Docstoc

nanotechnology

Document Sample
nanotechnology Powered By Docstoc
					         Nanotechnology 
            An Introduc2on 
                              
                Ishwar K. Puri
             Professor and Head  
                                             
Department of Engineering Science & Mechanics
Who We Are 

BRIEF INTRODUCTION 
                          Virginia Tech 
•  Located at Blacksburg, Virginia 
   –  Established in 1872; Ut Prosim: "That I May Serve” 
   –  Main campus has 100 buildings, 2,600 acres, airport 
   –  Among the Top 50 research ins2tu2ons in United States 
         •  Has adjacent corporate research center 
   –  165,000 alumni from all states & 100 countries 
•  Eight colleges and graduate school 
   –    Top (15/30) engineering program ‐ US News  
   –    60 bachelor's degree programs 
   –    110 master's and doctoral degree programs 
   –    25,000+ students 
   –    16:1 student‐faculty ra2o 
                                         
                                   Images



       ESM 




 Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains; VT is 
located on a plateau between the Blue 
       Ridge and Allegheny Mountains 
                   What is ESM? 

•  Founded in 1908 with a dis2nguished 
   interdisciplinary history 
•  Review by blue‐ribbon panel: “[ESM has] ... 
   longstanding record of excellence as a key element of 
   the College of Engineering with na2onal visibility”  
•  Undergraduate program ranked 8th best in na2on 
   –  Oldest such accredited program in the US 
•  27 faculty members support 80 doctoral students 
   –  We work in the fundamentals of tradi2onal and emerging 
      areas 
                   ESM, 2008 

•  Students 
  –  ∼120 plus undergraduate students 
     •  About half graduate with honors 
     •  5 year BS/MS program 
     •  Biomechanics op2on, engineering physics op2on, 
        nanotechnology concentra2on 
  –  ∼100 graduate students, ∼80 PhD students 
     •  Computa2onal engineering science and mechanics 
•  We act as a family 
  –  Small college feel, you won’t be lost 
                               
          Our Faculty Are Stars

•  High cita2ons of their research and 
   scholarship 
  –  Almost 20,000 2mes in the literature 
•  70 books (27 edited) 
•  Over half are Fellows of professional socie2es 
What is Nanotechnology 

AN INTRODUCTION 
              What is “Nano”? 

•  “Nano‐” means one billionth 
  –  1 billion nanometers (nm) make one meter  
  –  Six foot tall person is 1.83 billion nanometers tall 
  –  About 25.4 million nm in an inch 
  –  A nm is to a foot what 1 foot is to 4,800 miles 
  –  80,000 nanometers across width of a human hair 
  –  Viruses are typically 75 2mes bigger than a nm 
  –  DNA molecule is roughly 1‐2.5 nm wide 

                                Head louse on a human hair
       What is Nanotechnology ? 

•  The term was coined by Eric Drexler in 1986 
•  Control of maker on atomic/molecular scale 
   –  Normally 1 to 100 nanometers 
   –  Fabrica2on of devices with cri2cal dimensions 
      within that size range 
•  Possibili2es 
   –  Bokoms‐up approach 
   –  Top‐down approach 
Exercise 1 

WHAT IS THE SIZE OF AN ATOM? 
                Size of an Atom 

•  What is the size of an atom? 
  –  The atomic diameter ranges from ≈0.1 to 0.5 
     nanometers (1×10‐10 –5 ×10‐10 m) 
     •  Atoms vary greatly in weight, but they are all about the 
        same size.  
        –  An atom of plutonium (one of the heaviest elements) weighs 
           more than 200 2mes as a hydrogen atom (the lightest 
           element), but its diameter is only about 3 2mes larger 
     •  Keep in mind that the size of an atom is difficult to 
        describe because atoms have no definite outer 
        boundary  
Domain of Nanotechnology 
Exercise 2 

YOUR GENETIC CODE: WHAT IS THE 
SIZE OF A DNA MOLECULE? 
        Size of a DNA Molecule 

•  What is the size of a DNA molecule? 
  –  DNA does not usually exist as a single molecule, 
     but instead as a 2ghtly‐associated pair of 
     molecules in living organisms 
     •  Two long strands entwine in shape of a double helix 
     •  DNA is a long polymer made from repea2ng units  
        –  Called nucleo2des 
        –  DNA chain is 22 to 26 Ångströms wide (2.2 to 2.6 
           nanometres), and one nucleo2de unit is 3.3 Å (0.33 nm) long 
             »  DNA polymers can be enormous molecules containing 
                millions of nucleo2des 
                Adding Up DNA 

•  How does size add up through DNA? 
  –  Human genome comprises informa2on contained 
     in one set of human chromosomes  
     •  ≈3 billion base pairs (bp) of DNA in 46 chromosomes 
        (22 autosome pairs + 2 sex chromosomes) 
     •  The total length of DNA in an adult human 
        –  (length of 1 bp)x(number of bp per cell)x(number of cells in 
           the body) 
              »  (0.34 × 10‐9 m)x(6 × 109)x(1013) = 2×1013 meters 
              »  Equivalent of ≈70 trips from earth to the sun and back 
The Scale of Things 
                                         Short History 
•    1959                                                       •    1986 
      –    Richard Feynman gives aver‐dinner talk                     –    First book published 
           describing molecular machines built with atomic            –    AFM invented 
           precision 
                                                                •    1989 
•    1974                                                             –    IBM logo spelled in individual Xe atoms 
      –    Norio Taniguchi uses term “nano‐technology” in 
           paper on ion‐spuker machining                        •    1990 
                                                                      –    First nanotechnology journal 
•    1977 
      –    Eric Drexler originates molecular nanotechnology 
                                                                •    1991 
           concepts at MIT                                            –    Japan’s MITI announces bokom‐up “atom 
                                                                           factory”, commits $200M 
•    1981 
                                                                      –    IBM endorses bokom‐up path 
      –    First technical paper on molecular engineering to 
                                                                      –    Carbon nanotube discovered by Ijima 
           build with atomic precision 
      –    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) invented 
•    1985 
      –    Buckyball discovered (Curl, Jr., Kroto, Smalley) 
More Size Comparisons 




hkp://www.nanotech‐now.com/images/QDot‐nanocrystal‐size.jpg 
           Wavelength of Light 

                            nano 




•  Nanoscale problems can smaller than the wavelength of visible light!
•  So, you might not be able to “see” nanoscale materials with visible
   light
    •  This influences the characterization techniques that must be employed
            Quantum Mechanics 

•  The quantum scale is 
   smaller than the 
   nanoscale  
   –  Incorporates study of 
      individual behavior of 
      subatomic par2cles that 
      make up all forms of 
      maker 
   –  Electrons, protons, 
      neutrons, photons  
A new way of scien2fic and engineering thinking 

NANOTECHNOLOGY IS 
INTERDISCIPLINARY 
Physics, Biology, Chemistry Meet  
Exercise 3 

WHAT ARE THE FORCES ON AN 
AIRPLANE? 
         Forces on an Airplane 

•  Think about the forces that act on an airplane 
  –  Create a quick sketch of an airplane and show 
     various forces 
                    Macroscale Forces 

•  LiD is generated by the airflow 
   over the wings  

•  The engine provides the thrust   

•  Drag results from the resistance 
   of the air to the airplane’s 
   passage through it  

•  The weight is due to the mass of 
   the plane and gravity      
                 Macro: Forces on a Car 
•    Thrust force (F) provided by the 
     engine of the car 

•    Normal reac2on force from the road 
     on which the car is moving 

•    Force of fricMon (Fr) due to mo2on 
     on the road 

•    Weight (mg) ac2ng due to the mass 
     of the car and gravity 
Exercise 4 

WHAT FORCES ACT ON 
MOLECULES? 
  What Forces Act on Molecules? 

•  Think about the forces that act between two 
   molecules 
  –  Create a sketch showing these forces  
            Nano: Forces on Molecules 
•    Intermolecular forces of akrac2on 
     and repulsion. Interac2on due 
     charges on the ions, called Coulombic 
     forces  
•    Nuclear forces 
•    Van der Waal’s forces 
•    Pauli’s repulsion forces 
•    Weight is neglected as masses of 
     molecules are insignificantly small 
                Maxwell Distribu2on 
•  The Maxwell‐Boltzmann 
   distribuMon curve shows how 
   par2cle veloci2es are distributed 
   in an average sample of par2cles 
•  Forms a basis for the kine2c 
   theory of gases, which explains 
   many fundamental gas 
   proper2es, including pressure and 
   diffusion 
   Self Assembly and Organiza2on 

•  Self assembly 
  –  Disordered system of components forms 
     organized structure or pakern with specific, local 
     interac2ons among components 
     •  Ordered state approaches equilibrium, reducing system 
        free energy 
•  Self organiza2on 
  –  Process of akrac2on and repulsion through which 
     internal organiza2on of a system increases in 
     complexity without being guided or managed 
                                               
                                       Examples




                                                                                            N
                                       Bacterium with self-organized
                                       magnetic crystals that orient it with
Self-organization and replication of   Earth’s magnetic field                  Shaping magnetic droplets of a
protein-based nanotubes (NASA                                                  ferrofluid containing magnetic
Ames)                                                                          nanoparticles with a magnetic
                                                                               field
     Tackling Nanoscale Problems 
•  First principles/ab ini%o calcula2ons start directly at 
   the level of established laws in physics 
   –  Schrödinger’s equa2on 
   –  Newton’s laws 
•  Fewer assump2ons, such as those used for a 
   simplified model, are involved 
•  Fundamental principles 
   –  Mechanics 
   –  Quantum mechanics 
      •  Simula2ons involve direct input from quantum mechanics 
         calcula2ons, viz. Schrödinger wave equa2on 
Exercise 5 

MECHANICS: WHAT ARE NEWTON’S 
LAWS? 
                          
             Newton’s Laws

•  Briefly state Newton’s Laws of mo2on 
                            
               Newton’s Laws

•  Isaac Newton’s theory of mechanics 
  –  I: An object stay sat rest or con2nues at a constant 
     velocity unless acted upon by an external 
     unbalanced force 
  –  II: F = ma; the net force on an object equals the 
     mass of the object mul2plied by its accelera2on 
  –  III: Every ac2on has an equal and opposite 
     reac2on   
                   Issues 
•  First principles simula2ons are oven expensive in 
   terms of computa2on 2me 
•  Bridging the gap between length scales (angstrom 
   ‐ nano – micro) is challenging 
•  Proper input from quantum calcula2ons required 
   to choose appropriate poten2al func2on for MD/
   Monte Carlo 
             Molecular Mechanics 
•  Newton’s Laws of MoMon 
   can sMll be applied to 
   model the nanoscale 
   –  Integra2on techniques over 
      2me and space 
   –  Molecular dynamics 
   –  Monte Carlo 
   –  (Another method: Density 
      FuncMonal Theory uses a 
      quantum mechanical 
      approach) 
                              
 Jet Collision at Large Scales




Galac2c scale: Colliding black holes 



                                        Macroscale: Jet divergence 
   Physics of Colliding Nanojets 
    Jet formaMon 
                             Recoil 




Collision dynamics        EvaporaMon 




                           Diffusion 



         10 nm
              What We Know 

•  The same physical laws that govern flows at 
   the micro‐ and macroscales adequately 
   describe nanoscale flows in the absence of 
   strong interfacial forces 
  –  A number as small as ≈102 molecules in a control 
     volume is adequate for con2nuum rela2ons to 
     hold 
      But Interfaces Are the Issue 

•  Basis 
   –  Physical proper2es of materials change when the 
      feature sizes are shrunk 
   –  Example: nanoparMcles take advantage of 
      drama2cally increased surface area to volume 
      ra2o and compared to their bulk scale 
      •  Area = L2, Volume = L3; Area ÷ Volume = 1/L 
      •  Nanopar2cles can strongly influence mechanical 
         proper2es of materials, like s2ffness or elas2city 
             Interfacial Behavior 
The effect of interfaces becomes important at the nanoscale. For instance, in an 
iron‐ argon system, argon molecules are akracted to the iron molecules and 
local voids appear. This also happens in larger systems but the effect is masked  
Altering Surface Wekability 




       With nanoscale deposit 
                   
Surface modifica2ons

                                  Nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces 




Synergy: using “old” combusMon technology to create “new” nanotechnology 
                  Material Behavior 
Material behavior at the nanoscale is different, for instance at interfaces 



 Heat transfer at the macroscale               Heat transfer at the nanoscale 




                                                       Temperature jump 
                                                       At solid‐liquid interface 
Nanostructures in Nature 

       •  Small hexagonal bumps on a 
          moth’s eye are ≈100nm tall and 
          apart and are smaller than visible 
          wavelengths (350‐800nm). Hence, 
          the eye surface has a low 
          reflectance for visible light so the 
          nanostructures absorb light 
          efficiently and a moth’s eye can 
          absorb more light than humans in 
          dim or dark condi2ons 
Nanostructures in Nature ‐ II 
         •  Mul2layer nanoscale pakerns on 
            a bukerfly filter light and reflect 
            mostly one wavelength, so we see 
            a single bright color, e.g., wings of 
            the male Morpho Rhetenor 
            appear bright blue. The wings are 
            not blue but just appears so 
            because of the nanostructures 
            that are about the same size as 
            the wavelength of visible light. 
            Mul2ple layers in the structures 
            create op2cal interferences. 
Nanostructures in Nature ‐ III 
          •  Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale) is an 
             alpine flower at high al2tudes, up to 
             3000m/10,000 v, where UV radia2on is 
             strong. Flowers covered with thin 
             hollow filaments with nanoscale 
             structures (100‐200nm) on their 
             periphery. They absorb ultraviolet light, 
             around the same dimension as the 
             filaments, but reflect all visible light so 
             the flower has a white color. The layer 
             of filaments absorbs UV light and 
             protects the flower’s cells from possible 
             damage due to this high‐energy 
             radia2on. 
        Nanotechnology is Vast  

•  Asking, “What is nanotechnology?” is like 
   asking, “What is technology?” 
  –  Technology is the improvement of things 
  –  Nanotechnology is the improvement of things at a 
     very small scale 
     •  It is an emerging technology 
  –  Does not only apply to a single field or discipline 
     •  MulMdisciplinary and interdisciplinary 
Exercise 6 

WHAT ARE SOME 
NANOTECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS? 
                              
    Nanotechnology Applica2ons

•  Can you list a few applica2ons of 
   nanotechnology? 
                   Examples 

•  Tradi2onal polymers can be reinforced with 
   nanopar2cles 
  –  Novel lightweight materials as replacements for 
     metals 
•  Op2cal proper2es, e.g. fluorescence, become 
   func2on of par2cle diameter 
  –  Materials containing nanopar2cles can have useful 
     op2cal proper2es 
                        Everyday Applica2ons 
                                 •  Many Sunscreens contain nanopar2cles 
                                    of zinc oxide or 2tanium oxide 
                                 •  Pilkington offers a product Ac2v‐Glass, 
Silver dressings for 
Wounds and burns                    which uses nanopar2cles to make the 
                                    glass photocataly2c and hydrophilic 
    Tennis racket with           •  Adding aluminum silicate nanopar2cles 
    carbon nanotubes 
    and nanocoated                  to scratch‐resistant polymer coa2ngs 
    tennis balls                    makes coa2ngs more effec2ve, 
                                    increasing resistance to chipping and 
                                    scratching 
 Current Industry Focus 




hkp://www.direc2onsmag.com/ar2cle.php?ar2cle_id=375 
By Sector 
Example: Op2cs and Nanopar2cles 
                          •  Unique op2cal proper2es of 
          Smaller size       nanopar2cles recognized 
                             since the Middle Ages when 
                             colloidal gold provided 
                             intense red color in stained 
                             glass windows 
                          •  More recently, metal 
                             nanopar2cles have 
                             poten2al uses in 
                             optoelectronic devices, 
                             sensors, and other 
                             applica2ons  
                  Example: Gold 

•  Bulk                          •  Nanopar2cles 
   –  Mel2ng point of 1,064°C       –  Melts at as low as 300°C 
   –  Yellow color caused by        –  Color changes 
      reduc2on in reflec2vity           depending on size. Very 
      of light at blue end of          small gold par2cles are 
      the spectrum                     ruby red in color due to 
                                       strong absorp2on of 
                                       green light 
                                    –  Molecules can akach to 
                                       gold nanopar2cles 
                                       permi‚ng a bokoms up 
                                       fabrica2on approach 
Exercise 7 

WHAT ARE CARBON NANOTUBES? 
Carbon Nanotubes 

        •  Forms (allotropes) of 
           carbon 
           –  Length‐to‐diameter ra2o 
              exceeds 1,000,000 
           –  Extraordinary strength, 
              unique electrical 
              properMes, efficient 
              conductors of heat 
     Carbon Nanotube Proper2es 

•  SMffness (Young’s modulus) 5x of steel 
•  Breaking strain (tensile strength) 5x of steel 
•  Metallic (higher electrical conduc2vity than 
   copper) or semiconducMng (like silicon) 
•  Used for flat‐panel displays, scanning probe 
   microscopes and sensing devices 
  –  Many other poten2al uses (which is some of the 
     promise of nanotechnology)   
         Poten2al Applica2ons 


               Nanolaser 


                                         Lab‐on‐a‐chip device  
                                         with nanopar2cle sensors 


                                                         Advanced 
                                                         composite 
                                                         materials 




Tuning nanopore chemistry for sensors 
     The Applica2ons Are Diverse 

•  Diagnos2cs            •  Increasing Energy 
•  Tissue Engineering       Produc2on efficiency 
•  Catalysis             •  The use of more 
•  Water treatment/         environmentally 
                            friendly energy systems 
   Filtra2on 
•  Reduc2on of Energy    •  Recycling of Bakeries 
   Consump2on            •  Novel Semiconductor 
                            and Optoelectronic 
                            Devices 
             Nanobiotechnology 

•  Implica2ons for Medicine 
  –  Faster and remote diagnos2c techniques 
     •  New high throughput, mul2‐parameter, tunable 
        diagnos2c techniques; biochips for a variety of assays 
  –  Tissue‐engineered medical products and ar2ficial 
     organs 
     •  Heart valves, veins and arteries, liver and skin 
         –  Grown from individual’s own 2ssues as stem cells on 3‐D 
            scaffold, or by expansion of other cell types on suitable 
            substrate 
                             
            Other Applica2ons

•  Proteomics, Genomics, and Therapeu2cs  
  –  Smaller chip arrays for faster analysis; ar2ficial 
     organs with chemical func2onality at membrane 
     or ar2ficial surface to avoid rejec2on by host 
  –  Drug targe2ng 
  –  Dental and bone replacements 
  –  External and internal 2ssue implants 
  –  In‐vivo tes2ng device 
  –  Biomedical imaging 
                                               
                                       Examples

  Biodegradable drug‐elu2ng 
 poly(ester amide) nanofibers 


                            hkp://www.bme.cornell.edu/bme/research/ 




                                                                       Scanning electron microscopic 
                                                                       image of a synthe2c absorbable 
                                                                       suture material 
                                                                       hkp://www.bme.cornell.edu/bme/research/ 




   Cancer imaging using quantum dots 
hkp://www.kavehboghraty.com/nano_source/nano.html 
                            
       Example: Quantum Dots

•  Tiny semiconductor crystals that glow when 
   s2mulated by ultraviolet (UV) light 
  –  In vivo applica2on of nanotechnology 




                  Quantum dots light up to reveal the 
                  sen2nel lymph node closest to a 
                  tumor. Pinpoin2ng the node's 
                  loca2on simplifies surgical removal 
                  and tes2ng for cancer. 
                           Self Assembly 
•    Molecular self‐assembly is the 
     assembly of molecules without 
     guidance or management from an 
     outside source. 
•    DNA nanotechnology is a subfield of 
     nanotechnology which seeks to use 
     the unique molecular recogni2on 
     proper2es of DNA and other nucleic 
     acids to create novel, controllable 
     structures out of DNA. 
            DNA at the Nanoscale 

•  At the nanoscale, an 
   electrical field can 
   stretch the length of 
   DNA, reduce its 
   diameter and squeeze it 
   through a nanopore 
   –  Hence, it can permeate 
      smaller diameter  pores 
      than a DNA double helix 
      without losing structural 
      integrity  
                                   Theore9cal & Computa9onal Biophysics Group, UIUC  
•    Nanotubes and buckyballs could 
     serve as drug delivery systems 
•    Researchers have akached florescent 
     markers and proteins to nanotubes 
     and mixed them with living cells. 
     They have seem from the marker that 
     the nanotubes enter cells to deliver 
     protein 
      –  Nanotubes don't seem toxic to cells so far, 
         but lots more research must be done.  
•    Buckyballs or fullerene‐related                    Model of a fullerene‐based HIV protease 
     structures can serve as “cages” for                inhibitor  
     small drug molecules 
                Ethical Issues 

•  Nanotechnologies are predicted to provide  
  –  Inexpensive sustainable energy 
  –  Environmental remedia2on 
  –  Advances in medical diagnosis and treatment 
  –  More powerful IT capabili2es 
•  Profound implica2ons of these possibili2es for 
   the global society and interna2onal economy 
  –  Who will benefit 
  –  More crucially, who might lose out  
      Ownership and Innova2on 

•  Appropriate ownership of intellectual property 
   is advantageous. 
  –  Experience in gene2cs  
     •  Patents that are too broad or do not strictly meet the 
        criteria of novelty can work against the public good 
  –  Ethical concern that broad patents could be 
     granted for emerging technologies  
     •  S2fle broad innova2on by hindering access to basic 
        informa2on  
Exercise 8 

COULD THERE BE ETHICAL ISSUES 
INVOLVING NANOTECHNOLOGY? 
                             
               Ethical Issues

•  Please share your thoughts on the ethical 
   implica2ons of nanotechnology 
               Ethics of Privacy 

•  Nanotechnologies promise smaller, cheaper 
   and more ubiquitous sensing devices 
  –  Linked over networks to provide greater safety, 
     security and beker healthcare, but could 
     •  Limit privacy through covert surveillance 
     •  Collect and distribute personal informa2on without 
        consent 
     •  Concentrate access to this informa2on and enable 
        policing, profiling and social sor2ng  
    But Newness is Not Evidence 

•  Newness of a technology does not itself offer 
   evidence against its poten2al uses 
  –  In many cases, the underlying legal and ethical 
     issues raised by such developments will be similar 
     to those our society has already faced 
     •  An ethics based discussion of these issues is similar to 
        one about the use of radio frequency iden2fica2on 
        (RFID) technology to replace bar codes  
             And Other Issues 

•  Medical nanotechnology could make us 
   smarter, stronger and give us other abili2es 
   ranging from rapid healing to night vision 
  –  Could we con2nue to call ourselves human, or 
     would we become trans‐human – the next step on 
     our evolu2onary path 
•  If molecular manufacturing becomes a reality, 
   how will that impact the world’s economy and 
   all the manufacturing jobs 
      Implica2ons for Educa2on 

•  Ethics educa2on about emerging technologies 
   is emblema2c of new ways of thinking about 
   the future and the workforce 
  –  Mo2va2ng students by problems that combine 
     the social and the technical will also make 
     students into cri2cal thinkers, capable of 
     par2cipa2ng in intelligent debates about how 
     socie2es ought to be transformed  
                              
How Old Issues Become New Ones

•  Nanopar2cles can agglomerate to form 
   micropar2cles 
  –  Inhala2on of micropar2cle dust leads to diseas 
     •  Silicosis 
     •  Asbestosis  
                                 
    Health Implica2ons: Silicosis

•  Occupa2onal lung disease caused by 
   inhala2on of crystalline silica dust 
•  Marked by inflamma2on and scarring in forms 
   of nodular lesions in upper lobes of lungs 
•  Characterized by shortness of breath, fever, 
   and cyanosis (bluish skin) 
•  Pa2ents with silicosis are par2cularly 
   suscep2ble to silico‐tuberculosis 
    Health Implica2ons: Asbestosis 
•  Chronic inflammatory 
   medical condi2on affec2ng 
   the parenchymal 2ssue of 
   the lungs 
   –  Occurs aver long‐term, heavy 
      exposure to asbestos, e.g. in 
      mining 
•  Symptoms  
   –  Slow onset of shortness of breath 
      on exer2on, which may lead to 
      respiratory failure                  www.mesothelioma‐adviser.com 

•  Increased risk of lung cancer 
   and mesothelioma 
Nanotechnology 

THIS IS A RICH AREA FOR 
LEARNING! 
Hands On Exercises 
LABVIEW MODULE 
                 
  Nanotube Images




Carbon

                Silicon
                          
Exercise 1: Image Analysis
                                                         
Obtain the diameter and length of a carbon nanotube (CNT)
        Poten2al Func2on for 
                               
     Intermolecular Interac2ons
•  Lennard‐Jones pair–poten2al model between 
   two par2cles (at the nanoscale)  
  –  Accounts for both  short range repulsive forces 
     and long range akrac2ve forces 
  –  V(r) = 4ε [(σ/r)12 – (σ/r)6] 
     •  ε: energy value when poten2al is minimum 
     •  σ: distance at which inter‐par2cle poten2al is zero 
     •  r: distance between two par2cles 
                           
      Exercise 2: Graphing 
                                               
Plot the curves for poten2al and force func2ons
  Gravita2onal Force Of Akrac2on 

•  Every point mass akracts every other point 
   mass by a force poin2ng along the line 
   intersec2ng both points. The force is 
   propor2onal to the product of the two masses 
   and inversely propor2onal to the square of the 
   distance between the point masses 
  –  FG = Gm1m2/r2, G= constant   
                     
Exercise 3: Graphing 
     Plot the value of FG 
A New Curriculum 

NANOTECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 
       Virginia Tech Partnership 

•  A recent Nanotechnology Undergraduate 
   Educa2on grant from the Na2onal Science 
   Founda2on involves 
  –  Engineering Science and Mechanics; Engineering 
     Educa2on; Ins2tute for Cri2cal Technology and 
     Applied Science 
  –  A spiral four‐year curriculum 
  Spiral undergraduate curriculum 

•  Nanotechnology module in EngE 1024 
•  ESM 3xxx: Nanotechnology module in a course 
   on materials response and behavior 
•  ESM 4xxx: Nanotechnology module in 
   computa2onal mechanics class 
•  ESM 4xxx: Societal and Ethical Implica2ons 
•  Undergraduate research 
                                    
                          Thank You!
Ishwar K. Puri 
www.esm.vt.edu/~ikpuri 

Virginia Tech 
Engineering Science & Mechanics 
223 Norris Hall 
Blacksburg, VA 24061‐0219 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:3/31/2013
language:English
pages:94