Basic Principles of Practical Configuration Management

Document Sample
Basic Principles of Practical Configuration Management Powered By Docstoc
					                 Systems and Software Consortium

                 2007 Workforce Development and
                 Training Solutions
                 Proven, Program-Ready Training Programs and
                 Learning Solutions




                                                     •   Process Improvement
                                                     •   SEI Introduction to CMMI
                                                     •   Systems Engineering
                                                     •   Measurement
                                                     •   Security
                                                     •   Configuration Management
                                                     •   Mission Assurance
                                                     •   Test Automation
                                                     •   Verification and Validation
                                                     •   Requirements Engineering
                                                     •   Project Management



Courses, Workshops, Lectures, Executive Overviews, Coaching, Technology Transfer
SSCI-2007002-MC
      March 2007
                                               CONTENTS

Introduction ................................................................................................... 1
     Practitioners as Instructors ............................................................................1
     Open Courses................................................................................................1
     Regional Courses ..........................................................................................1
     Private Courses .............................................................................................1
     Workshops.....................................................................................................2
     eLearning.......................................................................................................2
     Custom Learning Solutions............................................................................2
     Guest Lectures ..............................................................................................2
     Materials Online.............................................................................................2
     2007 Pricing...................................................................................................3

Workforce Planning Services....................................................................... 5
     Training Program Reviews ............................................................................5
     For Additional Information..............................................................................6

Course Descriptions ..................................................................................... 7
     Advanced Higher Maturity Measurement.......................................................9
     Basic Principles of Practical Configuration Management.............................11
     Causal Analysis ...........................................................................................13
     Continuous Improvement.............................................................................15
     Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR).....................................................17
     Early Validation of Requirements.................................................................19
     Engineering Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling..................................21
     Engineering Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling Workshop.................23
     Enterprise Architecture Using the DoD Architecture Framework .................25
     Enterprise Architecture Using the Federal Enterprise Architecture..............27
     Fundamentals of Systems Engineering .......................................................29
     Inspection Training ......................................................................................31
     Integration, Verification & Validation ............................................................33
     Integration, Verification & Validation - Early Validation of Requirements.....35
     Introduction to a Disciplined Requirements Process....................................37
     Introduction to Higher Maturity Measurement ..............................................39
     Introduction to Lean Thinking, Six Sigma® and CMMI®: An Integrated
     Approach .....................................................................................................41
     Introduction to Object-Oriented Concepts....................................................43
     Introduction to Quality Assurance ................................................................45
     Introduction to Using Software Estimation Techniques and Tools ...............47
     Managing Agile Software Development .......................................................49
     Managing Process Improvement .................................................................51
     Model-Based Development and Automated Testing....................................53
     Object-Oriented Approach to Software Intensive Systems (OOASIS) .........55
     Planning Process Improvement through ROI Analysis ................................57
Practical Software and Systems Measurement (PSM) ................................59
Practical Software and Systems Measurement (PSM) Overview ................61
Process Architecting and Design .................................................................63
Quantitative Management............................................................................65
Requirements Engineering Course..............................................................67
Security Engineering....................................................................................69
SEI CMMI Version 1.2 Upgrade Training.....................................................71
SEI Introduction to the CMMI v1.2 ..............................................................73
SSCI Systems Engineering Certificate Program..........................................75
Systematic Approach to Process Engineering .............................................79
Systems Architecting Fundamentals............................................................81
Systems Engineering Measurement ............................................................83
Understanding the CMMI Executive Overview.............................................85
Understanding the CMMI v1.2 .....................................................................87
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Introduction
The Consortium offers a diverse catalog of proven, program-ready training
programs and learning solutions. Offerings range from single- and multi-day,
instructor-led courses open to all members, to private courses and workshops at
member company locations. In addition, we offer a growing number of e-learning
solutions, keynote speakers and guest lecturers, and customized training
programs designed to meet member needs.

Practitioners as Instructors
The Consortium’s technical staff members are leading subject matter experts in
their respective fields. As skilled technology developers, practitioners, and
consultants, instructors continuously develop their body of knowledge through
frequent interaction with the Consortium’s diverse membership. This ongoing
learning results in the most effective, applicable, and relevant training courses
available. The Consortium’s training courses come in three broad categories:
open, regional, and private.

See the current schedule of public offerings at:
http://www.systemsandsoftware.org/events_training/training/calendar/?id=60

Open Courses
Offered at our Herndon facility, and convenient to Dulles International Airport and
numerous hotels, open classes typically include 20-30 students from various
member companies. Courses are open to all member company staff and are
filled on a first-come, first-registered basis. See back panel for registration
information.

Regional Courses
A convenient, cost-effective way to leverage Consortium training is to host an
open course at your site. While the course remains open to other member
company staff, you receive guaranteed registrations for the first 15 seats in the
class and any additional seats remaining at registration cutoff. As host, you
provide a training facility, light refreshments, and a minimum number of students
(typically 15). The Consortium provides student materials and covers the cost of
instructor time and travel. (Offerings are provided to Full members only and are
subject to staff availability.)

Private Courses
Designed for program and project teams that require training of specific groups of
staff, these courses usually are held onsite at member company locations.
Private courses provide the same industry-recognized content as public
offerings, but in a focused approach to address your company’s programs.




                                         1
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007


Workshops
Workshops are an excellent way to speed the transfer of Consortium solutions
and other industry best practices, methods, and tools to your workforce.
Reflecting intensity and focus levels beyond those of training courses, workshops
are designed by subject matter experts to integrate Consortium products and
solution sets to meet your specific program goals. Scope and duration are
subject to member needs.

eLearning
Emerging technologies supporting virtual collaboration and video-streaming
enable the Consortium to offer training in new ways. New training solutions allow
your employees to learn just-in-time, any time, and from anywhere.

Custom Learning Solutions
Assembled from existing course materials or custom-built to meet your specific
training requirements, SSCI custom courses provide a competitive alternative to
commercially available programs. Custom courses and curricula reduce time-to-
market and development costs, while enabling you to focus training on meeting
specific business needs. Per-diem and other fees may apply.

Guest Lectures
Consortium subject matter experts are nationally known in their respective
disciplines and are available as guest lecturers to support your internal learning
and development initiatives. In addition to course and curriculum-based lectures,
these experts can provide technical keynote speeches and plenary talks and
facilitate breakout sessions on a wide variety of system and software subjects.

Materials Online
Member company personnel may access an extensive library of documents,
guidebooks, templates, course descriptions, and other assets via the “For
Members Only” (FMO) website. This indispensable resource allows for quick
search, selection, and downloading of the Consortium’s expertise onto your
desktop. Consider linking your learning management system or training program
directly to the FMO site to facilitate access to and usage of your member
benefits.




                                        2
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




2007 Pricing

For Full members, your company’s annual Consortium dues cover most initial
training services for major Consortium technologies. Course access is fee-based
for Service, Basic, and Affiliate members, and can be priced per individual or by
contract. Contact your Account Management Director at 703-742-8877 or Matt
Swayhoover, Director, Technology Transfer and Workforce Development at 703-
742-7228 to discuss pricing.

 Training Duration          Member           Commercial
       (Days)
          1                   $6,000             $7,375
         1.5                  $7,320             $9,025
          2                   $8,420            $10,400
         2.5                  $9,740            $12,050
          3                  $10,990            $13,575
          4                  $12,970            $16,050
          5                  $14,950            $15,525
Introduction to the          $14,740            $17,325
        CMMI
   (SEI licensed)




                                        3
Systems and Software Consortium       March 2007




                                  4
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Workforce Planning Services
Our learning curricula apply recognized organizational design and development
models to achieve member workforce development goals, aligning talent with
organizational goals. Our Workforce Planning consulting service is a highly
recommended augmentation to our training curricula, as it can help members
design an organizational, leveraged approach to utilizing our training courses in a
systematic fashion. Particularly for newer members, Workforce Planning is a
vital “first step” to ensuring that our learning program becomes an invaluable
corporate resource to achieve your business goals.

Our methodology begins with meetings with group and team leadership to define
organizational challenges, opportunities and goals. We interview key managers
to identify the skills, knowledge, and behaviors associated with high performance
staff. Follow-on activities include data collection efforts employing focus groups
and surveys of key staff to articulate strengths and developmental opportunities.
A complete review and analysis of collected data then identifies skill priorities and
gaps requiring further attention. The process concludes with a detailed review of
results with managers and the development of specific training plans.

Our Workforce Planning approach can help member companies to answer the
following questions:

What skills do I need to be successful?
What skills do my staff currently have?
Where are the skill gaps that I need to address to be successful?
What steps can I take to ensure my staff continues to develop and maintain their
skills?


Training Program Reviews
As an independent, neutral body, the Consortium is also well positioned to
perform objective Training Program reviews. Training program reviews help to
evaluate how well workforce development activities align to and are consistent
with an organization’s needs. During the review, we look at all facets of your
training program, including: training strategy; course and curriculum development
and maintenance; faculty development; program evaluation; elearning;
outsourcing; and staff development strategy.

Training program reviews also include interviews with key stakeholders and
participants. We present our findings at the organization-level and describe
opportunities for improvement in your relevant training processes. Our services
conclude with a detailed review of results with managers and the development of
specific plans for program enhancements.




                                         5
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


The Consortium’s Training Program Review approach can help Member
companies to answer the following questions:

Is my training program and associated process CMMI compliant?
How well is my organizational training program aligned with my business needs?
How well is my organization growing and maintain staff knowledge and
expertise?
How well is my training program performing compared to other members?

SSCI Training Program Reviews are highly recommended components of our
learning partnership with our members, for both new and existing members.

For Additional Information
For more information on our training courses, services, or how your Consortium
membership can benefit your training program, contact Matt Swayhoover,
Director, Technology Transfer and Workforce Development at 703-742-7228.

We are always ready to discuss:

   •   Access to Consortium courseware
   •   The current release schedule for new or revised courses
   •   Strategies for making the most of the Consortium’s training resources
   •   Your organization’s training needs or the Consortium’s solutions in more
       detail
   •   Competency models for software and systems engineering staff
   •   Course pricing
   •   Delivery options




                                        6
Systems and Software Consortium                  March 2007




                           Course Descriptions




                                    7
Systems and Software Consortium       March 2007




                                  8
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007



Advanced Higher Maturity Measurement

Format: 3 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Once organizations have mastered the basics of the measurement techniques
needed to achieve CMMI Level 4 and 5, they start looking for more techniques to
apply to areas other than just defect analysis. This course, using the SSCI
Integrated Measurement Series as a foundation, will provide guidance into more
advanced data analysis techniques with examples that go beyond basic defect
management activities.

Who Should Attend:

This course is aimed at engineering process improvement staff, measurement
and project management personnel responsible for analyzing project data and
understanding project performance. This course will assume a good
understanding of basic process improvement concepts, such as getting
management commitment, performing appraisals, setting up PI infrastructures,
documenting and training processes, and including basic statistical process
control and quality modeling techniques. Therefore, the course is intended for
organizations operating at or above Level 3, with a working knowledge of Level 4
measurement techniques. This course is for DOD contractors and commercial
organizations.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand how to:

   •   Use statistics for data analysis, including techniques such as Chi-Square,
       regression, ANOVA
   •   Create quality models that extend across entire systems activities
   •   Understand different data analysis tools available and their relative pros
       and cons

Highlights:

   •   General data analysis process
   •   Use of Chi-Square, regression, and basic ANOVA techniques
   •   Comparison of commercially available data analysis tools
   •   Use of these analysis techniques at the systems level




                                        9
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Prerequisites:

Participants should have a good understanding of basic process improvement
concepts, such as getting management commitment, performing appraisals,
setting up PI infrastructures, documenting and training processes, and including
basic statistical process control and quality modeling techniques.

Professional Development Units: None




                                       10
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Basic Principles of Practical Configuration Management

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Configuration Management (CM) plays an indispensable role in successful
product development and deployment. With effective CM, we know that we
consistently have all the correct "pieces and parts" of each product at all times.
Without effective CM, we experience costly rework, endanger our valuable
product assets, and risk losing customer confidence.

The purpose of this course is to:

Help member companies establish a basic CM capability by:

   •   Providing course participants with a foundation in sound CM principles
   •   Presenting four high-level CM process elements that member companies
       can use as a springboard for defining and improving their own CM-related
       processes, roles, methods, and tools

Help course participants develop these basic CM skills:

   •   Identifying configuration items
   •   Determining levels of control and baselines within a product life cycle for
       selected configuration items
   •   Identifying an appropriate structure for a configuration library
   •   Determining a Change Control Board (CCB) structure and holding a
       project CCB meeting to process change requests

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes process participants, individuals
with CM responsibilities, such as project configuration managers, configuration
management team members, and members of Change Control Boards. This
course will also be valuable to project managers and project team members,
such as requirements analysts, designers, developers, and testers, process
developers and process improvement personnel, such as SEPG and Process
Action Team (PAT) members.




                                         11
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand how to:

   •   Identify the major functions and benefits of CM
   •   Define each major CM function and identify its basic principles and
       activities
   •   Demonstrate basic skills in implementing selected CM activities via class
       exercises
   •   Identify important issues when defining and improving an organization-
       specific CM capability
   •   Distinguish two categories of CM support tools: version control and
       process-based

Highlights:

   •   Introduction
   •   Overview
   •   Configuration Identification
   •   Configuration Library
   •   Configuration Status Accounting
   •   Configuration Change Control
   •   Configuration Audits
   •   Project CM Planning
   •   CM Tools
   •   Conclusion

Prerequisites:

Students should have familiarity with systems engineering or software
engineering. Knowledge of capability maturity models and industry standards is
helpful, but not required.


Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                         12
Systems and Software Consortium                                            March 2007




Causal Analysis

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course provides members with processes, Six Sigma tools and practices,
and associated artifacts for performing systematic causal analysis (CA). This
course will benefit member personnel who need to perform root cause analysis
or develop CMMI compliant CA processes for their organization.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes technical and managerial staff,
typically system, and software and process improvement engineers.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify characteristic guidelines for CA process application
   •   Identify CA process elements and key considerations needed to define a
       CMMI CA compliant process
   •   Identify CA methods and techniques which may be appropriate for
       application in their organization
   •   Utilize Six Sigma tools including Pareto charts, affinity diagrams, relational
       digraphs, scatter diagrams, and cause-and-effect diagrams for CA
       applications

Highlights:

   •   Select defect data for analysis
   •   Analyze causes
   •   Implement the action proposals
   •   Evaluate the effects of changes
   •   Record data
   •   Review issue for analysis
   •   Organize and analyze data
   •   Understanding relationships among data
   •   Identifying root causes
   •   Prioritizing and offering solutions
   •   Presentation of Six Sigma tools and methods mapped to the CA process
   •   Coordinated exercises to support student understanding of these methods
       and techniques and provide a basis for application in their organizations


                                         13
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007




Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     14
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Continuous Improvement

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

Process improvement should provide tangible benefits. Unfortunately this is often
not the case. The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) addresses this
problem head on at Maturity Levels 4 and 5 by tying process improvement
activities to business goals. Continuous Improvement is the Consortium’s
approach to goal-based process improvement through the use of proven process
management techniques. Continuous Improvement integrates the concepts of
CMMI Maturity Levels 4 and 5 and provides an effective way to target process
improvement activities to achieve specific business objectives.

This course is an excellent first step on an organization journey to higher
maturity.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes employees from organizations
experienced in process improvement through CMM® or CMMI Maturity Levels 2
and 3. This includes organizations focused on moving beyond CMM/CMMI Level
3 to build business value into the software process and improvement programs.

Engineering managers, quality managers, process improvement champions,
and/or process group members addressing issues in developing a CMMI Level 4
and 5 capability will find this program beneficial.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The role of goal setting in identifying process improvements
   •   The measurement infrastructure needed to support process improvement
   •   The principals of process management and they are used to achieve ideal
       process performance
   •   CMMI® requirements for demonstrating Maturity Levels 4 and 5
   •   The Consortium approach for achieving high maturity




                                         15
Systems and Software Consortium                                       March 2007


Highlights:

   •   The concepts of Continuous Improvement as a means of guiding process
       improvement activities.
   •   Measurement as a means of identifying process improvement
       opportunities and tracking process improvement accomplishments.
   •   Process Management a two-phased approach to process optimization
       incorporating process stabilization and process improvement techniques.

Prerequisites:

Students should be familiar with the CMMI, process improvement, and
measurement.

Professional Development Units: None




                                      16
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR)

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course provides members with processes, practices, and associated
artifacts for performing systematic Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR). This
course will benefit member personnel who have the need to perform formal
evaluations or develop CMMI compliant DAR processes for their organization.
Although in the staged representation of CMMI DAR is a Maturity Level 3 PA, the
practices detailed in this course are Capability Level 1, base practices.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes technical and managerial staff,
typically systems, software, and process improvement engineers.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   Characteristic guidelines for DAR process application
   •   DAR process elements and key considerations needed to define a CMMI
       DAR compliant process
   •   Additional Consortium products that support typical DAR applications.

Highlights:

   •   This course will present generic CMMI DAR process activities with
       discussion of issues, requirements and considerations for implementing
       DARs specific practices:
   •   The course also includes:
   •   DAR evaluation methods

Prerequisites:

If attendee’s purpose is to write CMMI DAR compliant processes, the student
should be familiar with the basics of CMMI and process definition. Two
Consortium courses that would be beneficial are: Understanding the CMMI
Overview and a Systematic Approach to Process Engineering.




                                       17
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Professional Development Units: 10.5

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     18
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Early Validation of Requirements

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

This course teaches the concepts and value of validating requirements with
customers early in the system engineering lifecycle. The student learns the
considerations involved in planning and executing early validation, as well as the
approaches and methods including rapid prototyping, computer modeling,
simulation labs, and hot mock-ups.

This course is frequently combined with SSCI's Integration, Verification &
Validation course as a two-day offering.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes technical and managerial staff,
typically those dealing with system engineering, that are new to development
programs.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Develop and execute a plan for early validation of requirements to meet
       customer objectives
   •   Utilize early validation approaches
   •   Analyze and document the results
   •   Identify and use available tools for use in early validation of requirements

Highlights:

   •   Early validation as an essential risk mitigation technique to assure that the
       customer will accept the final product
   •   Definition of early validation and the differences between it and classic
       validation and verification
   •   Approaches and documentation of early validation
   •   Tools to be used in early validation of requirements
   •   Cost and schedule value of early validation within the systems lifecycle




                                         19
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Prerequisites:

SSCI's Fundamentals of Systems Engineering and Requirements Engineering
course are recommended but not required prerequisites for best results.


Professional Development Units: 6.5

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     20
Systems and Software Consortium                                            March 2007




Engineering Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

Member companies engineer and deploy systems and products in a wide range
of environments with varied concerns about confidentiality, integrity, availability,
and non-repudiation. This 2-day course provides an introduction to the
techniques of security threat modeling (STM) and the important role that it can
play during the initial development and throughout the system’s life cycle. It is
intended to be a preview of the more hands-on experience of the Engineering
Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling Workshop, which is offered to
development teams.

Through the use of STM, development teams can systematically identify
vulnerabilities and threats, and consider risk-mitigating steps throughout the
lifecycle, including requirements, architecture, design, implementation, testing,
and life cycle management. STM’s cost-effectiveness allows informed decisions
about the security properties of the system under development, balancing
security with other imperatives (i.e., functionality, schedule, cost, and quality).

Also available as a 2-day workshop.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes senior technologists (systems
and software engineers) and engineering managers who are responsible for
planning and managing the system development processes within their
organizations or who are concerned with the security properties of the systems
they develop.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Describe the security challenges facing information systems today
   •   Identify the 11 security key practices (including security threat modeling
       (STM)) that can be applied throughout the systems development life cycle
   •   Build a security threat model for a small system
   •   Demonstrate how the STM method models the threat and computes a
       cost-benefit estimate of various risk mitigating techniques




                                         21
Systems and Software Consortium                                       March 2007


Highlights:

The course is built around three major activities:

   •   Presentation of the STM process: Identification of vulnerabilities and
       threats; analysis of impact; techniques to mitigate risk
   •   Group exercise in STM: Consortium facilitator leads attendees in applying
       STM to a case study

Prerequisites: None


Professional Development Units: 7

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                         22
Systems and Software Consortium                                            March 2007




Engineering Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling Workshop

Format: 2 Days Workshop

Course Information:

Member companies engineer and deploy systems and products in a wide range
of environments with varied concerns about confidentiality, integrity, availability,
and non-repudiation. This 2-day course provides an introduction to the
techniques of security threat modeling (STM) and the important role that it can
play during the initial development and throughout the system’s life cycle. It is
intended to be a preview of the more hands-on experience of the Engineering
Secure Systems Using Threat Modeling Workshop, which is offered to
development teams.

Through the use of STM, development teams can systematically identify
vulnerabilities and threats, and consider risk-mitigating steps throughout the
lifecycle, including requirements, architecture, design, implementation, testing,
and life cycle management. STM’s cost-effectiveness allows informed decisions
about the security properties of the system under development, balancing
security with other imperatives (i.e., functionality, schedule, cost, and quality).

Also available as a 1-day overview course.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes senior technologists (systems
and software engineers) and engineering managers who are responsible for
planning and managing the system development processes within their
organizations or who are concerned with the security properties of the systems
they develop.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Describe the security challenges facing information systems today
   •   Identify the 11 security key practices (including security threat modeling
       (STM)) that can be applied throughout the systems development life cycle
   •   Build a security threat model for a small system
   •   Demonstrate how the STM method models the threat and computes a
       cost-benefit estimate of various risk mitigating techniques




                                         23
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Highlights:

The course is built around three major activities:

   •   Presentation of the STM process: Identification of vulnerabilities and
       threats; analysis of impact; techniques to mitigate risk
   •   Group exercise in STM: Consortium facilitator leads attendees in applying
       STM to a case study
   •   STM in context: STM is presented in a life cycle context, highlighting how
       the outputs of the STM process are reviewed and prioritized, and their
       potential effects in requirements, architecture, design, implementation,
       and testing.

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: None




                                         24
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




Enterprise Architecture Using the DoD Architecture Framework

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course introduces the steps required to architect an enterprise using the
DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF). DoDAF serves as a framework that
defines the enterprise architecture (EA) work products required of services and
agencies in the defense sector.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes individuals who are interested in,
or require an introduction to EA, DoDAF, or both. The instruction material
assumes that students have a basic understanding of architecture.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Describe the benefits of EA
   •   Identify the major frameworks used to classify EA work products
   •   Describe three major views and the component work products of DoDAF
   •   Execute the basic steps required to document an EA
   •   Implement the tools used in support of EA

Highlights:

   •   Overview-- explains why EA has become so prominent in the defense
       sector.
   •   The Case for EA-- discusses the benefits of EA and its value to
       stakeholders.
   •   DoDAF Overview-- provides an overview of the DoDAF, describing the
       three major views that comprise the DoDAF (Operational, Systems, and
       Technical Standards) and the supporting “All View.”
   •   EA Development Steps-- describes the steps to create and, in generic
       terms, implement the work products that comprise an EA.
   •   Operational View-- provides more detail on the purpose of the DoDAF
       Operational View and the work products that comprise it.
   •   Systems View-- provides more detail on the purpose of the DoDAF’s
       Systems View and the work products that it comprises




                                        25
Systems and Software Consortium                                      March 2007


Prerequisites:

Students should have a basic understanding of systems or software architecture.

Professional Development Units: None




                                      26
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Enterprise Architecture Using the Federal Enterprise
Architecture

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course introduces the steps required to apply the principles of enterprise
architecture (EA) using the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA), the framework
that defines the EA work products required of federal agencies. The FEA is also
a set of reference models that agencies can use as a starting point, and serve as
the nucleus of an EA for the entire federal government, emphasizing elimination
of duplication functions, data, and applications across agencies.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes individuals who are interested in,
or require an introduction to EA, the FEA, or both. The instruction material
assumes that students have a basic understanding of architecture.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify the major frameworks used to classify EA work products
   •   Identify the major elements comprising the FEA
   •   Describe the benefits of EA
   •   Implement the basic steps required to document an EA
   •   Deploy the tools used in support of EA

Highlights:

   •   Overview – this section explains why EA has become so prominent in the
       federal sector.
   •   The Case for EA – this section discusses the benefits of EA and its value
       to stakeholders.
   •   The FEA – this section describes the components of the FEA itself.
   •   Steps to Develop an EA – this section describes the steps to carry out EA
       and, in generic terms, the work products that comprise an EA.
   •   Key EA Practices – this section provides a discussion of key EA practices
       identified in other parts of the course.
   •   EA Compliance Criteria – this section describes the efforts in the federal
       sector to measure the maturity of architectures in federal agencies.




                                        27
Systems and Software Consortium                                      March 2007




Prerequisites:

Students should have a basic understanding of systems or software architecture.


Professional Development Units: 0




                                      28
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

Format: 5 Days Classroom

Course Information:

The Fundamentals of Systems Engineering 5-day course describes the basics of
systems engineering, from what it is, through how it proceeds through the life
cycle, to why do it. The course provides full coverage of the systems engineering
activities as defined in most standards and guidebooks. It is at the introductory
level but will provide sufficient learning and exercises to allow the students to be
able to apply the methods at an entry level.

An exercise is used throughout the course to allow the students to apply the
material in a somewhat realistic manner. The final exercise of the course is a
review dry-run to show how the process learned can be used to address a need
and present the proposed program.

Who Should Attend:

The primary audience is entry-level systems engineers. Additional audience
candidates include systems architects, software developers, hardware engineers,
program managers, and others interested in learning the basics of systems
engineering.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Recognize the basic activities of systems engineering (SE)
   •   Perform core activities, those included in the exercises, at an entry level
       with supervision
   •   Identify how the systems engineering activities fit together, with other
       activities, and into a program
   •   Prepare for INCOSE SE certification exam

Highlights:

   •   Introduction. Importance of SE; How does the SE process fit into other
       processes and life cycles, with focus on implications for SE.
   •   Needs, Conops, and Requirements definition
   •   Functional analysis
   •   Architecture. Synthesis and allocation
   •   Systems analysis, including trade studies, models, prototypes, and other
       types of analysis


                                         29
Systems and Software Consortium                                      March 2007


   •   Logistics and life cycle costs
   •   Integration and deployment
   •   Verification and Validation
   •   SE management, including risk
   •   Specialty engineering

Additional topics:
Systems engineering standards and guidebooks, specifically their degree of
influence on practicing systems engineers, INCOSE, Systems of systems,
systems-software interfaces

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 35

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                        30
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Inspection Training

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Finding and fixing product or system defects late in the lifecycle is extremely
costly. Formal, highly disciplined inspections of all work products (software,
systems, and hardware) throughout the product lifecycle reduces the number of
defects found not only in testing, but also in production. This increases
productivity and decreases the cost of product development.

This course prepares member company personnel to participate in systems,
software, and hardware inspections. The key to successful inspections is to
include a highly disciplined, well-defined process, with very specific roles for each
inspector on the team. This course incorporates the most effective and efficient
inspection methods employed by organizations that have successfully
incorporated inspections into their development lifecycle. The course is
compatible with the CMMI Level 3 Verification process area.

Moderator training has now been added as an integral part of the course.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes individuals who have engineering
(systems, software, or hardware) or management responsibility for product
development in any phase of lifecycle development. Benefits are maximized
when groups of 3-5 can be formed with similar technical background (for student
provided inspection). The course does not assume or require knowledge of any
process maturity models.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The inspection process
   •   How to differentiate types of work products
   •   How to perform all inspector roles -- including that of the moderator
   •   How to compare and contrast inspections with other types of reviews
   •   How to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of the inspection process
   •   How to identify methods for tailoring the inspection process to their own
       needs




                                         31
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007


Highlights:

The course presents inspection techniques and inspector roles and
responsibilities throughout the inspection process. In addition, the course:

   •   Alerts students to potentially problematic inspection techniques and
       illustrates how even a simple adjustment in execution can lead to
       disastrous results
   •   Includes three inspections conducted by students under the guidance of
       the instructor. The Consortium provides material for two of these
       inspections, and students provide the third
   •   Shows moderators how to handle difficult situations, using taped
       scenarios
   •   Identifies techniques for measuring inspection effectiveness and efficiency
   •   Shows how inspection defects form the basis for defect prevention
   •   Describes the infrastructure needed to support effective inspections

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                        32
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




Integration, Verification & Validation

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

This course introduces the concepts and methods for system Integration,
Verification and Validation (IV&V) within the system engineering lifecycle. The
course addresses the differences between validation and verification and the role
of integration in the V&V process.

This course is frequently combined with SSCI's Early Validation of Requirements
course as a two-day class.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes technical and managerial staff,
typically those dealing with system engineering, that are new to development
programs.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify the importance of IV&V with the life cycle
   •   Plan, organize and execute integration, verification and validation
       processes
   •   Develop completion criteria for verification and validation
   •   Determine approaches to achieve integration, verification and validation
   •   Address the resources needed for integration, verification and validation

Highlights:

   •   The importance of IV&V within the life cycle of a project
   •   The interface and interplay among system, hardware and software
       verification and validation activities.
   •   Planning, organizing and executing an IV&V process.
   •   Completion criteria for verification and validation.
   •   Approaches to achieve those completion criteria.
   •   Resource requirements for IV&V including time, materials, equipment and
       manpower.




                                        33
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Prerequisites:

SSCI's Fundamentals of Systems Engineering and Requirements Engineering
course are recommended but not required prerequisites for best results.

Professional Development Units: 6.5

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     34
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Integration, Verification & Validation - Early Validation of
Requirements

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This two day offering combines the Consortium's popular Integration, Verification
& Validation (IV&V) and Early Validation of Requirements (EVR) courses.

The IV&V content introduces the concepts and methods for system Integration,
Verification and Validation within the system engineering lifecycle. The course
addresses the differences between validation and verification and the role of
integration in the V&V process.

The EVR content introduces the concepts and value of validating requirements
with customers early in the system engineering lifecycle. The student learns the
considerations involved in planning and executing early validation, as well as the
approaches and methods including rapid prototyping, computer modeling,
simulation labs, and hot mock-ups.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes technical and managerial staff,
typically those dealing with system engineering, that are new to development
programs.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify the importance of IV&V with the life cycle
   •   Plan, organize and execute integration, verification and validation
       processes
   •   Develop completion criteria for verification and validation
   •   Determine approaches to achieve integration, verification and validation
   •   Address the resources needed for integration, verification and validation
   •   Develop and execute a plan for early validation of requirements to meet
       customer objectives
   •   Utilize early validation approaches
   •   Analyze and document the results
   •   Identify and use available tools for use in early validation of requirements




                                         35
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007


Highlights:

   •   The importance of IV&V within the life cycle of a project
   •   The interface and interplay among system, hardware and software
       verification and validation activities.
   •   Planning, organizing and executing an IV&V process.
   •   Completion criteria for verification and validation.
   •   Approaches to achieve those completion criteria.
   •   Resource requirements for IV&V including time, materials, equipment and
       manpower.
   •   Early validation as an essential risk mitigation technique to assure that the
       customer will accept the final product
   •   Definition of early validation and the differences between it and classic
       validation and verification
   •   Approaches and documentation of early validation
   •   Tools to be used in early validation of requirements
   •   Cost and schedule value of early validation within the systems lifecycle

Prerequisites:

SSCI's Fundamentals of Systems Engineering and Requirements Engineering
course are recommended but not required prerequisites for best results.

Professional Development Units: 13

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                         36
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Introduction to a Disciplined Requirements Process

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Companies and governments have wasted billions of dollars on projects that
exceed their original time estimates or fail altogether. More often than not, the
major causes of these overruns and failures stem from problems involving
system or program requirements. Oftentimes, requirements are incomplete,
poorly defined, or nonexistent; concerns of stakeholders are overlooked; and
changes to requirements are allowed without adequate consideration of their
impact. This course provides a foundation in sound requirements principles
which can help reduce the risk of project overrun or failure.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes representatives of organizations
at capability maturity Level 1 and Level 2. Process participants, such as analysts,
designers, developers, testers, managers, customer interface personnel,
configuration management personnel, and quality assurance personnel. Process
developers or process improvement personnel will also find this course
beneficial.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify benefits and key success factors for a disciplined requirements
       process
   •   Describe the five major process elements of the requirements process
   •   Develop basic skills in several tasks of the requirements process through
       classroom exercises
   •   List the six characteristics of a well-defined requirement, and use these
       characteristics to differentiate between well-defined and poorly defined
       requirements

Highlights:

   •   Provide an introductory level foundation in sound requirements principles
   •   Help organizations (primarily Level 1) establish a disciplined requirements
       process
   •   Help organizations (primarily Level 2) seeking to improve their existing
       requirements process



                                         37
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007


   •   Provide a generic requirements process that an organization can tailor for
       use.

Prerequisites:

Participants should have a background in systems engineering or software
engineering. Knowledge of capability maturity models is helpful, but not required.

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                        38
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Introduction to Higher Maturity Measurement

Format: 3 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course presents a complete approach for implementing the infrastructure
necessary to support the Level 4 Process Areas of the Capability Maturity Model
Integrated (CMMI), Software Capability Maturity Model (SW-CMM), and provides
the foundation necessary for implementing business-driven process
improvement.

This course addresses today's need for knowing the basic concepts and
techniques necessary to operate effectively at Level 4.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes EPG members, mid-level and first
level managers, supervisors, measurement specialists, and/or QA staff
responsible for establishing a quantitative management program or applying
quantitative management principles within their organizations and projects. In
addition this course would be useful for anyone that will be participating on a
higher maturity appraisal (Levels 4 and 5).

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

•   The roles, responsibilities and activities of quantitative management
•   Basic statistical process control techniques and use
•   Quality modeling and it's use in planning and managing projects
•   How to implement quantitative management of product and process quality
    within an organization
•   The Level 4 process area requirements described in the CMMI

Highlights:

The first day of this course explains how to integrate quantitative management
principles into an organization and how quantitative techniques such as statistical
process control and quality management can be used to quantitatively manage
the quality of products and the processes used to produce them. The second
day introduces basic statistical process control techniques and emphasizes their
use for project planning and management. The third day ties the first two days
together by introducing quality modeling and showing how this technique fits in



                                        39
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007


with and uses the components of quantitative management and statistical
process control.

Prerequisites:

The participant's organization is operating at Level 3 or above, or the participant
has a good working knowledge of Level 3 concepts

Professional Development Units: None




                                         40
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007



Introduction to Lean Thinking, Six Sigma® and CMMI®: An Integrated
Approach

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

This one-day course provides an overview of Lean Thinking, Six Sigma and the
CMMI, suggesting that integrating the three areas can formulate a unique,
powerful process improvement initiative that provide a single, comprehensive,
and proven approach to improve business performance and operating
excellence.

Companies around the world involved with Systems and Software are attempting
to learn and develop innovative ways to eliminate stovepipe domains and begin
to utilize and integrate successful approaches beyond manufacturing. Few
organizations have successfully applied together Lean Thinking/Six Sigma and
CMMI to software or systems engineering. Many companies, in fact, have
encountered strong internal competition between these programs, which does
not have to be the case.

This course lays the foundation for a unified approach and sets the cornerstone
for fostering Organizational and Project team synergies, reducing costs,
increasing customer satisfaction, streamlining systems and software processes,
while achieving higher maturity levels in a shorter timeframe.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes:

   •   Members of Engineering Process Groups
   •   Managers of Software or Systems Engineers
   •   Managers of Quality Assurance
   •   Managers of organizations with a strategic intent of pursuing Levels 4 and
       5 of CMMI
   •   Managers of organizations seeking to infuse Lean Thinking/Six Sigma into
       their process improvement program




                                       41
Systems and Software Consortium                                       March 2007


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will have an understanding of Six
Sigma sufficient to consider a unified Six Sigma and CMMI approach to their
process improvement for software and systems engineering.

Highlights:

Topics in this course include the:

   •   Definition and Genesis of Lean Thinking & Six Sigma
   •   Confluent Intentions of Lean Thinking Six Sigma and CMMI
   •   Six Sigma Improvement Cycle
   •   Six Sigma Design Steps
   •   Six Sigma Competencies and Organization
   •   Putting it all together (Lean Thinking, Six Sigma & CMMI)

Prerequisites:

Knowledge of the Capability Maturity Model® or CMMISM

Professional Development Units: None




                                      42
Systems and Software Consortium                                       March 2007




Introduction to Object-Oriented Concepts

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

This course provides a foundation for technical staff interested in learning
essential object-oriented (OO) concepts. This course will focus on the concepts
that make OO design and code powerful, and have led to its prevalence in the
software community. Attendees do not need to have any previous knowledge or
experience with OO in order to attend. This course will not teach the attendees
how to do an OO design or how to program in an OO programming language, but
rather will introduce key OO concepts to those fairly new to this topic. More
advanced courses teach the "how-to" methods, such as the 2.5 day OOASIS
Course. This introductory course is an optional prerequisite to the OOASIS
course, and is also offered as a standalone course.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes software engineers who are trying
to learn object-oriented concepts and those who will be taking the OOASIS
course. The secondary audience for the course includes other engineers who
must interact with developers applying OO software development techniques.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Understand basic concepts of OO
   •   Understand the manifestation of these concepts in code
   •   Understand the expected benefits of OO
   •   Understand the purpose of use cases
   •   Recognize the Unified Modeling Language (UML) as a notation for
       representing OO models




                                        43
Systems and Software Consortium              March 2007


Highlights:

   •   Introduction to Objects and Classes
   •   Abstraction and Encapsulation
   •   Inheritance and Polymorphism
   •   Benefits of OO
   •   Use cases
   •   UML

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: None




                                       44
Systems and Software Consortium                                           March 2007




Introduction to Quality Assurance

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information

There is a strong relationship between product quality and process quality.
Quality Assurance (QA) evaluates products and services against the processes
used to create them, to assure adherence to the process and to verify the
process’s ability to produce a product/service that meets a project or
organization’s quality objectives. Quality Assurance serves as the link between
Quality Control (determining the quality of the product after it has been built) and
Quality Management (defining a process that will produce a quality product).

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes individuals likely to be working in
either a system or software environment at an early CMMI maturity level. The
organization may wish to institute a new QA process or improve their current QA
process. This course can benefit people with current/future QA responsibilities as
well as organizational and project QA team leaders and managers. Other
audiences include: QA engineers, project managers, process developers and
process improvement personnel, Software Engineering Process Groups (SEPG)
and Engineering Process Improvement Groups (EPIG), Process Action Team
(PAT) members.

NOTE: The course does not discuss testing techniques and therefore is not
targeted to members of the test organization.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Identify the objectives, functions and benefits of QA
   •   Use the Consortium's generic QA process to define and improve quality in
       their organizations
   •   Determine whether their quality objectives are met
   •   Show how QA processes and practices transition in Quality Management
       as the organization matures




                                         45
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007


Highlights:

The course will stress QA's role as a quality facilitator and the return on
investments achievable through use of a strong QA infrastructure and process
with these process elements:

   •   Planning
   •   Evaluating and tracking
   •   Analyzing and reporting
   •   Lessons learned

Prerequisites:

Attendees should have a basic familiarization with:

   •   Systems or software engineering life-cycle activities such as: Engineering
       project management, requirement definition, design, code, integration,
       test, and system operation and maintenance
   •   Capability models or ISO quality standards (ISO 9000, 1994 or ISO
       9001:2000

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                        46
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Introduction to Using Software Estimation Techniques and Tools

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course introduces some of the most popular software estimation techniques
and vendor tools in use by our members. For each estimation technique or
vendor tool presented, the Instructor will discuss its background, how it works,
strengths and issues, demonstrate its use in a sample problem, and describe
appropriate development domains to apply it. A short, computer-based
demonstration is provided for software estimation vendor tools. The software
estimation techniques and vendor tools presented include Function Points, Lines
of Code, COCOMO/COCOMOII, PRICE S, SLIM, SEER-SEM, and Activity
Based Costing.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers, technical staff, and
analysts who want to increase their understanding of software estimation
techniques.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The use of popular techniques and tools to estimate software
       development size, effort, and schedule.
   •   How to select and match suitable software estimation techniques and
       tools with the appropriate domains, and relate those estimation techniques
       and tools to CMMI process areas.

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                       47
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  48
Systems and Software Consortium                                              March 2007




Managing Agile Software Development

Format: 1.5 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Today's software projects are increasingly volatile due to rapid changes in both
customer needs and underlying technology, as well as uncertainties arising from
the use of COTS and legacy components. Conventional project management
practices have difficulty coping with highly volatile environments.

A new approach is emerging called agile software development by the Agile
Alliance at www.agilealliance.org. This philosophy focuses on people and their
collaboration as key to project success. The highest priority is satisfying the
customer through early and continuous delivery of value-added functions; project
progress is assessed by customer reviews of working software rather than
documentation.

The project team proceeds with an attitude of learning about and exploring for
the best means of achieving an envisioned goal rather than following a map to a
known destination. Deviations from the original project plan are viewed as
indicators of new/improved project direction instead of errors to be fixed. This
course will introduce participants to the principles of agile software development
including the agile lifecycle and practices that facilitate it. Guidelines for adopting
agile practices and managing an agile development project are also introduced.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes program and project managers,
technical leads, or anyone working on projects that demand a more agile
approach.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will:

   •   Understand the Agile life cycle
   •   Understand agile development principles and techniques
   •   Understand agile management and adoption guidelines
   •   Understand agile development
   •   Determine whether agile development could be valuable to an
       organization




                                          49
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Highlights:

   •   Agile development beliefs, principles, and benefits
   •   The phases of the agile life cycle
   •   Survey of essential and optional agile practices
   •   Agile management and anti-agile practices
   •   Adopting agile development

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 5

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                        50
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Managing Process Improvement

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course presents a process for planning, managing, and implementing
process improvements. It also includes material on the technology transfer
process and concepts detailed in the Consortium’s Using New Technologies: A
Technology Transfer Guidebook. This is typically a 2-day course that integrates
parts of other SSCI process improvement technologies.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes line managers and engineering
staff responsible for implementing process improvement activities, including
members of a software engineering process group (SEPG). The participants
should have a general knowledge of process improvement concepts.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The major benefits, features, and components of the process
       improvement process
   •   How to develop a program plan to guide process improvement
   •   How to identify, analyze, and monitor risks to process improvement
       programs
   •   How to develop an action plan
   •   How to identify and manage resistance to process improvement

Prerequisites:

The participants should have a general knowledge of process improvement
concepts.

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.



                                       51
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  52
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




Model-Based Development and Automated Testing

Format: 3 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course uses lecture and exercises to discuss the motivations for and
conception & implementation of a testing environment that supports automated
model analysis, model-based test generation, and test execution based on the
Consortium's Test Automation Framework (TAF).

The TAF approach leverages rigorous software development models to automate
many traditionally manual and error-prone testing activities by combining
commercially-available model-based development, analysis and testing tools. It
promotes a continuous verification and validation (V&V) process similar to
extreme testing. TAF automates or eliminates time-consuming tasks encountered
during model verification, requirement defect identification, test creation, test
management, test driver creation, and test results analysis.

This course combines many computer-based exercises to demonstrate model-
based testing concepts using Software Cost Reduction (SCR) and tabular
models, and associated test generation tools. The instructor will describe how the
TAF approach uses interface-driven analysis that combines requirement
modeling to support automated test generation. The course also describe best
practices and roles for test engineers early during development and recommends
approaches for organizing model and test artifacts that can be easily reused and
extended as application components evolve.

If possible, course attendees should bring a laptop with the following minimum
configuration: either Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows XP with at least
128MB RAM and a 600MHz processor.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes testing engineers, quality
assurance personnel and others interested in learning about applying automated
model-based testing technology.




                                       53
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Describe the connection between model-based development and testing
   •   Identify the advantages offered by full life-cycle testing using automated
       model-based testing techniques
   •   Describe basic requirement modeling used for requirement defect analysis
       and automated testing
   •   Automatically generate test vectors to outline a test plan and generate test
       reports
   •   Develop and use test drivers to automatically perform tests
   •   Reduce rework by reducing requirement defects
   •   Get started with a pilot project

Highlights:

   •   TAF Overview
   •   Approaches for integrating TAF into the development process
   •   Modeling approaches and demonstration
   •   Fundamentals of Software Cost Reduction (SCR) modeling
   •   Exercise: Modeling and Testing max_positive
   •   Details of test generation and model analysis
   •   Test constraints
   •   Model management and reuse concepts, with Inlines and Includes
   •   Exercise: ATM model analysis
   •   Mode (state) machine concepts
   •   Generating test reports
   •   Test driver concepts and organization roles of test engineers

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: None




                                        54
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Object-Oriented Approach to Software Intensive Systems
(OOASIS)

Format: 2.5 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course teaches the OOASIS method, an object-oriented way to solve typical
problems in the analysis and design of software-intensive systems. OOASIS
addresses issues of performance, fault recovery, and the coordination of
software design with other aspects of engineering the overall system.

OOASIS provides an integrated method that cuts across the scopes of the
traditional system and software engineering roles; however, the emphasis is on
software and the systems engineering directly interfaced with it. OOASIS offers
practical, prescriptive guidance for development. Its work products are based on
the Unified Modeling Language notation.

The course focuses in particular on capture of system "behavioral requirements",
and on object-oriented (OO) analysis and design for the software portion of the
system.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes software engineers who want a
pragmatic method for applying OO techniques to system development. System
engineers/architects who wish to employ techniques for requirements capture
and analysis compatible with OO software development will also find this class
beneficial.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The benefits of the OOASIS method, and how to apply it through a hands-
       on case study exercise.
   •   How to address problems in communication between traditional systems
       and software engineering viewpoints
   •   Practical guidance for an integrated, OO method




                                       55
Systems and Software Consortium                                              March 2007


Highlights:

The course addresses these topics while covering the activities of the OOASIS
method:

   •   Capturing system behavioral requirements
   •   Analyzing and capturing fault recovery requirements
   •   System/software design for flexibility to address system volatility
   •   Software distribution across multiple nodes (i.e., processors)
   •   Designing concurrent threads of control
   •   Handling performance issues in requirements and design


Prerequisites:

SSCI's Introduction to OO Concepts course, unless the student already has a
good understanding of the concepts of abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance,
and polymorphism, and how these concepts are implemented in code.

Professional Development Units: None




                                         56
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Planning Process Improvement through ROI Analysis

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

In order to plan and sustain process improvement (PI) initiatives, organizations
need to justify PI investments by projecting the value of process improvements
on the business. This course shows organizations how to create a business
value network that indicates the impact of the process improvement on the value
components -– time, productivity, and quality -– within their organization’s
business model. Process improvement initiatives can then be evaluated against
each other and prioritized for the greatest return on investment. The resulting
analyses can also be used to gain commitment from all levels within the member
and customer organization and provide the basis for realistic process
improvement action plans.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers, engineers,
measurement analysts and other staff involved with process improvement efforts.
Others that would benefit from this course are those that are sponsoring or
championing organizational process improvement initiatives.

Learning Objectives:

The intended audience for this course is engineering PI staff that are planning
their process improvement initiatives and want to be sure that they are gaining
the most business value for the organization’s investment. Those PI groups that
already have plans in place may benefit by identifying ways to measure their
improvements as well as refining their plans. Although examples will be drawn
from organizations using the CMMI, others can apply the concepts.

Highlights:

The course focuses on developing a quantitative understanding of the process
improvement effort in relation to the organization's bottom line objectives. Topics
include: quantifiable objectives, business value network, return on investment
calculations, business case presentation, evaluating results of process
improvement, and planning based on this information.

A significant portion of the class time is spent on a case study to demonstrate
key concepts of the course. Students are encouraged to bring a laptop computer
to work the case study.



                                        57
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Prerequisites:

This course assumes a good understanding of basic process improvement
concepts, such as setting up PI infrastructures, documenting processes, training
processes and performing appraisals.

The course assumes that the students have had training on setting up a
measurement capability that is used to support management information needs
(such as described in the CMMI® Measurement and Analysis process area) and
have contributed to the measurement capability (by contributing data, verifying
data, or analyzing data). Students without some measurement background may
find course concepts valuable, but may not be capable of implementing the
approach in their current environment.

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                       58
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Practical Software and Systems Measurement (PSM)

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

The goal of the PSM project is to provide managers with the objective information
needed to successfully meet cost, schedule, and technical objectives on software
intensive/system development programs. PSM defines an issue-driven analysis
approach, which helps the manager make informed decisions. This is the
standard PSM version of the course which the Consortium provides as a PSM
Transition Organization. This course teaches students the basic skills needed to
select and apply measures.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers, measurement
specialists, and software and systems engineers responsible for defining a
measurement program for their organizations and projects.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   How measurement can be used to help manage programs
   •   Be able to define the characteristics on an effective measurement
       program
   •   How to plan for an effective measurement program
   •   How to perform measurement

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                       59
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  60
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Practical Software and Systems Measurement (PSM) Overview

Format: 1 Day Classroom

Course Information:

The goal of the PSM project is to provide managers with the objective information
needed to successfully meet cost, schedule, and technical objectives on software
intensive systems programs. PSM defines an issue-driven analysis approach,
which helps the manager make informed decisions. The PSM Overview course is
a half-day course that describes the PSM issue-driven measurement process.
This course teaches students the basic skills needed to select and apply
measures.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers, measurement
specialists, and engineers responsible for defining a measurement program for
their project.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   How measurement can be used to help manage programs
   •   Be able to define the characteristics on an effective measurement
       program
   •   How to plan for an effective measurement program
   •   How to perform measurement

Highlights:

Also available in a half-day format.

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 7

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.



                                       61
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  62
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Process Architecting and Design

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course is designed to train process architects in a practical and adaptable
approach to establish and manage the architecture of their process system. We’ll
discuss the value of architecting and managing the various interfaces between
processes, establish common ground for discussing process architectures, and
teach a tailorable approach for establishing the structural (i.e., architectural)
aspects of the overall process system. Using this tailorable approach, attendees
will learn how to identify and structure processes that contribute value to the
development or engineering of the services or products important to their
business. Participants will also learn how to document and communicate the
resulting process system architecture and the inter-process linkages to their
various process system stakeholders. Exercises are used to reinforce the topics
discussed during this course.

Although primarily focused on architecting processes for software-intensive
systems, this method can be used to architect a variety of process systems.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes members of process architecting
teams and people overseeing process architecting activities. The course will also
benefit members of organizational or engineering process groups, managers
sponsoring or championing organizational process improvement initiatives, and
process management personnel.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Create working definitions for the terms "process," "process system," and
       "process architecture"
   •   Integrate process architecting and design into your process engineering
       activities
   •   Describe the impact of architectural decisions on the resulting process
       system
   •   Identify the desirable interpersonal and technical skills of a process
       architect
   •   Describe the key characteristics and elements of a process architecture
   •   Apply the techniques discussed in this course to develop and evolve a
       process architecture


                                        63
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Highlights:

This course is designed for organizations seeking to apply a systematic,
repeatable approach to architecting their processes through a practical, tailorable
method for evolving a process architecture. We’ll discuss the value of process
architecting and design and how to manage the interfaces among processes

This course can also help organizations with architected processes by providing
ideas and suggestions for improving current process architecting and design
approaches, and by providing recommendations for evaluating an existing
process architecture.

Prerequisites:

Participants should have a general knowledge of process improvement concepts
as well as knowledge of at least one capability model or process standard, such
as:

   •   Capability Maturity Model for Software® (CMM®)
   •   Capability Maturity Model-Integration® (CMMI®)
   •   Information Technology – Life Cycle Management – System Life Cycle
       Processes (ISO/IEC FDIS 15288)
   •   Standard for Information Technology-Software Life Cycle Processes
       (ISO/IEC 12207)
   •   American National Standards Quality Management Systems (ISO 9000)

Professional Development Units: None




                                        64
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Quantitative Management

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course presents a complete approach for implementing the infrastructure
necessary to support the Level 4 Process Areas of the Capability Maturity Model
Integrated (CMMI), Software Capability Maturity Model (SW-CMM), and provides
the foundation necessary for implementing business-driven process
improvement.

The course explains how to integrate quantitative management principles into an
organization and how quantitative techniques such as statistical process control
and quality management can be used to quantitatively manage the quality of
products and the processes used to produce them.

Who Should Attend:

EPG members, mid-level and first level managers, supervisors, measurement
specialists, and/or QA staff responsible for establishing a quantitative
management program or applying quantitative management principles within
their organizations and projects.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   The history of process management and its applicability to software
       development
   •   The QM program requirements described in the SW-CMM and CMMI
   •   The role of statistical process control and other quantitative techniques in
       managing software processes and products
   •   How to implement quantitative management of product and process
       quality within an organization
   •   What policies, standards, procedures, policies, plans, and training typically
       are needed by a CMM Level 4 organization

Prerequisites:

The participant's organization is operating at Level 3.




                                         65
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     66
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Requirements Engineering Course

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

The first 10% of a program’s life cycle (its development), determines the
remaining 90% (its production, operations, and support.) Program development
depends on having a sound set of requirements that are based on how the
customers intend to use the product to satisfy their needs. Failure to develop and
use good requirements can result in costly rework to satisfy the customer or lost
business.

All too often, requirements don’t address stakeholder needs, or are incomplete,
poorly defined, or nonexistent. Changes to the requirements often occur without
adequate consideration of their impact.
    This course focuses on how to develop good requirements at the outset of a
development project, and how to ensure that the requirements will satisfy the
customer. It also describes how to use requirements to drive the system or
program architecture and verify that the delivered product does what it is
intended to do.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers who oversee
requirements development activities. Domain engineers who want to see the
bigger picture or assume a requirements engineering role will also find this
course of value. Junior systems or requirements engineers seeking to develop
their skills as well as senior systems or requirements engineers looking to refine
their skills will find this class beneficial.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Describe how needs analysis and requirement definition fit into the overall
       system engineering and management methods
   •   Assess customer needs and develop a needs statement
   •   Develop a Concept of Operations (“conops”)
   •   Apply engineering methods to a Statement of Needs and Conops to derive
       a requirement set
   •   Explain the thought processes behind needs assessments and
       requirement development, and perform them
   •   Validate requirements to ensure that a proper set has been developed



                                        67
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007


   •   Understand, at least at a high level, how TAF can be applied to verify and
       validate system and program requirements
   •   Begin the requirement flow-down process
   •   Apply requirements engineering principles while operating under various
       systems engineering and management processes

Highlights:

This course addresses how to perform the most critical, initial requirements
development tasks:

   •   How to elicit system or program needs from the customer and develop a
       needs statement
   •   How to determine an approach to solving those needs
   •   How to develop and use a concept of operations using the approach and
       needs statement
   •   How to develop and use a requirement set from the concept of operations
       and needs statement

The course also describes several procedural checks:

   •   How to validate requirements with the customer to be sure the needs are
       being addressed
   •   How to flow the requirements down into the architecture so that they can
       be verified
   •   How to use model-based, automated testing with the Consortium’s Test
       Automation Framework (TAF) to perform integrated verification and
       validation (IV&V) on your requirements to ensure their completeness and
       accuracy
   •   How the various system engineering processes provide a managerial
       framework for these tasks

Exercises are included to reinforce how to perform the requirements engineering
tasks and demonstrate their applicability to real problems

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units:

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.



                                        68
Systems and Software Consortium                                            March 2007




Security Engineering

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Achieving effective security in systems requires that "security" be planned and
engineered into the system as early as possible. Security concerns, however,
compete with other management imperatives (e.g., more functionality, less cost,
accelerated schedule) for resources during a development project. While
developers of information and software-intensive systems are increasingly
challenged to develop systems that meet the security needs of their customers,
two on-going factors make the problem worse:

The current trends toward increased connectivity, complexity, and commonality,
all of which combine to create a more challenging security environment; and
The increasing severity of the threat environment.

This course takes a system development life cycle (SDLC) view to address the
security issues at each phase of the SDLC, independent of the life-cycle model
being used (e.g., waterfall, spiral, RAD). Development teams typically make a
myriad of decisions throughout the SDLC and many of these have security
implications. This course illustrates the security implications of decisions that are
routinely made and suggests activities to make the SDLC more ‘security aware;’
it also describes techniques to enhance the security characteristics of the system
under development.

Understanding how attackers exploit systems is indispensable in security
engineering. This course includes a demonstration of common security attacks
on software systems. The attacks are explained using real systems with actual
vulnerabilities. The systems are based on Linux and Windows platforms. Once
attacks are explained, techniques are presented on how to defend against them.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes all stakeholders in the system
development process, especially project/program managers and engineering
staff.




                                         69
Systems and Software Consortium                                      March 2007


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Understand the security implications of system decisions
   •   Make system decisions based on proven risk management principles
   •   Determine when to accept certain inherent risks in systems development
   •   Manage inherent risks

Highlights:

This course addresses the following topics:

   •   Making the business case for security
   •   Security issues spanning the life cycle
   •   Security issues during:

   •   Concept development and requirements
   •   Design
   •   Implementation
   •   Testing
   •   Deployment and operations

Demonstrations of common vulnerabilities, how they are exploited, and how they
can be defended; topics include:

   • Buffer overflows
   • Cross-site scripting
   • SQL injection
   • Input manipulation
   • Session hijacking
   • Bypass authentication
   • Password attacks
  Network-based attacks

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: None




                                        70
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007



SEI CMMI Version 1.2 Upgrade Training

Format: 4 Hours eLearning

Course Information

This SEI online training courses provides students who have taken CMMI
Version 1.1 training the opportunity to understand the changes and
improvements made in CMMI Version 1.2. It will help systems and software
engineering staff to successfully make the transition from CMMI Version 1.1 to
the updated Version 1.2 of the CMMI model, method and training. It does not
matter which version of the Introduction to CMMI course that you attended
(staged, continuous, or staged and continuous). The materials are designed to
provide a general insight into the changes but also include refresher materials on
important CMMI concepts.

This course is required for any student who plans to take be a team member on a
SCAMPI Version 1.2 appraisal.

The SEI Course Fee for the training is $175 per attendee.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course is anyone who has completed an SEI-
authorized (Version 1.1) Introduction to CMMI training course. These courses
include:

   •   Introduction to CMMI Continuous
   •   Introduction to CMMI Staged
   •   Introduction to CMMI (Staged and Continuous)

This course is required for any student who plans to take be a team member on a
SCAMPI Version 1.2 appraisal.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will:

   •   Understand the differences between CMMI V1.1 and V1.2 (appraisals,
       model, training)
   •   Understand key concepts and terminology in CMMI models




                                        71
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Highlights:

   •   Model Changes
   •   SCAMPI A Appraisal Method Changes
   •   Training Changes
   •   CMMI Architecture
   •   Institutionalization
   •   CMMI Model Refresher
   •   SCAMPI Appraisal Refresher

Prerequisites:

Satisfactory completion of an SEI-authorized Introduction to CMMI v1.1 training
course.


Professional Development Units: None




                                       72
Systems and Software Consortium                                            March 2007




SEI Introduction to the CMMI v1.2

Format: 3 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course introduces systems and software engineering managers and
practitioners, appraisal team members, and engineering process group (e.g.,
SEPG, EPG) members to CMMI® fundamental concepts. CMMI models are tools
that help organizations improve their ability to develop and maintain quality
products and services. CMMI models are an integration of best practices from
proven discipline-specific process improvement models, including the CMM® for
Software, EIA 731, and the Integrated Product Development CMM.

This course has been updated to be part of Version 1.2 of the CMMI Product
Suite. The course was also improved to respond to change requests submitted
by students, instructors, and others.

The course is composed of lectures and class exercises with ample opportunity
for participant questions and discussions. After attending the course, participants
will be able to describe the components of CMMI models and their relationships,
discuss the process areas in CMMI models, and locate relevant information in
the model.

This course fulfills a prerequisite requirement for any course requiring an official
SEI Introductory CMMI course.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course is systems and software engineering
managers and practitioners interested in understanding the Capability Maturity
Model Integration:

Assessment teams who are going to be using the CMMI-based assessment
method in the future
Systems and Software Engineering Process Group (SEPG/EPG) members who
are leading process improvement




                                         73
Systems and Software Consortium                                       March 2007


Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will:

   •   Understand the importance of having defined processes within an
       engineering organization and the rationale for process improvement.
   •   Comprehend the architecture of the CMMI model (maturity levels, process
       areas, goals, and generic practices).
   •   Have a sufficient understanding of process area components to function
       as a CMMI-Based Appraisal team member.
   •   Be able to apply the CMMI principles to meet the needs of systems
       engineering and software engineering organizations.

Highlights:

   •   Introduction
   •   Model-based process improvement
   •   Overview of CMMI components
   •   Institutionalization
   •   Process areas of CMMI models
   •   Structure of the continuous and staged representations
   •   Next steps

Prerequisites:

Participants must have knowledge of systems engineering, software engineering,
and management, including exposure to quality assurance, configuration
management, and basic management principles. This course will fulfill one of the
prerequisites for CMMI-Based Appraisal training.

Professional Development Units: None




                                       74
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




SSCI Systems Engineering Certificate Program

Format: 12 Days Classroom

Course Information:

The SSCI Systems Engineering Certificate Program is an intensive, graduate-
level learning experience for experienced, practicing engineers. This program
uses a program lifecycle approach to guide the student through an in-depth
exploration of systems engineering (SE) activities. The program is taught
incrementally over four months in a blended learning format, including eLearning,
self-study, classroom, and team project work. A capstone or practicum project is
integrated throughout the course to allow the students to apply the material in a
realistic manner. The program integrates INCOSE SE Handbook material to help
participants prepare for the INCOSE Certified Systems Engineering Professional
examination.

This program is taught as four modules over a period of roughly 4 months. Each
module blends self-study readings and research, instructor-led classroom
experiences (3 days per module), eLearning, and team projects.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes experienced systems engineers
demonstrating the capability to lead engineering teams. Less-experienced
systems engineers having demonstrated the capability to perform at higher-levels
will also benefit from this course. Senior engineers from non-systems
engineering disciplines looking to make a transition to SE roles will find value in
this course. Senior systems engineers preparing for INCOSE Certified Systems
Engineering Professional exam will find this course a good reinforcement of SE
content and practices.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will have a working understanding of
the end-to-end systems engineering process and how it fits in a program.

They will be able to perform the following tasks with supervision:

   •   Develop a basic concept of operations
   •   Develop measures of effectiveness
   •   Define requirements and review them against basic quality attributes
   •   Develop a basic functional analysis using Functional Flow Block Diagrams
       or Behavior Diagrams
   •   Develop a timeline related to the functional analysis


                                        75
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007


   •   Define a basic system architecture using a Schematic Block Diagram
   •   Allocate requirements to system components
   •   Define and track Technical Performance Measures
   •   Use a parametric estimating tool
   •   Perform a basic trade study
   •   Define interface requirements
   •   Develop an integration strategy
   •   Develop basic verification and validation plans
   •   Define risks and mitigations
   •   Develop a basic SE Plan


Have an understanding of the following through inclusion in exercises:

   •   Various system life-cycles
   •   Systems of Systems
   •   Network Centric Systems
   •   Capability Based Acquisition
   •   Cost as an Independent Variable
   •   Life-cycle costing
   •   Producibility and learning curve
   •   Logistic support elements and their impact on design
   •   Work Breakdown Structure
   •   Reviews
   •   Baselines
   •   Principal specialty engineering disciplines
   •   Integrated Product Teams

Be familiar with:

   •   Various standards, models and initiatives affecting SE
   •   The content, concepts, and vocabulary of the INCOSE SE Handbook that
       is used as the reference for the INCOSE SE Certification exam

Highlights:

The SE Certification curricula includes:

   •   SE Planning
   •   Needs, expectations and constraints
   •   Concept of Operations
   •   Requirements
   •   Functional Analysis
   •   Specifications
   •   Architecting and Synthesis


                                           76
Systems and Software Consortium              March 2007


   •   Allocation
   •   Cost Factors
   •   Analysis and Decisions
   •   Specialty Engineering
   •   Integrated product teams
   •   Verification
   •   Validation
   •   Integration
   •   Deployment
   •   Logistics Support
   •   SE Management
   •   Organization & SE
   •   Risk & Opportunity Management
   •   Technical Parameter Measurement
   •   Work Breakdown Structure
   •   Earned Value Management
   •   Scheduling
   •   Process


Prerequisites: Nomination is required

Professional Development Units: None




                                        77
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  78
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




Systematic Approach to Process Engineering

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course provides the guidance necessary for an organization to architect,
design, and implement the process infrastructure and assets required to specify
a well-defined, engineering process. We present a systematic approach
composed of five phases: Plan the effort; Baseline existing organizational
processes; Identify one or more product life-cycle models; Construct a standard
process architecture; and Define an organizational standard process. Guidance
on developing a process asset library and process database is also provided.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes managers, engineers, and other
staff involved with process improvement efforts leading organizations from
CMMI, CMM, SE-CMM, and/or EIA IS 731 Level 2 to Level 3. Organizations
moving to Level 2 will also find much useful information that will guide their
improvement efforts and may lead to lessening the time to later move to Level 3.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   Basic concepts and terms related to process engineering
   •   A systematic approach to process engineering
   •   Related process standards and capability models, and how they may be
       used in process engineering

Prerequisites:

The participants should have a general knowledge of process improvement
concepts, including knowledge of at least one of the following capability models:
CMMI, CMM, SE-CMM, and/or EIA IS 731 Level 2 to Level 3.

Professional Development Units: None




                                        79
Systems and Software Consortium        March 2007




                                  80
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Systems Architecting Fundamentals

Format: 1.5 Days Classroom

Course Information:

Architecting increasingly complex systems is a growing and evolving challenge.
Architectural frameworks address only a piece of this puzzle. Although
architecting priorities, techniques, and tools vary across different types of
systems and customers, a few key practices are essential to successful
architecting. This course presents those key practices in the context of a case
study.

Course material is based on the SSCI technical papers, Key Practices in
Systems Architecting and Evaluating Architecture with System Attributes, which
are also included in the course notebook.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes individuals and teams who expect
to be performing or managing systems architecture activities such as:

   •   Systems architects
   •   Software architects
   •   Systems engineers
   •   Program managers and those new to systems architecture.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand the basics of systems
architecting, including its:

   •   Scope
   •   Value
   •   Principal tasks
   •   Place in a program
   •   Typical views and analyses
   •   Key practices




                                       81
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


Highlights:

   •   Overview of Systems Architecting
   •   Case Study
   •   Architectural Analysis
   •   Key Practices
   •   Staff a system architect role for the entire project
   •   Understand the real problem
   •   Involve all relevant stakeholders in the architecture process
   •   Describe the architecture in multiple views
   •   Focus on interfaces
   •   Evaluate the architecture
   •   Ensure evolvability, flexibility, and simplicity
   •   Use tradeoff analysis on major decisions

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: None




                                        82
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007




Systems Engineering Measurement

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

This course focuses on applying measurement to a systems engineering
environment. With hands-on exercises applying proven measurement techniques
to real- world situations, the course will help systems engineers understand the
measurement process and the various tasks and activities associated with
establishing and maintaining an effective measurement program.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes Systems Engineering Process
Group (SEPG) or Engineering Process Group (EPG) members or other
personnel who are tasked with planning, implementing, performing, evaluating,
and improving the systems engineering measurement process capability within
the organization. Systems engineers, systems engineering project managers,
and measurement personnel will gain an overview of their role in the
measurement activities.:

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will understand:

   •   PSM as a framework for establishing systems engineering measures
   •   Candidate measures for gaining insight to systems engineering activities
       and products
   •   How to identify CMMI systems engineering measurement requirements
   •   How to develop a comprehensive approach to establishing a systems
       engineering measurement program in their organization

Highlights:

   •   Information needs of systems engineering (i.e., the measurement
       requirements)
   •   Benefits of measurement
   •   An overview of systems engineering as it relates to measurement
   •   How to use Practical Systems and Software Measurement (PSM) as a
       framework for measuring systems engineering tasks and activities
   •   How to establish system level measurements
   •   Measurement needs of CMMI®




                                       83
Systems and Software Consortium                                        March 2007


   •   Existing measurement technologies and identifies the similarities and
       differences between software and systems oriented measurement
   •   How to determine the cost of implementing and maintaining a
       measurement program
   •   How to plan and implement measurement activities

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                       84
Systems and Software Consortium                                          March 2007




Understanding the CMMI Executive Overview

Format: 0.5 Day Classroom

Course Information:

The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®) is the driving model for
member company process improvement efforts. This is a one-half day course for
those who need an overview of the CMMI framework and assessment process.

This course covers the architecture of the CMMI and, for each CMMI process
area, its goals, relationships to other process areas, supporting practices, and
suggested artifacts. The course also describes relationships between CMMI
process requirements and corporate process implementations.

Note: This course is not a substitute for the detailed walkthrough of the CMMI
provided by the SEI’s “Introduction to CMMI” or other courses.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes anyone seeking to gain an
awareness of the CMMI.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Understand how the CMMI supports process improvement
   •   Appreciate the architecture of the CMMI model
   •   Identify each process area of the CMMI and understand significant
       relationships between mandatory process area goals and expected
       process area practices
   •   Understand the CMMI assessment process and of the relationships
       among CMMI practices, artifacts, and assessment requirements
   •   Actively participate in the design and implementation of CMMI-compliant
       processes.

Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 3.5

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the


                                        85
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     86
Systems and Software Consortium                                         March 2007




Understanding the CMMI v1.2

Format: 2 Days Classroom

Course Information:

The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®) is the driving model for
member company process improvement efforts. This is a 2-day course for those
who need an introduction to the CMMI framework and assessment process, at a
level of detail needed to design CMMI-compliant organizational processes.

This course covers the architecture of the CMMI and, for each CMMI process
area, its goals, relationships to other process areas, supporting practices, and
suggested artifacts. The course also describes relationships between CMMI
process requirements and corporate process implementations, and how to
design processes that successfully facilitate Standard CMMI Appraisal Method
for Process Improvement (SCAMPISM) assessments.

Note: This course is not a substitute for the detailed walkthrough of the CMMI
provided by the SEI’s “Introduction to CMMI” or other courses.

Who Should Attend:

The intended audience for this course includes systems or software engineering
process group (SEPG) or other process improvement group members. Systems
engineers, software engineers, and engineers in other disciplines as well as
engineering managers will find this course beneficial.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, attendees will be able to:

   •   Understand how the CMMI supports process improvement
   •   Appreciate the architecture of the CMMI model and how to use the CMMI
       as a guide to process requirements for their organizations' engineering
       processes
   •   Identify each process area of the CMMI and understand significant
       relationships between mandatory process area goals and expected
       process area practices
   •   Understand the CMMI assessment process and of the relationships
       among CMMI practices, artifacts, and assessment requirements
   •   Actively participate in the design and implementation of CMMI-compliant
       processes.




                                        87
Systems and Software Consortium                                    March 2007


Prerequisites: None

Professional Development Units: 14

As a Registered Education Provider of the Project Management Institute the
Consortium provides Professional Development Units (PDUs) to participants in
many of our courses and workshops. PDUs are an important part of earning and
maintaining Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and the
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Certified Systems
Engineering Professional (CSEP) certification.




                                     88