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Hitchhikers - RIT Honors Program

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					The Hitchhikers Guide to the Department of English Course Offerings

WINTER 20082
Building 6 Room 2301 585-475-6928

http://www.rit.edu/cla/english/

Writing - 0502
Basic Writing 0502-210-01 T/R 10:00am-11:50am Instructor: Paulette Swartzfager 0502-210-02 M/W 12:00pm-1:50pm Instructor: Maggie Everhardt Writing Seminar Various Instructors and Times Refer to SIS for Day/Time and Instructor 0502-227 This is a one-quarter, four-credit seminar limited to 19 students per section designed to develop first-year students' proficiency in analytical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand and interpret a variety of texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. Texts, chosen around a particular theme, are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Attention will be paid to the writing process including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, self assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Prerequisite: Liberal Arts Qualifying Exam for students who scored below 560 on verbal portion of SAT, below 6 on the SAT essay and below 23 on the ACT.

This course develops minimal entry-level college writing competencies prerequisite for Writing Seminar. The credits earned do not comprise part of the student’s normal Liberal Arts general education core curriculum, nor may the course be substituted for Writing Seminar. May be taken as a general education elective.

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Honors: Writing Seminar 0502-325-01 M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm Instructor: Laura Shackelford This is a one-quarter, four-credit seminar limited to 16 students per section designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of texts. Texts, chosen around a particular theme, are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through this course, students will gain experience analyzing topics critically and developing writing strategies that will be strengthened throughout their academic careers. There will be particular attention to the writing process including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, self assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision.

Written Argument 0502-443-01 M/W 10:00am-11:50am Instructor: Sharon Warycka All fields and professions require us to present arguments that support our statements and our proposals. So students of all subjects need to know how to make claims, provide evidence, explore underlying assumptions, and anticipate and address counter-points. In this course, students will study and apply the elements of reasoning to their written assignments. Students will discuss and identify the argument in a piece of writing, assess the argument’s effectiveness, and recognize particular means of argumentation. Students will practice evaluating argument by writing analyses of and responses to various texts that may be taken from academic, political, and scientific fields. Students will apply the principles of argumentation to a documented research project and to original arguments of their own. Part of the Writing Studies concentration and minor. May also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227.

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Technical Writing 0502-444-01 T/Thr 2:00pm-3:50pm Instructor: Sharon Warycka Provides knowledge of and practice in technical writing style; audience analysis; organizing, preparing and revising short and long technical documents; designing documents using effective design features and principles, and format elements; using tables and graphs; conducting research; writing technical definitions, and physical and process descriptions; writing instructions; and individual and group editing. Required course for Communication majors and a professional elective for Advertising & Public Relations majors. Part of the Writing Studies concentration and minor; the Communication minor. May also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. Worlds of Writing 0502-449-01 T/Thr 4:00pm-5:50pm Instructor: Janet Zandy Here is a world of writing that includes reading the investigations of a Nobel- prize winning physicist, an oral history/memoir of holocaust survivors as told in comic book form, letters by executed anarchists, selected stories, and explorations in words and photographs of what the world eats. Writing assignments are diverse and range from personal narrative, research and analysis, oral history, literary interpretation and documentary analysis. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing through drafts and revisions with short responses and longer researched essays. Films, videos, and photographs enlarge our understanding of the complexities of representation, the social context of language, and the difficulties of sorting out the real from the fabricated. Part of the writing studies concentration and minor and an elective for the Communication major. May also be taken as a general elective.

Creative Writing: Poetry 0502-451-01 T/Thr 10:00am-11:50am Instructor: Linda Reinfeld Discover, develop, deepen the pleasure of writing poetry! Whether this is your first creative writing experience or you're an old hand (or even a poetry addict!), this supportive workshop-style class is structured to help you write your best. Students will write and respond to poems every week, in and out of class. We'll take as a starting point a textbook with suggested exercises, experiments, and stimulating readings -- but there's no predicting where imagination may lead. At least once during the quarter you'll be able to present a selection of your work for class discussion and friendly feedback. Plan to share your weekly work on line and complete a collection of poems as a final project. Part of the Creative Writing minor. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

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Creative Writing: Prose Fiction 0502-452-01 M/W 8:00am-9:50am Instructor: Vincent F.A. Golphin Your life is your story. Pass it on! If you are an average person, buy me a coffee, and I’ll listen while you tell it. If you have a writer’s heart, you belong in this class. Participants spend ten weeks in the concept, craft and development of a publishable short story. This is a workshop. You will be expected to read, write and think about what is written possibly more than ever. In the end, most students learn a lot about storytelling, lives, loves, and how knowledge about the simplest things around us can open a door. Living is easy; writing is hard. Writing well is harder. Writing fiction well is one of the hardest kinds of livings in the world. Whether you want to make a living as a writer, or want to write something you think or feel because of your life, here is the chance. Try. Part of the Creative Writing minor. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

Advanced Creative Writing 0502-453-70 W 6:00pm-9:50pm Instructor: Vincent F.A. Golphin Students who have completed Creative Writing or who have satisfied the instructor (normally by presentation of a writing sample) of their readiness to undertake the course are given an opportunity to explore in depth a literary genre, subject or theme chosen by the individual student in conference with the instructor. The acceptability of the student's project is determined on the basis of its intrinsic literary merit and its potential value to the student's development as a writer. Part of the Writing Studies concentration and minor; the Creative writing and the Science Writing minor; and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite: Creative Writing and Writing Seminar 0502-227. Rhetoric of Science 0502-456-01 T/Thr 12:00pm-1:50pm Instructor: Lisa Hermsen Galileo was not only one of the world's most important scientists, but also one of the world's most talented writers. Darwin was master of metaphor. Barbara McClintock has made corn the most interesting vegetable in genetics research. In this course, students will read the writing of the most influential scientists-rhetoricians who have had to persuade both professional and public audiences of the validity of their science. We will trace the history of the "scientific paper" from the Royal Society to contemporary journals and look at students' favorite figures and texts in the history of science, ongoing controversies in contemporary scientific debates, and the representation of science in popular culture. Part of the Writing Studies Concentration and Minor, required course for Science Writing minor and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. 5

Creative Non-Fiction 0502-459-01 T/Thr 8:00am-9:50am Instructor: Gail Hosking-Gilberg This is an intensive workshop in writing and reading creative nonfiction. Students will explore many formats of nonfiction including memoir, the personal essay, sports writing and arguments. Ongoing writing projects will be discussed in weekly clinics, which will move the written work further and teach participants better editing skills. We will study the craft of writing, use the "I" as a guide, and find the story within the facts. Reading, writing, and reflection will be emphasized. Students will keep a process folder and work closely with an editing partner. Part of the Writing Studies concentration and minor; the Creative writing and the Science Writing minor; and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. Science Writing 0502-460- M/W 6:00pm-7:50pm Instructor: Elizabeth Mazzolini In this class we will read print and electronic prose that renders science scintillating, provocative, important, and dramatic. More than simply transcribing facts for a public unfamiliar with specialized knowledge, science writing has the power to shape public opinion, to create or undo ethical relationships among people, and to move large amounts of money. This class will cover contemporary debates within science and how those debates are humanistically--and humanely--addressed. It will also cover many of the nuts and bolts of science writing, including the mechanics of how to make expert scientific knowledge matter to non-experts. There is no prerequisite, and this course counts towards the minors in Science Writing or in Writing Studies. May also be taken as an elective (0502-227 or equivalent)

Editing Literary Magazine 0502-461-01 M/W 10:00am-11:50am Instructor: John Roche This class is open to Creative Writing or Literary & Cultural Studies Minors, as well as to those interested in working on Signatures, RIT's annual literary and art magazine for the past quarter-century (www.rit.edu/signatures). This class will be devoted to an examination of the history and cultural significance of the "small magazine" over the course of the past two centuries, examples of which include Democratic Review, The Dial (in both its manifestations), The Artsman, To-Morrow, Poetry, Criterion, Blast, Black Mountain Review, Origin, Sulfur, and Exquisite Corpse. We will also examine the history of student magazines at RIT (available in the RIT Archives), such as The Question, Symposium, and Signatures. We will also look at technological innovations, such as the "mimeograph revolution" of the 1960s, desktop publishing, and Internet magazines. Expect visits by poets, publishers, and editors. Although this is not a design class, nor a glorified staff meeting, students have the option of working on final projects related to Signatures’ print and online magazines.

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Literature - 0504
Literary/Cultural Studies Hero Myths Film/Literature 0504-210-01 - T /Thr 2:00pm-3:50pm Instructor: Sandra Saari From ancient to contemporary times, constructed narratives are embedding values prized by the culture. This course considers narrative examples in epic, saga, film, song, and short story from several global cultures in order to examine the creative process of self-definition embodied in hero myths. From the Gilgamesh epic to the Volsunga Saga to Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali to contemporary films such as Lone Star and Hero, it creates a context within which to examine heroic storytelling in song and the cultural implications of “hero” presented in short stories and drama. Students will study literary and cultural texts selected from traditional literature to contemporary media and culture (e.g. literature, film, graphic novels, television, advertising, anime). Students will analyze these texts from a variety of perspectives and become familiar with current debates about literature and/or culture as arenas of human experience. This course will fulfill a humanities core requirement. Literary/Cultural Studies 0504-210-02 – M/W 10:00am-11:50am Instructor: Tom Stone This course will examine literary and cultural texts selected from traditional literature to contemporary media and culture (e.g. literature, film, graphic novels, television, advertising, anime). Students will analyze these texts from a variety of perspectives and become familiar with current debates about literature and/or culture as arenas of human experience. This course fulfills a humanities core requirement.

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WRITING THE DISCIPLINES: ARTS OF EXPRESSION
Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Medicine: First, Do No Harm 0504-319-01 – T/Thr 8:00am-9:50am Instructor: Nicolas Jones A female child born in 2000 or later stands an excellent chance of living to the age of 100 and beyond, and with a viable lifestyle, experts tell us. Many Americans have come to expect every service to be provided and every treatment available to be applied to every condition in every locale all the time at little or no cost. The true miracles of modern medicine have brought us to this attitude, and there is reality in many of these expectations. This course explores some of the facets of medicine, including history, beginning with primitive medicine; the triumvirate of patient care, education and research; medicine as a political instrument; economic factors; landmark accomplishments; technology; ethical considerations; and medicine in the media (including film and television). The instructor spent 30 years in the health care field in administration, public relations, marketing, and fund development, including positions with the University of Rochester Medical Center, St. John’s Home, and Fairport Baptist Homes. Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Computer Games/Ethics 0504-319-02 – T/Thr 10:00am-11:50am 0504-319-21 – T/Thr 8:00am-9:50am (LC) Instructor: Julie Johannes Who Are You? What Are You Doing? Can I Play, Too? The Psychology and Identity of Games In this course, we examine some of the current trends in gaming, both electronic and otherwise, concentrating most heavily on RPGs role-playing games. We will examine how knowledge is framed and expressed in this discipline, especially concentrating on the continuing effort to legitimize and gain acceptance for game studies as an area for academic inquiry. We will utilize a variety of texts, which include critical scholarly essays, popular periodical articles, film excerpts, and actual RPGs. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Burden of Beasts 0504-319-03 – T/Thr 12:00pm-1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Peter Lovenheim They come in all shapes and sizes--these other animals with whom we share the planet--and our relations with them vary widely: some we cuddle and call pets, others we stick a fork in and call dinner, still others we rely on for medical research. The debate about what our proper relations with animals should be (call it “the burden of beasts”) has raged across the centuries and the disciplines: philosophy, law, ethics, business, theology, literature, and modern-day environmentalism. The question holds special relevance for those planning careers in science and technology who one day may have to decide whether new products should be developed and tested using animals. In class, we will study a range of texts across the disciplines, (engage in debate) (maybe attend the circus, visit a laboratory, or tour a farm) and wrestle with questions as old as the Bible and as fresh as your lunch. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression 0504-319-05 T/R 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) 0504-319-27 M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) Instructor: Catherine Doyle The course emphasizes writing practices within or across disciplines, recognizing the role writing plays in the formation of knowledge and the framing of academic specializations. This course highlights the processes and practices of written expression and the production of research, whether in the sciences, the arts or the humanities. Faculty design specific approaches to the study of the writing of a discipline, field, or program. Students have the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of important conversations within a particular area of study, and within a larger culturally-diverse context. Depending on the focus of the instructor, the course will engage one or more modes of disciplinary expression(s) such as films, written texts, photographs and other images, oral history, and ethnography. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Mississippi River: American Culture from the River’s View 0504-319-04 – T/Thr 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) Instructor: Paulette Swartzfager This course is about writing about place, specifically how the geography of one of the Great Rivers of the World has influenced the history, society, economics, and culture of the people who live along its banks, from the origin of the "Father of Waters" to where the great river empties into the Gulf of Mexico. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Advocacy, Commitment, Empowerment, Justice 0504-319-06 M/W 8:00am-9:50am (LC) Instructor: Jack Spula By rediscovering the underappreciated literature of social activism, students will sharpen their critical awareness and strengthen their own writing. They will navigate the countercurrents of nonfiction: the work of pamphleteers; alternative journalists; environmentalists; muckrakers; trade unionists; feminists; gay-, lesbian-, bisexual- and transgender-activists; and others. We will then write with passion about their causes and concerns. The readings will include essays and other works by Thomas Paine, Frederick Douglass, Emma Goldman, June Jordan, Eduardo Galeano, Katha Pollitt, Alexander N. Cockburn, Gore Vidal, Howard Zinn, et al. All points of view are welcome indeed, they're eagerly sought -- and class discussions will be wide-ranging, with occasional forays into relevant sociological, technological, and political matters. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Expressing Nature 0504-319-07 – M/W 10:00am-11:50am (LC) 0504-319-09 – M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) 0504-319-32 – M/W 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) Instructor: Barbara MacCameron Description: Students will examine a variety of written and nontraditional texts in order to determine how some cultures, past and present, have given shape to the environmental imagination. Assignments include a postcolonial reading of The Tempest by Shakespeare various accounts from journals written in the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, The Rediscovery of North America by Barry Lopez and poems by Mary Oliver. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. Writing the Discipline: Arts of Expression 0504-319-08 M/W 12:00pm-1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Jennifer Wolfley The course emphasizes writing practices within or across disciplines, recognizing the role writing plays in the formation of knowledge and the framing of academic specializations. This course highlights the processes and practices of written expression and the production of research, whether in the sciences or the arts or the humanities. Faculty design specific approaches to the study of the writing of a discipline, field, or program. Students have the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of important conversations within a particular area of study, and within a larger culturally-diverse context. Depending on the focus of the instructor, the course will engage one or more modes of disciplinary expression(s) such as films, written texts, photographs and other images, oral history, and ethnography. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. 10

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Abstract, Meaningful Art 0504-319-10 M/W 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) Instructor: Lloyd Milburn The central theme of this course is appreciation of visual art and music. Students will deepen their understanding of abstract expression. Choose relevant, individual topics as you prepare presentations, lead discussions, write a review of the arts, and create a research paper. Explore the conflict between artists who struggle in proletarian societies, and the progress of artistic movements that change organically as a result of visionaries conflicting with societies. We will discuss reasons for that conflict, why societies often undervalue their artists, and how the conflict can paradoxically hone art. Students will also consider the possibility of aesthetics (redefined) in postmodern cultures. Critical theory will be applied to music, visual arts, and to selected literary works by Thoreau, Wallace Stevens, and others. We will use concert performance videos and the new book Musicophilia by Dr. Sacks to explore the neurological basis for our enjoyment of music. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Graphic Novel 0504-319-11– T/Thr 8:00am-9:50am (LC) Instructor: Bobby Pelphrey Art Spiegelman once stated that, “Even in schools, one’s taught to read. One’s rarely taught to look.” In this course we are going to do just that—“learn to look” by focusing on the graphic novel. We will investigate/deconstruct the relationships between the concepts of “graphic novel” and pop culture, with each of us bringing our unique socioeconomic identities to our readings and discussions. Through in-depth studies of several primary texts, including Watchmen, Maus, V for Vendetta, and The Dark Knight Returns, we will learn how the graphic novelists use and manipulate historical and contemporary social issues as the foundation of their art. A research-based presentation on a (pertinent) topic of the student's choice will be required. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Inescapably Human 0504-319-12 – T/Thr 10:00am-11:50am 0504-319-18 – M/W 12:00pm – 1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Gail Hosking-Gilberg Have you ever wondered about the people behind global politics or the historical scene of science? How do humans deal with the ethical, political, historical, scientific, psychological issues contained in their work or passions? In this quarter we will experience brief encounters with those involved with such things as the atom bomb, the social upheaval of Haiti, the benighted landscapes of the Third World, the genius and the madness of mathematics, and the romanticized philosopher-warrior of Che Guevara. We will explore the intimate connection between the foreign, the familiar and the inescapably human. After reading plays and short stories students will explore links among the humanities, social sciences and science. Emphasis will be on multi-disciplines, primary and secondary evidence, argumentation and the writing process. Students will expand their proficiency in written and oral communication as well as the ability to reflect and to reason both critically and creatively. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Photography and Writing 0504-319-13 T/Thr 12:00pm-1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Janet Zandy The relationship of photographic images to words is as old as photography itself. The Chinese proverb, “A Picture is Worth One Thousand Words,” is actually a mistranslation. The literal meaning is “A Picture’s Meaning Can Express Ten Thousand Words.” In this course you will not be asked to write ten thousand words. But we will explore through a series of writing and reading assignments the many meanings of photographs. We begin with snapshots and self-images. Each week we view iconic, evocative, familiar, and unfamiliar images by known photographers such as Walker Evans, Lewis Hine, Tina Modotti, Richard Avedon, Robert Frank, Milton Rogovin, and others. Readings will include classic essays on photography, ways of reading and looking at photographs, and commentary from photographers about their art and craft. Through photographs, students will compare “unseen” America to “seen” America. Students are encouraged to explore images through the Library of Congress collection and by visiting the George Eastman House on East Avenue in Rochester. We also see one or two films about the importance of photography to understanding the world around us through, for example, the life of a war photographer or the creative process of placing cameras in the hands of children “born into brothels” in Calcutta. This course has a particular emphasis on the documentary tradition and requires weekly writing (graded and ungraded), a series of short writing assignments, and a final writing project. Students will give presentations on their writing and may choose a variety of approaches for a final project such as a more directed study of a particular photographer or an analysis of how technology has shaped the production of images or a topic of their own choosing. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. 12

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Experiments and Explorations 0504-319-14 – T/Thr 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) 0504-319-26 – M/W 12:00pm-1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Linda Reinfeld Ludwig Wittgenstein famously claimed that the limits of our language are the limits of our world. How can we re-think these limits, bend or break these boundaries? This is a nontraditional writing class structured around a series of multi-disciplinary "wreading" experiments: students will explore the possibilities of creative work in transforming, deforming, reforming and free-forming texts in various disciplines, including literary (and not-so-literary) texts. The emphasis will be on formally innovative, exploratory, and analytical approaches to composition rather than familiar exercises in traditional expository, narrative, or lyric expression. We'll examine the way the concept of experimentation in language has been constitutive of interdisciplinarity; we'll investigate the significance of "language games" in such fields as philosophical inquiry, critical analysis, poetic theory, technological documentation, political activism, and articulations of protest. Our starting point will be Hazel Smith's, “The Writing Experiment, ” a source of theory as well as practice for innovative writing. Students will keep a weekly journal in which they record their experiments and respond to the assigned readings drawn from scholarly as well as popular sources, from reports and reviews to lipograms and libretti. Overlap between response and experiment is welcome. Each student will be required to share one to two pages of weekly writing experiment or response with the class each week. Visual text, performance, and work in new media may be included as appropriate. At the end of the quarter, each student
will submit a completed manuscript, sufficient in length for a short

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Writing for the Screen 0504-319-15– T/R 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) 0504-319-71 – T/R 6:00pm-7:50pm (LC) Instructor: Breandan Connor This creative and research writing course will follow a threestep process when authoring a screenplay or teleplay. First, we will develop plot points for overall narrative structure. Second, we will expand the plot points into a working narrative that will complete the first draft of the screenplay/teleplay. Third, we will review the draft, designate research requirements and edit where appropriate. The student must make decisions on how to enhance dialogue and reach a greater understanding on how dialogue functions to not only serve the forwarding of a storyline but also reveal the complexities of their chosen character models. The edited screenplays/teleplays contain a myriad of nuances that may be absent if research were not applied. Therefore, with the application of various sources systematically enjoined to the screenwriting or creative process that merges imagination and experience with analysis and research a more rigorous writing process may emerge. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. .

chapbook, of his or her own most successful experimental writing. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. 13

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Pop Culture/Philosophy/Film 0504-319-16 – M/W 8:00am-9:50am (LC) 0504-319-30 – 12:00pm-1:50pm (LC) Instructor: Rebecca Housel Explore all three disciplines in the contexts of Monty Python, Poker and Superheroes using a theoretical lens as we write in and about pop culture, philosophy and film! The class includes three films: V for Vendetta, Rounders and Monty Python and the Holy Grail, as well as clips of The Flying Circus episodes on "The Spanish Inquisition," "Dead Parrot," "Ministry of Silly Walks," and more. Students have opportunities to shape their own research and writing through multiple assignments, including alternative assignments. If you love pop culture, this class is for you! If you don't know anything about pop culture, then this class is really for you! Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement. Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Media is the Message 0504-319-17- M/W 10:00am-11:50am (LC) 0504-319-20– M/W 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) Instructor: Karen vanMeenen We live in a media-saturated world but how closely do we usually question the messages we are consuming and how they are affecting our thoughts or behaviors? In this course we will debate the merits of video games, try to decide what is propaganda and create anti-/counter/spoof ads—while practicing important critical thinking skills. We will look at films/videos, television, advertising and news, Internet networking sites and other media production and student experience and expertise in these areas is welcome. A research-based presentation on a (pertinent) topic of the student's choice will be required. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Poetry/Slam/Spoken Word 0504-319-19 – M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) Instructor: John Roche A hands-on introduction to one of the most exciting and innovative directions in contemporary poetry, one with a long foreground that goes back to the oral roots of ancient Greek lyric poetry, the Celtic bardic tradition, and Renaissance troubadour verse. Modern examples of performance poetry include Dada cabaret, Beat poetry readings, and jazz spoken word, as well as more recent developments like hip-hop poetry, rock poetry, multimedia poetry, and slam competitions. As well as reinvigorating poetry through a return to its musical beginnings, today’s performance poetry is also helping to widen its focus through inclusion of varied multicultural emphases and is also taking advantage of new technologies, new media, and new venues to spread the word. Students will read about this tradition, watch live and videotaped performances, talk to guest artists, and take their own turn at the mic. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Beowulf to Buffy: The Hero's Journey 0504-319-22 T/R 10:00am-11:50am (LC) Instructor: Bill Capossere This class will quickly trace the historical development of the western hero (Beowulf, Robin Hood, King Arthur) then slow down to focus more fully and particularly on the contemporary heroic image of the past fifty years, including the rise of the superhero in comics and film and the recent influx of female/multicultural heroes such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Storm of the X-Men. We’ll explore what might be behind the public’s seemingly increasing fascination with superheroes as evidenced by the popularity of the Marvel and DC franchise films (X-Men, Spiderman, Batman, Superman) and recent television shows such as "Buffy", "Angel", and the newest, “Heroes.” Some of the questions we’ll ask include: What is the definition of a hero? Who decides what is heroic? Has this changed over time? What is different, if anything, when the hero is female rather than male? What is an anti-hero? What functions do heroes perform in a culture? What do the heroes of a particular time or place say about that time or place? What do a culture's villains reveal about that culture? Is there such a thing as "everyday heroism"? Students will further hone the skills learned in the first quarter of writing (persuasion, argument, analysis, etc.) by reading and responding to a variety of texts (both written and visual), as well as by performing individual research on related topics. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression The Future of Neo/Neuro Logic 0504-319-24 - T/Thr 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) Instructor: Lisa Hermsen The course examines the intersections between recent work in the humanities and neurosciences, including ethical issues raised by advances in functional neuroimaging, brain implants, brain-machine interfaces, as well as our growing understanding of the neural bases of behavior, personality, and consciousness. Scholars working in these areas have coined new subdisciplinary fields such as neuroethics and neuroaesthetics. Participants from across the whole range of both the humanities (art, religion, literature, philosophy, film studies, history, languages, etc.) and neuroscience and its related fields (psychology, cognitive science, physiology, animal behavior, organismal and evolutionary biology, etc.) will find intriguing. Among the possible themes for class discussions and final projects are: How are questions of culture (human activity in the world) being related to the activities of the mind and brain in new and productive ways? How does neuroscientific study affect the way we understand the reception of books, films, and digital media? How are rationality and emotion seen as part of human decision making process by humanists and neuroscientists? Don’t forget to bring your Brain! Prerequisite: Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Essay as Disciplinary Genre 0504-319-25 - T/Thr 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) 0504-319-70 – M/W 6:00pm-7:50pm (LC) Instructor: Rob Tillett This course emphasizes the essay as genre within and across the disciplines, recognizing the role the essay plays in the formation of knowledge and the framing of academic debate. This course highlights the processes and practices of the essay as a genre unto itself and the production of research across the academic disciplines. Students will read professional essays and endeavor to develop their own voice within the context of their disciplines, broadening their critical understanding of the important debates within their field of study. Students will also recognize how their discipline is located within a larger culturally-diverse context. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression To Make Peace 0504-319-31 - M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm (LC) Instructor: Vincent F.A. Golphin With the vast increase in talk about wars throughout the planet, some people believe harmonious co-existence is impossible for humans. "Peace is more than the absence of war," as Pope Paul VI once wrote. At the same time, the major holy books say to live as one is within the reach of humankind.This course begins with an effort to define the "more," through a consideration of peacemakers throughout the globe. Students will write and discuss those whose thoughts and actions have led the way out of violent clashes in the United States, and such far-flung nations as El Salvador, Northern Ireland, Kosovo, Bosnia, Israel, Indonesia, Palestine, Sudan, and Sierra Leone. In the end, participants will engineer their own solutions to a specific crisis. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Scientific Biography 0504-319-28 - M/W 4:00pm-5:50pm (LC) Instructor: Elizabeth Mazzolini Scandal, intrigue, politics and rebellion--this is the stuff of scientific biography. In this class we will read the biographies of several scientists, ranging broadly over time and contemporary relevance. We will also read about the history and purpose of a genre that is more controversial and rife with ideological conflict than you might have thought! Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

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Writing the Disciplines: Arts of Expression Storytelling 0504-319-90 – ONLINE SECTION Instructor: Tom Stone This class will examine a fundamental form of expression: storytelling. An activity that far transcends the borders of English class, we tell stories to make sense of things from relatively private moments like a car wreck to grander questions like the fate of the universe. This is thus a truly multidisciplinary enterprise, and we are going to examine narratives from a variety of fields from myth and folktale to astronomy, and psychotherapy, among others, to consider the way these stories work in their different disciplinary settings. Jerome McGann has argued that being human necessarily means being mired in what he has famously termed “the textual condition,” and so we would do well to recognize and appreciate the stories we tell ourselves. To aid us in this exploration, students will be expected to give presentations as well as write papers both in response to the reading material and develop their own independent argument. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. This course fulfills a Liberal Arts requirement.

The Novel 0504-443-01 M/W 12:00pm-1:50pm Instructor: AJ Caschetta A close reading and analysis of several novels selected to show the range of narrative techniques, methods of characterization and plot construction, and styles representative of the genre. Part of the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor; the creative writing minor; and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. May be taken as an elective. Shakespeare: Tragedy Romance 0504-454-01 T/Thr 12:00pm-1:50pm Instructor: Richard Santana For almost four hundred years Shakespeare’s work has stood as a monument to the literary imagination. He is widely regarded as the supreme exemplar of not just British, but world literature. How deserved is that reputation? Upon what basis has it developed? Are there political, social and cultural forces at work in the reverence we pay to the Bard? In this course, we will study Shakespeare's tragedies and romances, with a view toward exploring the influence of his work through the ages, as well as addressing questions of canonicity. Through class discussion, interactive activities, and examination of film, students will develop strategies both to investigate the literary and theatrical power of these works as well as to consider their cultural presence in both contemporary American culture and Shakespeare's England. Particular attention will be devoted to literary theory and the variety of interpretation in order to inform our readings of the plays. Part of the Literary and Cultural Studies concentration and minor. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. May be taken as an elective.

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Dostoyevsky 0504-456-01 M/W 4:00pm-5:50pm Instructor: Elena Sommers This course is about a writer who grappled with the fundamental problems of human existence. He asked -what is good and what is evil? What is permissible if God does not exist? Dostoevsky explores these and other so-called "accursed questions" in gripping novels about murder, suicide, sexuality, insanity, greed, sin, and holiness. His characters come to life in works that engage us immediately and may trouble us profoundly. Course readings will range from the absurdist ravings of Dostoevsky’s madmen to the existential dilemmas of his murderers. Discussions will cover the haunted and haunting city of St. Petersburg, saints, prostitutes, and infernal women, holy fools and Russian Orthodoxy. Students will explore major 19th century philosophical and cultural currents. The readings will be complemented by several film versions of the works, which will be screened and discussed. Part of the Russian language/ culture concentration and minor; the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor; the Russian language minor; and may also be taken as an elective. .Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

Latin American Literature 0504-461-70 W 6:00pm-9:50pm Instructor: Sandra Saari Reading short stories, novels, poetry, and essays, as well as viewing films of modern Mexico and Central and South America reveals a literature and culture wherein the mythic functions as an integral part of the modern world view and the poetic functions as a political power. The impressive vitality of modern Latin American literature can be attributed to its indigenous roots and to its branches that, stemming from a common language and a shared continent, overarch national boundaries and political regimes to form an international literary community. Part of the Latino/Latina/ Latin American and minority relations concentrations; the Spanish language/culture concentration and minor; the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor; and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227. Myth, Legend, folklore 0504-464-01 M/W 2:00pm-3:50pm Instructor: Tom Stone Scholarly investigation into the rationale, origins and sources of myths, legends and folklore of the western world and the effect these primary forms have had on our literature. Part of the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor and may also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

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Iranian Literature and Film 0504-511-01 T/Thr – 8:00am-9:50am Instructor: Babak Elahi The course provides a survey of Iranian literature and film focusing on the period after the development of modern poetry and prose since the second half of the 19th, and the importation of film technologies at the beginning of the 20th century. The course explores the cultural, intellectual, and political trends of a nation whose role in the Middle East and beyond has become pivotal in recent years. Part of the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor; and may also be taken as an elective for international studies majors. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

Immigrant Voices, American Literature 0504-476-01 T/Thr 12:00pm-1:50pm Instructor: Doris Borrelli This course examines literary treatments of immigration to the US. Students will study novels, memoirs, short stories, other literary genres, and films that explore themes on the immigrant experience and cultural identity of immigrants in the US. We will also consider historical and political aspects of immigration, as well as the roles of race, class, and gender. Readings will include works by authors Frank McCourt, Amy Tan, Jhumpa Lahiri, and more. Part of the literary and cultural studies concentration and minor. May also be taken as an elective. Prerequisite of Writing Seminar 0502-227.

Marjane Satrapi, Iranian-French graphic novelist and film-maker (left) and Forough Farrokhzad (Iranian poet and filmmaker, d. 1967)

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PLANNING PAGE: Mon Tue Wed Thurs Fri Course 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm

Department of English Concentration and Minors
Concentration Advisor Elizabeth Mazzolini Richard Santana Concentration Writing Studies Literary/Cultural Studies

Minor Code Lisa Hermsen Linda Reinfeld Elizabeth Mazzolini Richard Santana
For more information visit:

Minor Science Writing Creative Writing Writing Studies Literary/Cultural Studies

http://www.rit.edu/cla/english/

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English Department Contact List
Borrelli, Doris Assistant Professor 5-4618 1311 Liberal Arts dabgsl@rit.edu Caschetta, A.J. Lecturer 5-5405 1324 Gosnell Annex ajcgsl@rit.edu Elahi, Babak Associate Professor 5-5235 2307 Liberal Arts bxegsl@rit.edu Hosking-Gilberg, Gail Lecturer 5-6194 2317 Liberal Arts ghggsl@rit.edu Golphin, Vincent F. A. Assistant Professor 5-2252 1315 Liberal Arts vxggsl@rit.edu Heifferon, Barbara Chair/Professor 5-4547 2303 Liberal Arts bahgsl@rit.edu Hermsen, Lisa Associate Professor 5-4553 2118 Liberal Arts lmhgsl@rit.edu

Housel, Rebecca Lecturer 5-4422 1309 Liberal Arts rahgsl@rit.edu Johannes, Julie Lecturer 5-2467 A315 Liberal Arts jmwgla@rit.edu MacCameron, Barbara Lecturer 5-2914 A104 Liberal Arts blmgsl@rit.edu Mack, Peggy Staff Assistant 5-6928 2305 Liberal Arts pjmgla@rit.edu Mazzolini, Elizabeth Assistant Professor 5-6630 2112 Liberal Arts eamgsl@rit.edu McKenzie, Stanley Professor 5-2011 2455 - Library sdmpro@rit.edu Ray, Amit Associate Professor 5-2437 2309 Liberal Arts axrgsl@rit.edu Reinfeld, Linda Lecturer 5-4622 A106 Liberal Arts lmrgla@rit.edu

Roche, John Associate Professor 5-4922 2106 Liberal Arts jfrgla@rit.edu Saari, Sandra Professor 5-6793 2315 Liberal Arts sesgsl@rit.edu Santana, Richard Associate Professor 5-4414 2110 Liberal Arts rxsgsl@rit.edu Shackelford, Laura Assistant Professor 5-2461 2116 Liberal Arts lxsgla@rit.edu Sommers, Elena Lecturer 5-4417 1317 Liberal Arts ersgla@rit.edu Stone, Thomas Lecturer 5-4623 1328 Gosnell Annex tmsgla@rit.edu Swartzfager, Paulette Lecturer 5-5415 2114 Liberal Arts pmsgsla@rit.edu Walter, Andrea Professor, Director RIT Exploration 5-4938 1303 Liberal Arts acwgsl@rit.edu

Warycka, Sharon Lecturer 5-4426 1332 Gosnell Annex sdwgsl@rit.edu Zandy, Janet Professor 5-2905 2104 Liberal Arts jnzgsl@rit.edu

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ADJUNCT LISTING:
Capossere Connor Cope DesOrmeaux Doyle Everhart Granite Huff Jones Lovenheim Mahar Milburn Pelphrey Perry Spula Tillett VanMeenen Wolfley Bill Breandan Emily Paul Cass Maggie Harvey Steven Nick Peter Jean Louise Lloyd Bobby Andrew John Robert Karen Jennifer ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG billcap@mac.com bxcgla@rit.edu emilyanncope@yahoo.com hahouse49@hotmail.com cassdoyle@yahoo.com magswrites59@yahoo.com pmeek35036@aol.com nomdeplume@frontiernet.net hoosiernick1@yahoo.com peterlov@aol.com jlmism@rit.edu ljmgsl@rit.edu Bobby.pelphrey@rit.edu awpgsl@rit.edu jbspula@yahoo.com rjtgsl@rit.edu renvanmeenen@yahoo.com jwolfley@yahoo.com

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