane and that is from I have remembered. She died in 1961. She told me that she was and that one of her brothers (Austin?) had Spina bifida. Elizabeth, Arthur, I have very little anecdotal evidence the youngest of 13

In 1900 the family was living at 104 Burton Rd Didsbury Manchester. On this particular day John told Jane not to let the fire go out. Austin had been particularly crotchety and the fire had gone out. John went mad, throwing a large clay plant pot at Jane's head. It missed but Jane ran from the house into the arms of a young man who had been running up the road waving a newspaper and shouting "Mafeking's relieved!" This man was John Pownall who became her husband. Jane never returned to the house and went to live with her brother George until her marriage in 1903. Incidentally, George gave both his children the middle name of Norman.
10

jandscarter-carlton@tiscali.co.uk

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THOMAS NORMAN of George and Sarah ???? - ????
Thomas the last son of George and Sarah was born on 7th March and baptised at St. Andrew's , George entered as a labourer. A Thomas Norman, aged 8 months, and who died in Hounds Lane 18 Nov 1862 was the son of George Norman, and was buried at the “Old”Cemetery in Worcester. Peggy Norman believes that this Thomas is the father of the below mentioned Walter George: Thomas the youngest son of George and Sarah would have been 54 at the time of Walter William George‟s first marriage , 62 when his son married for the second time and perhaps too elderly to be still doing the hot and responsible job of driving an engine. Lame Jane acted as witness at her nephew‟s second marriage. The other witness was Helen Preece. Benjamin Arthur Norman and Walter George Norman were first cousins. Was this the Thomas Norman listed in the 1884 Littlebury‟s Directory as a journeyman Woodturner of Cypress Street ? Further enquiry obviously needs to be made. This tom would have been born before 1889

1.1.1.6.SARAH ANNE NORMAN of George and Sarah 1863 - 1928
Sarah would have been almost 43 when she gave birth to her last child, a daughter born on 5th March 1863 and baptised Sarah Anne at St. Andrew's on 23rd August of that year. In the family she was known as Sally or even Sal. She went to school with Jane and Walter, at 17 she was employed as a brush maker and when she was 27 the 1891 census has her as a brush drawer. The sisters Jane and Sal became Quakers, they had remained spinsters living with and in later years caring for their parents at the home in St Martin's Street. Their father died in mid 1889. The 1891 census taken on 6th April lists Sarah their mother as widow, head of household , aged 72 and a charwoman. It also showed that Sarah, Jane and Sal had taken in two boarders, Jack Griffin a 20 year old plumber and painter who had been born in Worcestershire and Kate Shackill a child of 8 who had also been born in the County. Was this child boarded out by the workhouse? Who paid for her? According to the census this house had four rooms. Mother Sarah died on 4th January 1892. The parents having left no wil1 the daughters felt entitled to inherit. Benjamin Albert their eldest brother disagreed. Family tradition has it that they sat arguing for three nights until Benjamin declared that if agreement that everything should be divided equally among the family could not be reached by morning he would put it all in Chancery and none would benefit. An “Amicable” settlement was arranged, according to Peggy Norman‟s recollections of Charles Norman. 1901 Census of St Martin‟s Street: 1, St Martin‟s Street, Worcester 1901 Jane Norman Head Unm Sarah Norman Sister Unm Arthur Greening Nephew Unm Hannah Murphy Boarder Unm

42 37 25 21

Brushdrawer Brushdrawer Plumber Brushdrawer

Worker Worker Worker Worker

Worcester Worcester Lancs, Manchester Wicklow Ireland

1923 Electoral Roll. 1 Saint Martin‟s Street. Sarah Anne is listed. She lived to be 64 dying in January 1928.

1.1.1.7.HENRY NORMAN of George and Sarah 1848 - 1865
Very little is known of Henry the 4th child and 4th son of George and Sarah Norman. He was Christened at St. Andrews on 15th November 1848 and buried from Hounds Lane on 23rd August or September 1865 aged 17 years at the new Cemetery Tallow Hill in Plot 2251 as a Blacksmith.

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Revision dated 06/11/2009

1.2.GEORGE’S OTHER RELATIVES ?
A James Norman married Mary Ann Jones on 9th March 1840 at Claines Church. His father's name is not given . His birthplace is sometimes not known and sometimes given as Herefordshire - like the William who was in the Workhouse in 1851. he may have been born between 1820 and 1826 according to various Census entries. In any case, they had very close links to our family. For example, by 1841 they were living 2 doors away from George and Sarah in Hounds lane, and in 1848 had their daughter baptised on the same day as George's son Henry. In 1841 and 1851 he was a hawker, in 1861 a fruiterer and grocer of the Shambles. He is buried in Astwood Road Cemetery on 29.11.1868 as a fruiterer of the Shambles. (is it worth his death certificate ?) The names of their children are very instructive: William born 1840 Merryvale George born 1842 Hounds Lane Benjamin born 1845 St Andrews Jane born 1 846 Jane born 1848 Rosina born 1850 Hounds Lane Mary Ann born 1863 Clara born 1855 James Henry born 1857

Perhaps it would be better if they were not related. 13 bapt St Andrew's Father a Cordwainer bapt All Saints Father a Hawker bapt St. Andrew bapt St. Andrew bapt St Andrew FAther a fruiterer bapt St Swfthun bapt St Swithun bapt St Swithun

On February 13th 1867 the Worcester Chronicle reported that the son Benjamin (then 22) assaulted three police officers in the entry behind the New Inn in the Shambles. He had been urinating in the alley, caught by a policeman and struck the Off icer. He then went back into the New Inn thumping the Officer again as he attempted to follow him through the door. Two detectives arrived and assisted as Norman was arrested. He continued to resist and kicked the Officer several times from the ground. Some onlookers, including the Landlord, incited him to resist and Benjamin bit one of the Officers between the legs and threatened to shoot him if he went to Gaol. He was fined 91 each for assaulting the assisting Officers, and 98 for resisting and biting the other. He failed to pay and was gaoled for 3 months. Then in April 1867 James (40/47) and his two sons William (27) and Benjamin were prosecuted for being drunk and disorderly in the Shambles - and William fined 5 shillings. !!

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