Becoming a Building Contractor

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					ALTERNATIVE ENERGY
Careers
Aerodynamics Engineers:                      Perform a variety of engineering work in designing,
constructing, and testing the flow of air past objects like autos, wind turbines, aircraft, missiles,
and spacecraft. May conduct basic and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials
and equipment to design and manufacture. May recommend improvements in testing equipment
and techniques.

Work Environment: Most engineers work in office buildings, laboratories, or industrial
plants. Some engineers travel extensively to plants or work sites.

Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is required for most entry-level jobs.
Continuing education is critical for engineers wishing to enhance their value to employers as
technology evolves.

Skills Needed: Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail oriented. They
should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing.




Architects:          An architect is a person who plans and designs structures like homes, office
buildings, theaters, and factories. They make detailed drawings and models so that other people
can visualize and build the structure.

Work Environment: An Architect works in an office Work Environment: and uses everything
from simple pencil sketches to Computer Aided Drafting to create hisdesigns

Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement. Many years of
experience and possibly a master’s degree are required depending on the type of work being
done.

Skills Needed: Active listening, Critical thinking, Complex Problem Solving, Communication




Building Contractors:              A Building Contractor contracts to perform specified
construction work in accordance with architect's plans, blueprints, codes, and other
specifications: Estimates costs of materials, labor, and use of equipment required to fulfill
provisions of contract and prepares bids.

Work Environment: Most Building Contractors work full time, and many work over 40 hours
a week. Construction workers may sometimes work evenings, weekends, and
 holidays to finish a job or take care of an emergency. They work both in an office and on job
sites.

Education Requirements: Persons interested in becoming a building contractor need a solid
background in building science, business and management, as well as related work experience
within the construction industry. They need to understand contracts, plans, and specifications,
and to be knowledgeable about construction methods, materials, and regulations.

Skills Needed: Management skills, communications skills both verbal and written.
Understanding a second language is a plus.




Chemical Engineers:               Chemical engineers apply the principles of chemistry to solve
problems involving the production or use of chemicals and biochemicals. They design
equipment and processes for large-scale chemical manufacturing, plan and test methods of
manufacturing products and treating byproducts, and supervise production.

Work Environment: Most engineers work in office buildings, laboratories, or industrial
plants. Some engineers travel extensively to plants or work sites.

Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is required for most entry-level jobs.
Continuing education is critical for engineers wishing to enhance their value to employers as
technology evolves.

Skills Needed: Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail oriented. They
should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing.




Chemists:          Chemists determine the structure, composition, and nature of substances
 by examining and identifying their various elements or compounds. Chemists are absolutely
crucial to the pharmaceutical industry because pharmaceutical companies need to know the
identity of compounds that they hope to turn into drugs. Furthermore, analytical chemists study
the relations and interactions of the parts of compounds and develop analytical techniques. They
also identify the presence and concentration of chemical pollutants in air, water, and soil.

Work Environment: Chemists usually work regular hours in offices and laboratories. R&D
 chemists spend much time in laboratories but also work in offices when they do theoretical
research or plan, record, and report on their lab research.

Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree in chemistry or a related discipline usually is
 the minimum educational requirement for entry-level chemist jobs. However, many research
jobs require a master’s degree, or more often a Ph.D.

Skills Needed:
Perseverance, curiosity, and the ability to concentrate on detail and to work independently are
essential.




Civil Engineers:              Civil engineers design and supervise the construction of roads,
buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and water supply and sewage systems. They must
consider many factors in the design process, from the construction costs and expected lifetime of
a project to government regulations and potential Work Environmental hazards such as
earthquakes.

Work Environment: Most engineers work in office buildings, laboratories, or industrial plants.
Some engineers travel extensively to plants or work sites.

Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is required for most entry-level jobs.
Continuing education is critical for engineers wishing to enhance their value to employers as
technology evolves.

Skills Needed: Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail oriented. They
should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing.




Geologists:         A Geologist studies the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of
the Earth. With the use of sophisticated instruments and by analyzing the composition of the
earth and water, geologists study the Earth’s geologic past and present

Work Environment: A geologist divides his time between working out in the field and in a
laboratory.
Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is adequate for a few entry-level positions, but
most geologists need at least a master’s degree in general geology or earth science. A master’s
degree also is the minimum educational requirement for most entry-level research positions in
private industry

Skills Needed:
Computer skills in computer modeling, data analysis, and digital mapping. A knowledge of the
Global positioning System and good communication skills are required.




Materials Scientist:             Materials scientists study the structures and chemical properties
of various materials to develop new products or enhance existing ones. They also determine
ways to strengthen or combine materials or develop new materials for use in a variety of
products.

Work Environment: Materials scientists usually work regular hours in offices and
laboratories. R&D materials scientists spend much time in laboratories but also work in offices
when they do theoretical research or plan, record, and report on their lab research.

Education Requirements:
Materials scientists hold a degree in materials science, a bachelor’s degree in chemistry, physics,
or electrical engineering also is accepted. Many R&D jobs require a Ph.D. in materials science or
a related science.

Skills: Perseverance, curiosity, and the ability to concentrate on detail and to work
independently are essential.




Nuclear Physicists:              Physicists explore and identify basic principles and laws
governing motion and gravitation, the macroscopic and microscopic behavior of gases,
 and the structure and behavior of matter, the generation and transfer between energy, and the
interaction of matter and energy.

Work Environment: Most nuclear physicists work in either academic positions, such as
university faculty, or in large research laboratories which are usually run by the Government.
These positions are highly competitive and difficult to get. Some companies also hire nuclear
physicists to work in a variety of research areas and work environments.

Education Requirements:
A doctoral degree is the usual educational requirement for physicists. Additional experience and
training in a postdoctoral research appointment, although not required, is important for physicists
aspiring to permanent positions in basic research in universities and government laboratories.
Many physics Ph.D. holders ultimately teach at the college or university level.

Skill Needed:
Mathematical ability, problem-solving and analytical skills, an inquisitive mind, imagination,
and initiative are important traits for anyone planning a career in physics.




Wildlife Biologists:            A Wildlife biologist studies wild animals and their habitats.
Research and technical investigations are performed by scientists educated in wildlife biology,
zoology, botany, chemistry, mathematics, or various combinations of these disciplines.

Work Environment: Wildlife biologists split their working time between work in a laboratory
and assignments or projects in the field.

Education Requirements: Basic qualifications for the wildlife biologist series, GS-486, in
 nonresearch positions includes a degree in the biological sciences with: at least 9 semester hours
in such wildlife subjects as mammalogy, ornithology, animal ecology, wildlife management, and
wildlife techniques.

Skills Needed: Wildlife biologists should be able to work independently or as part of a team and
be able to communicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in writing. Those in private
industry, especially those who aspire to management or administrative positions, should possess
strong business and communication skills.

				
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