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					Bookshelf - "Women for Hire: The Ultimate Guide to Getting a Job" - Jobs calendar
By Joshua Sommer


Friday,February 10, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial JOBS, Page G02

"Women for Hire: The Ultimate Guide to Getting a Job," By Tory Johnson (Perigee
Books; $15.95)

This book gives readers the advice they need to help get a job, and identifies specific
ways for job-seekers to maximize search efforts. The book includes networking
necessities for the shy to the gutsy; the truth about job functions; answers to resume
dilemmas; smart interview strategies; mess-ups to avoid; tips on negotiating salary and
benefits; overcoming obstacles faced by women job seekers; and how to keep a job once
you land it. One last perk is that the book also includes interactive exercises and resource
lists.

Joshua Sommer

Jobs calendar

* Feb. 16: Beaverton Employer Presentation --DePaul Industries; 1 to 2 p.m.; Portland
Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W.
Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.

* Feb. 23: Beaverton Employer Presentation --City of Portland; 1 to 2 p.m.; Portland
Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W.
Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.

* Feb. 28 and April 11: Oregon Tradeswomen --a group dedicated to promoting success
for women as electricians, carpenters, heavy equipment operators, and other trades --
provides education, leadership and mentorship, holds recruitment meetings, tradeswomen
classes, and job fairs. Their free Trades and Apprenticeship Career class meets every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., for seven weeks beginning
Feb. 28 and April 11; 503-335-8200; www.tradeswomen.net.

* Those interested in a career at a truck or car dealership can visit a virtual job fair at
www.oregonlive.com/jobs/virtualjob/.

* To search more than 9,000 current job openings in the state of Oregon's Employment
Department database, visit www.emp.state.or.us/jobs.

**********
sound check notes from the Northwest music scene
By Byjoshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Tuesday,February 7, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 18
ROUGH-CUT DIAMOND --With the fingers on one hand you can tick off the popular
singer-songwriters with less-than-perfect voices and great lyrics: Tom Petty, Bob Dylan,
Willie Nelson.

Here's another --one you've probably never heard of, but someone you should get to
know: Jon Itkin.

The Eugene songwriter's voice may not be the sexiest around, but his lyrics and melodies
more than make up for it. With his disheveled red locks, 5 o'clock shadow and laid-back
attire, Itkin looks comfortable perched atop a stool behind a microphone, sloppily
strumming away on an acoustic guitar. He doesn't much look like a rocker, and he doesn't
sound much like one, either. But don't throw tomatoes just yet.

"I'm a songwriter all the way, I do my best to sing my songs, but my 'right hand' gets
nervous when I perform," Itkin admits. "When I play solo or with the band, I'll hit a
wrong note, and I try to plow through it and hope that no one notices it."

He's the first to admit that he's more a songwriter than a singer or musician. Itkin's songs
sound like country with a little bit of rock 'n' roll, and Northwest locals will recognize
landmarks throughout his lyrics.

A 23-year-old journalism major at the University of Oregon, Itkin heads up from Eugene
to play Ash Street Saloon on Wednesday. The gig likely will be equal parts raw
musicianship, unique melodies and thoughtful prose.

"Jon has the 'it,' " says Portland musician Scotland Barr. "I'm not exactly sure what 'it' is,
but it's what makes writers good." The frontman of Scotland Barr and the Slow Drags
used two of Itkin's songs on his group's latest CD, and plans to use more. "He has the
ability to be honest and original. He has a knack of making his songs intimate, personal
and digestible.

"I was happy that he entrusted me with his songs; they're two of the best tracks on the
CD."

But even those who look past Itkin's admittedly imperfect voice and strumming skills still
might not become fans. The type of clubgoer who would hate his set? In Itkin's own
words, "The majority. Anyone with a short attention span, or who wants glitter, beautiful
vocals, ear candy, bombastic rock and roll, or someone who can shred on an instrument.
The people who might like my stuff is anybody that likes the lit angle of songwriting."
Itkin has a rare ability to match highly literate lyrics with unusual, catchy melodies. (Plus,
he's been playing guitar for only 10 years --a relatively short time in the music biz.) Other
musicians playing his songs, Itkin ticks off, include "a guy in Michigan named Mark
Duval, an old guy in Eugene and some kids from a high school in a band that had a demo
of a song I wrote. It's actually kind of an honor."

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.

*********

Bookshelf "Working in the Dark:
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Friday,February 3, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Business Jobs, Page G02
Bookshelf

"Working in the Dark: Keeping Your Job While Dealing with Depression" by Fawn
Fitter and Beth Gulas (Hazelden Publishing and Educational Services; $16)

Authors Fawn Fitter and Beth Gulas provide a reassuring, informative guide to dealing
with depression in the workplace. They address questions such as: Should I ask my boss
for time off? Should I tell my colleagues about my depression? Are my treatment records
confidential? With self-assessment tools and decision-making guidance, this book is a
good resource for anyone working through depression and the hardships it creates --
including loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness, and difficulty concentrating and
making decisions. The book is inspired by one of the authors' personal experiences with
major depression.

Jobs calendar

* Feb. 9: Employer recruitment --Quiznos is holding a recruitment session for 12 full and
part-time positions at its restaurants, both day and evening shifts. Pay ranges from $7.60
to $9 an hour. Come dressed for an interview and bring a resume if possible; 1:30 to 4
p.m.; Oregon Employment Department, 1433 S.W. Sixth Ave; 503-872-6852

* Feb. 9: Beaverton Employer Presentation --Comcast showcases its organization and
discusses industry trends and news, current positions available, and the application
process. Learn how you may fit in or how your skills could be utilized; meet the
recruiters one-on-one, do some networking and ask questions; 1 to 2 p.m.; Portland
Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W.
Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.
* Feb. 16: Beaverton Employer Presentation --DePaul Industries; 1 to 2 p.m.; Portland
Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W.
Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.

* Feb. 23: Beaverton Employer Presentation --City of Portland; 1 to 2 p.m.; Portland
Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W.
Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.

* Oregon Tradeswomen --a group dedicated to promoting success for women as
electricians, carpenters, heavy equipment operators, and other trades --provides
education, leadership and mentorship, holds recruitment meetings, tradeswomen classes,
and job fairs; 503-335-8200; www.tradeswomen.net.

* Those interested in a career at a truck or car dealership can visit a virtual job fair at
www.oregonlive.com/jobs/virtualjob/.

* To search more than 9,000 current job openings in the state of Oregon's Employment
Department database, visit www.emp.state.or.us/jobs.

To submit calendar items, fax them to Marketplace/Jobs, The Oregonian, 503-294-5185.
Please include phone number for verification.
*****************


OBSERVED Big-bang theorists
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian


Tuesday,January 31, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 06
The end of the world is nigh! Wanna dance?

It is with this disposition that Mythmedia, a self-described group of "preemptive post-
apocalyptics" who embrace and celebrate the end of civilization, last weekend launched
the Nuclear Winter Formal, a fundraiser for the group.

The event was held in the stark, cold, unfinished space next door to Backspace (115 N.W.
Fifth Ave.), in what was really just a long, rectangular, brick box with a stage at one end
and free beer at the other.

Mythmedia's underground movement consists of people who believe that civilization will
collapse in the next 100 years, and features everyone from artists to inventors and
scientists.
A press release for the event read, "This year's lineup is killer, just like the genocides,
famines and ecological destruction inherent in civilization!"

There you go.

Painted head-to-toe in yellow and orange to symbolize nuclear fallout, Peter Bauer, the
executive director of Mythmedia who goes by the moniker Urban Scout, said,
"Agricultural civilization has a little under 100 years left."

Bauer, 23, wearing only a loincloth and a camouflage cap, with a fake pistol tucked into
the back of his loincloth, refuses to let the doom and gloom of a nuclear winter dampen
his spirits.

Other attendees included folks in all sorts of costumes, including several wearing gas
masks, a dude in a bloody, ripped-up suit and post-apocalyptic lasses looking to go out
with a kaboom.

Performing at the formal were the Hunches, a punk rock band; Hillstomp, two guys
playing melancholy rock, who were quite good; and The Alberta Street Clowns.

According to Bauer, the purpose of this formal is "to promote the idea of Mythmedia."

"We would like Mythmedia to be an art collective of people creating art that deals with
the collapse of civilization," Bauer said. "At the same time, we want to show people that
during the collapse many will die, like 6 billion people. I may not survive the collapse of
civilization, but I want to support new ideas and changes that people can do now to create
a Noah's Ark that will last through that collapse. So, right now, we're starting with media
and action."

The formal also featured a post-apocalyptic costume contest, with gas masks, "Mad Max"
DVDs, survival kits and a computer as awards.

Cash raised from the fundraiser was earmarked to fund the creation of Mythmedia's Web
site, its quarterly print publication and a scholarship fund for low-income people to attend
programs --such as myth-making workshops for artists, and post-apocalyptic survival
summer camps for homeless teens --which is sure to include how to test roadkill to see if
it's fresh.

"Most predators and scavengers are not a very good meal," Bauer said. "Stay away from
opossums."

Bauer, a man who practices what he preaches, admits that the last roadkill squirrel he ate
was not good. Apparently, it needed to be marinated.

On the Web: www.mythmedia.org
--Joshua Sommer

Special to the Oregonian

*****************

BOOKSHELF; JOBS CALENDAR
By Joshua Sommer


Friday,January 27, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: JOBS Advertorial, Page F03

"Job Search Handbook for People with Disabilities" by Daniel J. Ryan (Jist Publishing;
$17.95)

Designed for people with physical and mental disabilities, this book is a complete career
planning and job search guide. The book helps job seekers identify their strengths;
explore career options; find job openings; search the "hidden" job market; understand and
navigate employment law; write resumes, cover letters, and follow-up letters; and
perform well in interviews. The book also shows how to tell potential employers about
disabilities and ask for accommodations. Finally, after the reader lands a job, this book
prepares them for job success.

Jobs calendar

* Jan. 30: The Oregonian's free Career Expo includes representatives from American
West Steamboat Co., Ameriprise Financial, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Golden State Foods,
Gunderson, Opti Staffing Group, Resource Staffing Services, Waddell & Reed and the
Warner Pacific College Adult Degree Program; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Oregon
Convention Center; free to attendees; for updates of participating employers, visit
www.oregonlive.com/jobfair/index.ssf.

* Feb. 01: Employer Recruitment --Cruise West, Alaska, is looking for drivers,
deckhands, galley assistants, guest services representatives and an exploration leader with
good customer-service skills and job-related experience. Applicants must be at least 18
years of age, pass background, reference and drug screenings, and be able to work 12-
hour days onboard vessels or driving guests. Pay is $9 to $11.50 per hour, plus overtime
pay and a season-end bonus; 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; Oregon Employment Department, 1433
S.W. Sixth Ave; 503-731-4139.

* Feb. 02: Beaverton Employer Presentation --The Oregonian Circulation Department
showcases its organization and discusses industry trends and news, current positions
available, and the application process. Learn how you may fit in or how your skills could
be utilized; meet the recruiters one-on-one, do some networking and ask questions; 1 to 2
p.m.; Portland Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium),
18624 N.W. Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free from 12:30 to 2:30
p.m. Thursdays.

* Feb. 02: First Strike Environmental is conducting an orientation and accepting
applications for forest firefighting positions; experienced and new forest firefighters
encouraged to apply; 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m.; Downtown Worksource Oregon
Employment Office, 1433 S.W. Sixth Ave.; 503-731-4139.

* Oregon Tradeswomen --a group dedicated to promoting success for women as
electricians, carpenters, heavy equipment operators, and other trades, provides education,
leadership and mentorship --holds recruitment meetings, tradeswomen classes and job
fairs; 503-335-8200; www.tradeswomen.net.

* Those interested in a career at a truck or car dealership can visit a virtual job fair at
www.oregonlive.com/jobs/virtualjob/.

* To search more than 9,000 current job openings in the state of Oregon's Employment
Department database, visit www.emp.state.or.us/jobs.

To submit calendar items, fax them to Marketplace/Jobs, The Oregonian, 503-294-5185.
Please include phone number for verification.
**********

FIRST GLIMPSE Logan's Backyard Barbecue
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Tuesday,January 24, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 07
Alarmingly, clouds of smoke billow from the small house on Lake Oswego's B Avenue.
At first glance a call to the fire department seems in order. But then the sweet scent of
smoking meat hits and the clouds part to reveal several large barbecues in the driveway
of the home that has been converted into a restaurant.

As the menu states, it's "Not just another hibachi in the back of a Volkswagen." Said
owner Matthew Ramey, "Logan is my little boy. He's 9, and we named it after him
because we wanted it to reflect the neighborhood and that this is a place for families."

The menu ranges from chicken seared until crisp ($6), to beef and pork ribs ($3-$15) and
the signature Santa Maria-style Tri-Tip ($7-$27). "The tri-tip is the most popular,"
Ramey said. "Everything is dry-rubbed in sugar, salt and spices and cooked over
mesquite wood. And the quality of beef that we use is very high because we serve
Brandts Beef --it's all-natural, grain-fed and rated as USDA Prime."
As for ambience, Logan's lives up to its goal and is family friendly. Don't let the beer
paraphernalia fool you, Ramey said. "We're probably never going to offer beer and wine
here because we just don't have the space to keep it, but the next restaurant (planned to
open in Portland) will offer both beer and wine."

So put down the phone: no need for 9-1-1 here. The only emergency you're likely to
encounter will have something to do with Wet-Wipes.

Logan's, 342 B Ave., Lake Oswego; 503-675-1139.

Joshua Sommer:flotsam2000@gmail.com

***************


Downtown Monthly Calendar


Friday,January 27, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial Downtown Monthly, Page DM04
Downtown Monthly Calendar

Feb. 5,

John Stossel lecture

John Stossel of the ABC News program "20/20" presents "Freedom and its Enemies," a
lecture about the benefits of individual freedom and free markets, at the The Multnomah
Athletic Club. A book signing will follow; 503-242-0900; $35 lecture only, or $125
private reception and lecture.

Through April 29,

Jews at Work

"Jews at Work: 150 Years of Commerce and Industry in Oregon," an exhibit at the
Oregon Jewish Museum, chronicles Jewish businessmen and women making a living in
Oregon from 1922 to the present; 503-226-3600; www.ojm.org.

Through March 31,

Lillian Pitt exhibit

"Building on the Frames of My Ancestors," a new exhibit at the Oregon Historical
Society, features works based on the forms of the Native American longhouse and
salmon drying racks; 503-222-1741; www.ohs.org.
Through May 29,

Sesame Street on the hill

The Portland Children's Museum features "Can You Tell Me How To Get To Sesame
Street," a nationally touring exhibit that recreates the set of the TV show; 503-223-6500;
www.portlandcm2.org.

Jan. 29 to Feb 12,

Chinese New Year

The Portland Classical Chinese Garden will host special events in recognition of the Year
of the Dog, or lunar year 4704, which starts Jan. 29 with the new moon; 503-228-8131;
www.portlandchinesegarden.org.

Feb. 10 to 25,

PDX film fest

The 29th Annual Portland International Film Festival, presented by The Oregonian,
features outstanding international cinema at three venues throughout February: Guild
Theater, Whitsell Auditorium, and Regal Broadway Metroplex; $8; 503-221-1156;
www.nwfilm.org.

Feb. 17 to 26,

PDX Jazz Fest

The 2006 Portland Jazz Festival, presented by The Oregonian, includes shows at several
downtown locations; portion of festival proceeds benefits NOLA2PDX
(www.nola2pdx.com), a program to assist New Orleans jazz musicians displaced by
hurricanes Katrina and Rita; 503-228-5299; www.pdxjazz.com.

Feb. 18 and 19,

I Love the Zoo

Celebrate Valentine's Day at the zoo and experience its nighttime wonders with guided
tours, animal visitors and behind-the-scenes peeks and projects. Dinner, evening snack
and continental breakfast included; $45; call 503-220-2781 to register;
www.oregonzoo.org.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is Feb. 1.
**************


COVER STORY Happiest happy hours
By Grant Butler, Kyle O'brien, Lee Williams, Christina Melander, Shawn Levy, Shawn
Vitt, Inara Verzemnicks, Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Tuesday,January 24, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 12
SUMMARY: A penny-pincher's guide to the 25 best bite bargains in the city


Newport Seafood Grill

It's not like Northeast Broadway needed another restaurant, but it got one anyway. While
dinner in the main dining room can be a mixed experience, during its three happiest hours
you'll be treated to a nice array of bargain appetizers and entrees, from $1.95 to $3.95.

Hits: Indulge yourself. With 16 food items to choose from, there's bound to be something
that tempts you. A few choices: Cabo Shrimp Cocktail ($2.95), loaded with bay shrimp,
avocado, tomatoes and salsa; three Oyster Shooters ($2.95); and Cajun Penne Pasta
($1.95), topped with reggianito cheese.

Misses: With its businesslike atmosphere, the place could stand being a little less
contemporary and a little more rock 'n' roll. C'mon, it's called happy hour.

Sips: All the old standbys are here, a full bar, wine, sake and beer.

The details: 1200 N.E. Broadway St.; 503-493-0100; $1.95 drink minimum; served 3-6
p.m. daily.

-- Joshua Sommer

Rivers Restaurant

Unfortunately situated behind stale, boxlike offices on Southwest Macadam Avenue,
Rivers nonetheless shines with its fantastic Willamette River view and an amazing range
of happy hour meals ($3-$7).

Hits: The light and succulent Another Salad ($4) blends salt roasted beets, frisee, house-
cured guancale and citrus flavors to tease and satisfy the tongue. Pair the salad with a
juicy burger ($5), served on a potato bun with a side of Rivers' signature fries, and you
will make your mouth very happy.
Misses: Like many places, the happy hour portions are smallish and generally designed to
stave off hunger until a later meal.

Sips: Putting a new spin on old favorites, the Magellan Martini (Magellan Quadruple
Distilled Gin and Vya Dry Vermouth), and the Chambord Kamikaze (Absolut Vodka,
Cointreau, a splash of Chambord, fresh-squeezed lime juice and sour mix) are cold,
beautiful companions to the food menu.

The details: 0470 S.W. Hamilton Court; 503-802-5850; $2 drink minimum; 3:30-6 p.m.
daily.

-- Joshua Sommer

Sellwood Public House

Possibly the only place in town that offers Texas-style barbecue for happy hour, this
classy pub has a smokin' deal for hungry folks looking for good food after work. Dishes,
$2 to $4, include brandy mushrooms with focaccia ($4), huge short ribs that are so tender
that regulars refer to them as prime rib on a stick ($4), and jalepeno brisket burgers, an
amazing invention of the owner's that you won't find anywhere else ($3). The place also
offers New York-style pizza slices for $2 to $3.

Hits: If you like a little heat and tender, smoked meat, try the jalepeno brisket burger.
Actually, the entire unique menu is a welcome relief from your standard happy hour fare,
and each item is delicious.

Misses: The entrance is hidden between a couple of storefronts; you'll miss it if you're not
careful.

Sips: Being a pub and a family-friendly restaurant, the place has everything from soda to
a full bar. It's also one of the only spots around town that carries Tuck's Brewery beers
(try the vanilla porter or imperial IPA), and if you happen to drop in on a Sunday or
Wednesday, microbrew pints are 2 bucks.

The details: 8132 S.E. 13th Ave.; 503-736-0179; one drink minimum; 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays-
Sundays.

-- Joshua Sommer

****************


Bookshelf "Work Worldwide: International Career Strategies for the Adventurous Job
Seeker"
By Joshua Sommer
Friday,January 13, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial JOBS, Page F02

"Work Worldwide: International Career Strategies for the Adventurous Job Seeker" by
Nancy Mueller (Avalon Travel Publishing; $14.95)

This book shows how to research, apply for, and obtain international jobs. It includes
quizzes to help define goals, culturally specific information for doing business in a
foreign country, and a resource directory with helpful e-mail and Web site addresses.

JOSHUA SOMMER

Jobs calendar

* Jan. 19: Beaverton Employer Presentation --Affiliated Computer Services (ACS)
showcases its organization and discusses industry trends and news, current positions
available, and the application process. Learn how you may fit in or how your skills could
be utilized; meet the recruiters one-on-one, do some networking and ask questions; 1 to 2
p.m.; Portland Community College, Capital Career Center, Room 1508 (auditorium),
18624 N.W. Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-533-2754; parking free 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Thursdays.

* Jan. 26: Beaverton Employer Presentation --Labor Ready; 1 to 2 p.m.; PCC, Capital
Career Center, Room 1508 (Auditorium), 18624 N.W. Walker Road, Beaverton; 503-
533-2754; parking free 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays.

* Jan. 30: The Oregonian's free Career Expo; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Oregon Convention
Center; for updates of participating employers, visit www.oregonlive.com.

* Those interested in a career at a truck or car dealership can visit a virtual job fair at
www.oregonlive.com/jobs/virtualjob/.

* To search more than 9,000 current job openings in the state of Oregon's Employment
Department database, visit www.emp.state.or.us/jobs.

To submit calendar items, fax them to Marketplace/Jobs, The Oregonian, 503-294-5185.
Please include phone number for verification.
**************

Choice of reception mostly matter of taste
By Sonja Johnston And Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Thursday,January 12, 2006
Edition: Sunrise, Section: 2006 Guide for Brides, Page 02
Back in the day, as they say,

many a wedding reception was held in a church hall. The provisions were simple: a
beautiful cake, champagne, coffee, tea, nuts and mints.

But times have changed and so have guests' expectations of where they'll be received and
what they'll be offered to eat at a wedding reception. They arrive hungry.

For most weddings, the cost of the reception site, food and beverages adds up to about
half of the total budget.

So the big question is: Where is the best place to have your wedding reception? And how
do you feed those seemingly always hungry wedding guests?

What makes it both easy and hard to decide is that there's no set answer.

The recent wedding receptions featured in this section --from a simple, homemade buffet
to a catered event at an island resort --illustrate the range of choices available to couples
today.

Bottom line: It's your wedding and the reception site and food should suit your style. To
help you get started, here's a list of Northwest venues that comprises a range of styles,
prices and places.

**************


Downtown Monthly Calendar Through Dec. 21,


Friday,December 16, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial Downtown Monthly, Page DM06
Downtown Monthly Calendar

Through Dec. 21,

Ship parade

For the 51st year, the Christmas Ship Parade lights up the Columbia and Willamette
Rivers. The fleet averaging 55 to 60 boats is out every night during the parade's two-
week run; www.christmasships.org.

Through Dec. 24,

Saturday Market
More than 350 local craftspeople sell items that they've made, baked or grown
themselves under the west end of the Burnside Bridge; www.saturdaymarket.org.

Through Dec. 27,

Art by Chinese youths

The Portland Classical Chinese Garden hosts a show of Chinese children's artwork
depicting the environment. "Flying the Child's Hope" shows what kind of world the
children believe they will inherit in adulthood; www.portlandchinesegarden.org.

Through Dec. 31,

Christmas Treasures

The Pittock Mansion has vintage toys, trains, dolls and Santa and angel collections
throughout its 23 rooms during December; noon to 4 p.m.; $6; 503-823-3623;
www.pittockmansion.com.

Through Dec. 31,

ZooLights 2005

This annual feature at the Oregon Zoo includes a lighted train, choral and ensemble
music, puppet shows, a model train display and a winter wonderland of more than a half-
million lights; 503-221-1561.

Through Dec. 31,

Tokyo Nights

See how the Japanese illuminated their evenings at an exhibit featuring antique Japanese
woodblock prints of Edo nightlife at Shogun's Gallery; 503-224-0328;
www.shogunsgallery.com.

Through Dec. 31,

wine and art discounts

Vinopolis is offering a 15-percent discount on all wines regularly priced under $10 and a
15-percent discount on displayed artwork, along with free tastings and extended hours
every day; 503-223-6002; www.vinopoliswineshop.com.

Through Dec. 31,
Dance in Cuba

Lawrence Gallery hosts an exhibit of black-and-white photography from former Los
Angeles County district attorney Gil Garcetti's recently published book, which attempts
to convey the spirit of the Cuban people through their dance; www.lawrencegallery.net.


Through Jan. 1,

More than sauce

Yoshida's Fine Art Gallery/Wine Bar and Bistro is featuring Bend artist Tracy Leagjeld
and her new collection of colorful, oil-based monotype paintings; 503-227-3911;
www.yoshidagallery.com.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is Jan. 1.
***********


FIRST GLIMPSE Barcode
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Monday,November 21, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 07
Barcode

Conspiracy theorists and food industry types have a new venue downtown to add to their
"to-do" list of places to check out. At times, Barcode is clearly a sports bar. Later in the
night, it's a vibrating club. Regardless, there is something for nearly everyone who lurks
downtown in the wee hours: good food.

With operating hours that blanket the vast time period of 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. (closed
Tuesdays) and a menu with offerings from mac and cheese ($6.95-$8.95) to oven-roasted
mussels ($3.95 at happy hour), finding something tasty is a cinch. Food service industry
workers whose restaurants have closed can dig into Barcode's breakfast menu, served
from 11 p.m. to closing. There's Cajun-style biscuits with spicy sausage gravy ($7.50),
chicken-fried steak ($6.75), even Thai breakfast dishes ($4-$7.95).

Perhaps the most appealing menu is during happy hour, 4 to 8 p.m. daily and all day
Sundays and Mondays, when dishes are only $1.95 to $3.95. There's barbecued chicken
tenders in pineapple sauce, steamed clams, salmon cakes, fresh salad rolls. Plus well
drinks to wash it down ($2-$3).
Boasting five separate food menus, Barcode --at once a thumping club, sports bar and
chic late-night hang --aims to please the palate at all the crucial times, early to late and
then early again.

Located at Southwest Second Avenue and Pine Street; 503-242-0019;
www.barcodeportland.com.

Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

**************


Downtown Monthly Calendar
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian


Friday,November 25, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial Downtown Monthly, Page DM5
Downtown Monthly Calendar

Through Dec. 4

Bovine theatre

The Oregon premier of Ferdinand the Bull, from Oregon Children's Theatre, includes
songs in both Spanish and English; Miracle Theatre, 425 S.E. Sixth Avenue; 503-228-
9571.

Through Dec. 11

Venetian etchings exhibit

The Portland Art Museum displays prints and etchings by Venetian architect Giovanni
Battista Piranesi; www.pam.org.

Through Dec. 24

Saturday Market

More than 350 local craftspeople sell items they've made, baked or grown themselves
under the west end of the Burnside Bridge; www.saturdaymarket.org.

Through Dec. 31
Christmas Treasures

The Pittock Mansion displays vintage toys, trains, dolls and Santa and angel collections
throughout its 23 rooms during December; noon to 4 p.m.; $6; 503-823-3623;
www.pittockmansion.com.

Through Dec. 31

ZooLights 2005

This annual event at the Oregon Zoo includes a lighted train, choral and ensemble music,
puppet shows, model train display and a twinkling wonderland of more than a half-
million lights; 503-221-1561.

Through Dec. 31

Tokyo Nights

Antique Japanese woodblock prints of Edo nightlife exhibited at Shogun's Gallery; 503-
224-0328; www.shogunsgallery.com.

Through Dec. 31

wine and art discounts

Vinopolis wine merchants offer a 15-percent discount on all wines regularly priced under
$10 and a 15-percent discount on displayed artwork, along with free tastings and
extended hours every day; 503-223-6002; www.vinopoliswineshop.com.

Dec. 1 - 4

Winter ale fest

The 2005 Holiday Ale Festival features 29 craft brewers in heated tents at Pioneer
Courthouse Square; free admission; www.holidayale.com.

Dec. 1 to Dec. 31

"Dance in Cuba"

Black-and-white photography by former Los Angeles County district attorney Gil
Garcetti's from his published book, "Dance in Cuba" (Princeton Architectural Press; $65);
Garcetti attempts to convey the spirit of the Cuban people through dance. An artist's
reception will be Dec. 1, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Lawrence Gallery; www.LawrenceGallery.net.
Dec. 1 to Jan. 1

Monotype exhibit

Yoshida's Fine Art Gallery/Wine Bar and Bistro is featuring Bend artist Tracy Leagjeld's
new collection of colorful oil-based monotypes, including cityscapes and landscapes.
Artist reception Dec. 1, 5 to 10 p.m.

Also, a special holiday art event will be held from Dec. 1 to 11 with 45 percent of
proceeds benefiting the Salvation Army; 503-227-3911; www.yoshidagallery.com.

Dec. 8 to Dec. 21

Ship parade

For the 51st year, the Christmas Ship Parade lights up the Columbia and Willamette
Rivers. The fleet averages 55 to 60 boats, sailing every night for two weeks; routes and
times at www.christmasships.org.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is Dec. 1.

***************


cheap eats feeding frenzies with pocket change Gladstone Street Pub
By By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Monday,November 14, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 20
Gladstone Street Pub

Gladstone Street Pub, "The Stone" to locals, has helped to fill the desperate void of good
grub and brew in the community surrounding Southeast 37th Avenue and Gladstone
Street.

The chow: Taking a siesta from generic pub fare, The Stone delivers a full range of plates
from a Tex-Mex portion of the menu from $4 to $6.50. They also offer sandwiches from
$5 to $7, along with other pub grub including a delicious charbroiled hamburger or
chicken-burger for under seven bucks.

Real deals: The Stone offers a hearty half-sandwich along with soup or salad as a lunch
special during the week ($4.50) and $3 soups, salads and chips and salsa.
Hangout factor: Comfy and rustic, the place has a lot of charm and potential. Because it's
a newer spot, time will tell if it is able to develop enough character to compete with
established pubs close by.

Liquids: Beer ranges from $2 for Pabst to $3.50 for micros, with 50 cents off all draft
beer during happy hour (3 to 7 p.m., daily and all day Sunday).

What's half-baked? As far as neighborhood pubs go, this place is all right. Tight seating
on the interior might make this place a better bet for sunny days with outside seating.

Inside tips: Go for something off the Mexi-Faves portion of the menu. A sure bet is the
chili-cheese quesadilla ($4.75), which comes spicy and fully loaded.

The numbers: 3737 S.E. Gladstone St.; 503-775-3502

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
**************


SCENE AND HERD Game for adventure
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Wednesday,October 26, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 09
ILLUSTRATION: Photo by The Oregonian / MOTOYA NAKAMURA

Andrew Denton (from left), Jacob Wood, Ashley Wood and Darin Briskman - Playing
Dungeons & Dragons at NerdCon

Ah, the sweet scent of adventure --be it a dew-drenched battlefield at dawn, or a dueling
of wits between rivals overcoming impossible odds in a strategic chase wherein death or
wealth or shame or prominence lurks around every corner.

It's a crisp morning. The early sun coats the asphalt of Southeast 82nd Avenue like the
gleam of blood splashed across a dark knight's armor.

Through the doors of the Denny's at Southeast 82nd Avenue and Oregon 224, deadly
battles rage and adventures unfold. Battles and adventures between everything from
bionic cattle with heavy artillery to pirates, orcs, Munchkins (the name of one of the role-
playing games) and futuristic miniatures (Combat Assault Vehicles, or CAVs) similar to
MechWarriors.

As Optimus Prime (of Transformers fame) would say, "What the slag? Is this the Spawn
of Unicron? I'll blast the frag out of him!" (These are Transformer curses.)
To which we'd have to reply (gently), "Stay calm, sir. This is NerdCon 2005. A
convention featuring board and card games, and role-playing games, including
miniatures. It's prime!"

NerdCon is a three-day event with players moving from table to table every few hours,
when their games end. Games include Battle Cattle (cows with guns and other
armaments), Living Arcanis, Eberron, Munchkin, Sword and Skull and CAV.

A guy going by Mugsy and Josh Masher, two youngish gamers, demo a practice game of
CAV (www.reapermini.com/?nav=Games) for bystanders. With a tape measure and die,
they show how to measure out a strike against the enemy in this complex and addictive
game of strategy with miniatures on realistic, scaled-down terrain (officially: miniature
wargaming ).

You've got to love the real-world, hands-on approach of these games.

"We know these games are competing against video games," said Mugsy. But they have
their benefits, educational and otherwise. "My son turns 6 in January and he already
knows his multiplication tables, and basic math. And he can read," added Mugsy. "We
demo this game each Thursday at Bridgetown Hobbies on Sandy Boulevard ."

Ada Kerman , convention coordinator and co-coordinator of local gaming club Clan of
the Cave Nerd , said, "The next convention is GameStorm in March in Vancouver and it's
only $20 if you register by Oct. 30 . It usually draws upwards of 500 players." Kerman is
not the coordinator of GameStorm.

The whole point of the convention is to "bring people into town to a premier event where
the stories can evolve with new characters. When people bring their characters in from
other places, the games get really interesting," said Eric Gorman , one of the refs for
Living Arcanis at NerdCon.

Adventurers rage on in a room that is a maze of bodies, chairs, tables and dice --12-sided,
more or less. Players are crying out when they take or make hits and the aroma of battle
and Denny's "Moons Over My Hammy" sandwiches fills the air.

To catch one of these games yourself, visit www.bthobbies.com , www.gamestorm.org or
www.kermanenterprises.com/cavenerds .

-- Joshua Sommer

*************


FIVE QUESTIONS City Ambassadors walk the talk
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Wednesday,October 26, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 11
A geeky guy sits with his beautiful wife at the lovely new Thai restaurant Peemkaew in
the North Park blocks. They're sharing a plate of delicious pumpkin curry while he waits
for bocce ball players to populate the court in the park across from where they're sitting.

Mid-meal, a Downtown Sidewalk Ambassador strolls through the door of the restaurant
in his smashing green-and-black outfit emblazoned with a gigantic "i."

The geeky guy doesn't know a thing about bocce, but he's curious, so he asks the
Sidewalk Ambassador if he knows anything about the sport. In less than five minutes the
information guru has stepped out of the restaurant, consulted his PDA, talked into his
two-way radio and come back to the couple's table with the complete history of bocce,
the game's rules, where it can be played locally and places to purchase equipment.

How did he do that? Sidewalk Ambassador Mark Twohy, sheds some light on the
Ambassadors program.

Q: What is the strangest question ambassadors are asked?

A: Are you a forest ranger? Are you a cowboy? (a 4-year-old regarding my Seattle
Sombrero rain hat).

Q: Sidewalk Ambassadors are helpful, happy, energetic and informative. Why do you
like your job?

A: We get to help people. This is the way downtown businesses keep downtown Portland
friendly and easy to navigate. There's something really cool about helping a lost tourist
find their way to Powell's Books or even a Portland resident who knows downtown like
the back of their hand discover a new, exciting restaurant.

Q: How do you guys know so much?

A: We have a lot of resources. We cross-reference with each other; we have pocket PCs;
Internet access; and we're part of the Portland Business Alliance, which is greater
Portland's Chamber of Commerce, so we stay connected to what's going on and have
access to a lot of information.

Q: Your hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday. How safe are you?

A: We're out walking the streets all day and feel safe because downtown Portland is a
safe place to be. To ensure that, we're in direct two-way radio contact with the Clean and
Safe officers (who are managed by the Portland Business Alliance and work with local
police to enhance security) who patrol downtown.

Q: How much territory do you cover?

A: The Business Improvement District, a 213-block area downtown, roughly bounded by
Naito Parkway, Southwest Harrison Street, 11th Avenue, and the Broadway Bridge. The
property owners in the district ensure that the area is patrolled for safety, cleanliness and
friendliness --that's our part!

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

******************


FIRST GLIMPSE Lilith
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian


Tuesday,October 4, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Entertainment, Page 10
Ladies (and some gentlemen) who like to shop for women's clothes and have a preference
for locally made items should drop by Lilith, a new boutique on Northeast Alberta Street
that carries clothes and jewelry that are mostly designed and made in Portland (a few
items come from Seattle).

"I live in the neighborhood and wanted my store to be on Alberta as well," said Snowzie
Roze.

The classy, compact store gleams with jewelry and beautiful fabrics that have been
nipped and tucked to form one-of-a-kind items including basic sweatshop-free tees,
undershirts, boy shirts, dresses, funky trousers, vintage jeans, contemporary jeans and
recycled and restructured sweaters, dresses and coats.

Roze saw a niche that could be filled on the increasingly popular street and decided to do
something about it.

"There's a thriving and growing fashion scene in Portland. And it's great to see a woman
walking down the street wearing something made in Portland. There's something very
intimate about it."

Lilith, catering primarily to outerwear, also has something for everyone, naughty or nice.
"If you need some pasties (Bosom Blossoms), we have those too," she said.

Commenting on local designers that Lilith carries, Roze said, "I love (Portland jewelry
designer) Tiffany Thomas. I think her work is amazing. Every piece is unique . . . very
modern and earthy at the same time. My two favorite clothing designers are Genna
Golden (Portland) and Suzabelle (Seattle). Both are really strong designers and very
different. They represent the spectrum you'll find at Lilith.

"This is the best job I have ever had. I look forward to going work. What a concept!"

Lilith, 1524 N.E. Alberta St.; 503-282-2762; closed Monday, Tuesday by appointment,
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

**************


Downtown Monthly Calendar Sept. 28 Nob Hill specials
By Joshua Sommer


Friday,September 23, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Advertorial Downtown Monthly, Page DM4
Downtown Monthly Calendar

Sept. 28

Nob Hill specials

The Nob Hill Business Association presents What's on Wednesday (WoW), with more
than 50 retail stores and restaurants participating; www.nobhillbiz.com.

Through Oct. 23

The Lion King

Fred Meyer Broadway in Portland presents The Lion King at the Portland Center for the
Performing Arts; www.pcpa.com.

Through Dec. 24

Saturday Market
More than 350 local craftspeople sell items that they've made, baked or grown
themselves under the west end of the Burnside Bridge; www.saturdaymarket.org.

Through Dec. 11

Rome etchings exhibit

The Portland Art Museum will display prints and etchings by Venetian architect
Giovanni Battista Piranesi; www.pam.org.

Oct. 7 to 16

Fall ballet program

The Oregon Ballet Theatre kicks off its fall series with works by Christopher Stowell,
Jerome Robbins and Julia Adam at the Newmark Theatre; 503-222-5538; www.obt.org.

Violence summit

Raphael House of Portland presents bands, speakers and a silent vigil at Pioneer
Courthouse Square; www.raphaelhouse.com.

Oct. 9

Portland Marathon

The 34th annual Portland Marathon will begin at 7 a.m. at Southwest Fourth and Third
avenues between Salmon and Jefferson streets; www.portlandmarathon.org.

Oct. 16

Run for the Cheetah

The Cheetah Conservation Fund will present 8k and 5k runs to increase awareness about
and raise funds for the endangered cheetah; www.cheetah.org.

Oct. 20

Author lecture

Simon Winchester, author of "The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder,
Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary," will speak at the Arlene
Schnitzer Concert Hall; 503-227-2583; www.literary-arts.org.

Oct. 27 to 30
Halloween at the zoo

Trick-or-treaters may enjoy a scavenger hunt and activity stations around the zoo and
goodie bags filled with candy and prizes; 503-226-1561; www.oregonzoo.org.

Through Oct. 30

Portland Center Stage

PCS brings Glen Berger's (author of "O Lovely Glowworm") "Underneath the Lintel" to
Winningstad Theatre; www.pcs.org.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is Oct. 1.
**********


Many bites, few bucks
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian


Wednesday,September 21, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Living, Page 19
You've just cashed in a grocery bag full of empty Pabst cans, and you've now got $2
tucked in your wallet. If you're like me, you are either looking forward to blowing the
cash on a 22-ouncer of Mickey's or you're looking for someplace inexpensive to grab
grub.

Fortunately, the $2 meal still exists in Portland -- though you have to do some serious
looking to find the great buys. Here's a week's worth of some of the best -- as well as a
few bites you can take a pass on.

Saturdays and Tuesdays the owners of Penguin Pub and Eatery (8117 S.E. 17th Ave.;
503-232-4629) and the Drift On Inn Bar and Grill (12611 S.E. McLoughlin Blvd.; 503-
652-7966) offer delicious 75-cent tacos from open to close.

"We've been doing this for 28 years, and I'm really careful about the ingredients. I go for
the best and freshest quality in all our food because I want people to enjoy it and keep
coming back," said DeAnn Charpentier, one of the pub's owners.

This philosophy shows even in the inexpensive tacos, which come piled high with
seasoned beef (a top-secret recipe), lettuce, cheese, sour cream and salsa. After a couple
of these, you'll be stuffed.
On Mondays and Tuesdays, Jake's Place (8039 S.E. 17th Ave.; 503-233-8257) offers
less-than-tasty tacos at 50 cents a pop. Beware! Though the price may be inviting, only
those with the strongest stomachs should brave the things. Instead, this place has a great
plate of chicken gizzards or a wicked kielbasa dog for a buck-and-a-half during all hours
of operation.

Who-Song and Larry's (4850 S.W. Macadam Ave.; 503-223-8845) offers tasty steak and
chicken tacos for 99 cents from 3 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. The tacos come on
fresh, handmade corn tortillas, and a small salsa and veggie bar is provided for patrons to
doctor their meals.

One of the best deals in town is at The Slammer tavern (500 S.E. Eighth Ave.; 503-232-
6504), which offers three tacos for a buck on Wednesdays from 5 p.m. until they run out
of the ingredients. If tacos aren't your game, try one of the super hot dogs (any time) for
$2 or a bowl of chili for the same price.

All week long, the lounge of Carrows Restaurant (10900 S.W. 69th Ave.; 503-246-5588)
offers a nice substitute if you, like me, have been eating tacos most of the week. For 2
bucks you can get ample portions of several entrees including a cheeseburger, Southwest
chicken wraps, spaghetti with garlic bread and fettuccine Alfredo, again with garlic
bread. These are available daily from 3 to 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. to close and all day Sundays.

Still starving for a taco? Every day except Sunday you can score a delicious pork,
chicken, steak or shredded-beef taco for $1 all day, starting at 11 a.m., at Taqueria Los
Reyes, a mobile canteen truck near Southwest 86th Avenue on Barbur Boulevard. All the
meats can be ordered regular or spicy.

So, keep a bib in your glove box because there are scads of places around (besides
obvious happy-hour destinations such as McCormick & Schmick's, Stanford's and the
like) that are willing to trade you food for a couple of bucks. The secret is to keep your
eyes open, because these places (usually on a strict advertising budget) often only post
their best deals on sandwich boards or in their windows. So keep your laundry change
clenched tight in your fist the next time you're feeling low on dough and have a seriously
growling stomach.

Did I miss your favorite $2 food find? I'm always hunting for ultracheap eats. E-mail me
at flotsam2000@gmail.com.

*************


sound check notes from the Northwest music scene HITTING ALL THE RIGHT NOTES
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian
Friday,September 16, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts & Living, Page 13
HITTING ALL THE RIGHT NOTES -- Any band that has the words "bar" and "drags"
in its name already has a swanky coolness going for it. Throw in music that punches the
heart like a fist with brass knuckles, and a package emerges that could be the beginning
of a steamy love affair.

It's "Merle Haggard (expletive) slaps the Beach Boys," is the way Scotland Barr, lead
singer of Scotland Barr and the Slow Drags, puts it.

"Most of us are from San Diego," Barr says. "We grew up listening to Kiss, Circle Jerks,
John Denver. Mik (Mik Nucci, bass) and I have played in bands together since we were
14."

The band members' familiarity shines in the seamless sets when they perform live and on
their new CD, "Legionnaires Disease."

The songs range from the catchy Americana of "When You Cried" to the brooding "5
years in Nashville," about a songwriter who gets stranded and loses his girl: "Well, time
is a butcher for dreamers and cattle/ Both get sold off by the pound."

There's also plenty of straight-up rock, especially the title track, that will get your toes
tapping, hips swaying and heart pumping.

Made up of Nucci; Charley Adams, guitar; Matt Nicely, drums; Chris Hubbard, keys;
Brian Daste, pedal steel; and Barr, vocals and guitar, the group faces the challenge of
gaining exposure as a great band in a town that's full of great bands already looking for
attention and bad bands that somehow get a lot of it.

Acknowledging a band scene that's standing-room-only, Barr ticks off some of his
favorite local competition: "I'm listening to Morgan Geer/Drunken Prayer, the
Lonesomes, the Imprints, the Sort of's/Chris Robley and Mission 5."

They're in good company. Barr and the boys should feel proud of producing something
some good bands never pull off: an attractive, wholly listenable album that hits all the
right chords with powerful, painful and beautiful accuracy.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
**************


Sake cocktail dazzles palate
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian
Wednesday,August 31, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Arts and Entertainment, Page 09
Every third Saturday, in a watering hole in Forest Grove, a Geisha, an Emperor, someone
named Wasabi Mary and a Happy Sumo line up at a bar -- ready to be picked up by
anyone brave enough to initiate the first move.

Actually, those aren't people -- they're Saketini cocktails made with the likes of Tabasco
sauce, wasabi, lime, cranberry juice and other ingredients.

The sakery at SakeOne recently introduced Saketini Saturdays, from noon to 5 p.m. the
third Saturday of each month.

On these select Saturdays, the tasting room fills with eager palates searching for the latest
sake cocktail or tried-and-true favorites.

In the cedar-lined room, there's a casual, relaxed euphoria among the staff and patrons on
Saketini Saturdays, which began mostly by accident.

"We started out as traditionalists when it came to making sake and then we moved on to
the fruit-infused sakes. The truth is that Saketini wasn't our idea," said Steve Boone,
president and chief executive officer. "I started getting e-mails from restaurants in Miami,
San Francisco and New York, and they would say, 'Did you know that if you mix your
Pearl with a little cream and some Midori melon liquor and shake it up, you get an
amazing cocktail? My answer was no.

"At first I was like, I'm not sure about these Saketini things, but as we started making
them we discovered that they were really delicious. Then we started experimenting and
making them here and at home. And people started calling us locally to let us know that
they were going to put on Saketini tasting parties. Major papers picked it up, like the San
Francisco Chronicle, the L.A. Times and papers from New York and Miami, with stories
about sake and how mixable it is. The thing sort of took off on its own."

Even folks who don't usually favor traditional sake will likely find something to wet their
whistle with a fruity sake cocktail that helps to mask the initial bite of the Japanese brew.

Want to experiment with the elixirs without leaving Portland proper? Local restaurants
including Saucebox, Dragonfish and P.F. Chang's serve several versions and even new
inventions for the Saketini-curious.

For more information, including cocktail recipes, visit www.sakeone.com.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian.

************
Downtown Monthly Calendar Through Aug. 3, Paolo Design opening Through Aug. 31,
Vinopolis events Through Aug. 29 and Sept. 6, Ballgames Through Sept. 1, Noon Tunes
Concert Series Through Sept. 2, Zoo Summer Camp Through Sept. 5, Summer gu
By No Byline


Friday,July 22, 2005
Edition: Sunrise, Section: Downtown Monthly, Page DM04
Madoka Ito and Paolo Design will be on display at The Lifeline Story Project (Series I &
II), at Paolo Design Group, 1031 N.W. 11th Ave.

Madoka Ito's series of seven pen-and-ink tablets explores the evolution of art through
audience participation. Ito asks viewers to select and remove key pieces of the series,
which Ito will later replace with a new scene, changing the meaning of the story that is
unfolding.

Also on display in the gallery space will be several new furniture pieces from Paolo
Design Group. New designs include mobile and dynamic danza tables, which can be
arranged to serve as banquet tables, buffet tables, office desks, casual dining tables,
homework stations, or end tables.

Open 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 503-222-1757, ext. 15.

Vinopolis Wine Shop's August discount section will be Oregon wines. Shoppers can buy
a bottle of Ponzi or Beaux Freres and get a case discount. The section discounts apply to
in-store purchases only.

On First Tuesday, Aug. 2, the Women's Wine Class, "Sangria & Cider in the Dog Days
of Summer," will cover the classic elements of sangria. Participants will create four or
five different versions and learn which foods they complement. Space is limited and pre-
registration is required. Tickets can be purchased online in the "Shop Online" section of
the company site by clicking on "Classes."

Cost is $15; 7 p.m.; 1025 S.W. Washington St.; 503-223-6002;
www.vinopoliswineshop.com.

Through Sept. 6, the Portland Beavers baseball team will play home games at PGE Park.

Also, through Aug. 29, the Portland Timbers soccer team will play home games at PGE
Park.

For ticket prices, dates and directions, visit www.pgepark.com.
This annual program hosted by Pioneer Courthouse Square, presented by Volkswagen
and co-sponsored by KINK FM 102, features lunchtime performances by local, regional
and national musical acts.

The free shows run Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to 1 p.m.

The August lineup includes Valerie Day with Tom Grant, Aug. 2; Rye Hollow, Aug. 4;
Stephen Kellogg & The Sixers, Aug. 9; Careen, Aug. 11; Stephanie Schneiderman Aug.
16; Laura Gibson, Aug. 18; and Geoff Byrd, Aug. 30.

* At Pioneer Courthouse Square through Sept. 1 is the Live After 5 Summer Blues
Concert Series. The free shows are Thursdays at 5 p.m.

Performances include Jesse Samsel and Crosstown Traffic, Aug. 4; Paul deLay Band,
Aug. 11; and the Jay "Bird" Koder Band featuring Carl Joiner, Aug. 18.

For more information, visit www.pioneercourthousesquare.org.

Four-year-olds to ninth-graders can spend five days at the zoo this summer studying
endangered species, taking tours, playing games, making crafts and more; 9 a.m. to 4
p.m., Monday through Friday, throughout the summer. For more information, call 503-
220-2781, or visit www.oregonzoo.org.

Volunteer zoo guides will present extensi animal talks from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays
and Sundays, and from 1 p.m. to close on $2 Tuesdays (the second Tuesday of each
month). Guides throughout the zoo will give brief presentations and answer questions
about zoo animals. For more information, visit www.oregonzoo.org.

The Oregon Historical Society has an extensive collection of paraphernalia on display
from the Lewis & Clark Centennial & American Pacific Exposition & Oriental Fair, the
1905 world's fair held in Portland. The exhibit will be open through the summer.
Admission is $10; 1200 S.W. Park Ave; 503-222-1741; www.ohs.org.

The Portland Saturday Market has opened for its 32nd year with more than 350 local
craftspeople offering items that they've made, baked or grown themselves -- from clothes
to pottery to crafts.Other highlights include live music and the International Food Court,
featuring 26 vendors. Open every Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; under the west end of the Burnside Bridge on Southwest 1st Avenue. Admission is
free; www.saturdaymarket.org.

The movie "Ghostbusters" will be shown at dusk at Pioneer Courthouse Square. Free.

The annual celebration of Italian culture, with live entertainment, dancing and food, will
take place at Pioneer Courthouse Square. Free events also include a grape stomp, pizza
toss and more. Times vary; for more information, visit www.festa-italiana.org.
The Nob Hill Business Association presents What's on Wednesday (WoW) on the last
Wednesday of each month. More than 50 retail stores and restaurants participate by
offering store discounts and dinner specials. For more information, visit
www.nobhillbiz.com.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is Aug. 1.
***************


PLUGGED IN FIRST GLIMPSE GOGO MONGOLIAN FEAST
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,July 8, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 09
Friday, July 8, 2005

PLUGGED IN FIRST GLIMPSE GOGO MONGOLIAN FEAST

Gogo Mongolian Feast

For Mongolian barbecue fans who eat close to Portland proper, but live farther out on the
west side, there's good news in the form of Gogo Mongolian Feast, a spiffy spot that
satiates with a superb grill and snazzy atmosphere.

Instead of the stand-alone sauces usually found at the end of the buffet -- after noodles,
meat and veggies -- several tried-and-true premixed sauces can be scooped into tiny
bowls and added to your food on the huge, round grill right at the end of the cooking
process.

Manager Brian Luu explains the reason behind adding the sauces at the last minute:
"When we first opened we relied a lot on customer feedback to perfect the menu. We
found that if the sauces were added too soon on the grill that they would burn and add a
burnt flavor to the meal. Other places douse the food with water on the grill, but we
found that this dilutes the flavor. So we created some of our customer's favorite premixed
sauces and we add them last on the grill."

Rather than reinventing the Mongolian barbecue wheel, Gogo has simply perfected the
way it operates, streamlining the buffet counter's key ingredients, spices, and they've
done it with a snazzy flare that makes the restaurant strike all the right notes. Lunch
plates range from $6.95 to $9.95 and dinner from $7.95 to $11.95.

For hours and directions, call 503-531-9988, or visit www.gogofeast.com.
-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

***************


SOUND CHECK SQUIDS' INFLUENCE MAKES A SPLASH
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday, July 8, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 17
Friday, July 8, 2005

SOUND CHECK SQUIDS' INFLUENCE MAKES A SPLASH

sound check

notes from the Northwest music scene By JOSHUA SOMMER

SQUIDS' INFLUENCE MAKES A SPLASH -- Eugene's Dan Jones, along with his
band, the Squids, has become a familiar name in a city that nurtures some of the finest
musicians in Oregon. That reputation is stretching the long reach of its tentacles north on
the wave of several live shows, two previous albums and a tour for Jones' latest release,
"Get Sounds Now."

"This CD has a level of relaxed ensemble playing that people have never heard in support
of the songs I write," Jones said. "I've recorded stripped-down acoustic, I've recorded
with bombastic slabs of rock, and I've recorded in a highly detailed, multilayered
production environment. But this album is a band playing live in a studio -- playing songs
they know, but not too well." Jones plays the Rock Creek Tavern on Friday.

"The tracking sessions only took a day and a half -- there's a lightness to this, I guess the
pleasure of the company I was keeping and the level of musicianship."

His two previous CDs include a self-produced acoustic album titled "For Your Radio,"
released in 1998; and the pop/punk-rock "One Man Submarine" that made a critical
splash with its release in 2003.

Two years later, "Get Sounds Now" is a refreshing bit of songwriting with witty yet
passionate lyrics and masterful orchestration. The album shines with Jones' and the
Squids musical maturity and the powerful acceptance of reality.
"These songs seem to be about daily life and work in a lot of ways," said Jones. "But it's
also just the usual things: love, suffering, hope, finding courage. I look at things from the
side in my songs, or pretend I'm not there, but my heart is in there somewhere, I hope."

His casual approach to songwriting belies a certain seriousness masked with humor. "I
catch onto a phrase or a story line while I'm doing something mundane, or even trying to
entertain someone in a mundane environment like work, and then I write it on a piece of
paper shove it in my pocket and hope I find it later.

"Did your mom ever have a bad day and try to make it fun by saying, 'Let's have
breakfast for dinner'? It's kind of like that."

For influences and inspiration, Jones turns to musicians such as the Minutemen, D. Boon
and Lou Reed, and such writers as William Stafford, James Lee Burke, Julia Cameron
and Natalie Goldberg.

"Cooling Off," the second track on the new album, acknowledges William Faulkner with
the quip, "Dropped my Sound and Fury in the sea/The pages stick together and they
stink," and follows with the yearning chorus, "I wonder what became of the girl/With the
'I Shot Reagan' tattoo on her stomach."

Billy Barnett, owner of Eugene's Gung-Ho Studio (where "One Man Submarine" was
recorded and mixed), says of Jones' songs, "They tend to be musically straightforward,
unpretentious, melodic; lyrically smart and thoughtful; and the angst and angles within
the story lines come across with a wry humor and sympathy . . . never the urgent, needy,
in-your-face variety."

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
**************


THE 45TH ANNUAL MCMINNVILLE TURKEY RAMA MCMINNVILLE FLUFFS
ITS FEATHERS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF RESEARCHER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,July 7, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: SOUTHWEST ZONER TURKEY RAMA, Page 01
Thursday, July 7, 2005

THE 45TH ANNUAL MCMINNVILLE TURKEY RAMA MCMINNVILLE FLUFFS
ITS FEATHERS

Kicking summer off with a sizzle, the city of McMinnville will once again transform into
a three-day, open-air festival in celebration of the 45th Annual Turkey Rama, an event
that started in 1961 when turkey growers joined with the Chamber of Commerce to form
a community event.

To this day it is the largest event of its kind in McMinnville, with 148 booths featuring
ethnic foods, local craft makers and commercial vendors. Attendees come from all over
to gobble up the entertainment, food and visual feast, which will run July 7 to 9 this year.

Around 25,000 to 30,000 people attend the event each year over three days, according to
Celia Wheeler, president of the McMinnville Chamber of Commerce. People come from
as far away as Citrus County, Fla., for the event.

"I started working on Turkey Rama in 1994, just to help with the downtown setup," said
Dick Windle of Citrus Springs, Fla. "Each year after my involvement kept expanding. In
1996 I designed and built the current chamber information booth and have handled the
setup and tear down ever since. I was the general chair for the barbecue until last year."

The event has grown steadily for a number of years. Last year, 700 whole turkeys were
slowly cooked over 5,000 pounds of charcoal for the popular Saturday barbecue. For
each turkey half sold (at $15), $1.50 went to the Community Action Agency of Yamhill
County's (YCAP) food bank. In 2004, the barbecue raised slightly more than $1,600 for
the program, Wheeler said.

Groups benefiting from funds raised at the event include the McMinnville Chamber of
Commerce, Hospice of Yamhill County, YCAP Food Bank, Kiwanis, Willamette Valley
Cancer Foundation and about 20 nonprofit vendors. The Hospice of Yamhill County
hosts the Biggest Turkey Contest each year.

With the help of fundraising efforts on the part of contest participants, last year's event
raised $44,000 for the hospice.

New to the community festival this year is the Turkey 2-Step, a community dance to be
held from 7:30 to 11 p.m. Saturday. Live music performances, always a festival favorite,
return this year with the Jake Blair Band, one of Portland's leading blue grass bands;
Dukes of Juke, performing oldies and classic rock; and White Rhino, a marimba group
playing African music.

Complementing the stage performances will be the Golden Valley Brew Pub's beer
garden near the stage, which will be open from 4 to 10 p.m. each night. Another festival
feature is the Turkey Trot run/walk on Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m. Day-of-the-race
registration is from 7 to 7:45 a.m., and the cost is $15. Also at the event will be a kick-off
parade; a pancake breakfast; a farmers market; soccer, softball and baseball tournaments;
a car cruise-in; and, the morsel that will have folks tying bibs around their necks and
getting Handi-Wipes ready, the Famous Turkey Barbecue.

Head cook Bill Bach has been slowly turning turkeys on spits at the festival for 12 or 13
years and he starts early with his preparation. Bach lights the coals Friday night for the
Saturday event because it takes the coals a few hours to get hot enough to suit his expert
eye.

For the returning Windle, the event hasn't always been pain-free.

"I once broke my right arm putting up the road signs for Turkey Rama two weeks before
it started," he muses. "I'm returning because I'm proud of how the event has worked and
all the help and cooperation from the community. The committee has it down to a very
good system and I think everyone who helps -- from the Elks cooks who start cooking
turkeys at midnight to our key cleanup lady, a local salon owner -- really enjoys the effort
and the success. I'm also returning because of the people and many friends I have made
via Turkey Rama. A year ago in April, just before the event, I had prostate cancer and the
support and prayers of my many friends in McMinnville were just overwhelming."

The turkey barbecue is Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., or until sold out. The meal
(includes turkey, potato salad and coleslaw, dinner roll, watermelon, cake and drink)
costs $12 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children. Freshly grilled turkey halves are $15,
with a $1.50 from each sale benefiting YCAP.

************


DINING CHEAP EATS SALAD WORLD
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,July 1, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 19
Friday, July 1, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS SALAD WORLD

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

Salad World

Picture your perfect salad. Now, imagine that salad available with every conceivable
dressing and side dish in a deceptively simple, streamlined buffet that includes four long
smorgasbord tables.

The chow: Everything from lettuce to fruit to exotic toppings is farm-fresh. Many forms
of salad are here, from Caesar to spinach. Also: noodles, entrees and meat dishes,
including teriyaki chicken.
Real deals: Plates are $5.15 a pound. If you're going with vegetables, they weigh in much
less than meat and, when paired with cheeses and nuts, are filling.

Hangout factor: To go. No inside seating, only two small tables outdoors.

Liquids: The usual sodas, juices and bottled water.

What's half-baked? At $5.15 a pound, the cost of your meal can add up quickly,
especially if you're going for some of the denser items, such as meats.

Inside tips: Eat lightly and it's entirely possible to get out of the place for under $5. So
pack your to-go container with a medium quantity of salad and a chunk or two of teriyaki
chicken.

The numbers: 837 S.W. Second Ave.; 503-222-9726. Hours: 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. daily.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
****************


DINING CHEAP EATS SUPER BURRITO EXPRESS
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,June 24, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 22
Friday, June 24, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS SUPER BURRITO EXPRESS

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

By JOSHUA SOMMER

Super Burrito Express

The name of the place fits so well, they should hang tiny "SBE" capes on the burritos.

The chow: Burritos range from basic bean and cheese ($2.75) to the more extravagant,
such as the tasty al pastor, with a filling of barbecued pork chunks, beans, onions and
cilantro ($4.25); and the All Meat, with shredded beef and green chili sauce ($4.35).
Also: tacos ($1.55 to $1.95), tostadas ($3.25) and quesadillas ($1.95 to $3.95), plus
hamburgers, sandwiches and nachos.

Real deals: Tacos are large. Two of these and you'll be sated for hours.

Hangout factor: The building is clean and bright compared with many taquerias. The
combination of fast service, a drive-through and a location off the beaten path makes it an
ideal weekday lunch destination.

Liquids: Sodas and juices galore. Try the tamarindo juice ($1.35, $1.65 and $1.85), a
sweet-and-sour concoction that tempers the spicy dishes.

What's half-baked? The surrounding shopping complex is evolving, with parking delays
and construction noise likely.

Inside tips: Get the tacos. Meal-worthy choices: Express Taco, shredded beef, onions,
cilantro and red chili sauce ($1.55); and the carne asada taco, charbroiled steak, tomatoes,
onions, cilantro, chili and avocado sauce ($1.55). If you're not fond of corn tortillas,
choose a burrito, but be warned: You're likely to have leftovers.

The numbers: Open daily 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., with drive-through open until
midnight; 10506 S.E. 42nd Ave., Milwaukie; 503-786-8231.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
***************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: VILLEBOIS MODEL HOMES SHOWCASE
DEVELOPMENT'S EUROPEAN FLAVOR
By Joshua Sommer
Staff researcher, The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Saturday,June 18, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Saturday, June 18, 2005

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: VILLEBOIS MODEL HOMES SHOWCASE
DEVELOPMENT'S EUROPEAN FLAVOR

The grand opening of three model homes at Arbor Custom Homes' portion of Villebois, a
500-acre development planned by Costa Pacific Communities on the former site of
Dammasch State Hospital in Wilsonville, will be June 18 and 19.

The three model homes represent new designs.
"We believe our new designs are unlike anything currently being built in a master-
planned community elsewhere in the metropolitan area. True to the French meaning of
Villebois as a 'village near the woods,' our neighborhoods here will have a distinct
European village flavor," said Dennis Sackhoff, president of West Hills Development,
parent company for Arbor Custom Homes.

The new designs range from 1,707 to 3,533 square feet, with prices from $231,000 to
$550,000.

Model homes will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., a
balloon-sculpting clown will perform and refreshments will be available.

When complete, Villebois is expected to have 2,500 homes, including town homes,
single-family houses, apartments and condominiums, by various builders.

For more information about Arbor Homes at Villebois, call Judy Cross or Rhianna Bayse
at 503-582-0472, or visit www.arborhomes.com.

Habitat for Humanity starts building in Lents

Portland Habitat for Humanity begins construction this month on 16 paired town homes
at Southeast 83rd Avenue and Lambert Street in the Lents neighborhood.

The project kicked off June 15.

Portland Habitat for Humanity is a participant in the Lents Homeownership Initiative, a
coalition of nonprofits, faith-based organizations, businesses and government agencies
committed to revitalizing the Lents community by increasing homeownership. It provides
families with affordable housing.

Habitat homes are built by volunteers, then sold to qualifying families at cost with a zero-
interest, 1-percent-down mortgage.

Prospective Habitat home buyers must attend a free orientation to apply for the program.
For more information or an orientation schedule, call Jaimi Coward at 503-287-9529,
Ext. 22, or visit www.pdxhabitat.org.

Host's New Columbia sells first of 80 homes

Host Development has sold the first of 80 new homes it is building at New Columbia in
North Portland.

The first home buyer moved in this month, which is National Homeownership Month.
Prices for the homes range from $145,500 to $186,950, and home sizes range from 944 to
1,528 square feet. The homes have two, three or four bedrooms, and some have attached
garages.

Host is a nonprofit organization that creates affordable homeownership opportunities. For
more information, call 503-331-1752, ext. 100, or visit www.hostdevelopment.com.

Remodelers group distributes awards

The Oregon Remodelers Association announced the winners of its Outstanding
Remodeling Achievement awards.

All projects were completed by the residential remodeling contractors in the past 15
months.

Following are the award categories and recipients:

* Residential Kitchen Under $30,000 and Residential Exterior, Wade Freitag, Craftsman
Design and Renovation

* Residential Interior, Bert Hansen, Renovation Innovations

* Residential Bath Under $25,000, Greg Olson, Olson & Jones Construction Inc., in
conjunction with designer Diane Plesset, DP Design

* Residential Kitchen Over $30,000, Residential Bath Over $25,000 and Residential
Addition, Scott Gregor, Master Plan Remodeling

* Whole House Remodel, Jim Feild, Progressive Builders Northwest

* Historical Renovation/Restoration, Richard DeWolf and Anne DeWolf, Arciform.

The winners were honored at the association's June 8 membership luncheon.

Hambach Crossing plans grand opening

Hambach Crossing, a town-home community on Southwest Durham Road in Tigard,
opened home sales on June 12.

Built by Legend Homes, the finished community will have 38 two-story town homes in
four floor plans. All Hambach Crossing town homes are attached at the garage and
feature three or four bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms, and will range in size from 2,000 to
2,217 square feet. Prices range from $307,900 to $334,900.

The Hambach Crossing sales office is open daily from noon to 6 p.m. For more
information, call 503-968-3040, or visit www.legendhomes.com.
Buena Vista honored for its rapid expansion

The Portland Business Alliance honored Buena Vista Custom Homes with a Top Ten
Growth Award at its May 18 annual meeting.

The award recognizes Buena Vista Custom Homes as the third-fastest growing company
in the mid-size business category (businesses having 26 to 100 employees) for
outstanding growth in jobs and revenues.

The award is sponsored by Oregon Business Magazine.

For more information, visit www.portlandalliance.com.

Also, Buena Vista recently broke ground on Hearthside Cottages, a 14-lot project in
Beaverton open to home buyers ages 55 and older.

Homes will range in size from 1,656 to 1,927 square feet and in price from $269,950 to
$289,950.

Hearthside floor plans include 9-foot main-floor ceilings, vaulted master bedrooms,
marble countertops in the master baths, fireplaces in the master bedrooms and great
rooms, and maple entryways. The kitchens will feature granite countertops, cooktop
islands, stainless-steel appliances and maple or cherry cabinets. In addition, all homes
will have a central vacuum system.

For more information, contact listing agent Mike Wiltshire with Prudential Northwest
Properties at 503-306-9002.

Local builders adopt Energy Trust criteria

According to the Energy Trust of Oregon, Portland-area builders lead the state in the
construction of high-efficiency homes, and two have made a commitment to meet Energy
Star requirements in every home they build.

D.R. Horton and Vernon Rifer Real Estate Development Inc., both with operations in
Portland, agreed to build all of their Oregon homes to Northwest Energy Star standards as
of May 2005.

For 2005, D.R. Horton plans to build approximately 200 homes to these requirements
throughout the Portland metro area, with an additional 750 homes meeting the same
requirements in 2006.

The names of other Oregon builders offering Energy Star qualified homes can be found at
www.energytrust.org/residential/enh/choose.html.
For more information, call 866-368-7878, or visit www.energytrust.org on the Web.

Cambridge condos opens sales showroom

The Cambridge Condominiums opened its Northwest sales office and showroom June 11
in Northwest Portland.

Though construction didn't start until June 15 and the sales office just opened, 48 of the
73 units in the luxury project were already reserved, said MJ Steen of
Windermere/Cronin & Caplan Realty Group.

Cambridge Condominiums, by developer Marty Kehoe, will include a collection of five
low-rise buildings with nine penthouses, 10 townhouses and 54 condos. Architect Barry
Smith designed the street-level buildings to blend in with vintage neighbor buildings by
facing them with brick, while hillside units with mountain and city views will have a
modern, glass-and-metal exterior.

"It breaks the mold of the typical condo building," said Steen.

It also shatters the ceiling on per-square-foot condo pricing for the Portland area, with
units costing from $565 to $1,000 per square foot. The one- and two-bedroom units range
from 865 to 3,000 square feet and are priced between $280,000 and $3 million.


The sales office and showroom at 909 N.W. 19th Ave., Suite A, will be open daily 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. and includes a finished kitchen and bathroom.

For more information, call the sales office at 503-222-3343 or visit
www.thecambridgecondos.com.

Second phase opens at Thornton Springs

Pacific Lifestyle Homes announced the opening of sales in phase two of Thornton
Springs, a project near Northeast St. Johns Road and 44th Street in Vancouver.

The community features greenspaces, jogging and walking trails, as well as a playground.
Homes range from 1,680 to 2,106 square feet, with prices from $229,500 to $305,000.

The model home for the second phase -- a 2,106-square-foot design -- is open from noon
to 7 p.m. daily.

For more information, call 360-518-5894.

Arbor Station releases final lots in phase two
Sales are under way on the final 18 lots in phase two of Arbor Station at Southwest 170th
Avenue near Merlo Road in Beaverton.

In addition to the existing models at the site, Arbor Custom Homes has introduced a
garage-in-back town home at 1,485-square feet, with two or three bedrooms and 2.5
baths.

Home sizes in the latest release range from 1,460 to 1,474 square feet, with prices
expected to range from $190,000 to $210,000.

For more information, call Tara Jacobi at 503-591-7175, or visit www.arborhomes.com.

Site work under way at Hansen Estates II

Ostercraft Inc. has begun site work on Hansen Estates II, six single-family homes
adjacent to the Hansen Estates subdivision in Northeast Portland.

The development is near Glendoveer Golf Course and is within walking district of a
MAX light-rail station. Prices in Hansen Estates II will start at $219,950.

Construction is set to begin in July on homes in Ostercraft's 24-lot subdivision Hunter
Pollock on Southwest 174th Avenue and Shaw Street in Aloha. The 1,465-square-foot
rowhouses will start at $179,950. For more information, call 503-772-0022.

FHA raises mortgage limits by large margin

The Federal Housing Authority (FHA) raised its mortgage loan limits significantly on
June 1 in the Portland metro area, making it possible for more buyers to use the low-
down-payment loans.

The new loan limit is $243,200. With the program's 3-percent down payment, a purchase
price of $250,700 can now be considered for FHA financing in Clackamas, Multnomah,
Washington, Yamhill and Columbia counties, as well as Clark and Skamania counties in
Washington.

One year ago, the area's FHA mortgage limit was $194,750. The new limit is the latest in
a series of increases, reflecting the climb in sales prices in the metro area.

In April, the average sales price in the Portland area was $268,900 and in Vancouver it
was $250,000, according to data from the Regional Multiple Listing Service.

For more information, visit www.hud.gov/oregon.

Brasada Ranch sites available for selection
Developers Jeld-Wen Inc. and Eagle Crest Resort are taking reservations to tour home
sites at Brasada Ranch, a new resort community in Powell Butte, 16 miles northeast of
Bend.

Phase one has 201 home sites, and some lots border Brasada Canyons Golf Course, a
private, 18-hole championship course designed by pro golfer Peter Jacobsen and Jim
Hardy, partners in Houston-based Jacobsen Hardy Golf Course Design.

The course is set to open in 2006.

The 1,800-acre community also includes tennis courts; swimming pools; numerous
hiking, biking and running trails; and The Brasada Ranch Equestrian Stables.

When completed, Brasada Ranch will have 900 single-family and cabin-style homes.
Initial home sites range in size from just under a half-acre to 1.3 acres and in price from
about $200,000 to $450,000.

For more information, visit www.brasada.com.

Kitchen, bath trends close seminar series

Neil Kelly Co.'s spring series of free remodeling seminars wraps up today, June 18, with
a review of the latest kitchen and bath trends at the Neil Kelly Westside showroom in
Lake Oswego.

Designer Barbara Murphy will present a 9:30 session on bath projects and an 11 a.m.
session on kitchen trends.

Murphy is certified in universal design, which emphasizes accessibility in planning and
remodeling.

A demonstration featuring Dacor appliances will be held at 12:30 p.m. in the Neil Kelly
kitchen. At 1 p.m., designer Chelly Wentworth will talk about the latest styles of floor
coverings and countertops.

All sessions are scheduled to last an hour and include time for questions and discussion.

The Neil Kelly Westside showroom, at 15573 S.W. Bangy Road, Lake Oswego, will be
open until 3 p.m.

Kendra Hogue and Kara Cogswell contributed to this report.

**************


PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD EVERYTHING IS BEAUTIFUL
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,June 10, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 08
Friday, June 10, 2005

PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD EVERYTHING IS BEAUTIFUL

Everything is beautiful

"I have the Internet, but I don't have power," kids the Reverend Tony Hughes, setting the
tone for the evening at Miss White Trash 2005. "They cut it off."

Swooping in to defend an oft-misunderstood, underappreciated and sometimes jailed
sector of the community, Hughes steps to the plate as a hero of sorts.

"I felt that these wonderful women were not being represented," said Hughes. "These
girls are the most fun women to hang out with. Everybody thinks being white trash means
you're poor and stupid. We all need to look at Paris Hilton to understand that you don't
have to be poor or stupid to be white trash. These girls aren't hung up about anything,
they know what they like and know how to get it, God bless 'em all."

Hughes, an ordained minister, is lead singer for Jesus Presley, and organizer for last
weekend's pageant.

Judges for the event have stiff criteria that the winner must measure up to. Bill McNally,
vice president of Burnside Distribution Corp., and one of the judges for the past five
years, looks for "originality. How gaudy the outfits are. How limited the vocabulary is.
General trashiness. The ability to chain-smoke and shotgun a PBR at the same time."

As candidates stumble into Conan's Pub for the contest, a few things become clear: 1)
Daisy Duke cut-off shorts are socially acceptable tonight; B) camouflage pants and wife-
beaters mesh well with tiaras; and Fourthly) Some of the people here don't know that the
event is going on and that they may well be nominated as contestants.

McNally recalls finding a contestant two years ago in the audience who didn't know she
was a contestant, "She didn't plan on competing. From the moment I saw the words
'White' on one thigh and 'Trash' on the other, I knew she'd win. She, of course, did."

The room is peppered with low-rise pants and high-rise thong panties; crimped, big, hair-
sprayed hair; and at least one horseshoe tattoo.
"These beauty pageants are not trying to hide behind if the girls have talents, gifts, or
what they would do to change the world," said Hughes. "They are about how it's OK to
be themselves."

Grand prize for Miss White Trash 2005 was $20 cash and a 1968 Ford F-100 truck, with
a complimentary canopy. "I'd buy gas," said contestant Sarah Cook. "And I'd trick out the
truck with spinners on the wheels and a BMW emblem for the hood. Oh, and a bumper
sticker that says 'My Other Car Is Greyhound.' "

Tucked into one corner of the pub is Meleni Shimkevich, armed with a Flowbee (The
Precision Home Haircutting System), and she's ready to use it. "I got directions in the
box," she jokes as she offers free haircuts.

The night wraps up with the selection of Miss Amberleigh Eldridge, sporting a black
tank-top, a Big Daddy's BBQ cap and what looks like a hickey on her neck, as Miss
White Trash 2005.

For more information, visit www.misswhitetrash.com or www.jesuspresley.com.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

************


DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR THROUGH JULY 12, SESSION OF TAI
CHI

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 27, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: DOWNTOWN MONTHLY PORTLAND INCLUDING
THE PEARL & NOB HILL DISTRICTS, Page DM4
Friday, May 27, 2005

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR THROUGH JULY 12, SESSION OF TAI
CHI

Through July 12, Session of Tai Chi

Instructor Robert Lau conducts a series of eight tai chi classes at the Portland Classical
Chinese Garden. Classes will combine the Yang style of tai chi and the principles of
Qigong; Tuesday mornings from 8 to 9 a.m. (warm up begins at 7:45 a.m.);
$170/nonmembers, $150/members; registration required, call 503-228-8131, ext. 2001.

Through Aug. 3,
Paolo Design Opening

Madoka Ito and Paolo Design will be on display at The Lifeline Story Project (Series I &
II), at Paolo Design Group, 1031 N.W. 11th Ave.

Madoka Ito's series of seven pen-and-ink tablets explores the evolution of art through
audience participation. Ito asks viewers to select and remove key pieces of the series,
which Ito will later replace with a new scene, changing the meaning of the story that is
unfolding.

Also on display will be several new furniture pieces from Paolo Design Group. New
designs include mobile and dynamic danza tables, which can be arranged to serve as
banquet tables, buffet tables, office desks, casual dining tables, homework stations, or
end tables.

Open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 503-222-1757, Ext., 15.

Through Aug. 29 and

Sept. 6, Ballgames

From now until Sept. 6, the Portland Beavers baseball team is playing home games at
PGE Park.

Also, from now until Aug. 29, the Portland Timbers soccer team is playing home games
at PGE Park.

For ticket prices, dates and directions, visit www.pgepark.com.

Through Dec. 24,

Saturday Market

The Portland Saturday Market has opened for its 32nd year as a venue for more than 350
local craftspeople featuring items that they've made, baked or grown themselves. These
include clothes, pottery and many more items from nearly every craft discipline.

There are also 26 food booths in the International Food Court and live musicians. Open
every Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., under the west end of
the Burnside Bridge on Southwest First Avenue. Admission is free;
www.saturdaymarket.org.

June 2 to 19, Rose

Festival, Downtown Events
June 3: The Rose Festival's fireworks spectacular begins at 9:45 p.m. at Governor Tom
McCall Waterfront Park.

June 4: Lincoln High School will host the start and finish line of the Starlight Run,
beginning at 6:30 p.m.; $9 for runners, free to observers. Also, the Starlight Parade will
begin at 8:30 p.m. at Northwest Broadway and West Burnside Street, ending near PGE
Park and Lincoln High School.

June 8 to 12: Fleet Week, with ships from the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, Army Corps of
Engineers and the Royal Canadian Navy sailing in and lining up along the west bank of
the Willamette River from the Japanese American Historical Plaza to Pepsi Waterfront
Village's seawall in Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park.

June 10: Regional marching bands will be on display to compete at the Festival of Bands,
at 7:30 p.m., at PGE Park. Cost is $12 for reservations or $10 for general admission.

June 11: The Jazz Band Classic, an evening of performances by regional high school jazz
bands, will include competitions for first-, second- and third-place trophies. The event is
at 7:30 p.m., at the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall. Admission is $12.

June 11 and 12: Dragon-boat races will take place at the south end of Governor Tom
McCall Waterfront Park and will feature more than 100 local, national or international
teams competing every six to eight minutes. Free to the public.

June 17 to 19: Portland Rose Festival Charitable Foundation will produce the Portland
Arts Festival, an open-air celebration of the arts that is free to the public. Works from
approximately 150 local and national visual artists will be on display. The event will be
from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday in Portland
Parks and Recreation's South Park Blocks.

For more information on Rose Festival events, visit www.rosefestival.org.

June 14 to July 5,

Festival of Flowers

The Festival of Flowers will take place during a two-week celebration to salute the
beginning of summer. The free festival includes flowers, entertainment and interactive
events. For more information, call 503-223-1613.

June 17, Father of the

Year, Zoo Style
The Oregon Zoo will name an animal dad Zoo Father of the Year and award him a
special Father's Day treat at 10 a.m. For more information, visit www.oregonzoo.org.

June 17, An Evening

with David McCullough

Author David McCullough, winner of two National Book Awards for history and
biography, and recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes for "Truman" and "John Adams," will
speak about his new historical work, "1776," to be published this month, at 7:30 p.m., at
First Congregational Church -- 1126 SW Park Ave. Sponsored by The Oregonian;
general admission is $12. For more information, visit www.literary-arts.org.

June 18, Discover

Birds Day at the Zoo

Bird enthusiasts are invited to Portland General Electric's (PGE) Discover Birds summer
shows, featuring bird-flyover demonstrations, activities for kids, prizes, PGE's mascot
Larry the Lightbulb and a drawing for a behind-the-scenes tour of the zoo's birds-of-prey
mews; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 503-226-1561, or visit
www.oregonzoo.org.

June 18 to Sept. 5, Summer Guide Series

Volunteer zoo guides will present animal talks from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and
Sundays, and from 1 p.m. to close on $2 Tuesdays (the second Tuesday of each month).
Guides throughout the zoo will give brief presentations and answer questions about zoo
animals. For more information, visit www.oregonzoo.org.

June 20 to Sept. 2,

Zoo Summer Camp

Four-year-olds to ninth-graders can spend five days at the zoo this summer studying
endangered species, taking tours, playing games, making crafts and more; 9 a.m. to 4
p.m., Monday through Friday, throughout the summer. For more information, call 503-
220-2781, or visit www.oregonzoo.org.

June 29,

Nob Hill Specials

The Nob Hill Business Association presents What's on Wednesday (WoW) on the last
Wednesday of each month. The event features more than 50 retail stores and restaurants
that participate by offering store discounts and dinner specials. For more information,
visit www.nobhillbiz.com.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is May 1.

*****************


NOTEBOOK: ANNUAL PARADE OF HOMES TAKING SHAPE AT RIVER VIEW
TERRACE IN CLARK COUNTY
By Joshua Sommer
Staff researcher, The Oregonian\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Saturday,May 21, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Saturday, May 21, 2005

NOTEBOOK: ANNUAL PARADE OF HOMES TAKING SHAPE AT RIVER VIEW
TERRACE IN CLARK COUNTY

Construction is under way on the Building Industry Association of Clark County's (BIA)
2005 Parade of Homes, which runs Aug. 19 to Sept. 5 at River View Terrace in
Washougal, Wash.

River View Terrace is off Southeast Crown Road, near the site of the 2004 show.

Builders for the 2005 show include Quail Homes, Clark & Son Homes, Fantasy Homes
by Vladimir, Philip Custom Homes, Fazzolari Custom Homes, Harbour Bay Homes,
Larry Boitano Builders, M.J. Olson Enterprise Co., Lynwood Homes and Monterey
Custom Homes.

The show is the third Parade of Homes in Washougal.

Admission is $12 for adults. For more information, call Avaly Mobbs at 360-694-0933,
or visit www.clarkcountyparadeofhomes.com.

Local housing agencies begin fund-raising effort

Two local affordable-housing agencies -- HOST Development and a land-trust
partnership -- have teamed up with The Wells Fargo Foundation to launch a fundraising
drive to help low- to moderate-income people buy homes of their own.
The Wells Fargo Foundation will donate up to $100,000 ($50,000 to each agency) if the
groups can raise matching funds from other businesses, foundations and individual
donors within six months.

HOST Development (Home Ownership a Street at a Time) plans to use money raised to
support its effort to build 200 affordable, energy-efficient homes and sell them to buyers
who take a homeowner class, keep the house in good condition and donate 50 hours
annually to the community.

The joint partnership of Portland Community Land Trust and Clackamas Community
Land Trust will use the money to acquire and remodel 60 affordable homes in Portland
and Clackamas County, as well as provide home buyers with down-payment assistance.
The trusts purchase land, then lease it to home buyers, bringing house prices within reach
for working families.

To find out more or to make a donation, contact one of the following agencies:

* HOST Development, 503-331-1752; www.hostdevelopment.com

* Portland Community Land Trust, 503-493-0293; www.pclt.org

* Clackamas Community Land Trust, 503-654-1007; www.clackamasclt.org.

Foundations awards $5,000 in schloarships

The Home Builders Foundation of Metropolitan Portland (HBF) has awarded $5,000 in
scholarships to Portland metro-area high-school students.

HBF is the charitable foundation for the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan
Portland.

The winners were announced at the foundation's annual dinner and auction, held April
23. They are Paige Cameron, McMinnville High School, $2,000 grand prize; Whitney
Cole, Sandy High School, $1,000 first place; and Ian Rose of Aloha High School, Lauren
Svenson of Amity High School and Rodolfo Cardiel of Roosevelt High School, $500
finalists.

U.S. Savings Bonds worth $100 were awarded to Arleen Espinoza, Aloha; Stacy Long,
Roosevelt; Vanity Saechao, Roosevelt; and Amy Marie Van Dyke, McMinnville.

Sixty-nine students from more than 20 area high schools competed for the honors. The
students earned points using a home-building CD-ROM game, volunteered 16 hours with
a housing service organization and wrote essays on the benefits of home-building to the
community and economy.

Building under way at Buena Vista project
Buena Vista Custom Homes broke ground in April on 20 homes in phase one at Jackson
Hills, a new subdivision in Happy Valley.

Other contractors building homes at the site are Craft Construction, Exceptional Homes
by Andre, Michael Ball Construction and A and V Construction.

Jackson Hills has 210 sites on Southeast 145th Avenue in Happy Valley, with homes
ranging from 3,684 to 4,684 square feet and prices ranging from $439,000 to $534,900.

A grand opening for the project is expected in early summer.

For more information, call Larry Strutz or Stuart Gunderson at 503-698-6600.

* Also, Roger Pollock, owner of Buena Vista Custom Homes, was named 2005 Business
Donor of the Year by Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA).

CASA is a nonprofit group that provides trained volunteer advocates for abused and
neglected children in need of safe and permanent housing. The honor recognizes
outstanding support from a local business for CASA programs and goals.

Event weighs benefits of building with clay

On May 25, the Portland Office of Sustainable Development and City Repair is
sponsoring a dialogue on sustainable building called "Is Clay Our Future?"

The event runs from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center, 721 N.W.
Ninth Ave., and speakers include Kiko Denzer, Joe Kennedy, Lydia Doleman, Sukita
Crimmel and Rob Bolman.

Admission is free. There is free bike parking, and the center is near the Portland Streetcar
stop at Northwest Johnson Street.

For more information, call 503-823-7202 or visit www.sustainableportland.org.

Final phase of homes released at Rex Hill

Stearns Marnella Communities has released the final phase of its Rex Hill condominium
project in the Jennings Lodge area.

Rex Hill detached units have elements of vintage-style single-family homes but offer
easy-care condo-style ownership. The final 11 units in the 52-home community range
from 1,500 to 1,800 square feet, and prices run from $199,950 to $264,950.

The homes have traditional-style architecture and include shingles, board-and-batten and
lap siding.
For more information, visit www.stearnsmarnella.com or call Liz Holland or Suzie
Tridente at 503-654-1769.

JLS Custom Homes finishes model home

A furnished model is open at the 43-home community of Cedar Terrace in Cornelius
from JLS Custom Homes.

The project features home designs from 1,565 to 1,833 square feet, with prices ranging
from $169,950 to $182,950.

For more information, call Mike Luyten at 503-351-2611.

* Also, JLS Custom Homes broke ground this month on Brookfield, a 41-home site in
Salem.

The Brookfield community will feature homes ranging from 1,596 to 2,265 square feet,
priced from $169,000 to $200,000.

For more information, call Brandon Drake at 503-871-7151.

Model home finished at Conzelmann Farm

Construction is complete on a European-style model home at Conzelmann Farm in
Sherwood, signaling the site's grand opening.

When finished, Conzelmann Farm will have 57 homes built by JLS Custom Homes. The
houses range from 2,444 to 3,123 square feet and are priced from $347,950 to $447,950.

The site is at Oregon 99W and Southwest Roy Rogers Road. The model is open Monday,
Tuesday and Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information, call Faith O'Billovich at 503-317-8640.

Grand opening at EdgeWater

Three model homes are open for viewing at EdgeWater, Legend Homes' new community
in Tualatin.

EdgeWater features three- and four-bedroom homes with porch entries and attached two-
car garages. Homes will range from 1,855 to 2,633 square feet and prices range from
$319,900 to $389,900.

The development includes a 17-acre park.
For information, call Jenny Lee or Sandy Vosburgh at 503-684-0428, or visit
www.legendhomes.com.

Arbor Terrace selling quickly

Arbor Custom Homes' Arbor Terrace in Sherwood sold out of its first batch of homes -- a
total of 26 -- in about two hours in April.

When completed, Arbor Terrace will have 160 homes. The development is on Oregon
99W in Sherwood.

The project is being released in batches of 15 to 20 lots, with homes ranging from 1,460
to 1,908 square feet and priced from about $198,900 to $289,900.

A second batch of homes were released for sale on May 8; 19 are still available.

For more information, call Lesley Jeffries at 503-925-9615, or visit
www.arborhomes.com.

* Also, Arbor Custom Homes announced the opening of sales in two new neighborhoods
approximately two miles from each other on Southwest Bull Mountain Road in Tigard.

Arbor Summit is a 42-home project near the summit of Bull Mountain Road. Arbor
Pointe is near the intersection of Southwest Bull Mountain Road and Roy Rogers Road.

Both projects will feature homes ranging from 1,602 to 3,500 square feet, with prices
running from $280,000 to $600,000.

For more information on Arbor Pointe or Arbor Summit, call Krista Cordill at 503-267-
0830.

***************


DINING CHEAP EATS CASA COLIMA
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 20, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 21
Friday, May 20, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS CASA COLIMA

feeding frenzies with pocket change
By JOSHUA SOMMER

Casa Colima

Goodbye, so-so Mexican food -- welcome, muy excelente Mexican restaurant. The exit
of Mucho Grande in Hillsdale made room for the house of the old kingdom, or Casa
Colima, with a hip village feel and food that pulls no punches in assaulting your taste
buds -- in a good way.

The chow: I was introduced to a chile verde burrito, chunks of pork in a green sauce, as a
kid in Santa Cruz, Calif. It was at a small restaurant named El Paisano Tamales, near the
town's famous Boardwalk amusement center. My dad managed to bribe the recipe from
the owner; it's been a staple in my diet ever since. I've only rarely found its equal in
Portland restaurants. Casa Colima's chile verde burrito ($6.95 at lunch, $9.95 at dinner)
rivals my own concoction.

Real deals: Black bean soup with Ranchero Mexican cheese ($2.50 per cup, $4.95 per
bowl); sopes gordos, which is three corn taco shells with beans, choice of meat and
vegetables ($9.50); and a variety of quesadillas ($6.95 to $7.95).

Hangout factor: Plenty of natural lighting and living greenery throughout make for a
pleasant space in which to dine.

Liquids: Try one of its "largest margaritas in town" and thank me tomorrow -- if you can
even remember drinking the thing (lime, strawberry, peach, mango, kiwi, guava and
raspberry flavors; price varies).

What's half-baked? Some of the cheesy Mucho Grande decorations have not yet been
removed.

Inside tips: Food and beverage happy hour from 3 to 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. to close daily and
all day Sunday. Lunch menu features much of the dinner menu and includes burritos
from $6.95 to $7.95.

The numbers: 6319 S.W. Capitol Highway; 503-892-9944.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
**************


PLUGGED IN OBSERVED THREE'S COMPANY
Joshua Sommer, Special to The Or

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 20, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 07
Friday, May 20, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED THREE'S COMPANY

Three's company

As the dance floor fills with sharp-dressed men, women, boys and girls, the three-piece
band strikes up a tune -- feet shuffle and soon hips are swaying and women are being
tossed in the air.

The dance floor is one heaving, flowing group of dancers. You think for a moment that,
between the dancing and the band, the night is complete, then the Swizzle Chicks take to
their mikes and you know the real reason why you're there.

Ask the Swizzle Chicks what they all have in common and they respond, in three-part
harmony, "Vegas!"

Between them, two have performed in Las Vegas and one grew up there. But to the
discerning ear, there's something else the trio has in common -- they all have fabulous
voices and a knack for writing catchy songs with tight harmonies.

The girls, backed by the Piping Hot Toddies, recently brought their combination of 1930s
to '50s jazz, lounge and swing songs to the Paradise Ballroom off Southeast Belmont
Street. The crowd ate it up.

The Swizzle Chicks are mezzo Beth Kahlen, soprano Carrie Rambo and soubrette
Stephanie Torres. The Piping Hot Toddies are drummer Kurt Deutscher, bassist Jon
Hughes and Craig Bidondo on keyboards.

"We've played together in one form or another for eight or nine years," said Kahlen.

"And we're still at it because we really like each other," Torres chimes in.

An interesting side note: Despite the booze-laced innuendo of the titles "Swizzle Chicks"
and "Piping Hot Toddies," the Paradise Ballroom is a dry venue -- it allows and sells pop,
juice and water, but not alcohol.

Each of the girls contributes to the songwriting process, producing originals ranging in
topic from dancing, marriage, travel, love, aliens, voodoo, kitties, alcohol and, somehow,
even cheese.

The Swizzle Chicks manage to pack something for everyone into their songs. They even
throw some contemporary pop into the mix. To hear this for yourself, give their CD,
Shakin', Not Stirred, a listen online at www.cdbaby.com/cd/swizzle.
"One of our strongest points is that we all write songs and have a tight harmony," said
Rambo.

The trio plays on the Columbia Queen every Sunday evening. They board the ship in
Astoria at 4:30 p.m., cruise up the Columbia river, and sing after the second dinner
seating, around 9:15 p.m.

Listening to their set makes it clear that they have a wide range of talent and influences
and the band sports a loyal fan base.

"We can't mention our biggest fan because of the restraining order," quips Kahlen.

For more information, visit www.swizzlechicks.com.

-- Joshua Sommer,

Special to The Oregonian

*************


PLUGGED IN OBSERVED TAKING A SWIRL WITH INDIE WINES
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 13, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 05
Friday, May 13, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED TAKING A SWIRL WITH INDIE WINES

Taking a swirl with indie wines

Accompanied by a guy playing soft acoustic guitar, excited chatter and the clinking of
glasses and bottles, folks who attended the first annual Portland Indie Wine Festival last
weekend wore broad smiles and -- as the gig was billed -- swirled, sniffed, sipped and
savored their way through the two evenings.

To spit or to swallow? That is the question at these things. There were equal amounts of
both as visitors and winemakers spoke in excited murmurs, dissecting each wine, jotting
down notes, exchanging contact information and generally being wooed by reds and
whites.

In a move of perhaps perfect coordination, 20 winemakers were featured each day and
were split into groups of 10, with one group filling Urban Wineworks and the other
forming a rough circle in Chown Hardware's large warehouse. The atmosphere of the two
large, airy rooms made a comfortable tasting environment, despite the large crowd of
tasters.

Attendees were treated to appetizers from Andina and Nostrana (opening in July on
Southeast Morrison), a viewing of the documentary "Mondovino" and, of course, tastes
of around 80 wines from 40 independent wineries (wineries that produced less than 1,000
cases a year) .

"We're delighted with the success of the show," said Lisa Donoughe, who organized it.
"There was a need for this. I was helping Jason Lett (Bishop Creek Cellars/BlackCap) to
market his first wine in 2002 and I wanted to get him invited to the International Pinot
Noir Celebration, and he said that winemakers had to produce at least 500 cases or more
to be invited. So, we needed to create a stage for these winemakers. There was a hole in
the industry, and we're filling it with the help of an amazing group of volunteers."

The festival's screening of "Mondovino" by filmmaker Jonathan Nossiter at the Mission
Theater was Portland's first for the film, which contrasts artisan wine growers, or
garagistes (think of a garage-band persona for winemakers), with international wineries.
More on the film, which opens Friday at Cinema 21, can be found at
www.mondovinofilm.com.

People interested in Portland's independent wine industry can check out news and events
at www.indiewinefestival.com. The site includes an eight-minute video of some of the
festival's winemakers.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

*************


SOUND CHECK ENERGY FOOD FOR YOUR EARS -- A TASTY BLEND
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 13, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 15
Friday, May 13, 2005

SOUND CHECK ENERGY FOOD FOR YOUR EARS -- A TASTY BLEND

sound check
notes from the Northwest music scene By JOSHUA SOMMER

ENERGY FOOD FOR YOUR EARS -- A tasty blend of clean guitar, wicked drums and
impressive orchestration comes together in Pharrah Phosphate, a band of local boys with
a big sound and a promising future.

Not to mention a deliciously ironic moniker.

"We got the name from the back of a PowerBar," says Nathan Kincaid, on keys and
vocals. "We were on the way to record a demo, realized we had no name, and decided
that the name would come from the bar, no matter what.

"I named off ingredients and ferrous phosphate came up, then Cory McNulty, our ex-bass
player, suggested Farrah Phosphate. We switched a couple letters to avoid a lawsuit and -
- bam!"

Asked about feather-haired 1970s supermodels, the band members explain that they are
not at all interested in models, old or new. "The name is only a tongue-in-cheek
association with that," Josh Curll clues in.

Formed in 2003, the group brings together influences from Britpop, classic rock, Goth,
electro and mod. Nathan Kincaid's twin brother, Jordan, plays bass and sings backing
vocals, while Curll is on guitar and contributes to vocals, too. So naturally one of the
band's strongest suits is an ability to layer harmonies, a sound that resonates to the
listener's core. After the group opened for the Psychedelic Furs last winter, Furs bassist
Tim Butler said the up-and-coming group caught his attention.

"We listen to a lot of Manic Street Preachers, Doves and the Shore," Nathan says, adding
The Beatles, Pink Floyd, U2 and the Smiths to the list of influences.

Pharrah Phosphate recently replaced their drummer with Terry Drysdale, fresh from
Boston's Berklee College of Music, where he majored in jazz percussion.

Being fraternal twins adds a special musical connection to the mix. "We're pretty close,"
Jordan says. "After all, I basically had him in my face for nine months."

But they all play their individual roles as well.

"Nate's our John Lennon," Curll says. "Along with Jordan, they're the glue that keeps us
together."

"Jordan's sort of the free-spirit dreamer," Nathan says. "The one who is most likely to be
late to rehearsals. But he's also the intuitive feeler in the group."

"And he's the hot one," adds Curll.
Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.

***************


PLUGGED IN OBSERVED 'OUTSIDER' ART COMES IN
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 13, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 06
Friday, May 13, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED 'OUTSIDER' ART COMES IN

'Outsider' art comes in

Like many underrated, talented artists, Matt Barter wears the familiar grin of someone
shrouded in a misplaced anonymity. You'll recognize the smile on rock stars, actors and
visual artists in photos snapped before they hit the big time -- before their names became
household fare in the homes of appreciative, adoring fans.

Barter (an outside, raw or art brut artist, originally a misplaced definition of the self-
taught and patients in psychiatric wards) has his work hanging on the walls and resting
atop pedestals (made by Barter) at The Storefront (1339 N.W. 19th Ave; 503-546-8863).
The show runs 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays, until May 26.

"Outside artists haven't gone to school and have sort of gone on their own," Barter said.
"It's hard to be an outside artist and not be a folk artist. We try to make something
serious, more specific to an idea."

Opening night of the exhibit fills the old building with people eager to view art from a
new name. After all, there's something about discovery, to be among the first to find a
new artist of one discipline or another.

The Storefront is a two-story (four if you count a basement and attic) building that was
originally a mom-and-pop market at street level, with the owner's living space on the
second floor. It was built in 1884, fell into decades of disrepair and has recently been
rescued by the latest proprietor of the place, a woman named Pandora, who operates an
eclectic clothing, antique and secondhand store with a fine collection from local artists.
The second floor's empty bedrooms with peeling paint and crumbling plaster are an
excellent backdrop for Barter's work.

Barter, a transplant from Sullivan, Maine, a mere four hours from that other Portland, has
a style that draws from Nordic, Native American and other primitive rough and lovely
artistic influences. His work carries a lot of traditional symbolism and can at times be
abstract, without being nauseatingly obscure. One of the first things you notice is the
iconoclastic nature of some of the pieces. Samples of his work include pieces titled
"Papageno," wood and copper; "Blind Leading the Blind," wood and copper; and "The
Last Days," oil on wood.

Most of the pieces are made with recycled ingredients from the ReBuilding Center.

Even the frugal art lover can find something that won't put a terrible dent in the
pocketbook in the form of Barter's handmade and painted-enamel-on-metal belt buckles
for around $60. Designs include a row of teeth titled "Gingivitis" and a fish titled,
appropriately, "Cod Piece."

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

JOEL DAVIS/ MATT BARTER Sets up his sculpture "Wooden Suit"

**************


DINING CHEAP EATS MARCO POLO GARDEN
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 6, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 24
Friday, May 6, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS MARCO POLO GARDEN

feeding frenzies with pocket change

Marco Polo Garden

As if borrowing from its namesake, Venetian explorer Marco Polo -- who traveled
throughout China -- the once well-known Marco Polo Garden restaurant (at Northwest
Fifth Avenue and West Burnside Street until July 2004) has brought its signature Chinese
dishes from various regions of China to a new location on Southwest Canyon Road.

The chow: Tweaking its menu since 1981, the place sports more than 100 items on its
menu. Dishes include cashew nut chicken ($7.95 to $9.95), which is chicken sauteed with
cashews, onions, green peppers and water chestnuts, and beef with oyster sauce ($7.95 to
$9.95), a self-explanatory mix of tender beef, snow peas bamboo shoots, mushrooms and,
you guessed it, oyster sauce.

Real deals: The dishes that regulars of the old place were addicted to have made it onto
the new menu and traveled the distance from downtown to Canyon Road tasting and
appearing none the worse for wear. Prices run from inexpensive ($2.95 for 10 fried won
tons) to moderate ($9.95 to $16.95 for chef's specials).

Hangout factor: No worries about having to elbow past some of the seedier characters
loitering outside the front of Marco Polo's old joint. This place is large and airy, with lots
of warm wood features, a fireplace and decent views of a water feature and courtyard.

Liquids: Both domestic and Chinese beers, as well as soda and tea, with prices varying.

What's half-baked? While they are still working the kinks out of the transition to the new
spot, the menu has gone through some revising -- both in offerings and pricing.

Inside tips: Most of the signature dishes show up on the lunch menu. Prices for these
large, tasty portions run $6.95 to $9.95.

The numbers: 9900 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-222-1090.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
****************


GEO-CRASHING IN WEST HILLS
Joshua Sommer, Special to The Or

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,April 29, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 10
Friday, April 29, 2005

GEO-CRASHING IN WEST HILLS

Armed only with a flashlight and a GPS device that we are just beginning to figure out,
Seth Short and I set out to find something called the Double Cross cache, somewhere in
the West Hills.

It's nearly 5:30 p.m. on Day One when we realize that A) it's totally going to be too dark
to find the cache once we figure out its approximate location and B) the coordinates that
we've printed off www.geocaching.com are much more difficult to follow than we'd
originally thought. (For more geocaching history and alternate GPS-based games, see
www.gpsgames.org.)
The light wanes as the sun goes down, and we park in some gravel off the road. Neither
of us can figure out how to get the light on the GPS thingy to work, and we agree that we
need its manual. Day One ends with the agreement that we will find the GPS maker's
Web site, print the manual and start earlier the next time we meet. We figure that we're
close to a trailhead that we can't see in the dark.

A history of geocaching (according to GPSgames): The Global Positioning System,
created by the Department of Defense, is a satellite navigation system designed for the
military. In early 2000, President Clinton made the military's scrambling of the GPS go
away, which meant that anyone using a GPS device could find accurate coordinates
within 10 meters. A couple days later the first hidden cache (a bucket full of flotsam and
jetsam) was placed in the woods just outside of the Rose City with coordinates posted to
a USENET newsgroup. The bucket was discovered within a day of the posting, and a
sport was born.

This brings us to Day Two of my maiden voyage with the sport.

After downloading and printing the PDF manual for Short's GPS device, I spend the
better part of a day figuring out how to turn on the thing's light, place "flags" (or way
points) on a tiny map on the display and various other things that I'm sure will impress.

I call Short and we agree on a day and time to meet. We also agree to bring along two
extra explorers in the form of Chris Hoff and my wife, Natoscia (aka Tosh).

Not only has Short figured out, without the manual, how to turn the GPS thing's light on
and all of my other surprises, but by now he knows how to have it plant markers, order
pizza, and travel through time back to 1983.

It only takes the group a few minutes to realize that the place where Short and I left off
was quite a bit off the mark, so we spend some time in the car trying to close the gap
between where the streets end and the trail begins.

Hoff, holding the GPS device, says, "The numbers are getting closer" as we near a dead-
end with a clearly marked trailhead.

Sure enough, as we pound down the trail the numbers improve and we know we're
getting close.

The deal with the cache is that if you take something, you leave something, so we're well-
equipped. Tosh points out what is clearly the last clue to the Double Cross cache and
says, "Is that what we're looking for?" A few minutes later, after some deliberating about
the coordinates and our position, Tosh whispers something to me while pointing. We wait
until the others catch on and we discover the cache as a group.

We are equally thrilled with the hunt, our new trinkets and the "treasure" we've left
behind for others to find.
***********************


DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR GREAT SHOPPING, GREAT DINING,
GREAT PERFORMANCES

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,April 22, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: DOWNTOWN MONTHLY PORTLAND INCLUDING
THE PEARL & NOB HILL DISTRICTS, Page DM04
Friday, April 22, 2005

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR GREAT SHOPPING, GREAT DINING,
GREAT PERFORMANCES

Through April 30, Antique Japanese textiles

Shogun's Gallery will be exhibiting a collection of antique Japanese textiles including
tsutsugaki paste relief indigo fabrics from the Edo and Meiji Periods circa 1750-1890;
Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; 1111 N.W. 23rd Ave.;
503-224-0328; www.shogunsgallery.com.

Through May 1,

Kite Exhibit

The Portland Classical Chinese Garden will host a kite exhibit from April 1 to May 1 and
a Qing Ming (kite festival) April 2 and 3. Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; Northwest Third
Avenue and Everett Street; general admission, $7; www.portlandchinesegarden.org.

Through May 26,

Timothy C. Ely exhibit

Antarktos: Magnitudes of Black is an exhibition that combines manuscripts, sketchbooks
and edition books (1975-2005) by Timothy C. Ely over the last 30 years.

Ely has created books since 1957 that are visually stimulating and mystically
embellished. His work has elements of astronomy, alchemy, mystery, mathematics,
physics, cartographic imagery and invented languages. His books are made by hand using
traditional and unconventional binding techniques; for open hours, contact Multnomah
County Central Library, 801 S.W. 10th Ave.; 503-988-5123; www.multcolib.org.

Through July 12,
Session of Tai Chi

Instructor Robert Lau conducts a series of eight tai chi classes at the Portland Classical
Chinese Garden. Classes will combine the Yang style of Tai Chi and the principles of Qi-
gong; Tuesday mornings, beginning May 17, from 8 to 9 a.m. (warm up begins at 7:45
a.m.); $170/non-members, $150/members; registration required, call 503-228-8131, ext.
2001.

Through Aug. 29 and

Sept. 6, Ballgames

From April 8 to Sept. 6, the Portland Beavers baseball team will play home games at
PGE Park.

Also, from May 1 to Aug. 29, the Portland Timbers soccer team will play home games at
PGE Park.

For ticket prices, dates and directions, visit www.pgepark.com.

Through Dec. 24,

Saturday Market

The Portland Saturday Market has opened for its 32nd year as a venue for over 350 local
craftspeople featuring items that they've made, baked or grown themselves. These include
clothes, pottery and nearly everything from all craft disciplines.

There are also 26 food booths in the International Food Court and live musicians. Open
every Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., under the west end of
the Burnside Bridge on Southwest 1st Avenue. Admission is free;
www.saturdaymarket.org.

May 5 to May 8,

Cinco de Mayo

The Portland Guadalajara Sister City Association's Cinco de Mayo Fiesta celebrates its
21st anniversary in 2005. This year's theme is "Family, Culture and Community."

The event will feature five stages of entertainment including music, dance and folklore;
the Plaza de Artesanos will have Mexico-based and local artisans demonstrating their
craft and selling their pieces; a variety of food vendors; and a carnival with games and
rides; Gov. Tom McCall Waterfront Park; $6/adults; 503-232-7550;
www.cincodemayo.org.
May 7, Oregon Safe

Kids Day at the Zoo

The Oregon Safe Kids Coalition will kick off National Safe Kids Week from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Oregon Zoo. The event will feature exhibits, prizes, safety tips and hands-on
activities for children and parents; free with zoo admission; for information, call 503-
731-4241.

May 7 and 8, Portland

Indie Wine Festival

The Portland Indie Wine Festival features 40 Artisan wineries, Oregon's best self-
distributed wines, a movie premier and food; 4 to 6 p.m.; block party near Urban Wine
Works, 407 N.W. 16th Ave.; $40 for one day or $70 for both days; 503-961-2205.

May 8, Mother's Day

Brunch, Oregon Zoo

A Mother's Day brunch will be in the Oregon Zoo's Cascade Crest Banquet Center from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. The event features a setting with animal mothers with children;
$18.95/adults (12 and older) and $8.95/youths (ages 3-11); reservations are
recommended, call 503-525-4299.

May 13 to 22, Pearl

CitySpaces 2005

This urban, walking home tour features the Pearl District's newest residential buildings --
The Louisa, The Pinnacle and The Lexis; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., daily; Monday to Thursday,
$10, Friday to Sunday, $15; 503-288-5614.

May 15, St. Honore

bakery family day

The 2nd annual St. Honore Family Day will let children become bakers for a day and also
help kids in need. The annual celebration honors Saint Honore, France's patron saint of
bakers and is a fundraiser for the local chapter of Court Appointed Special Advocates
(CASA) for Children, a group that advocates for abused and neglected children. All
proceeds raised from the sales of Galette Sucre ($5 for 4 galettes) will support CASA for
Children; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; St. Honore Boulangerie, 2335 NW Thurman St.; 503-445-
4342; www.sainthonorebakery.com.
May 22, Portland Rose

Festival Duathlon

The Portland Rose Festival will hold the Rose Festival/LifeWorks Northwest Duathlon, a
35k run/bike/run event to benefit Portland Rose Festival Charitable Foundation and
LifeWorks Northwest (formally Tualatin Valley Centers) and to kick off the 2005
Portland Rose Festival.

The first leg of the event and the start and finish line for each leg will be downtown; 5:30
to 10:30 a.m.; $50/individuals, $65/teams and a $9 USA Triathlon fee; Gov. Tom McCall
Waterfront Park; www.rosefestival.org/duathlon.html.

May 24, Conservation

series on wildlife

Discussing Primates in the Shadow of Kilimanjaro, Dr. Jeanne Altmann will cover
studies that show the effect of environmental changes on baboons and how to conserve
their unique ecosystem for the future.

The Wildlife Conservation Lecture Series, hosted by Oregon Zoo, Audubon Society of
Portland and World Forestry Center, will be held in Oregon Zoo's Cascade Banquet
Center; $10/general admission for each lecture; for more information, call 503-226-1561,
or visit www.oregonzoo.org.

May 25,

Nob Hill specials

The Nob Hill Business Association presents What's on Wednesday (WoW) on the last
Wednesday of each month. The event features more than 50 retail stores and restaurants
that participate by making store discounts and dinner specials available to visitors. For
more information, visit www.nobhillbiz.com.

May 28 and 29,

Columbia River Market

In conjunction with the groundbreaking exhibition of People of the River: Native Arts of
the Oregon Territory, the Portland Art Museum will host an Indian Market.

The People of the River Indian Art Market, sponsored by the Columbia River Intertribal
Fish Commission, will consist of 32 Native American artists from throughout the
Northwest, including Lillian Pitt, Pat Courtney Gold, Marvin Oliver, Jim Jackson, David
Boxley, Phillip Charette, Lisa Telford and Bob Charlo. The pieces range from carvings,
basketry and beadwork to paintings and photographs; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Portland
Art Museum's Sculpture Courtyard; free; 503-226-2811.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is May 1.

***************

NOTEBOOK: DESIGNER'S SEMINAR TO SHINE LIGHT ON AWARD-WINNING
GREEN PROJECT
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian Kendra Hogue and

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,April 21, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 19
Thursday, April 21, 2005

NOTEBOOK: DESIGNER'S SEMINAR TO SHINE LIGHT ON AWARD-WINNING
GREEN PROJECT

Nathan Good, a Salem-based architect and one of America's leading green building
designers, will make a presentation on Saturday, May 7, as part of a free remodeling
seminar series sponsored by Neil Kelly Co.

Good's presentation will focus on an Oregon coast residence he designed which was
recognized as "Green Project of the Year: Custom" at last month's National Green
Building Conference in Atlanta.

Good will discuss the home's energy-efficiency measures, indoor air quality strategies,
green materials and water-saving techniques. Known as a "net zero energy" home, the
house can generate more energy than it uses.

The seminars, to be held at Neil Kelly's showroom at 15573 S.W. Bangy Road, Suite 100
in Lake Oswego, will run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Other featured speakers include
kitchen and bath designers Randi Reed and Mitch Stanley.

Good's 90-minute presentation is scheduled to start at 1 p.m. For more information, call
Julia Spence, communications manager for Neil Kelly Co., at 503-335-9235, or visit
www.neilkelly.com on the Internet.

Brooks Resources acquires ranch land

Brooks Resources Corp., developers of several Central Oregon real estate projects
including Black Butte Ranch, has acquired a portion of the 700-acre Gopher Gulch
Ranch. The land, north of Bend, includes 1.5 miles of Deschutes River frontage.
Brooks also has an option to purchase the balance of the historic ranch.

Portions of the property were originally purchased from the federal government in 1905
by O.B. Riley. Deschutes County acquired the land in a tax foreclosure in 1939. Ralph
Cake and his family bought the land in the early 1940s. The Charlie Miller family of
Portland and Mitchell owned it from 1964 until 1985 when it was purchased by Ed Elkins
and Dee Elkins.

Kirk Schueler, president of Brooks Resources and Brooks Land and Cattle Co., said the
corporation has not announced plans for the property, but the project may be developed
over 15 to 20 years, fitting the pattern of other Brooks developments such as Awbrey
Butte, Mount Bachelor Village Resort and NorthWest Crossing.

For more information, visit www.brooksresources.com.

Three model homes ready at AmberGlen

Three furnished models are open for viewing in the first phase at AmberGlen, a town-
home project in Hillsboro by RCM Development and Matrix Development.

The initial phase, at Northwest 206th Avenue and Brownstone Way, includes 20
condominiums ranging in size from 897 to 1,548 square feet and priced from $139,900 to
$210,900, as well as six one-, two- and three-bedroom town homes ranging in size from
1,479 to 1,628 square feet and priced from $183,900 to $204,900.

For more information, call 503-533-7089, or visit www.amberglenhomes.com.

Industry association announces awards

Seven members of the Oregon Remodelers Association (ORA) earned regional
Contractor of the Year awards at the April 13 meeting of the National Association of the
Remodeling Industry (NARI), and one regional recipient, Neil Kelly Design/Build
Remodeling, went on to earn an national award.

Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodeling won national and regional awards for a residential
bath in the $30,000 to $60,000 range, as well as a regional award for a residential
historical renovation/restoration.

Other ORA regional award recipients were Speck Enterprises, residential kitchen under
$30,000 and residential addition under $100,000; Square Deal Remodeling, residential
kitchen, $60,001 to $100,000; Master Plan Remodeling Design/Build, residential kitchen
over $100,000 and residential interior specialty; Olsen Homes & Renovation, residential
bath under $30,000; Golden Rule Remodeling & Architecture, residential addition,
$100,000 to $250,000; and Cottage Craft Construction, entire house, $250,000 to
$500,000.
Also, ORA received the 2005 Governmental Affairs Award from NARI in recognition of
its successful pilot program, Field Issuance Remodel, an efficient process for plan
review, permits and final inspection of remodeling projects.

For more information, visit www.oregonremodelers.com.

New Tradition Homes agrees to build green

Clark County-based New Tradition Homes announced it will build approximately 400
homes in 2005 to Earth Advantage standards.

"Our goal is to team up with home builders and help them offer a greater number of
options and superior quality to home buyers," said Jay Coalson, manager of Earth
Advantage, a program from Portland General Electric which advocates sustainable
building methods and products.

Under the agreement, New Tradition Homes will consult with Earth Advantage green-
building experts during all stages of planning and building the homes. Completed homes
will be inspected by Earth Advantage and checked for performance, adherence to
standards and tested for energy efficiency.

For more information, visit www.earthadvantage.com or www.newtraditionhomes.com.

HOST receives grant for its Good Deeds

Wells Fargo Housing Foundation awarded a $10,000 grant to the Portland nonprofit
agency Home Ownership a Street at a Time (HOST) in March.

The funds will support the Good Deeds by HOST program, which organizes
homeownership classes and provides down payment and closing cost assistance to
qualified home buyers throughout Oregon.

"Increasing the number of permanent homeowners helps stabilize families and improves
the communities they live in," said Ted Salter, development director of HOST. "This
grant from Wells Fargo will enable us to market our classes and financial assistance
program throughout Oregon."

For more information on the Good Deeds by HOST program, call 503-331-1752.

Foundation chooses April 23 for benefit

The Home Builders Foundation of Metropolitan Portland's eighth annual benefit dinner
and auction is set for April 23, 5:30 p.m., at The Benson Hotel, 309 S.W. Broadway Ave.
The foundation builds shelters for homeless people, provides scholarships to high-school
and college students and promotes homeownership opportunities for low-income and
minority families.

Cost is $85 per person, and the event is black-tie optional.

For more information, call Tamar Hare at 503-684-1880, or visit
www.homebuildersportland.org.

Tri-county nonprofit swings into spring

The Remodelers Foundation, a local nonprofit organization that serves Washington,
Clackamas and Multnomah counties, will hold its second annual Swing into Spring
fundraiser on Saturday, April 23, from 6 to 10 p.m.

The event will be at The Goodrich Center at the Home Builders Association of
Metropolitan Portland (HBA) offices, 15555 S.W. Bangy Road, Lake Oswego. Festivities
include a dinner, silent auction and music from The Swingline Cubs.

The foundation makes homes accessible for elderly or disabled people by removing
barriers, opening up spaces and adding safety features such as grab bars or additional
lighting.

Cost is $55 per person or $400 for a table for eight. To make reservations, call 503-698-
8382.

Forest Heights project launches sales effort

Sales have opened at Forest Heights Crossing by Centurion Homes.

The development, off Northwest Miller Road and Millridge Road, includes 44 two- and
three-story rowhomes ranging from 1,700 to 2,300 square feet and from $384,000 to
$400,000. Units have two vaulted master suites and one- or two-car garages, and some
have lower-level bonus rooms and storage.

Neighborhood amenities include a picnic area, playground and walking trails.

For sales information, call Russ Diehl at 503-939-9100.

Project in Beaverton begins to take root

Buena Vista Custom Homes announced groundbreaking on a 22-lot project in Beaverton
off of Northwest Walker Road and 180th Avenue in March.

The development, Angela Gardens, will feature homes from 2,206 to 3,212 square feet,
with prices ranging from $314,950 to $389,950.
"The location (of this project) is ideal . . . in the heart of the Sunset Corridor, near Nike
and Intel," said Roger Pollock, owner of Buena Vista Custom Homes.

Angela Gardens' home plans have 9-foot ceilings on the main floor, vaulted master
bedrooms, fireplaces in the master and great rooms, gourmet kitchens and central vacuum
systems.

For more information on Angela Gardens, call Mike Wiltshire, Prudential Northwest
Properties, at 503-306-9002.

Brookwood Crossing opens phase-one sales

Brookwood Crossing by D.R. Horton has opened sales in the first phase of what will be a
384-home development in Hillsboro.

Phase one includes a mix of 132 detached homes and town homes. Brookwood Crossing
will feature courtyard designs from 1,546 to 1,800 square feet, cottage homes from 1,514
to 1,582 square feet and town homes from 1,760 to 1,812 square feet. Prices will range
from $180,900 to $208,900.

For more information, call Dan Petilke at 503-849-0351 or visit www.drhorton.com.

Sales effort begins at Sunset Crossings

Sales are under way at Sunset Crossings, a development of 10 town homes on the corner
of Southwest Boones Ferry Road and West Sunset Drive near Lake Grove Town Center.

Aspen Townhomes, a division of Centurion Homes, is the builder.

Units are approximately 1,700 square feet and are priced from $384,950 to $398,950.
Homes will have hardwood floors, slab-granite kitchen counters and stainless appliances.

For sales information, call Dwight Schwab, The Hasson Co., at 503-534-1525.

Big Meadow opens sales in new phase

Phase 12 of the Big Meadow community in Molalla opened for sales in February.

The new phase consists of 22 home sites, with home plans ranging from 2,155 to 3,066
square feet and prices from $229,900 to $274,000.

The two- to five-bedroom homes feature hardwood floors, granite countertops in gourmet
kitchens, vaulted master bedrooms and 9-foot ceilings.

For more information, call 503-829-3646.
Final phase under way at Renaissance Pointe

Renaissance Homes opened the final phase of Renaissance Pointe on Cooper Mountain in
Beaverton, site of the 2003 Street of Dreams.

The phase will feature 162 homes from 2,500 to 4,300 square feet, with prices ranging
from $450,000 to $750,000.

"We had 90,000 to 100,000 people at the Renaissance Pointe Street of Dreams," said
Randy Sebastian, president of Renaissance Homes. "Today, we still have people walk
into the model home at Renaissance Pointe and say they first saw the property during the
Street of Dreams and are back to see what's happened since."

For more information, call Johnyne Donnelly or Sharlene Pearson, 503-356-1540.

Kendra Hogue and Phil Favorite contributed to this report.

*************

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED SKETCHY TED FINELY DRAWN
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,April 15, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 08
Friday, April 15, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED SKETCHY TED FINELY DRAWN

Sketchy Ted finely drawn

The tight, smoky attic at the Buffalo Gap fills with patrons clad in sparkly red sequin
numbers in the shape of flashy ties and cocktail-dresses stretched wonderfully over
shoulders, waists and hips. The entire scene is bathed in red light.

Sketchy Ted, a steamy, sultry combination of what fans are calling indie soul -- melodic
pop, driving guitar and old-fashioned Louisiana zydeco -- and smart, fun and touching
lyrics, is a band worth keeping an eye, and ear, on.

Lead singer Barry Todd explains that the band's sound comes from a hypothetical
scenario wherein "Frank Sinatra gets drunk with the Replacements while listening to
Merle Haggard." This comparison rings true when you hear the band and recognize the
various layers of influence, talent and raw potential for something big.
The gig at Buffalo Gap is a reunion of sorts. Remember Thrillbilly? Well, the night
features Sketchy Ted opening for the Lonesomes. It just so happens that the drummer for
Sketchy Ted, Tom Kilman, and Lonesomes' guitarist Mark Dybvig used to do that pretty
little thing called music in the form of Thrillbilly, one of the city's historically and
nationally recognized groups.

Sketchy Ted has a wide range of influences, from alt-country to ska and rock, and
listeners will hear it in the songs. "I listen to a little bit of everything," said Todd. "We
listen to a bunch of local stuff. I have (the Lonesomes) CD and I listen to it a lot."

Sketchy Ted features Todd, Kilman, Mike Nucci, George Turner, Kristen Arnett, Tricia
Snedden and Benny Morrison. The band's bio reads: ". . . songs kinda peek over the top
of rose-colored glasses, but then pinch your butt so you don't take the view too seriously."

"The band's history is long and sordid," said Todd, and the songs are "about recognizing
regret and how to overcome it. Realizing that everything is going to be all right."

Sketchy Ted waxes playful and serious, emerging with a winning combination. Songs
like "Swim Fishy Swim" immediately sound a bit corny, but when the band comes
together and Todd's crisp, clear lyrics are heard over the music, it becomes apparent that
there is depth in the band.

Part of this depth comes from individual trials that members are dealing with outside of
the band.

Kilman's 2-1/2-year-old son has diabetes. "We have to give him shots every day," Kilman
said. "He doesn't complain. He's a trooper." This leads to Sketchy Ted's next live show
with the Lonesomes, which is April 30 at Mississippi Pizza Pub in North Portland to
benefit the American Diabetes Association.

To listen to Sketchy Ted or for other band information, visit www.sketchyted.com.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

*****************

DINING CHEAP EATS BANGKOK NOODLE
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,April 15, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 21
Friday, April 15, 2005
DINING CHEAP EATS BANGKOK NOODLE

feeding frenzies with pocket change

By JOSHUA SOMMER

Bangkok Noodle

If you're a wet noodle (or dry) connoisseur, as am I, there can't be too many noodle
shacks -- and it seems a new one pops up every couple of months simply to taunt my
Atkins mettle. The latest temptation is Bangkok Noodle, with five noodle varieties to
choose from: flat wide noodles, small thin rice noodles, fine rice noodles, egg noodles
and low-carb, glassy bean thread noodles.

The chow: Most of the plates range from $6.50 to $13 for dinner entrees and $6.50 to
$8.50 for lunch. Meals vary from noodle specials such as the Thai Sukiyaki
($8.50/dinner), which is a clear bean thread noodle in broth with shrimp, calamari,
scallops, egg, celery, spinach and red tofu curd sauce, to your standard Thai specials such
as Pad Thai and Drunken Noodle.

Real deals: Lunch versions of their best dinner entrees are served from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
weekdays, with portions both big and tasty.

Hangout factor: The atmosphere is comfortable and the place is just taking off, so you're
liable to find plenty of seating. The service at Bangkok Noodle is superb.

Liquids: Try my favorite Asian Pabst knock-off, Singha ($3.50). It's light and goes well
with the complex, spicy flavors in Thai food.

What's half-baked? The BBQ Pork Noodle ($6.50) is your choice of egg or rice noodles
in clear broth with sliced pork fillet, green onions, cilantro and bean sprouts. Sounds
delicious, doesn't it? Here's the catch: They offer this dish wet or dry, meaning with or
without broth, and the dry version shouldn't be offered. Without the broth, the dish is a
bland, cold version of what would otherwise be a fantastic meal.

Inside tips: Both lunch and dinner prices are great, as are the meals. A personal favorite is
Evil Noodle ($6.50/lunch; $9/dinner), a combination of special Thai curry sauce, rice
noodles, bell peppers, sweet basil and bamboo shoots.

The numbers: 7113 S.W. Macadam Ave.; 503-452-2656.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
****************

PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD SCREENINGS AT THE RAIN
Joshua Sommer, Special to the Or

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,April 1, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 10
Friday, April 1, 2005

PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD SCREENINGS AT THE RAIN

Screenings at the Rain

Venture off busy Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard and you'll discover the Chance of Rain
Cafe, a throwback to the grass-roots 1980s coffeehouse scene and a refreshing change
from the big chains.

While you're there, stick around for a movie.

The past four months, the Side Room Theatre has offered free movies from 6 to 10 p.m.
on Tuesdays. Recent titles seemed designed to feed your inner geek: "Raiders of the Lost
Ark," "Terminator," "Krull," "Willow," "Real Genius."

Julia Davis, 17, who lives in the neighborhood, has become a movie night regular. "My
favorite movie here so far was 'Heathers,' " she said. "It's very comfortable here.
Everyone, staff and customers, are very friendly and welcoming."

News of movie night has spread. "My boyfriend and I came here, and we've told our
friends about it, and now we have more of our friends coming down," Davis said. "I've
seen this one guy a lot. I don't know if he works here or knows the guys here, but I see
him on my bus on the way to school, so, I dunno. I think a lot of (attendees) are from
around here."

A few minutes later "this one guy," otherwise known as Jason Brown, 27, walks through
the door. "You get pretty much every kind of person here, from the old hippie to the punk
skaters. It depends on the time of day," he said. "I come back because of the people. The
people that work here and the people that show up."

Brown added, "The movie I'd like to see here is 'Battle Royale.' " Chimed in Davis,
"Mine would be 'Pee-Wee's Big Adventure.' " (Movie night suggestions can be made by
going online to rain.sitesled.com and following the e-mail link.)

The films screen on a white cloth sheet affixed to the inside of a garage door. Couches
are dragged into the Side Room Theatre for moviegoers' comfort, the room brightened a
little with colorful paintings by local artists.

Movie night came about when owner Nathan Day and some friends were brainstorming
ideas for an adjacent space that came with the cafe. "I'm a movie guy, and I've always
wanted to show movies. So we started with old-run movies that we wanted to see, and
people really liked it and made it known."

Day and friends spent six months renovating the space, which has been open now about
six months. "We are trying for a neighborhood feel. We don't want to spend the day
making coffee-to-go for people; we want people to stick around," he said. "We want that
sense of community in a comfortable space."

-- Joshua Sommer,

Special to the Oregonian

****************

DINING CHEAP EATS FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN BUFFALO WINGS
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,March 25, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 20
Friday, March 25, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN BUFFALO WINGS

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change By JOSHUA SOMMER

Fire on the Mountain Buffalo Wings

Ever heard of the Cheese Stick House, Louie's Side of Fries Shack or the Green Salad
Grill? These places do not exist. The reason? Not many restaurants try to make a business
out of featuring an appetizer as their house specialty, let alone as their main dish. Given
Fire on the Mountain Buffalo Wings, someone may want to rethink the above
entrepreneurial ideas.

The chow: Beginning with farm-fresh chicken, Fire on the Mountain fries the birds and
adds made-fresh-daily sauces. The wings run from six for $5.95 to 250 for $114.95, with
nine sauces to choose from: mild, medium, hot x-hot, El Jefe, sweet barbecue, Jamaican
jerk, "soon to be famous" spicy peanut, raspberry habanero and a sauce of the month.

Real deals: This place is extremely easy on your coin collection, with appetizers ranging
from $2.25 to $5.95, including tasty fried mushrooms and sweet potato fries. The most
stunning and delicious are the fried pickles ($3.95) and the banana fritters with Jamaican
jerk sauce ($4.95). Entrees range from spicy peanut pasta for five bucks to the wings to
sandwiches ($6.95 to $7.50).

Hangout factor: For a small place there's plenty of seating and prompt, friendly service.

Liquids: Pop quiz, what goes great with hot wings? Answer: Beer, wonderful beer. Pints
are $1.50 to $3.50 and pitchers are $5 to $10.50; microbrews are $2.50 if you show a
Blazers ticket. Fire on the Mountain also serves soda, sweet tea and iced tea.

What's half-baked? The close-up view of the MAX line is perfect -- but only if you like
trains.

Inside tips: Vegetarians, don't dismay -- the Portland wings (eight for $5.95 or 16 for
$7.95) are a meatless alternative and great with any of the sauces.

The numbers: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays; and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays; 4225 N. Interstate Ave.; 503-280-9464;
www.portlandwings.com.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
******************

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR THROUGH APRIL 10

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,March 25, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: DOWNTOWN MONTHLY, Page DM04
Friday, March 25, 2005

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR THROUGH APRIL 10

BodyVox photography

View an exhibit of BodyVox First Impressions Dance photography by Blaine Truitt
Covert. The free exhibit is open to the public in the Main Concourse of Pioneer Place
Shopping Center.

Through April 12,

William Joyce exhibit

This exhibit features original art by William Joyce, creator of Rolie Polie Olie and
Dinosaur Bob. Anyone interested in illustration and computer animation will enjoy the
free event; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Multnomah County Central Library, 801 S.W. 10th Ave.;
503-988-5123; www.multcolib.org.
Through April 24,

Family Albums at PAM

By documenting personalities -- from those on the fringes of society to celebrities like
Mae West and Ricky Nelson -- Diane Arbus established herself as an prominent
photographer. Many featured works have never before been on public display. Portland
Art Museum, 1219 S.W. Park Avenue. Open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, 10
a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sundays noon to 5 p.m.
General admission, $10; 503-226-2811; www.portlandartmuseum.org.

April 15 to May 26,

Timothy C. Ely exhibit

"Antarktos: Magnitudes of Black" is an exhibition that combines manuscripts,
sketchbooks and edition books by Timothy C. Ely over the last 30 years.

Ely has created embellished books since 1957 that are visually stimulating. His work has
elements of astronomy, alchemy, mystery, mathematics, physics, cartographic imagery
and invented languages. His books are made by hand, using traditional and
unconventional binding techniques; for open hours, contact Multnomah County Central
Library, 801 S.W. 10th Ave.; 503-988-5123; www.multcolib.org.

Through May 1,

Kite Exhibit

The Portland Classical Chinese Garden will host a kite exhibit from April 1 to May 1 and
a Qing Ming (kite festival) April 2 and 3. Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; Northwest Third
Avenue and Everett Street; general admission, $7; www.portlandchinesegarden.org.

Through Dec. 24,

Saturday Market

The Portland Saturday Market has opened for its 32nd year as a venue for more than 350
local craftspeople, featuring items that they've made, baked or grown themselves. These
include clothes, pottery and nearly everything from all craft disciplines.

There are also 26 food booths in the International Food Court and live musicians. Open
Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., under the west end of the
Burnside Bridge on Southwest First Avenue. Admission is free;
www.saturdaymarket.org.

April 7, PNCA
student art show

The Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA) will hold a student art show at the
Portland Children's Museum to showcase young artists in celebration of Day of the
Young Child; open all day; call for prices; 4015 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-223-6500;
www.portlandcm2.org.

April 8 to Aug. 29 and

Sept. 6, Ballgames

From April 8 to Sept. 6, the Portland Beavers baseball team will play home games at
PGE Park.

Also, from May 1 to Aug. 29, the Portland Timbers soccer team will play home games at
PGE Park.

For ticket prices, dates and directions, visit www.pgepark.com.

April 9, City of

Portland Chess event

The 2005 City of Portland Chess Tournament will be at Pioneer Courthouse Square
beginning at 9 a.m. for grades K-5. This single day event is free. For more information,
visit www.pioneercourthousesquare.org.

April 16, Walk to

benefit MS Society

The 2005 National MS Society's MS Walk will start at Pioneer Courthouse Square and
will run from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The walk is a fund-raiser for the Multiple Sclerosis Society
and takes place in 12 communities across Oregon and Washington.

For more information or to register, visit www.orcnmss.org.

April 16 and 17,

Packy's 43rd birthday

The Oregon Zoo is celebrating Packy the elephant's birthday with their entire family of
elephants. The event will feature cake for everyone on the 16th and a cake for Packy at 2
p.m. on the same day. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 4001 S.W. Canyon Road; general
admission, $9.50; www.oregonzoo.org.
April 19 to 24,

Wordstock book fest

Part of Wordstock, Portland's annual Festival of the Book, authors Alice Sebold, Chris
Bohjalian, David Shannon, Dr. Andrew Weil, John Irving, Kent Haruf, Norman Mailer,
Philip Yancey, Russell Banks, Sarah Vowell, Susan Orlean and Ursula K. Le Quin will
be in Portland at various venues.

The festival includes readings by best-selling authors, poets and Northwest writing
legends, panels, workshops for teachers of writing, dinners with authors, a free two-day
book fair with hundreds of exhibitors, two days of children's readings and activities, food,
music and cooking demonstrations.

For more information and directions to venues, visit www.wordstockfestival.com.

April 21, 2004 Pulitzer

winner for fiction

Edward P. Jones received both the 2004 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics
Circle Award for his novel "The Known World," a rendering of life in Virginia where
freed black slaves now own black slaves and the complexities that arise through sex, race
and class.

Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series, Jones will be speaking at 7:30 p.m., Arlene
Schnitzer Concert Hall, Southwest Broadway and Main Street. Admission is $18.75 to
$29.75. For more information, visit www.pcpa.com.

April 27,

Nob Hill specials

The Nob Hill Business Association presents "What's on Wednesday" (WoW) on the last
Wednesday of each month. The event features more than 50 retail stores and restaurants
that participate by making store discounts and dinner specials available to visitors. For
more information, visit www.nobhillbiz.com.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is April 1.

*************

NOTEBOOK: SPECK ENTERPRISES RECOGNIZED BY REMODELING
INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION
By Joshua Sommer
Staff researcher

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,March 17, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 14
Thursday, March 17, 2005

NOTEBOOK: SPECK ENTERPRISES RECOGNIZED BY REMODELING
INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) recognized Speck
Enterprises of Sandy with 2005 Regional Contractor of the Year (CotY) awards in the
categories of residential kitchen under $30,000 and residential addition under $100,000.

All projects submitted for the CotY awards were improvements or additions to existing
structures completed between July 1, 2003, and Nov. 20, 2004. Winners earned awards
based on before and after photos, project descriptions, problem-solving, functionality,
aesthetics, craftsmanship, innovation, degree of difficulty and entry presentation.

Winners will receive their awards at an April 2 ceremony in Chicago.

For more information, visit www.remodeltoday.com.

Home tour announces show dates, location

The 2005 RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings is set for June 11 through July 3 at
Holland Park, Beaverton.

Featured builders at this year's home show will be Anthem Homes; C&L Properties; Four
D Construction Co.; J.T. Roth Construction; Loranger Builders; McGehee Construction;
Ryan Olsen Development; Sequoia Custom Homes; Timberland Homes; and Buena Vista
Custom Homes.

Ten show homes are planned, ranging in price from about $300,000 to $375,000 (some
prices are yet to be determined).

Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 6 to 12. For more information,
including directions, visit www.streetofnewbeginnings.com.

Custom Home seeks noteworthy projects

Entries for Custom Home magazine's 2005 Custom Home Design Awards are due March
21.
The awards recognize custom-home builders, remodeling contractors, architects,
developers, planners, kitchen and bath specialists, and other industry professionals
representing homes completed after Jan. 1, 2001.

Homes designed and built for specific clients and specific sites are eligible.

Each entry must be accompanied by a $125 entry fee.

Projects will be judged in eight categories. For more information, visit
www.customhomeonline.com.

Hoyt Street to convert The Lexis to condos

Hoyt Street Properties plans to convert The Lexis -- a luxury Pearl District apartment
building built a year ago -- into condominiums.

Hoyt Street applied in February to the Oregon Real Estate Agency to convert the six-
story Lexis, 1125 N.W. Ninth Ave., into a 139-unit condominium community.

The Lexis has floor plans ranging from studios and one-bedrooms to two-bedroom and
live/work units. On-site amenities include a conference room, fitness center, concierge
services and reserved underground parking. Condo sales are expected to open in May; no
prices have been set.

For more information, call 503-227-2000, or visit www.hoytstreetproperties.com.

Students compete for industry scholarships

March 18 is the deadline for high-school students applying for scholarships in the Home
Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland's annual Home Builders Foundation
competition.

For months, more than 60 students have been studying a home-building CD-ROM,
volunteering with nonprofit organizations such as Habitat for Humanity and writing 500-
word essays to qualify for the scholarship program. The five finalists, who will receive
scholarships of up to $2,000, will be announced April 23.

A similar scholarship competition for Portland-area community college students studying
remodeling or new-home construction begins in March, with applications due May 20.

For more information, visit www.homebuildersportland.org.

Kemper Crest open for sales in Newberg

Sales are under way at D.R. Horton's Kemper Crest on Chehalem Drive, in Newberg.
The 84-home development will feature three- and four-bedroom houses ranging from
1,896 to 2,732 square feet and prices from $235,900 to $297,900.

For more information, call Angie Kozma at 503-209-9374, or visit www.drhorton.com.

D.R. Horton begins sales at Bridal Springs

Sales opened at the 200-home Bridal Springs, developed by D.R. Horton, on the corner of
Goldfish Farm Road Southeast and Knox Butte Road East in Albany.

For more information, call Kimberly Heintz at 541-936-0379, or visit
www.drhorton.com.

***************

OBSERVED JAPANESE ANIME FAN? HEY, JOIN THE CLUB
By Joshua Sommer
Special to the Oregonian\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,March 11, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 12
Friday, March 11, 2005

OBSERVED JAPANESE ANIME FAN? HEY, JOIN THE CLUB

Japanese anime fan? Hey, join the club

So you're itching for some great anime and you aren't online, the Cartoon Network is on
the fritz and you either can't wait for Saturday morning, or you can't stand the tripe local
networks are trying to peddle? Here's your supernova blasting ray of light: the Northern
Oregon and Vancouver Anime association (NOVA).

Founded in 1991, this group of Japanimation junkies runs hours of anime -- which has
not yet been released commercially in the U.S. -- on the first and third Saturday, each
month. Once a feature or series becomes commercially available, they pull the item out of
their show lineup and add it to a mammoth collection for members to check out from the
archivist, or "Keeper of the Neat Stuff."

The 115-ish members of NOVA range in age from 13 to 50, and the cost of joining is $15
or one English release of a commercial anime DVD.

Peter Krug and Paru Borte arrive to a viewing last month early to shoot the breeze and
talk shop.
"There's only three of us here right now, but in a little while there's going to be a lot
more," Krug says as he eagerly waits for the doors of Tigard City Hall (one of two
NOVA show venues) to be unlocked.

"Yeah, usually between 40 and 50 of us show up," said Borte. "And then there are always
new people who are here for the first time.

"Our library is kind of different. What you have in the library is either something that can
be bought at a store here or something that is pretty old. The stuff that we show here, at
our meetings, is stuff that's really new and that has not been licensed or released here,"
Borte said, contrasting the library collection with the bimonthly shows

"And it's not like the stuff we're showing won't ever be released commercially here, but a
lot of times what we see here is released a long time later," added Krug.

Bob Cannard, an import from Wales, joined the group in the mid-1990s and has been
vigorously active ever since. He is the member who oversees NOVA's online presence.

"In principle, I like any animation, but I'm not over-fond of the trend toward 3-D
animation, for one because I like the style of 2-D and for another I like the fact that
someone actually sat there drawing it," said Cannard. "So, I'm very much a 2-D man.
Anime I like because the characters are so interesting . . . there are exceptions, but I try
not to dismiss (shows like) "Pokemon" because I actually think it's quite a good show for
children, it's just not the sort of thing I would be watching."

Lisa Eide, NOVA's president, confirmed that anime is alive and well in Portland and that
the group is actively accepting new members.

For information on show times, viewing schedule and locations, visit
www.novaanime.org.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to the Oregonian

*****************

DINING CHEAP EATS SZECHUAN KITCHEN
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,March 4, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 23
Friday, March 4, 2005
DINING CHEAP EATS SZECHUAN KITCHEN

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

By JOSHUA SOMMER

Szechuan Kitchen

In a town teeming with great Chinese food joints, which cover the five major regional
cuisines -- southeastern (Canton), east coast (Fujian), northeastern (Beijing-Shantung),
central (Hunan) and western (Sichuan-Hunan) -- it's a bit of a shock to discover a new
one with the ability to twist familiar dishes into unique renditions that will stand up to the
established places. Szechuan Kitchen is just such a place.

The chow: Typical Szechuan dishes, with some Hunan variations to keep the menu
interesting. Dinner dishes range from $4.95 to $12.95. A couple of must-tries are the Ma
La Chicken ($10.50/dinner), a spicy combination of chicken slices with vegetables; and
the House Spicy Ginger Chicken ($10.50/dinner), the meat sauteed with baby ginger and
vegetables.

Real deals: Lunch and dinner come with a choice of two soups; the hot and sour soup is
superb. Hungry diners can easily fix themselves up with large portions of any dinner
entree for around $9 each and still have leftovers to bring home.

Hangout factor: The interior is large and comfortable, accommodating the lunch and
dinner crowds.

Liquids: You can wash down the spicy dishes with tea, beer or soda.

What's half-baked? Located off the main drag that is Boones Ferry Road; if you're not
watching for it, you could drive past the place for years.

Inside tips: Try, hard, to get here for lunch, when the huge portions of all of the best
dishes range from $5.25 to $6.95.

The numbers: 15450 Boones Ferry Road, Lake Oswego; 503-699-5056

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
****************

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED SWEAT CLUB
Joshua Sommer, Special to the Or

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,February 25, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 05
Friday, February 25, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED SWEAT CLUB

Each Wednesday night, several new club-hoppers are trained on the dance floor at the
Northstar Ballroom in North Portland. Ghanaian expatriate Chata Addy, a master of
African dance styles, leads them until they are ready to go it alone.

Chata Addy -- even his name, the syllables slashed by crisp consonants and delicate
vowels, sounds like something you could dance to -- has been dancing to and playing
traditional and modern African music for 25 years. He learned from his father in Ghana
and brought it with him to the States in 1985. He has also passed the art on to his
children, all of whom dance and drum.

Addy is a guy who slides into a room with a bass line. He seems to have his own theme
song and it follows him wherever he goes. It's a rhythm in his steps as he walks, in the
gestures he makes with his hands and in his voice when he talks.

With his guidance, a tiny rhythmic miracle happens on North Killingsworth Court, a
bouncing, thrusting, shuffling, dipping, crouching, shoulders quaking sort of thing as
Addy guides his class through a set of African dances and aerobics. The classes range in
age from 9 to 45. Addy's class is much more than sweatin' to the oldies. It's like sweatin'
to the ultra-oldies mixed with something yet to come. Beats so old that you'll recognize
them in your chest, so new that you may think that you're just discovering music.

"Dancing is a lot like walking," Addy says. "Find a beat that you match your heart to. Pay
attention, feel your heartbeat. This is something even I have to do when I learn another
culture's dance and rhythm." (In addition to his own recordings, Addy spins as a DJ at
Billy Reed's on Thursday evenings.)

The focus of the class is to work out and tone the body to African rhythms by learning
dance movements to music ranging from soukous, reggae, soca, highlife and traditional
Ghanaian. Both recorded music and live drumming are featured.

The night has barely begun when Addy turns around after a fast song and sees his pupils
fanning themselves and gulping water.

"Uh-oh," he says. "It looks like some clothes are coming off!"

7-8 p.m. Wednesdays, Northstar Ballroom, 635 N. Killingsworth Court; $10/drop-in,
$45/five weeks. For a complete schedule of gigs and classes, visit www.chataaddy.com.

-- Joshua Sommer,
Special to the Oregonian

****************

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR: MARCH THROUGH MARCH 27

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,February 25, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: DOWNTOWN MONTHLY, Page DM06
Friday, February 25, 2005

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY CALENDAR: MARCH THROUGH MARCH 27

Breath of a Wok

The Portland Classical Chinese Garden will give visitors a view of authentic Chinese
wok culture and cooking with Breath of a Wok, an exhibit based on a book with the same
name by Grace Young and Alan Richardson; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; $10; Northwest Third
Avenue and Everett Street; 503-228-8131; www.portlandchinesegarden.org.

Through April 12

William Joyce exhibit

Original artwork by William Joyce, creator of Rolie Polie Olie and Dinosaur Bob.
Anyone interested in illustration and computer animation will enjoy the free event; Feb.
17 to April 12, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Multnomah County Central Library, 801 S.W. 10th
Ave.; 503-988-5123; www.multcolib.org.

March 1

Examining a Lambert Street home

Part of the Oregon Historical Society's free Discovering Oregon Originals Series, a series
of lectures about the people who have contributed to the literary, musical and artistic
history of Oregon, the Lambert Street Lifestyle presentation examines the post-World
War II literary and cultural movement, the beat generation and its connection to a house
at 1414 S.E. Lambert St., where writers and Reed College colleagues met; noon; 1200
S.W. Park Ave.; 503-222-1741; www.ohs.org.

Through April 24

Family Albums at PAM

By documenting personalities -- from those on the fringes of society to celebrities like
Mae West and Ricky Nelson -- Diane Arbus established herself as an prominent
photographer. Many never before displayed works will hang through April 24 as part of a
show called "Family Album" at the Portland Art Museum, 1219 S.W. Park Ave. Open
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays,10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.
to 8 p.m.; and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.; general admission, $10; 503-226-2811;
www.portlandartmuseum.org.

March 5, 6, 11 and 12

Body, Mind, Spirit

"Body, Mind, Spirit" is three dances highlighting physical excellence, romance and the
solace to be found in a sense of place. Showtime for March 5, 11 and 12, is 7:30 p.m.,
and for March 6, 2 p.m., at Keller Auditorium. The program, from Oregon Ballet Theatre,
features "In the Night to Frederic Chopin" by Jerome Robbins; "Concerto Grosso to
George Frederick Handel" by Charles Czarny; and "The Impending Hour to Maurice
Ravel" by Christopher Stowell.

For pricing, directions and tickets, visit www.obt.org.

March 8

$2 Tuesday at the Oregon Zoo

Celebrate the second Tuesday of each month with reduced admission price from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m.; 4001 S.W. Canyon Rd.; 503-226-1561, Ext. 0; www.oregonzoo.org.

March 10

Tibetan Uprising Day

A free event to recognize the 46th anniversary of the first Tibetan Uprising, when China
invaded Tibet in 1959, will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Pioneer Courthouse Square;
503-223-1613; www.pioneercourthousesquare.org.

March 17

St. Patrick's Day celebrations

On March 17 the Oregon Zoo will feature an event titled "Environmental Enrichment --
The Luck of the Irish" with green ice treats stuffed with seafood for the polar bears at 10
a.m. Free with zoo admission: adults (12 to 64) $9.50; children (3 to 11), $6.50; and
infants (2 and under) free; 4001 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-226-1561, Ext. 0;
www.oregonzoo.org.
From March 17 to March 19, a St. Patrick's Day brew festival featuring the season's best
local micro beers will run from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., at Pioneer Courthouse Square.
Admission is $5.

For more information, call 503-252-9899 or visit www.shamrockale.com.

March 19

Oregon Zoo Bear Fair

Haggen Food and Pharmacy will present this event for spring break and to help
understand why bears don't really hibernate.

Activities include a Repair-A-Bear stuffed bear vet station, games, storytelling and a
Teddy Bear Picnic; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., free with zoo admission: adults (12 to 64), $9.50;
children (3 to 11), $6.50; and infants (2 and under) free; 4001 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-
226-1561, Ext. 0; www.oregonzoo.org.

March 19 to May 29

The Pre-Raphaelites

On loan from the Delaware Art Museum, "Waking Dreams: The Art of the Pre-
Raphaelites" is making its national premiere at the Portland Art Museum. The collection
features works by young British rebels who stirred up Victorian society and changed
English art; 1219 S.W. Park Ave. Open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sundays, noon to 5 p.m.; general
admission, $10; 503-226-2811; www.portlandartmuseum.org.

March 20 to 27

Gone Wild Spring Break

Keepers, volunteers and Oregon Zoo staff have planned a spring break week of activities
for the animals and visitors. Free with zoo admission: adults (12 to 64), $9.50; children (3
to 11), $6.50; and infants (2 and under) free; 4001 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-226-1561,
Ext. 0; www.oregonzoo.org.

March 22

Wildlife conservation lecture

A lecture series at the Oregon Zoo with Dr. Nalini Nadkarni will explore tropical and
temperate rainforest canopies; 7 p.m.; $10; 4001 S.W. Canyon Road; 503-226-1561, Ext.
0; www.oregonzoo.org.
March 30

Nob Hill specials

The Nob Hill Business Association presents What's on Wednesday (WoW) on the last
Wednesday of each month. The event features more than 50 retail stores and restaurants
that participate by making store discounts and dinner specials available to visitors. For
more information, visit www.nobhillbiz.com.

March 31

Child abuse prevention rally

A free rally to recognize Child Abuse Month, which is April, will be from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m., at the Pioneer Courthouse Square; 503-223-1613;
www.pioneercourthousesquare.org.

Submit calendar items to Joshua Sommer, 503-294-4112;
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com. Deadline for next publication is March 1.

********************

NOTEBOOK HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION RECOGNIZES JEFF FISH WITH
ANNUAL AWARD
By Joshua Sommer
Staff researcher\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,February 17, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 10
Thursday, February 17, 2005

NOTEBOOK HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION RECOGNIZES JEFF FISH WITH
ANNUAL AWARD

Jeff Fish, Fish Construction Northwest, was named 2004 Builder of the Year by the
Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA).

The selection was based on Fish's leadership and participation in the association, his
support for the building industry and his community involvement. He was formally
recognized at the HBA Excellence Awards banquet on Feb. 5 at the Embassy Suites
Hotel, Washington Square.

"Jeff Fish is a deserving winner. He's a strong representative of our industry and an active
leader within the HBA," said David Nielsen, HBA chief executive officer.
The HBA also recognized Lee Zajic, Northwest Renovations & Design Co., as 2004
Remodeler of the Year.

Zajic was cited for his leadership and involvement in the HBA and support for the
remodeling industry.

"Lee has made a huge impact on our Remodelors Council over the last several years and
has also provided great leadership, representing remodeler, small builder and
subcontractor perspectives and needs on our board of directors," Nielsen said.

In addition, Karl Finkelnburg, HomeStreet Bank, was selected as 2004 Associate
Member of the Year.

* On Feb. 11, the home builders association broke ground on the 2005 Northwest Natural
Street of Dreams at The Quarry at Stafford, near Wilsonville.

The following builders are participating in this year's show of luxury homes: Blazer
Development, Haggart Construction, CastleRock Homes, Olsen Homes, Wallace Custom
Homes, Taurus Homes, KDC Construction and Hearth & Home Residential
Construction.

The 2005 Street of Dreams is scheduled to run July 30 to Aug. 28. Eight custom-built
homes are planned, with estimated prices ranging from $2 million to $3.4 million.

CastleRock Homes' entry is the 2005 Miracle House. Proceeds from its sale will be
donated to Doernbecher Children's Hospital.

For more information, call 503-684-1880 or visit www.homebuildersportland.org.

Bridgewood Homes garners two awards

Bridgewood Homes received recognition at the annual Best in American Living Awards
(BALA), held in January at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)
conference in Orlando, Fla.

Silver awards were presented to Bridgewood Homes, a subsidiary of Don Morissette
Homes, in the categories of Best Attached 20 Units Per Acre and Over, and Best
Attached Urban Infill. The awards recognize The Gardens on Fifteenth Avenue, a 35-unit
town-home community in Portland's Sellwood neighborhood.

For more information, visit www.housingzone.com/bala.

Jackson County HBA recognized for service

The Jackson County Home Builders Association received an award for community
service at January's International Builders Show in Orlando, Fla.
The association earned the Housing Endowment Home Builders Care Community
Service Project of the Year Award, which honors outstanding community service.

The association was recognized for its support of Mistletoe House, a new facility for
victims of child abuse. Mahar Homes, general contractor on the Mistletoe House, worked
with the association and the Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) to build the 3,200-
square-foot facility in Medford.

Volunteers who work for 30 different HBA member companies donated more than 1,300
hours to the project. Services and donations totaling $180,000 were raised for the project.

Oregon loan program increases some limits

Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) increased purchase price limits for its
Residential Loan Program in 30 of Oregon's 36 counties in January.

To qualify, a property's purchase price must be below the program's limit. The increases
range from $14,750 to $62,887 per county.

The state-sponsored home loan program, also known as the Oregon Bond Loan Program,
offers home buyers low interest rates on 30-year fixed-rate loans, as well as closing-cost
assistance.

"These increases allow more properties to qualify for our agency's home loan program
and closing cost assistance," said Bob Repine, OHCS director.

To qualify in most counties, home buyers must not have owned and occupied a home in
the three years prior to closing the loan.

For more information, call 877-788-2663 or visit www.oregonbond.us.

Phase two sales open at Morgan Meadows

Sales have opened on phase two of D.R. Horton's Morgan Meadows, at Northeast 257th
Avenue, Gresham. The 103 homes in the new phase will range in size from 1,497 square
feet to 2,732 square feet and in price from $181,900 to $329,000.

When completed, Morgan Meadows will have 367 homes.

For more information, call Jodi Martin at 503-674-2631 or visit www.drhorton.com.

Model home finished at Eagle Landing site

A model home is open at Renaissance at Eagle Landing, off Southeast Stevens Road near
the former Top O' Scott golf course on Mount Scott.
The Renaissance Homes development will feature 73 homes ranging from 1,903 to 3,258
square feet, with prices ranging from $373,900 to $469,900.

For more information, call Lee Wells at 503-496-0614.

Construction continues on new JLS projects

JLS Custom Homes announced progress on several new projects in the Portland
metropolitan area.

* In Beaverton, construction is complete on a model for a development of nine town
homes at Sunset Gardens, Beaverton.

The town homes are 1,400-square-foot units with vaulted ceilings in the master bedrooms
and gourmet kitchens. Prices range from $169,900 to $174,490.

* A sales model is open at Fieldstone at Murrayhill, a community with 21 single-family
home sites.

The project features 10 floor plans ranging in size from 2,678 to 3,123 square feet. The
three- and four-bedroom homes feature dens, bonus rooms, gourmet kitchens, hardwood
floors and two- and three-car garages. They are priced from $369,950 to $429,950.

The model home -- off Southwest Weir Road at 155th Avenue -- is open Mondays,
Tuesdays and Fridays, noon to 5 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information on Fieldstone at Murrayhill or Sunset Gardens, call Dawn Hanavan
at 503-803-7458.

* Construction has begun on European-style model homes at Conzelmann Farm in
Sherwood.

When completed, Conzelmann Farm will consist of 57 homes ranging from 2,444 to
3,123 square feet and priced from $339,000 to $379,000.

For more information, call Faith O'Billovich at 503-317-8640.

* Construction is under way on Craftsman-style models at Cedar Terrace, a JLS project
in Cornelius. The community will feature houses ranging from 1,689 to 1,833 square feet
with base prices from $169,950 to $182,950.

For more information, call Mike Luyten at 503-351-2611.

* A sales model will be completed this month at the Bonita Place Townhomes at
Southwest Bonita Road and Fanno Creek Drive.
Office hours are Friday to Monday, noon to 5 p.m., at the intersection of Southwest
Bonita Road and Fanno Creek Drive.

For more information, call Mindy Ruef at 503-998-5379.

* Work has begun on European countryside-style model homes at Rose Meadow, a new
21-lot community near Clackamas.

Home sizes will range from 2,444 to 3,490 square feet, and the houses will feature
gourmet kitchens with granite tile islands and stainless-steel appliances, walk-in closets
in master suites and hardwood floors. Rose Meadow homes will be priced from $329,950
to $374,950.

The site is off Southeast Sunnyside Road at 132nd Avenue and Rose Meadow Drive.

For more information, call Chris Kincaid at 503-439-6311.

*****************

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED GET ON OUT AND SQUARE DANCE
Joshua Sommer, Special to the Or

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,February 11, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 06
Friday, February 11, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED GET ON OUT AND SQUARE DANCE

Get on out and square dance

With Portland hosting the 54th National Square Dance Convention in June, it's a good
time to check in on the state of modern square dancing.

And if you dropped in to Trinity United Methodist Church on a recent Wednesday
evening, you know that it truly is modern. This is where the Rosetown Ramblers were
having a mainstream dance for members and drop-ins. But the Ramblers are different
from granny's Friday night square dance social. It's a 22-year-old group of gay and
lesbian square dance enthusiasts -- though all are welcome.

At first glimpse, what's going on is a bit mind-boggling. A gentleman onstage (the caller)
zips out in a rapid-fire, sing-song manner, various moves that dancers in groups (squares)
of eight immediately follow, transforming the dance floor into a mass of fluidly moving
bodies. The outcome is a gently choreographed dance that, after a few tries, is not too
difficult follow.
Before the class began, the caller, Scott Zinser, explained that calling is an art form that's
passed on from generation to generation. So, like martial arts, if a person wants to learn
the craft, they must find a sensei who will share their secret fighting style. This is one of
the ways Zinser picked it up.

Today there's a stereotype when it comes to square dancing -- that it's an outdated dance
only older folks follow. But, these events commonly draw from 30 to 80 dancers of all
ages.

"Scott (Zinser) has a family club that includes lots of children," said Franklin Hyry, vice
president of Rosetown Ramblers, which is open to people of all ages and from all walks
of life. "In fact, our club has an 11-year-old and teenagers."

The clubs are made up of graduating classes created each year after basic square dance
training. Each graduating class is named by its members, who then wear a badge with
their club and class names engraved on it.

The Rosetown Ramblers name each class after a rose.

Once members become part of a graduating class, they continue to attend the introductory
classes as "angels," or mentors, to make sure that there are plenty of experienced dancers
for newbies to partner with.

"The basic class, or the first year, is free," said Pamlin Pegg, a member of the 2004
graduating class "Ain't Misbehavin'." "Then, when you become a member, you pay for
classes and come to the classes to dance, but also to act as angels, or helpers, for the new
basic dancers."

Square Dance Convention: www.54nsdc.com/ext/main

Oregon Square Dance Federation: www.squaredance.gen.or.us/

Caller Scott Zinser's site: www.squarezilla.com

Rosetown Ramblers: www.rdrop.com/users/ramblers/.

-- Joshua Sommer,

Special to the Oregonian

******************

PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD FLIRTATION GAME 101
By Joshua Sommer
Special to the Oregonian
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,February 11, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 10
Friday, February 11, 2005

PLUGGED IN SCENE AND HERD FLIRTATION GAME 101

Well, here's the thing for you.

It's a cool mid-winter Thursday evening. An elaborate banquet area above Kell's Irish
Pub begins to fill with singles looking to hone their flirting skills.

Richard Mohley, who has been conducting the workshops nationwide since 1982,
mingles among the attendees, a group of 21 males and 21 females. Much of the group is
part of Julee Wasserman's Singles Outdoor Social Club. Others discovered the session
from ads around town. Wasserman sponsored and presented the event.

The workshop teaches body language, posture, attire and where to go to meet people. The
flirting techniques Mohley teaches aren't strictly for singles.

After Mohley was widowed, he traveled often for work and developed no close friends.
So, he did what many do, he went to bars to meet people. He noticed he wasn't alone, so
he decided to offer a class at a community college on How to Overcome Shyness and
Make Friends.

"Many married people take my classes," Mohley said. "My classes are not just about
flirting; they're primarily about how to establish all sorts of relationships." In fact, many
marriages have taken place between people who met in his class.

Here are Mohley's top do's and don'ts for both sexes.

For women: Use permissive gestures (wrist flash, shoulder raise, toe points, leg twines,
throat displays, etc.). Show some skin or show some shape. Don't dress like a lumberjack.
Don't be shy about using courtship gestures; women won't appear as subordinate or
sexual, they appear as interesting.

For men: Dress neatly and cleanly. Start conversations even with women you're not
attracted to. Show interest by asking questions. Don't use primate (belly scratches, crotch
displays, etc.) gestures. Don't be a crude or creepy.

Seamus Kennedy, who took the class months ago, said Mohley was a hilarious instructor
and mentioned that the tips learned from the class have helped him meet others.

After the workshop, the singles are encouraged to stick around and practice their new
skills.
For more information on the workshops, visit www.meetfunpeople.org. For information
on the Singles Outdoor Social Club (they will be holding a Valentine's Night Dinner and
Dance at the Greek Cusina), visit www.gorgetours.com.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to the Oregonian

**************

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED LET'S MAKE A DEAL
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,January 28, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 09
Friday, January 28, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED LET'S MAKE A DEAL

Let's make a deal

There is an unmistakable tension in the air.

The owner of the house is a little nervous. He wasn't told that a reporter would be there.
Oh, yeah, and also a photographer. After a few minutes of dialogue he relaxes into a
roughly charming host. He requests politely (a pit bull by his side) that no full names are
mentioned without permission and that winning dollar amounts are not disclosed. He
makes an honest argument, something not easily countered, that the folks in his home are
there for fun, to enjoy a private game and play cards.

Partially collapsed stacks of tiny red, green and blue discs ring the table near an equal
number of paired Bicycle playing cards, face down. Slim fingers, some with painted
nails, pry a corner of their set of cards a fraction of an inch from the red felt and,
somehow, quickly, eyes imperceptively register their value.

Also, there is a cooler full of beer and soda.

Welcome to Ladies Night No Limit Texas Hold'em, somewhere in what used to be
Felony Flats (the borders of Southeast Foster Road, Interstate 205 and Johnson Creek
Boulevard), Portland.

This is serious. The cards always come from new, unopened packs, and the players
shuffle and eye the dealer carefully.
At the table, the ladies game emits a light harmony to coat the underlying competition of
the game and the stakes. There's an empathy-slash-camaraderie among the women that
contributes to an overall airiness to help thaw the ice in the room.

Ice enveloped the area on the Saturday that Ladies Night was originally planned. This
made for a postponed game, and everyone is eager to play the set of 20-minute rounds.
The girls come from as far away as Hillsboro and Gresham.

One of the girls at the table explains, when she wins the first hand, that she's there to try
to win enough to afford ear surgery for her 12-year-old black lab, Leo.

Getting in the game costs $20, and winners walk away with (approximately) a whopping
$400.

Small stakes. So, why play? Because its fun and no one goes broke if they lose.

All of the groups accept new members and can be accessed at
www.meetup.com/cities/us/or/portland/.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

*******************

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED THINGS OF BEAUTY A JOY FOR OTHERS
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,January 28, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 07
Friday, January 28, 2005

PLUGGED IN OBSERVED THINGS OF BEAUTY A JOY FOR OTHERS

Things of beauty a joy for others

This is dangerous. This is exactly what happens when people, of any discipline or trade,
meet to fuel their passions. Beware, local charities: these women love you.

Shiny Pretty Things, a jewelry sale last Sunday, evolved from a group of friends and
artists who realized that they all participated in some sort of donation to their favorite
charity via their craft.
These donations come in the form of percentages of dollar amounts earned at sales, or in
donated pieces for auctions.

The six artists -- Jessica Vasi, Julie Hockley, Debi Johnson, Shannon Miranda, Shannon
Nichols and Michelle Woodruff -- all share a passion for shiny, pretty things, jewelry, art
and giving back to the community.

"It all sort of started after Christmas," said Vasi. "We talked about doing a sale but
decided that it shouldn't just benefit us. I mentioned that I'd love to donate a portion of
the proceeds to our favorite charities. This way people are getting designer jewelry and
giving back to the community at the same time."

Who benefits? For starters, the buyer because they get a piece of fine, handmade silver or
gold jewelry that has been labored over and manipulated into something beautiful. The
seller benefits, too, from the good vibes that come from giving. Ultimately, these
charities are the real winners: Oregon Humane Society, American Cancer Society, Jewish
Federation of Portland, Dinner and a Movie, International Justice Mission, Court
Appointed Special Advocates for Children and the Epilepsy Foundation of Oregon.

"By doing this sale, or others like it, we're giving to a cause that is really important, and
also people are buying something tangible that means something and that they can wear,"
said Miranda.

Some of the girls plan to reunite in February for another sale. For information and
directions to the sale or any of the artist's Web sites, call Vasi at 503-351-0587.

-- Joshua Sommer

Special to The Oregonian

*********************

DINING CHEAP EATS SELLWOOD PUBLIC HOUSE
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,January 14, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 23
Friday, January 14, 2005

DINING CHEAP EATS SELLWOOD PUBLIC HOUSE

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change
Sellwood Public House

One of the bummers of having family in Brooklyn, N.Y., is that whenever they visit,
there's an underlying tension related to (I know this is silly) pizza. It seems there's a
certain science behind the making of a true New York-style pie and, apparently, the
secret is in the hand-tossed crust and clay-oven baking process. And, according to the
New Yorkers I know, many of our pizza joints just don't cut it. Well, having been to their
city enough times to get an idea of what they're looking for, I think I've stumbled across
just the spot to bring them on their next visit: Sellwood Public House.

The chow: Everything I've tried here has been delicious. There are two styles to choose
from, the Gourmet (thicker than the New York and contains herbs; $10.50 to $19.50) and
the New York ($12 to $18). Of special note is the Gourmet-style Piccata ($12 to $19),
with a garlic white sauce topped with chicken breast, mushrooms, roasted peppers and
(this makes the pizza) capers. Also, the Hula Girl (Canadian bacon and pineapple, $10.50
to $18.50) and the Margherita (mozzarella and basil, $13.50 to $16.50) are exceptional
variations of a couple of classics. The menu also carries pastas ($7.25 to $9.50), dinner
entrees ($7.75 to $11.50) and sandwiches ($6.25 to $7.75).

Real deals: An astonishing secret that regulars realize is that you can get any of the pizzas
on the menu, at any time, by the slice ($2.25, and 25 cents for each additional topping).
This is the first place in town that I've found to offer all of their pizzas by the slice at all
hours of operation.

Hangout factor: Plug in. The pub offers a Wi-Fi hotspot at no charge, many TVs tuned to
sports and a large, comfy dining area and bar with hockey-based decorations. This is the
closest hockey fans may get to the NHL this season with the players locked out.

Liquids: There's a full bar including drafts beers and sodas at varying prices.

What's half-baked? As Antique Row slowly morphs into a street with more and more
restaurants, folks will find themselves needing to park off of the main drag and into the
neighborhoods.

Inside tips: Mix and match styles and bases to suit your taste. Both styles can be made
with any of their four custom bases -- sweet tomato, roasted garlic and olive oil, pesto
and garlic white sauce. Besides cheese, additional toppings for a custom-made pie
(medium, $9; large, $12; and ex-large, $15) range from $1 to $2.

The numbers: 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays-Thursdays and until 10 p.m. Fridays-
Saturdays, closed Mondays; 8132 S.E. 13th Ave.; 503-736-0182.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
********************
NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: LEGEND OPENS LATEST PHASE AT
STONEWATER IN HILLSBORO
By Joshua Sommer
Staff researcher

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,January 13, 2005
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 10
Thursday, January 13, 2005

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: LEGEND OPENS LATEST PHASE AT
STONEWATER IN HILLSBORO

Legend Homes' new phase of condominium and townhome models at Stonewater at
Orenco in Hillsboro is celebrating its grand opening Jan. 16, from noon to 3 p.m.

Floor plans range from 906 to 2,138 square feet, with prices from $162,900 to $289,900.
Many units have attached garages and private courtyards or decks.

The grounds feature protected heritage trees, pocket parks, recreation areas, courtyards
and greenways.

For more information, call Robin Taylor or Valerie Mooney at 503-648-0233, or visit
www.legendhomes.com.

Haven House opens in Southeast Portland

HomeAid Portland and Caritas Housing Initiatives are celebrating the completion of a
new multi-family shelter, Haven House, which will provide temporary housing for six
teen mothers and their children.

HomeAid Portland is the shelter-providing arm of the Home Builders Foundation of
Metropolitan Portland and the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland
(HBA).

Caritas Housing Initiatives is the housing development unit of Catholic Charities of
Oregon, the social services branch of the Archdiocese of Portland.

Contractors, manufacturers and suppliers donated more than $180,000 in labor and
supplies to build Haven House. Local builders, Legend Homes and Renaissance Homes
acted as co-builder captains.

During their stay at the shelter, women will receive education or work experience and
gain life skills training.
The shelter, at the corner of Southeast 69th Avenue and Powell Boulevard, will open with
a ribbon cutting Jan. 19 at 11 a.m.

For more information, call Tamar Hare at 503-684-1880.

* Also, the HBA installed its 2005 officers and board of directors in December.

New officers and board members include Jim Chapman, Legend Homes, president;
David DeHarpport, Four D Construction, vice president; Lee Zajic, Northwest
Renovations and Design, vice president-treasurer; and Mike Arnett, Lifestyle Homes,
vice president-secretary.

Builder directors installed were Tom Skaar, Pacific Western Homes; Jeff Fish, Fish
Construction Northwest; Claire Loranger, Loranger Builders; Tim Breedlove,
Renaissance Homes; and Jeff Haggart, Haggart Construction.

Remodeler directors Tracy Hankins, Hankins Construction and Jeff Metke, Metke
Remodeling and Woodworking, were also installed -- as were associate directors Gary
Phillips, Gary's Vacuflo, and Luke Morley, Lakeside Lumber.

FHA hikes loan limits, but not in Portland

Federal Housing Administration ( FHA) mortgage loan limits rose Jan. 3 in many Oregon
counties, allowing borrowers using the program to purchase homes worth a bit more.

The changes are part of occasional adjustments made by the Department of Housing and
Urban Development to offset rising home prices.

Benton, Deschutes, Lane and Jackson counties had substantial increases.

Loan limits increased four times in 2004in Josephine County and the Portland
metropolitan area but remain unchanged this time.

Mortgage limits by county are:

Benton: $222,205

Deschutes: $217,265

Jackson: $237,500

Josephine: $204,250

Lane: $172,900
Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah, Washington and Yamhill counties in Oregon; and
Clark and Skamania counties in Washington: $213,750

For current FHA mortgage loan limits, visit
https://entp.hud.gov/idapp/html/hicostlook.cfm on the Web.

Phase-three sales start at D.R. Horton project

Sales on phase three of D.R. Horton's Oaks at Springbrook, in Newberg, began in early
December.

The 24 properties will feature three- and four-bedroom homes ranging from 1,820 to
2,135 square feet and priced from $209,900 to $225,900. Model homes open in January.

Half of the houses in this phase will border Gladys Park, a one-acre area including a
playground and a basketball court.

For more information, call Brett Grantham or Jack Hall at 503-538-6038.

Eligible family sought for building program

The Community Action Team is looking for a family to qualify for the last of 11 homes
to be built as part of its Self-Help Building Program.

The site for the project is Ravenwood Drive in St. Helens.

Participants must commit to 30 hours per week of sweat equity; the mortgage on the
home is approximately $121,000. Applications must be submitted in January.

Construction begins in February; the homes should be finished by October.

For qualification guidelines or other information, call 503-397-3511.

Don Morissette starts sales at Summit Ridge

Sales are under way at Don Morissette Homes' Summit Ridge, a 130-home development
on Bull Mountain in Tigard.

Summit Ridge sites range from 5,000 to 8,300 square feet and will feature houses from
1,800 to 4,800 square feet. Prices run from $320,000 to $500,000. A model home is
expected to open in spring 2005.

For more information on Summit Ridge, call 503-639-0497 or visit www.dmhomes.net.

Hansen Estates opens in Northeast Portland
Hansen Estates, a new community of 25 single-family homes near Glendoveer Golf
Course in Northeast Portland, is open for sales. A model home is close to completion.

The project, by Ostercraft Inc., has homes ranging from 1,600 to 1,850 square feet, with
base prices from $190,000 to $260,000. Eleven of the homes have sold.

Standard features at Hansen Estates include attached garages with openers, tile entries,
gas fireplaces, CAT-5 wiring, covered front porches and rear patios. Built on lots up to
5,600 square feet, many of the homes have sizeable backyard space.

For more information on Hansen Estates, call Katerina Iconomou of Coldwell Banker
Barbara Sue Seal Properties, 503-997-5459.

Workshop outlines seismic requirements

A lunchtime presentation on seismic design requirements for existing Portland buildings
is set for Jan. 14, from noon to 1:30 p.m., at 1900 S.W. Fourth Ave., in Conference Room
2500-A.

Part of the Portland Bureau of Development Services' free Lunch-and-Learn series, the
program will include an overview of the residential inspection process, requesting and
scheduling inspections, what orange "job site" cards mean and 10 suggestions on how to
avoid inspection problems.

For more information, call 503-823-7822.

****************

PASHA RESTAURANT
By Joshua Sommer, Special To The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,December 31, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 18
Friday, December 31, 2004

PASHA RESTAURANT

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

Pasha Restaurant

Chinese food and karaoke aficionados, lamenting the exit of the popular Marco Polo
Garden last July, will notice that the space has been filled by Pasha Restaurant, a
Persian/Mediterranean restaurant. Here's how Pasha, with huge shoes to fill, is shaping
up:

The chow: Some of the house favorites include Pasha's special ($13.95), olive oil sauteed
mushroom, broccoli, zucchini, tomato, garlic and herbs topped with rice and cheese;
chicken mazeh ($13.95), which is a combination of homos spices and chicken kebabs;
and homos (hummus, $5.95 or $8.95 with sauteed tenderloin).

Real deals: A few cheaper items that are particularly tasty are the stuffed grape leaves
with beef, vegetables and rice baked in a sweet sauce ($6.95); a wonderful cucumber
dinner salad of yogurt, cucumber and mint ($2.95); baked brie kalamata olives, roasted
garlic, sun-dried tomato and roasted pepper with French bread ($7.95); and a personal
favorite, the ground beef kebab, a charcoal-broiled dish that is marinated and served with
saffron rice ($9.95).

Hangout factor: Like its predecessor, the restaurant is well-lighted and open. Antique
furniture pieces line the walls and the high, warehouse-like ceilings make the place less
stuffy, even when packed.

Liquids: Pasha offers standard beverages, including several juices ($2) and an array of
bottled beers ($4). They also have a full bar.

What's half-baked? The lunch buffet ($6.95) is a generic do-it-yourself affair that
sometimes has more room for food than is being offered.

Inside tips: On the other side of the argument, the lunch buffet often offers some of the
best dishes from the main menu (and special dishes not on the menu) at a bargain price. A
recent trip through the buffet garnished a great chicken parmesan, vegetarian stuffed
grape leaves, a Mediterranean coleslaw that was salty but good, and a delicious eggplant
dip.

The numbers: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays and 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-
Saturdays, closed Sundays; 19 N.W. Fifth Ave.; 503-222-1667;
www.pasharestaurant.net.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
*****************

PRODUCT PROFILE: WHEN WINTER'S WORST BLOWS IN, HAVE EMERGENCY
KIT WELL-STOCKED
By Joshua Sommer Home Improvement Writer Paul Bianchina Contributed To This
Story

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,December 16, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 19
Thursday, December 16, 2004

PRODUCT PROFILE: WHEN WINTER'S WORST BLOWS IN, HAVE EMERGENCY
KIT WELL-STOCKED

Even newly built homes can fail when wind, cold, rain and snow conspire to push the
limits of their heating and electrical systems.

Here's a sampling of products safety-minded home owners can have on hand when the
heat or power goes out.

The Web sites of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Oregon Red
Cross and most local fire departments post lists of items all homes should have on hand,
especially in areas where power outages are common during winter months.

These sites also have tips for winter safety and survival and most give plenty of
preparedness advice on everything from power outages to earthquakes and winter storms.

In addition to the basics (first-aid kit, food, water), nearly every list recommends these
essentials: a battery-powered radio and flashlight, a heat source, something to cook on,
several hand tools and, ideally, some sort of back-up power, such as a generator. All of
these can readily be found in area stores.

* A seven-in-one flashlight/tool kit/radio from Claybrooke ($24.99, Meier & Frank)
features twin flashing safety blinkers, a flashlight, an AM/FM radio and tools including a
crescent wrench and hammer.

* Mr. Heater's Portable Buddy Propane Heater ($100, Camping World) puts out 4,000 to
9,000 BTUs, enough heat for a 200-square-foot space.

The heater uses either a one- or a 20-pound propane cylinder, can be used free-standing
or wall-mounted and has a handle on the top. It's lightweight (8 pounds), portable and can
operate for up to 110 hours. For indoor use, these heaters require ventilation such as a
slightly open window.

The Portable Buddy heater features a low-oxygen safety shutoff pilot that extinguishes
the heater if it uses too much oxygen in a room. Since propane heaters designed for
indoor use are a relatively new technology, check with local fire departments on the safe
use of these products.

"Space heaters in general need at least three feet of clearance on all sides," said Connie
King, fire prevention education officer, Hillsboro Fire Department. "Local fire officials
say that if you use propane heaters it is wise to ventilate them and absolutely do not
modify them. Also, if you decide to use one of these, buy an additional carbon monoxide
monitor and install it."
People with a power generator may prefer to use it to operate a electric heater indoors.
The Patton 1500 Watt 1Touch Oscillating Heater/Fan (heater or fan model 5505, $34.97,
Home Depot) features two heat settings, 1000 and 1500 watts.

The unit has a motorized oscillating fan to heat wider areas, an electronic thermostat for
precise temperature control and a handle for portability. The unit also features an auto
safety shut-off and overheat function.

"Never leave any space heater unattended," said King. "Always turn the heaters off and
unplug them (electric heaters) if you need to leave."

* Small, portable generators that pack enough power to operate a stove, computer,
refrigerator or a heat source have become compact and easily manageable -- ideal for
emergencies.

The Honda EU2000i (46.3 lbs.; $999, Beaverton Honda & Yamaha) utilizes Honda's new
inverter technology to generate 2000 watts of lightweight, quiet and efficient power.

To calculate how much wattage you'll need in an emergency, make a list of power
devices that are essential, add up the total wattage of each and purchase a generator that
will supply enough power.

The EU2000i will run up to 15 hours on a single tank of gas when used with its Eco-
Throttle feature.

Ultra-quiet, this generator emits less sound than the noise rating of common speech and
its new inverter technology is designed for use with sensitive electronics (computer, fax,
printer, telephone and stereo) because the generator produces a wave of energy that
prevents surging. The available power is commonly used for full-size microwave ovens,
larger power tools and resistive load appliances (coffee maker, toaster, small air
conditioning units, space heaters).

FEMA, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and the Red Cross recommend never operating a
generator from inside a home.

* For lengthly power outages, a stove that can operate without electricity will come in
handy.

The Century Deluxe two-burner camp stove ($54.95, REI) features 10,000 BTUs per
burner and offers plenty of room for large cooking pots.

The propane cook stove has a lid and side panels that provide flame protection for windy
days. The stove includes a two-foot hose assembly with a regulator that connects to a
disposable propane cylinder. The regulator can convert to fit larger propane tanks.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue advises to never operate camp stoves inside the home.
Store all emergency supplies in a dry place where they will be easily accessible -- even in
the dark.

Joshua Sommer is a staff researcher. He can be reached via e-mail to
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com.

Home Improvement writer Paul Bianchina contributed to this story.

RESOURCES:

* Beaverton Honda & Yamaha, 503-684-1199; www.bhy.net

* REI Portland, 503-221-1938; www.rei.com

* Meier & Frank downtown Portland, 503-223-0512; www.meierandfrank.com

* Home Depot, 503-774-6342; www.homedepot.com

* Camping World, 503-682-0752; www.campingworld.com

* Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, www.tvfr.com/cs/ep/index.html

* Hillsboro Fire Department, 503-681-6166; www.ci.hillsboro.or.us/Fire/

* Oregon Red Cross, www.redcross-oregontrail.org/news/daily_ preparedness_tips.htm

* FEMA, www.fema.gov/hazards/winterstorms/stormsf.shtm

* U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, www.cpsc.gov

***************

NOTEBOOK: REMODELORS COUNCIL DONATES BUILDING MATERIALS TO
REBUILDING CENTER
By Joshua Sommer

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,December 16, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 08
Thursday, December 16, 2004

NOTEBOOK: REMODELORS COUNCIL DONATES BUILDING MATERIALS TO
REBUILDING CENTER
The Remodelors Council of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland
donated about $4,000 in surplus building materials to The ReBuilding Center.

The materials were left over from the Builders Surplus Sale at the Portland Fall Home &
Garden Show.

The ReBuilding Center is a project of the nonprofit group Our United Villages, which
focuses on creating healthy neighborhoods by bringing neighbors together to share ideas
and strengthen communities. The center collects and sells quality used or unwanted
building materials that would otherwise be discarded.

For more information, call 503-331-1877, or visit www.rebuildingcenter.org.

Hansen Estates opens in Northeast Portland

Hansen Estates, a new community of 25 single-family homes near Glendoveer Golf
Course in Northeast Portland, is open for business, with a sales model nearly completed.

The project, by Ostercraft Inc., has homes ranging in size from 1,600 to 1,850 square
feet, with base prices ranging from $190,000 to $260,000. Eleven of the 25 homes have
been sold.

Standard features for the homes at Hansen Estates include attached garages with openers,
tile entries, gas fireplaces, CAT-5 wiring, covered front porches and rear patios. Built on
lots ranging up to 5,600 square feet, many of the homes have space for a sizeable back
yard.

For more information on Hansen Estates, call Katerina Iconomou of Coldwell Banker
Barbara Sue Seal Properties at 503-997-5459.

Open Door receives $63,000 federal grant

Open Door Counseling Center received a $63,000 grant from the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide housing counseling.

A HUD-certified housing counseling agency for 21 years, Open Door serves as
Washington County's referral center for housing resources.

Open Door, 34420 S.W. Tualatin Valley Highway in Hillsboro, provides mortgage
default prevention counseling, first-time home-buyer workshops and reverse-mortgage
counseling.

The center also operates a homeless drop-in shelter to provide hot meals, showers,
laundry facilities, counseling and assistance in finding housing, employment, clothing
and case management.
For more information, call 503-640-6689 or visit www.opendoorcounselingcenter.org.

Development company holds public meeting

A free public workshop is set for Saturday, Dec. 18, to view preliminary plans and
participate in roundtable discussions about property that Brooks Resources Corp., a real
estate development company, recently purchased in Prineville.

The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. in the Crook County Library, Broughton Room, 175
N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville. It will be hosted by Brooks Resources.

For more information, call 541-382-1662 or visit www.brooksresources.com.

Sales effort begins at Cloud Pass Ranch

Sales have begun at Cloud Pass Ranch, a 12-house development on Southeast Idleman
Road at the top of Mount Scott.

Houses on the lots, at 20,000 to 26,000 square feet, will be sized from 3,200 to 6,500
square feet and priced from $679,960 to $1.2 million. Three lots have sold.

Builders are Home Trends Northwest, Cedar Ridge Homes and Stonewood Homes. Sales
agent for the project is Troy Martin, RE/MAX Equity Group, 503-495-3391.

JLS Custom Homes starts new projects

JLS Custom Homes began construction at four new sites in November and December.

Montarosa, a 56-lot community at Southwest Weir Road and 155th Avenue, will feature
homes ranging from 1,323 to 1,509 square feet and prices from $172,950 to $189,950.

Bonita Place Townhomes includes 53 units at Southwest Bonita Road and Fanno Creek
Drive. The townhomes will range from 1,295 to 1,943 square feet and prices range from
$159,000 to $199,950. The designs feature two-car garages, gourmet kitchens and
vaulted ceilings.

Glencory, an 83-lot site off Northwest Glencoe Road, offers four home designs ranging
from 1,700 to 1,850 square feet, priced from $178,950 to $189,950.

The Heathcliff at Jackson Bottoms, at Southeast Cedar and Fifth Streets, features 57 lots
with six Craftsman-style designs ranging from 1,445 to 1,900 square feet and priced from
$155,950 to $174,950.

For more information on Glencory, call Faith O'Billovich at 503-317-8640.
For more information on Heathcliff at Jackson Bottoms, call Jonni Purdy at 971-212-
4275.

For more information on Montarosa, call Brian Fortune at 503-969-1454.

For more information on Bonita Place Townhomes, call Mindy Ruef at 503-998-5379.

Washougal welcomes Parade for third time

The Building Industry Association of Clark County (BIA) announced its 2005 Parade of
Homes will be held Aug. 19 to Sept. 5, 2005, in the second phase of River View Terrace
in Washougal, Wash.

River View Terrace is off of Southeast Crown Road, near the site of the 2004 show.

The 2005 show be the third Parade in Washougal. Hugh Hall, president of Lynnwood
Homes in Gresham, is the event's chairman.

For more information, call Avaly Mobbs at 360-694-0933.

Persimmon begins townhouse project

Persimmon Construction broke ground on Gresham Station Townhomes, a 60-home
community, at the beginning of November.

Home sizes range from 1,304 to 1,775 square feet and are priced from $179,500 to
$239,800.

The site is next to Gresham Station Medical Center at Northwest Fanning Way and Civic
Drive. The completion of the fist phase is slated for summer 2005.

For more information, call 503-491-9200.

Sales commence at Burlingame East

A new project in Troutdale has opened sales on 47 homes at Southwest McGinnis
Avenue and 29th Street.

Homes at Burlingame East, developed by Palace Construction, range from 1,493 to 1,821
square feet and are priced from $185,450 to $211,000.

Real Estate Headquarters is marketing the homes.

For more information, call 503-674-7878 or visit www.burlingame.com.

Arbor breaks ground on Tigard project
West Hills Development, the parent company of Arbor Custom Homes, has begun site
preparation for 41 of 53 homes at Arbor Summit, a new project off of Southwest Bull
Mountain Road, Tigard.

Home sales and a model are expected to open in February 2005. New French, English
and traditional American exteriors are being introduced specifically for the project, with
homes ranging from 2,400 to 3,500 square feet and prices based from $300,000 to
$450,000.

For more information, call 503-641-7342, or visit www.arborhomes.com.

Site work under way at new development

Site development has begun at Sawgrass Flats, a 15-rowhome project at Northeast Sixth
and Cleveland Streets in Gresham.

The homes, built by Ostercraft, will range from 970 to 1,900 square feet and will be
priced from $129,000 to $187,900. For more information, call 503-772-0022.

A place to live is gift that keeps on giving

Join -- a private nonprofit organization -- is recruiting businesses, faith organizations and
individuals to participate in a program to help provide 40 housing units to homeless
families and individuals.

"Home for the Holidays" is part of Join's ongoing goal to house the homeless. Last
season, the program served 49 people, including 25 children, thanks to sponsors that
included Rejuvenation, Pixelworks and PGE.

Founded in 1992, Join focuses on outreach services to individuals who are on the street.
The group provides access to community resources that help homeless people make the
transition from the street to stable housing.

"Home for the Holidays" is part of an annual effort that helped house 235 families last
year. Sponsors donate $2,500 and provide a move-in box. The cash donation covers
move-in, stabilization and follow-up expenses. Contents of the move-in box include like-
new items such as sheets, towels, dinnerware and cookware.

"As a 'Home' sponsor, contributors embody the spirit of the season in a gift whose impact
goes way beyond just the holidays," said Rob Justus, executive director of Join

For more information or to become a sponsor, call 503-232-7052 or visit
www.joinpdx.com.
**************
PLACE TO LIVE IS GIFT THAT KEEPS GIVING
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,December 12, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H06
Sunday, December 12, 2004

PLACE TO LIVE IS GIFT THAT KEEPS GIVING

Join -- a private nonprofit organization -- is recruiting businesses, faith organizations and
individuals to participate in a program to help provide 40 housing units to homeless
families and individuals.

"Home for the Holidays" is part of Join's ongoing goal to house the homeless. Last
season, the program served 49 people, including 25 children, thanks to sponsors that
included Rejuvenation, Pixelworks and PGE.

Founded in 1992, Join focuses on outreach services to individuals who are on the street.
The group provides access to community resources that help homeless people make the
transition from the street to stable housing.

"Home for the Holidays" is part of an annual effort that helped house 235 families last
year. Sponsors donate $2,500 and provide a move-in box. The cash donation covers
move-in, stabilization and follow-up expenses. Contents of the move-in box include like-
new items such as sheets, towels, dinnerware, cookware and cleaning supplies.

"As a 'Home' sponsor, contributors embody the spirit of the season in a gift whose impact
goes way beyond just the holidays," said Rob Justus, executive director of Join. "The gift
of stable housing is life- changing. This is not a Band-Aid or a temporary fix -- it's
permanent housing."

For more information or to become a sponsor, call 503-232-7052 or visit
www.joinpdx.com.

-- Joshua Sommer

******************

JUAN COLORADO MEXICAN RESTAURANT
By Joshua Sommer, Special To The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,December 10, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 26
Friday, December 10, 2004

JUAN COLORADO MEXICAN RESTAURANT

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

Every once in a while a restaurant sneaks up on you. It seems like everywhere I turn
lately -- BOOM -- I see the words "Juan Colorado" dangling before me. I'm not sure how
old the chain is, but the hungry consumer can find a conveniently located Juan's in
Beaverton, Northwest Portland (off Bethany Boulevard), Gresham, Hillsboro, Tualatin,
Wilsonville and the one I stumbled across on Southwest Barbur Boulevard.

The chow: Many of the appetizers, including the signature Juan Colorado's Flautas
($6.95), are tasty and well worth your dime. There are a bunch of unique main dishes that
are sure to please, including the burrito Tijuana ($6.95 at lunch, $8.45 at dinner).

Real deals: The lunch menu ranges from $5.95 to $7.95 and includes many of the best
dishes from the dinner menu.

Hangout factor: This place, or the one I visited, was bright and well-lit. Suitable for
intimate conversations or professionals looking for a good power-lunch spot.

Liquids: Two must-haves are the Margarita Loco ($6.50) and regular margarita ($4.50).
They are delicious.

What's half-baked? The cheese enchilada ($3.25) and the pork tamales ($3) are bland.

Inside tips: If you go, get the flautas mentioned above, the avocado tostada ($6.45 at
lunch, $9.75 at dinner) and top off your evening with either xangos (pronounced
"changos" -- $3.50) or flan ($2.50) for dessert.

The numbers: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sundays; 10075 S.W.
Barbur Blvd., Suite 7, and numerous other locations; 503-244-4360.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
*****************

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE NEW
DELHI RESTAURANT
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,November 5, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 22
Friday, November 5, 2004

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE NEW
DELHI RESTAURANT

New Delhi Restaurant

Something about the word "buffet" makes my mouth water. The phrase "all you can eat"
has much the same effect. The New Delhi Restaurant has a lunch buffet ($6.95) that's
easy on the coin collection and more than ample for the hardiest appetite.

The chow: All of the standard favorites are available. A few sure hits are the tandoori
chicken ($7.95), lamb saag ($10.95), aaloo matar ($8.95, vegetarian), chana masala
($8.95, vegetarian) and eggplant curry ($8.95, vegetarian).

Real deals: Side orders such as papadams ($1) and naan ($1.25) go great with all of the
flavorful tandoori dishes ($7.95 to $15.95), which are prepared in a clay oven.

Hangout factor: The place is nicely tucked into a small shopping area off Southwest
Barbur; the large, bright interior lends an overall comfy atmosphere.

Liquids: The Maharaja Premium Indian Pilsner ($3.50), new to me, is a smooth, easy
brew that complements the cuisine.

What's half-baked? Parking can be a problem if the place (or surrounding stores) gets
busy.

Inside tips: The lunch buffet runs 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. It
usually features many of the dishes mentioned above, as well as many not on the regular
menu, including tasty chicken makhani.

The numbers: Lunch, 11 .a.m.-3 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, dinner, 5-9 p.m. (closed
Sundays); 9111 S.W. Barbur Blvd.; 503-892-5811.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
**************

NOTEBOOK ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON GIVES QUALIFYING BUILDERS A
GREEN STAR
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,October 21, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, October 21, 2004

NOTEBOOK ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON GIVES QUALIFYING BUILDERS A
GREEN STAR

Oregon builders can now earn a star -- the Energy Star.

Energy Star is a national symbol designating energy efficiency standards. It was
introduced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of
Energy, with labels appearing on products ranging from computer monitors to light bulbs.
Through a new program from Energy Trust of Oregon, this label can now be found on
new homes in Oregon.

The program, Efficient New Homes, sets standards for home builders to increase energy
efficiency in home construction through energy-saving heating and cooling units and
water heaters; Energy Star-qualified windows, lighting and appliances; and building
practices such as controlled ventilation, tighter ducts and improved insulation.

After construction, the home is tested by a third-party inspector to make sure it qualifies
as an Energy Star-rated home and that it fits the criteria of the Efficient New Homes
program.

The Energy Trust Web site lists Efficient New Homes builders, including Leader
Builders of Bend, Loranger Builders of Hillsboro and W.B.S. Construction of Portland.
For more information, call 866-368-7878 or visit www.energytrust.org.

Street of Dreams gala raises $40,000-plus

Midsummer Night's Dream -- the annual event that marks the opening of the Northwest
Natural Street of Dreams -- collected more than $40,000 for charities, according to the
Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland.

The 2004 beneficiaries include Candlelighters for Children with Cancer, Community
Vision, HOST Development, Junior League of Portland, Kruse Way-Lake Oswego
Rotary Club, Northwest Housing Alternatives, Northwest Medical Teams, Portland
Housing Center, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oregon and Southwest
Washington, the Women for Children Chapter of Friends of Doernbecher and YWCA.

Deadlines approaching for NAHB contests

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) has announced entry deadlines for
three design competitions:

* The deadline for the 2005 Pillars of the Industry Awards, which focuses on apartment
and condominium design, development, marketing and management, is Nov. 8.
Complete details and an application are available at www.pillarsconference.com.

* The NAHB Seniors Housing Council's 2005 Best of Senior Housing Awards honors
architectural and interior designs, marking approaches that bring quality, innovation and
spirit to the seniors housing industry while looking ahead to the future.

The deadline for submissions to this competition is Nov. 5.

For more information, visit www.nahb.org/seniorshousingawards.

* The 2005 National Green Building Awards -- which recognize individuals, companies
and organizations that demonstrate a commitment to green home building -- is open for
submissions until Dec. 15. A $250 entry fee is required.

For more information, visit www.nahb.org/greenbuildingawards.

HBA receives award for lobbying efforts

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA) received a national
Association Excellence Award for "Best Governmental Affairs/Lobbying Program
Administered" on Aug. 26 in Destin, Fla.

Award recipients are selected by members of the National Association of Home Builders
(NAHB) Executive Officers Council, representing more than 850 local home building
associations across the country.

Judges honored the HBA for its innovative efforts in 2003 to preserve the ability of
Portland builders to construct homes on narrow city lots.

HBA's Government Affairs Department includes Kelly Ross, manager; Ernie Platt,
director of local government affairs; Misty Slagle, political affairs director; and Kristin
Glover, administrative support.

"This is a great honor for our staff and membership," said Tim Roth, JT Roth
Construction, 2004 HBA President. "It illustrates both our commitment to government
affairs on behalf of our industry and the effectiveness of our government affairs team."

The award is the second in two years for HBA's government affairs program. The HBA
received NAHB's "State & Local Government Affairs Recognition Award" for its efforts
to expand the regional urban growth boundary in 2002.

Arbor begins work at Wilsonville project

Arbor Custom Homes has started infrastructure work at Villebois on the site of the
former Dammasch State Hospital in Wilsonville.
West Hills Development, Arbor's parent company, will develop 159 acres of the 500-acre
project. Arbor's 60-home phase one is the first building activity at the site off Southwest
Grahams Ferry Road.

Over the next six years, Arbor expects to build 850 detached and townhome residences at
Villebois. Developer Costa Pacific Communities and Legend Homes also will build
homes at Villebois, which is expected to have 2,700 homes, as well as commercial
development, when completed.

Homes in Arbor's phase one will range from 1,400 to 3,500 square feet and will be priced
from $180,000 to $500,000. By agreement with Costa Pacific, architectural styles will be
French Revival, English Revival, American Classic and American Modern.

For more information, call 503-641-7342, Ext. 249, or visit www.arborhomes.com.

Buena Vista breaks ground at two sites

Buena Vista Custom Homes has announced groundbreakings on two of its projects.

Kessler Estates is a 26-lot subdivision in Tigard off Southwest Hall Boulevard. A model
home is expected to open in late October. Homes will range from 2,116 to 3,684 square
feet and will be priced from $349,950 to $429,950.

Vesper Park, an eight-lot site near Northwest Murray Boulevard and Cornell Road, will
hold a grand opening this winter. Vesper Park homes will range from 2,342 to 3,212
square feet, with prices from $279,950 to $349,950.

For more information on Kessler Estates, call 503-495-3876.

For more information on Vesper Park, call 503-306-9002.

Renaissance opens sales at Eagle Landing

Early interest prompted sales to open at Renaissance at Eagle Landing, off of Southeast
Stevens Road near the former Top-O-Scott golf course on Mount Scott.

"We received more phone calls and e-mails regarding Renaissance at Eagle Landing
before we'd even broken ground for our model than for any other Renaissance
neighborhood in the 20-year history of our company," said Randy Sebastian, president of
Renaissance Homes, which is developing the site.

The development will feature 73 homes ranging from 1,895 to 3,258 square feet, with
prices expected to range from $360,000 to $470,000. For more information, call Lee
Wells at 971-563-6358.
* Renaissance announced plans to develop a 12-home site near Wilsonville High School.
Named Cedar Pointe, the development will feature homes ranging from 3,422 to 4,320
and prices from $600,000 to $700,000.

For more information, call 503-969-1962.

Sales effort under way at Sherwood project

Don Morissette Homes has opened sales on 23 home sites at The Bluffs at Cedar Creek, a
new development in Sherwood. The homes will range from 1,800 to 3,400 square feet
and will be priced from $300,000 to $400,000.

For more information, call 503-730-5980.

Ostercraft starts work at two new projects

Site development has begun at Coldwater Creek, a 21-lot project at 2833 N.E. Division
St.

The homes, built by Ostercraft Inc., will range from 790 to 1,547 square feet and will be
priced from $109,950 to $159,950.

Also, foundation work and framing has begun at Hansen Estates, a 25-home project by
Ostercraft, near Glendoveer Golf Course and Northeast Glisan Street.

The homes will range from 1,515 to 1,852 square feet and will run from $185,000 to
$219,000.

For more information, call 503-772-0022.

Newest phase opens at Bauer Highlands

Legend Homes has announced the grand opening of the latest phase of its Bauer
Highlands community off Northwest Saltzman Road.

A newly finished and furnished model home is open for tours.

The newest phase features homes from 2,579 to 2,875 square feet and prices ranging
from $390,000 to $409,000.

For more information, call 503-466-1005.

Vancouver community holds grand opening

A grand opening for Fairfield Park, a 167-home community between Interstate 5 and
Interstate 205 in Vancouver, was held in early September.
Built by Pacific Lifestyle Homes, the houses range in size from 1,298 to 3,302 square feet
and are priced from $151,200 to $321,400.

For more information, call 360-573-8081.
************

SHOW BRINGS OUTDOORS IN
JOSHUA SOMMER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,October 3, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H04
Sunday, October 3, 2004

SHOW BRINGS OUTDOORS IN

Gardeners, landscapers and homeowners can find materials -- and inspiration -- for house
and yard projects at the Portland Fall Home & Garden Show.

New to the show this year is a pet showcase that includes the Friskies for More Stage
Show as well as cats and dogs in search of homes from Bonnie L. Hayes Small Animal
Shelter.

Also new this year is a Portland-area builders surplus sale, which has materials such as
windows, doors, appliances and roofing.

Returning showcases include

vignette gardens by 10 designers that feature rockwork patios and water elements; a fall
plant sale with proceeds donated to Legacy Health System's Horticultural Therapy
Program; and a Borders Bookstore display.

The show is at the Portland Expo Center, 2060 North Marine Drive, and runs Oct. 7 and
8, noon to 9 p.m.; Oct. 9, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Oct. 10, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Admission is $7 for adults, $1 for kids six to 12 and free for children age 5 and under.

-- Joshua Sommer
***************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK PARTNERSHIP BRINGS HOMES TO ST.
JOHNS NEIGHBORHOOD
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,September 16, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, September 16, 2004

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK PARTNERSHIP BRINGS HOMES TO ST.
JOHNS NEIGHBORHOOD

A partnership between Peninsula Community Development Corporation (Peninsula
CDC) and Portland Community Land Trust (PCLT) is bringing six new homes to the St.
Johns neighborhood by March 2005.

The development, Orchard Homes, is between North Nashton and Seneca streets at North
Gilbert Avenue. The homes will range from 1,030 to 1,276 square feet, and prices will
run from $109,900 to $118,900.

Two houses are scheduled to be finished by winter 2004; the other four should be
completed by March 2005.

Based on the PCLT's community land trust model of homeownership, the partnership is
providing homeownership opportunities to low- and moderate-income buyers by taking
land costs out of the equation, holding the land under the home in trust.

The office for Orchard Homes is at 6823 N. Seneca St.

For more information on the PCLT, call Allison Handler at 503-493-0293 or visit
www.pclt.org.

For more information on Peninsula CDC, visit www.peninsulacdc.org.

Grand opening set for McDaniel Village

The grand opening for McDaniel Village, a new single-family home development at
Northwest 119th Avenue and McDaniel Road, is planned for Sept. 18 and 19. A model
home -- 2,134-square-feet and priced at $288,000 -- will be open for viewing, and lunch
will be provided both days.

Grand opening hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Developed by Don Morissette Homes, the development will include 62 homes from
1,800 to 2,900 square feet and priced from $260, 000 to $400,000.

For more information, call 503-690-6559.

Clinton Street Lofts close to completion
Sales are under way at loft-style condominiums on Southeast Clinton Street near 20th
Avenue.

Developer Robert Ross, Shoehorn Group, anticipates that construction will be completed
this month.

The condos, which range from 836 to 928 square feet, are priced from $219,900 to
$235,000. For more information, call Richard Chyle, Prudential Northwest Properties, at
503-887-1665.

Parade of Homes lends site to garden show

The final weekend of the Riverview Community Bank Parade of Homes packs a one-two
punch.

From Sept. 17 to 19, the Building Industry Association of Clark County's annual
Remodeling and Garden Show is being held as part of the Parade of Homes at Granite
Highlands in Washougal, Wash. Admission is free with admission to the home show.

More than 100 exhibitors will be at the Remodeling and Garden Show, representing
breakthrough remodeling products and services, home decor and landscaping.

Exhibits will be set up in the garages of the show homes and also in tents, with the garden
portion of the event expanding into the back yards of four of the homes.

Like the show homes, the Remodeling and Garden Show features environmentally sound
building products.

For more information about the show, visit www.clarkcountyparadeofhomes.com.

Green-building tour includes 20 homes

Anyone interested in green-building techniques and products can check out the third
annual Build It Green! (BIG!) home tour on Sept. 18, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Part of the American Solar Energy Society's National Solar Tour, BIG! includes 20
homes throughout the Portland metropolitan area that incorporate environmentally sound
construction and products.

Presented by G/Rated, Metro and the Solar Energy Association of Oregon, the tour is
sponsored by Neil Kelly, The Energy Trust of Oregon, Environmental Building Supplies
and PGE Earth Advantage.

Cost for the fair is $15 for adults; $10 for "car-free" people, students and seniors; and free
for children under 14.
For more information, call 503-823-7725, or visit www.green-rated.org.

Three chosen to join Housing Hall of Fame

The Oregon Building Industry Association (OBIA) announced that Dale DeHarpport, H.
Pat Ritz and Pat Bridges will be inducted into the Oregon Housing Hall of Fame in a
ceremony on Nov. 5.

Leaders of the OBIA choose inductees based their significant and lasting contributions to
housing in Oregon, the building industry and to the OBIA.

DeHarpport is recognized as an active leader of the OBIA at the local, state and national
level; Ritz has been an honorary life member of the Home Builders Association of
Metropolitan Portland (HBA) since 1999; and Bridges was instrumental in developing
the International Residential Code.

For more information, call the OBIA at 503-378-9066.

Pros, Realtors, visitors select winning entries

Winners of the 2004 Northwest Natural Street of Dreams were announced Wednesday by
the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA).

There were three judging panels for entries in the annual show of luxury homes. The
People's Choice awards resulted from ballots cast by attendees as they toured the show.
Realtors voted for their favorites on Realtor Day, sponsored by The Oregonian.
Professional awards were determined by industry judges from outside the Portland area.

* People's Choice Awards

Best Kitchen: The Grand Retreat, KDC Construction

Best Landscaping, Best Interior Decorating, Best Home Furnishing and Best of Show:
Hidden Lake Lodge, Skreen Construction

* Professional's Choice Awards

Best Kitchen, Best Architectural Design, Best Master Suite and Best of Show: The Grand
Retreat, KDC Construction

Best Landscaping: Hidden Lake Lodge, Skreen Construction

Best Interior Decorating and Best Home Furnishing: The Cosmopolitan, Aspen Leaf

* Realtors' Choice Awards
Best Kitchen, Best Landscaping, Best Architectural Design, Best Home Furnishing, best
Master Suite and Best of Show: The Grand Retreat, KDC Construction

Best Curb Appeal: Hidden Lake Lodge, Skreen Construction

Best Interior Decorating: Lakewood Manor, Haggart Construction

The HBA also announced the award winners for the 2004 RE/MAX Street of New
Beginnings, held in June.

* Peoples' Choice Awards

Best Value and Best Landscaping: The Duckworth, Gregory Construction

Best Interior Decorating, Best Home Furnishings and Best Architectural Design: Fresco,
Crown Construction of Oregon

Best Kitchen and Best of Show: The Heron, Loranger Builders

* Realtors' Choice Awards

Best Value and Best Landscaping: The Duckworth, Gregory Construction

Best Interior Decorating and Best Architectural Design: Fresco, Crown Construction of
Oregon

Best Home Furnishings, Best Kitchen and Best of Show: The Heron, Loranger Builders

New Web site outlines residential regulations

Residential home builders have a new way to keep up with current Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA) information: a Web site created by OSHA and the
National Association of Home Builders (NAHB).

The site includes OSHA standards, hazards present in residential construction, solutions
available to the industry and information on electrical safety, fall protection, fire safety,
hand and power tool safety, proper scaffolding and personal protective equipment.

There's also information about enforcement of rules and training.

To visit the site, go to www.osha.gov/SLTC/residential/index.html.

Renaissance begins two developments

Work is under way at two Portland sites being developed by Renaissance Homes.
Renaissance at Peterkort Woods, a townhome community near the U.S. 26 and Oregon
217 interchange, will feature homes from 1,233 to 2,710 square feet and prices expected
to range from $224,900 to $499,900.

Sales on the 223 homes will begin in early 2005.

The second site, Renaissance at Eagle Landing, at the former Top-O-Scott golf course on
Mount Scott, will feature 73 homes ranging from 1,902 to 3,258 square feet, with prices
expected to range from $349,000 to $449,000.

The first phase will include 12 homes with models open in early 2005.

For more information on these projects, call Lee Wells at 971-563-6358.

Phase two sales begin at Magnolia Estates

Phase two of D.R. Horton's Magnolia Estates in Hillsboro is open for sales, with two
model homes available to view.

This is the second and final phase of the 179-home project at Southeast Minter Bridge
Road and Morgan Road. Seventy-one homes are sold.

Magnolia Estates features homes from 1,546 to 2,064 square feet; prices run from
$172,900 to $212,900.

For more information, call 503-648-4580 or visit www.drhorton.com.

*******************

DINING CHEAP EATS HIBACHI PARK
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,September 3, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 20
Friday, September 3, 2004

DINING CHEAP EATS HIBACHI PARK

feeding frenzies with pocket change

Hibachi Park

With Labor Day weekend looming and the autumnal equinox around the corner, people
who love the smell and taste of sizzling meat may begin experiencing the winter of their
discontent. That's where Hibachi Park, a Korean charcoal barbecue joint, comes to the
rescue.

The chow: Prices run the gamut from cheap and tasty lunch items such as Vegetable
Udon ($4.95) to moderately priced dinner items including the BBQ Gal-Bi (beef short
rib, $10.95).

Real deals: Several unique dishes will be hard to find elsewhere. Favorites: the Korean
Pancake appetizer ($3.50), BBQ Bool-Go-Gi with cabbage salad ($5.25/lunch,
$7.95/dinner) and a superb homemade Ice Cream Coffee ($3.50) served in a pint glass.

Hangout factor: White noise from the busy intersection at Southeast Powell Boulevard
and 50th Avenue is masked by Korean music. The large seating area makes the place
ideal for bigger groups, and the tall ceilings lend an open feeling.

Liquids: For a new treat, try chilled Soju ($9.95), which is a sort of cousin of the
Japanese sake, except it's lighter with a blend of barley, sweet potato and tapioca.

What's half-baked? The view of Powell Boulevard is dreary.

Inside tips: The charcoal grilled meats ($5.25 to $10.95) are very worthwhile. Also, try
the deep-fried pot stickers ($3.50), which come with homemade kimchi and sonomono
(sliced cucumber with ginger). Hibachi Park's version of Kung Pao Chicken
($6.25/lunch, $7.95/dinner) is a delish spicy dish.

The numbers: 503-245-8646; 4908 S.E. Powell Blvd.; open 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays to
Fridays, noon to 10 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
*************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK SHOW-HOME SALE YIELDS $200,000 FOR
DOERNBECHER CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,August 19, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, August 19, 2004

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK SHOW-HOME SALE YIELDS $200,000 FOR
DOERNBECHER CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
A donation of $200,000 is being made to Doernbecher Children's Hospital on behalf of
the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA), Blazer Development,
John L. Scott Real Estate and the Ford Foundation.

The funds come from the sale of the "Miracle House" -- a house featured at the 2004
Northwest Natural Street of Dreams, which is open until Sept. 6 in Clackamas County.

Miracle House is part of the HBA's Home Builders for Miracles program. Blazer
Development volunteered to build the home, and John L. Scott donated commissions,
marketing and staffing fees back to the project.

The Ford Foundation donated matching funds.

"There's no question that the sale of the Miracle House was a top priority for everyone
involved with the show. A lot of effort went into making the sale," said David Nielsen,
chief executive officer of HBA.

Construction begins at multi-family house

Construction of a new multi-family home, Haven House, began Aug. 10 with a ground-
breaking celebration.

At Southeast 69th Avenue and Powell Boulevard, Haven House will offer transitional
housing and services to homeless teen-age mothers and their babies. The project is a
partnership between Caritas Housing Initiatives (the housing development arm of
Catholic Charities of Oregon) and HomeAid Portland (a program from the Home
Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland).

Legend Homes and Renaissance Homes are leading the construction effort. For more
information, call Tamar Hare, of the Home Builders Association, at 503-684-1880.

Housing center tallies year-end successes

During the 2003-2004 fiscal year, the Portland Housing Center (PHC) helped 120
minority families achieve homeownership.

The PHC credits its success to its public education programs, its media campaign, its
participation in home-buying fairs and collaborations with lenders, real-estate
professionals, home builders, insurance companies, government agencies and nonprofit
organizations.

For more information, call 503-282-7744, or visit www.portlandhousingcenter.org.

Builder plays a role in summer concerts
Randy Sebastian, president of Renaissance Homes, donated $5,000 and is the major
sponsor for Music in the Park 2004, a concert series in Woodburn.

The program is presented by the Friends of the Woodburn Public Library and features
free concerts for all ages on Tuesdays through August. Concerts begin at 7 p.m.

For directions call, 503-982-5252, or visit www.ccrls.org/woodburn/mip/index.html.

Hayden Island condo launches sales effort

Sales have begun at The Waterside, an 84-unit condominium development on Hayden
Island.

Developed by Hayden Island Condos, the community includes a walking trail, a private
marina for 84 boats and views of the Columbia River, Mount St. Helens and Mount
Hood.

Tenants are expected to begin moving in next year.

Units range from 1,750 to 4,500 square feet and are priced from $399,000 to $1.4 million.

For more information, call Walter Valenta, Harbor Properties, at 503-880-0181, or visit
www.viewthewaterside.com.

Townhomes arrive at NorthWest Crossing

West Bend Properties Co. of Bend has begun construction on its first townhomes at
NorthWest Crossing.

Lewis & Clark Townhomes, near Northwest Lemhi Drive and Shields Drive, will feature
34 townhomes in its first phase ranging in size from 1,400 to 1,900 square feet and in
price from $250,000 to $300,000. Building is expected to be completed by winter.

For more information, call NorthWest Crossing Realty at 541-388-1992, or visit
www.northwestcrossing.com.

First phase of sales opens at North Rim

The Brooks Resources Corp. is developing 122 home sites at North Rim, a 200-acre
development near the north side of Awbrey Butte in Bend. First-phase sales opened in
July.

Prices for the initial phase range from $285,000 to $410,000; lots are at least an acre.
Five phases will be released over the next three to four years, the company said, and
Brooks Resources Realty is handling sales. For more information, call 541-318-8002, or
visit www.brooksresourcesrealty.com.

Buena Vista Homes begins new project

Buena Vista Custom Homes broke ground on a 32-lot development in Wilsonville.

The Village on Main Street will feature homes from 1,631 to 1,927 square feet, with
prices ranging from $231,950 to $264,950. For more information, call Mike Wiltshire,
Prudential Northwest Properties, 503-306-9002.

Home show attracts about 15,000 visitors

A total of 15,002 visitors toured the 2004 RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings.

The show was held June 19 to July 11 at Nature's Ridge in Cornelius. As of Aug. 17, four
of the nine homes in the tour had sold.

***************

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE CURRY
LEAF
By Joshua Sommer
Special to The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,August 6, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 24
Friday, August 6, 2004

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE CURRY
LEAF

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

By JOSHUA SOMMER

Curry Leaf

Featuring some of the best Indo-Chinese food I've had in Portland, this place offers
specialty Indian dishes from several regions for the cash-conscious diner.
The chow: A quick scan of the menu reveals these tasty temptations: Chicken Pepper Fry
($6); Nilgiris Kurma, fresh vegetables in cashew and coconut sauce ($9); and Karaikudi
Chicken, roasted in some tasty and seldom-used spices from the southern Indian state of
Tamilnadu ($9).

Real deals: Prices range from around $3 for starters to $12.50 at the most for entrees.
Curry Leaf caters to both vegetarians and meat lovers. With two appetizers, an entree to
share and beverages, a couple can easily make it out of Curry Leaf for less than $30 --
doggy bag included.

Hangout factor: Once you get past the strip-mall aura, you'll find the staff and the
restaurant to be bright and inviting.

Liquids: If you haven't already, try the Indian import Kingfisher Lager ($3.50), a crisp,
light beer.

What's half-baked? It's a ways from Portland proper, but if you find yourself on U.S. 26
near the Northwest Bethany Boulevard exit, you really should take a slight detour and
check out Curry Leaf.

Inside tips: East meets West with Spicy Wings ($6), with a sauce that's a complex mix of
Indian spices -- you'll want to use whatever garlic naan ($1.75) you have handy to mop
up the plate. Also, in perhaps one of the best Indo-Chinese-influenced dishes, the Veggie
Fried Noodles ($8) really show off the restaurant's ability to fuse two regional cuisines.

The numbers: 503-645-6113; 15325 N.W. Central Drive; open daily 11:30 a.m.-9:30
p.m., closed Mondays; www.curryleafpdx.com.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
***********

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK STUDENTS WIN GRANTS FROM HOME
BUILDERS FOUNDATION
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,July 22, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, July 22, 2004

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK STUDENTS WIN GRANTS FROM HOME
BUILDERS FOUNDATION

Three Portland-area community-college students won $1,800 to be applied toward their
studies in residential remodeling and building.
The recipients are Julie Starr, who is studying remodeling at Mt. Hood Community
College (MHCC); Amir Lukmanji, who is studying new-home construction at Portland
Community College (PCC); and Gary Higginbotham, who is studying new-home
construction at MHCC.

Presented by the Home Builders Foundation of Metropolitan Portland, the awards will be
given to the recipients on Aug. 13 during ceremonies at the 2004 NW Natural Street of
Dreams.

To qualify, applicants must be enrolled in a full-time course of study at PCC, MHCC,
Clackamas Community College or the Associated General Contractors Apprenticeship
Program and maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or higher.

For more information, call Tamar Hare, 503-684-1800.

HBA members make donation to food bank

Members of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland and participants in
the 2004 RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings collected 1,474 pounds of food for the
Oregon Food Bank at the show's Industry Open Night in June.

The donation is roughly enough to provide 20 families with food for seven days.

The Industry Open Night is a sneak preview of the homes for builders, trade contractors
and suppliers involved in the show. The event concluded July 11.

Tigard townhomes open model to visitors

Autumn Park Townhomes, a new community in Tigard from Derek L. Brown &
Associates, has opened a model home for visitors to tour.

One block from Summerlake Park, Autumn Park Townhomes range in size from 1,568 to
1,668 square feet with base prices beginning at $169,900.

For more information, call 503-521-1035, or visit www.autumnparktownhomes.com.

Phase-six lots released for sale at Persimmon

A new phase of 27 home sites in the Persimmon Country Club community in Gresham
was released for sale in mid-July.

Lots average 20,000 square feet and are priced from $79,000 to $220,000. Owners can
choose from a list of preferred builders or have one approved by Persimmon
Development, developers of the site.
Off of Southeast Butler Road and 242nd Avenue, the community is bordered by the
Persimmon Country Club and golf course.

For more information, call Sue Piazza at 503-674-2556, or visit
www.buypersimmonhomes.com.

Arbor Roses opens sales in phase two

Arbor Custom Homes announced the opening of phase two of its Arbor Roses
community next to Hillsboro's Shute Park on the Tualatin Valley Highway.

The 113-home second phase will feature homes from 1,601 to 1,921 square feet at prices
ranging from $192,900 $219,900.

Phase two borders the Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve.

For more information, call Natalie Peloquin at 503-648-2277.

The second phase of Arbor Custom Homes' Arbor Station has opened for sales.

The release includes 148 homes from 1,400 to 2,000 square feet. Prices range from
$152,900 to $236,450.

Arbor Station is on Southwest 170th Avenue near Merlo Road in Washington County.
For more information, call Tara Jacobi, 503-591-7175.

New Beaverton site features 13 homes

Ground has been broken for a 13-lot subdivision, near Southwest Barrows Road,
Beaverton.

Bailey Woods, a project by Buena Vista Custom Homes, will feature homes sized from
2,342 to 3,212 square feet and prices ranging from $309,950 to $364,950.

For more information, call Mike Wiltshire, Prudential Northwest Properties, 503-306-
9002.

Stonewater at Orenco opens second phase

Eighteen of the 94 home sites in the second phase at Stonewater at Orenco in Hillsboro
have been released for sale.

The houses, by Legend Homes, will range from 1,155 to 1,728 square feet and will be
priced from $174,900.
The sales office is at 7196 N.W. Stonewater St. For more information, call 503-648-0233
or visit www.legendhomes.com.

Hilltop condo sales pass halfway mark

Seventy of 108 units were reserved in June at the Hilltop Condominiums at Uptown.

The units, built by MK Development, range from 643 to 1,129 square feet and are priced
from $169,900 to $315,000.

At 335 N.W. Uptown Terrace, just west of West Burnside Street and Northwest 23rd
Avenue, the condominiums are open for viewing from noon to 6 p.m. daily. For more
information, call 503-274-4200.

Don Morissette builds three homes for tour

Don Morissette Homes will have three homes in the Central Oregon Builders Association
(COBA) Tour of Homes this year.

Two of the homes are planned for Skyliner Summit near Bend: a 3,585-square-foot home
priced at $489,900 and a 3,460-square-foot home priced at $349,900. The third home is
to be at Desert Skies, also near Bend; it is 3,220 square feet and is priced at $289,900.

The COBA Tour of Homes, a free show that includes homes in Bend, Redmond, LaPine,
Sisters and other locations, runs July 23 to 25. For information, visit www.coba.org.

For more information about Don Morissette Homes, call 503-387-7555.

Forty-four units sold at Pinnacle Condos

The Pinnacle Condominiums, a 176-unit building in the Pearl District, has recorded 44
sales, including all three penthouses.

The Pinnacle features units from 600 to 2,500 square feet and priced from about
$200,000 to more than $1 million. The majority of the sold units are in the $200,000 to
$300,000 price range and include studios, lofts and one-bedrooms.

For more information, call 503-227-2000, or visit www.liveinthepearl.com.

******************

CHEAP EATS ISLAND CAFE
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,July 2, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 20
Friday, July 2, 2004

CHEAP EATS ISLAND CAFE

cheap eats

feeding frenzies with pocket change

By JOSHUA SOMMER

Island Cafe

One of two floating restaurants in Portland (there's a Newport Bay near downtown), the
Island Cafe on Hayden Island in North Portland is a fun spot for anyone who loves open-
air restaurants, water and sleek boats.

The chow: The menu features lots of great burgers ($6.75-$7.25), a pulled-pork sandwich
($7), oyster baskets ($8.75) and an array of appetizers including kung-pao rolls ($3.50).

Real deals: The shrimp salad (heavy on the shrimp, please, $8.75) is enough for two. A
personal favorite, the Hawaiian burger ($7.25) comes complete with ham and pineapple
and is a gorgeous burger; watch your knuckles as you are likely to eat this burger with a
blind fury.

Hangout factor: This place is all about a relaxed, soothing view, watching luxury yachts
and sailboats rocking in their slips. Pair this with good food, beer and service, and the
only thing you might have to worry about is being rocked to sleep.

Liquids: Pitchers of beer range from $10 to $13.50. But the real winner here is the Island
Cafe Punch ($6). I am not at liberty to divulge the secret ingredients of the punch, but if
you drop by, you have to try it. All blended drinks are $6.

What's half-baked? The place is almost too hidden. If you didn't know precisely where it
was, you could drive past it for years. Also, if you get motion sickness, you'll need to
pack some Dramamine.

Inside tips: Onion-ring fans unite! Onion petals ($2.50), an appetizer, are closely related
to their ring-shaped cousins, but these stay crisp and tasty through the deep-frying
process.

The numbers: 250 N.E. Tomahawk Island Drive; 503-283-0362.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
***************
NOTEBOOK: GRANTS, LOANS OFFERED TO RURAL PROPERTY OWNERS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,June 17, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 13
Thursday, June 17, 2004

NOTEBOOK: GRANTS, LOANS OFFERED TO RURAL PROPERTY OWNERS

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is offering $940,000 for repair loans and grants to
qualified homeowners in rural Oregon.

The program aims to help very-low-income homeowners improve their living standards
by providing money for repairing roofs, installing storm windows, insulating homes and
electrical, heating/cooling and plumbing improvements.

Loans can be made for up to $20,000 for 20-year periods at 1-percent interest. To qualify,
a household's income must be no more than 50 percent of the county's median income.

There is no cost to apply; applications are due by Sept. 30.

For more information, call 1-866-923-5626 or visit www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/504.htm.

Oaks at Springbrook heads into third phase

The third phase of D.R. Horton's Oaks at Springbrook, off Oregon 99W in Newberg, is
open for sales.

Homes in the third-phase release range from 1,500 to 1,772 square feet and are priced
from $179,900 to $194,900.

For more information, call Brett Grantham or Jack Hall at 503-538-6038, or visit
www.drhorton.com.

Annual home show arrives a month early

The 29th annual Home Improvement & Remodeling Show will be held a month earlier
than usual this year.

Presented by the Oregon Remodelers Association, the show traditionally is held at the
Oregon Convention Center in October. This year, show dates are Sept. 23 to 26.
"Holding the show in September allows contractors to start and finish more projects
before the holidays begin," said Diana Montgomery, marketing manager, M&M
Productions.

Show times are Thursday, 2 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and
Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

About 350 local and national home-improvement companies and vendors are expected to
participate in the show. For more information, visit www.remodelshow.com.

Phase two blooms at Sellwood complex

Sales in phase two of The Gardens on 15th Avenue, a townhome development by
Bridgewood Homes, are under way at Southeast 15th Avenue and Umatilla Street.

Ranging in size from 1,170 to 2,270 square feet, the townhomes are priced from
$200,000 to $300,000.

For more information, call 503-239-7900 or visit www.bridgewoodhomes.com.

Sales effort under way at McDaniel Village

Sales are open for McDaniel Village, a new single-family home development at
Northwest 119th Avenue and McDaniel Road.

A model is slated to open in late July.

The site, developed by Don Morissette Homes, features houses from 1,800 to 2,900
square feet and priced from $260, 000 to $400,000.

For more information, call 503-690-6559.

Grand opening at Gateway Arbors

An open house to celebrate the completion of Gateway Arbors Condominiums is set for
Thursday, June 17, from 3 to 7 p.m.

Developed by Gordon Jones of Milwaukie, the 48-unit project at 737 N.E. 99th Ave. is
part of the Portland Development Commission's Opportunity Gateway Concept Plan and
Redevelopment Strategy.

Approximately 24 of the condos, which range from 525 to 800 square feet, are still
available. The homes are priced from $81, 950 to $132, 950.

For more information, call 503-659-3300.
Buena Vista opens Chailand Heights sales

Chailand Heights, a 17-lot development by Buena Vista Custom Homes on Southwest
Rigert Road, Beaverton, opened sales in mid-June.

The site will feature homes ranging in size from 2,000 to 3,200 square feet and priced
from $250,000 to $339,950.

For more information, call 503-306-9002.

Also, Buena Vista Custom Homes has added marketing manager Liz Holland.

****************

SUPPORTING THE SHOOTOUT MAKES SENSE TO SPONSORS
By Joshua Sommer
Staff writer<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Tuesday,June 1, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEIL LOMAX QUARTERBACK SHOOTOUT, Page 05
Tuesday, June 1, 2004

SUPPORTING THE SHOOTOUT MAKES SENSE TO SPONSORS

Anyone with a fondness for sports heroes, ice cream and golf has something to look
forward to at the 2004 Neil Lomax Quarterback Shootout.

Participants and spectators are in for a full menu of these treats as the Shootout enters its
14th year.

(LIBRARY NOTE: To view complete text see the bound volume or Oregonian
microfilm.)<

****************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: DON MORISSETTE HOMES MARKS 30TH
ANNIVERSARY
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,May 20, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 10
Thursday, May 20, 2004
NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: DON MORISSETTE HOMES MARKS 30TH
ANNIVERSARY

Don Morissette Homes is celebrating 30 years in business in 2004, and the company is
showing no signs of slowing down.

At work on communities in Portland, Tigard, Sherwood and Central Oregon, the
company has opened sales at two new sites: Bella Terra in the Bethany area of Northwest
Portland, with 19 lots; and Quail Meadows in Sherwood, which offers homes from 1,665
to 3,650 square feet. Prices run from $290,000 to $400,000.

Also, Don Morissette Homes is taking reservations in phase three at Bannister Creek
Park, off Northwest Saltzman and Laidlaw roads. The new phase will feature homes
ranging from 1,665 to 3,650 square feet and priced from $300,000 to $400,000.

Builder Don Morissette founded the company in 1974. Since then, it has built more than
3,000 homes in the Portland area and Central Oregon.

For more information on Don Morissette Homes, call 503-387-7538, or visit
www.dmhomes.net on the Web.

Buena Vista opens sales at two locations

Buena Vista Custom Homes opened home sales at Firwood Crest, its new neighborhood
in Hillsboro.

Firwood Crest features nine homes ranging from 2,078 to 2,116 square feet and priced
from $219,950 to $229,950.

Also, Buena Vista opened a sales model at Falcon Crest in Beaverton. Falcon Crest
features 19 homes from 2,412 to 3,581 square feet and priced from $340,000 to
$400,000. The model is open noon to 6 p.m., Fridays through Sundays, until all homes
are sold.

For more information, call Mike Wiltshire, Prudential Northwest Properties, at 503-306-
9002.

Hoyt opens Pinnacle in the Pearl for sales

Hoyt Street Properties opened sales of 176 residential units at The Pinnacle, the
company's latest site in Portland's Pearl District, at Northwest Overton Street and 10th
Avenue.

The Pinnacle features condominiums from 600 to 2,500 square feet and priced from
about $200,000 to more than $1 million. The building has 14 floors, with retail space on
the ground level.
For more information, call 503-227-2000, or visit www.liveinthepearl.com.

Second-phase homes for sale at Castle Oaks

Timberland Homes, one of the builders at Castle Oaks in Tigard -- site of the 2003
RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings -- has three homes available in phase two at the site.
The homes range in size from 2,225 to 2,500 square feet and are priced from $334,900 to
$339,900.

Overall, there are 14 lots available from Timberland Homes at Castle Oaks.

For more information, call Nancy Gregg, Gregg Real Estate, at 503-720-6117.

The Avenue readies one unit for viewing

A furnished model at The Avenue Lofts in the Pearl District is now open, and three more
will be available for viewing later this year.

More than 60 percent of the 170 lofts have been sold. First-floor occupants will begin
moving in on Aug. 19. Subsequent floors will opened to owners about a week at a time
until the end of September.

The sales office is at 1001 N.W. 14th Ave. For more information, call Judi Bost, Pearl
Real Estate, at 503-223-2255, or visit www.theavenuelofts.com.

Initial phase done at Tukwila project

Dijahnelos Homes completed the first phase of Goose Hollow at Tukwila, a new
development in Woodburn.

The site features homes sizes from 1,800 to 3,000 square feet and priced from $260,000
to $500,000.

Goose Hollow includes a swimming pool for residents and lots are available both on and
off the neighboring golf course -- the OGA members course at Tukwila.

For more information, call 503-981-0621 or visit www.dijahnelos.com.

Construction complete at Hawthorne condos

Gray Purcell Inc. recently finished construction of Hawthorne Condominiums, a
Southeast Portland project featuring luxury townhomes above retail space.

The building features six two-story townhomes from 1,046 to 1,404 square feet. They are
priced from $245,000 to $310,000.
For more information, call Ron Garcia of the Realty NetWork at 503-248-4663, or visit
www.hawthornecondos.com.

D.R. Horton launches sales in Happy Valley

Sales are under way at Kensington Bluff, a new neighborhood by D.R. Horton in Happy
Valley.

A sales model is scheduled to open in June. The 107 homes at Kensington Bluff will
range from 2,586 to 4,387 square feet and be priced from $329,000 to $481,900.

For more information, call Steve Rosling of D.R. Horton Realtors at 503-810-7691, or
visit www.drhorton.com.

****************

RENTAL ROUNDUP: ORGANIC EXPO MAKES CASE FOR CREATING
NATURAL SPACE
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,May 16, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H29
Sunday, May 16, 2004

RENTAL ROUNDUP: ORGANIC EXPO MAKES CASE FOR CREATING
NATURAL SPACE

Renters in search of environmentally sound decorating ideas may find what they're
looking for at the second annual Natural Style Home & Garden Expo.

Featuring natural and organic products and services for homes and gardens, the expo is
May 15 and 16, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, at the
DoubleTree Lloyd Center Convention Hall.

Booths include products for bed, bath and kitchen, fair-trade imports and furnishings,
recycled paints and sustainable home decor and furnishings.

The expo is sponsored by the City of Portland Office of Sustainable Development/Green
Building Division, Energy Trust of Oregon, Oregon Bamboo Flooring, Harrity Tree
Specialists, Wild Oats, Lavish Flora and Specialty Analytical.

A suggested $2 entry donation benefits the Multnomah Education Service District
Outdoor School.
For more information, visit www.redirectguide.com/naturalstyle.

Rental applications under way at The Lexis

Hoyt Street Properties' apartment community, The Lexis, started offering leases at the
beginning of May to prospective tenants.

The building, at Northwest Ninth Avenue and Marshall Street, features apartments
ranging from 547 to 1,360 square feet.

For more information, call 503-227-5624.

-- Joshua Sommer

*****************

PORCELLI GROCERY AND DELICATESSEN
By Joshua Sommer, Special To The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,May 7, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 24
Friday, May 7, 2004

PORCELLI GROCERY AND DELICATESSEN

A market since 1958, Porcelli offers a lunch and dinner menu that ranges from smoked
barbecued ribs ($6.50/lunch) to fresh pizza by the slice, paninis ($5.50) and bento ($4).
None of the lunch items exceeds $6.50.

The chow: Half a chicken with coleslaw and beans ($6.50) is enough for two people, or
for one with leftovers. Pizza slices ($1.99-$2.75) are a delicious way to spend your last
few bucks, and the fresh pasta specials ($6.50) that change weekly are a sure bet.

Real deals: They recently imported a pasta machine from Italy and now offer fresh pasta
($2.99 a pound) to go, plus sauce to your specifications.

Hangout factor: A small-town Italian vibe. It's easy to get comfortable seating inside or
outdoors, then sip on wine and enjoy samples of the next food or drink item that the
owners are introducing.

Liquids: With the draw of good prices, Porcelli is elbowing in on the upscale beer and
wine market controlled by the fancy supermarket down the street. They also have a
coffee bean roaster and several bags of green espresso beans from which to choose.
What's half-baked? The store is slowly evolving into a charming wine and deli joint,
while trying to keep the quaint personality of a neighborhood market.

During the transition it may be hard to find a seat if the place gets packed.

The numbers: 6500 S.W. Virginia Ave.; 503-246-4814.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
****************

HOME AND GARDEN EXPO HELPS FUND OUTDOOR SCHOOL
JOSHUA SOMMER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,April 18, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H15
Sunday, April 18, 2004

HOME AND GARDEN EXPO HELPS FUND OUTDOOR SCHOOL

Donations from the Natural Style Home and Garden Expo are earmarked for the
Multnomah Education Service District Outdoor School Program, an environmental
education program for sixth graders in Multnomah County.

Hosted by the ReDirect Guide, a directory of businesses in the Portland Metro area that
offer green products and services, the expo is set for May 15 and 16 at the Lloyd Center
Double Tree Hotel, 1000 N.E. Multnomah St. Admission is a suggested $2 donation, and
the event opens at 10 a.m. both days.

The event will feature informational displays, vendor booths and free workshops on
green remodeling, solar and renewable energy, organic gardening, native landscaping and
eco-friendly home furnishing.

Sponsors include the City of Portland/Office of Sustainable Development, Energy Trust
of Oregon, Harrity Tree Specialists and Oregon Bamboo Flooring.

For more information, call Dana Zipser at 503-231-4848, or visit
www.ReDirectGuide.com.

-- Joshua Sommer
**************

TELEVISED FORUM WELCOMES COMMENTS FROM VIEWERS
JOSHUA SOMMER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,April 18, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H15
Sunday, April 18, 2004

TELEVISED FORUM WELCOMES COMMENTS FROM VIEWERS

A televised forum addressing housing discrimination in the Portland metro area is set for
April 21, at 7 p.m., on Comcast cable channel 11.

Hosted by the Fair Housing Council of Oregon, the forum will cover illegal forms of
discrimination reported in the area, the rights of disabled renters and home buyers and
what home buyers and homeowners should know about discrimination and predatory
lending practices. Viewers will be able to call in with comments.

Speakers include Michael Allen of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health
Law in Washington, D.C.; Betty Dominquez, Oregon Housing and Community Services;
and Diane Hess, Fair Housing Council of Oregon.

The event's co-sponsors include the the City of Portland Bureau of Housing and
Community Development and The Oregonian. For more information, call 503-412-6000.

-- Joshua Sommer
**************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK -- MIXED-USE LOFTS UNDER WAY IN
SOUTHEAST
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,April 15, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 16
Thursday, April 15, 2004

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK -- MIXED-USE LOFTS UNDER WAY IN
SOUTHEAST

A four-story loft project is under construction at Southeast 35th Avenue and Belmont
Street.

Grey Purcell Inc., general contractor, broke ground for the project in March for developer
Randy M. Rapaport of Gabbert/Morton/Oishi/Rapaport.

The $4-million structure will feature 27 loft condos on the upper three levels, ranging
from 862 to 1,210 square feet and priced from $190,000 to $290,000. The ground level
will be retail space.
For more information, call Jebra Turner at 503-228-9276.

Loan program raises income, price limits

Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) has increased purchase-price and
household-income limits for its Residential Loan Program as of February.

New annual income limits differ per county: The limit in Benton County increased by
$1,600 to $67,400 per household; limits in Columbia, Clackamas, Multnomah, Yamhill
and Washington counties increased by $2,100 to $67,900; and limits in all other counties
increased by $2,300 to $58,600.

The new income limit for Portland area residents is $67,900.

Home purchase-price limits now range from $189,682 to $281,875.

The expanded limits are a result of new purchase-price limits published by the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS). The IRS last published new limits for the program in 1994.

Also known as the Oregon Bond Loan Program, the state-sponsored home-loan program
currently offers an interest rate of 4.5 percent for a 30-year fixed-rate loan.

To qualify, home prices must fall below the program's purchase price limits, and
households cannot earn more than the income limits.

In most counties, home buyers may not have owned and occupied a home for three years
prior to closing the program loan. This requirement is waived in Baker, Clatsop, Coos,
Crook, Harney, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Union, Wallowa and
Wheeler counties.

"More homes and households than ever before qualify for our program's record low rate,
putting homeownership within reach for more low- and moderate-income households,"
said Bob Repine, OHCS director.

For more information, call 877-788-2663, or visit www.oregonbond.us on the Web.

Buena Vista begins new Beaverton project

A new Beaverton project, Chai-

land Heights, featuring 18 homes ranging in size from 2,000 to 3,200 square feet, broke
ground in March.
Homes at Chailand Heights, off Southwest 185th Avenue and Rigert Road in Washington
County, will be built by Buena Vista Custom Homes and will be priced from $250,000 to
$325,000.

For more information, call Mike Wiltshire, Prudential Northwest Properties, 503-306-
9002.

Home sales stay brisk in metropolitan area

Area new home projects are experiencing steady sales.

In less than a month, 40 homes have sold in D.R. Horton's 112-home project at Heron
Ridge on Southwest Roy Rogers Road in Sherwood.

Also, since sales began in October 2003, more than half of the 170 lofts at the Avenue
Lofts, at Northwest Irving Street and 14th Avenue, have sold.

For more information about Heron Ridge, call 503-625-0481. For information about
Avenue Lofts, call Judi Bost, 503-223-2255.

Boy Scouts earn more than badge for efforts

The Remodelors Council of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland has
donated a 6-by-12-foot tandem-axle trailer to Boy Scout Troop 728.

Troop members volunteered as greeters at the 14 locations on the council's recent Tour of
Remodeled Homes.

Troop 728 will use the trailer to haul equipment to activities and events.

New program helps families buy homes

A qualifying family in Bend recently purchased a 1,388-square-foot home at cost from
the Central Oregon Trust for Affordable Housing (COTAH), a group that assists families
with homeownership by separating the ownership of the home from ownership of the
land.

The land under the home is placed in trust and leased to the homeowner.

The home, built in the NorthWest Crossing project by volunteer contractors with donated
materials, was finished in early March. It was COTAH's first land-trust house.

The program will make more homes available over the next five years and welcomes new
participants. For more information, call 541-504-1389.

Change of dates for 2004 Parade of Homes
The Building Industry Association of Southwest Washington (BIASW) announced a
change of dates for the 2004 Parade of Homes. Originally scheduled to run in August, the
show is now set for Sept. 3 to 19, at Granite Highlands in Washougal, Wash.

Sales effort begins at new Arbor project

Arbor Station, a project on Southwest 170th Avenue near Merlo Road in Washington
County, opened its sales effort in March.

The project, by Arbor Custom Homes, features 291 houses from 1,410 to 2,000 square
feet and priced from $149,900 to $161,900. A clubhouse with a swimming pool, hot tub,
exercise facility and gathering room is planned.

For more information, call Patti Santrizos at 503-730-4339.

The second phase of sales at Arbor Creek, an Arbor Custom Homes project on Northwest
Evergreen Street and Thompson Road, opened in March, three months ahead of schedule,
with 34 lots.

The new phase features 2,650- to 3,550-square-foot homes priced from $350,000 to
$450,000.

For more information, call 503-260-1113.

D.R. Horton project starts first sales phase

Morgan Meadows, D.R. Horton's largest residential project in the Portland metropolitan
area, has opened its first sales phase.

When finished, the development will include 257 homes on 29 acres across from
Reynolds High School on Northeast 257th Avenue in Troutdale. Thirty home sites have
already been sold.

Home designs range from 1,500 to 2,500 square feet and are priced from $166,900 to
$242,900.

Two models -- a 2,335-square-foot home priced at $231,900 and a 2,135-square-foot
home priced at $218,900 -- are open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Tuesday, and
noon to 5 p.m. on Wednesday. For more information, call 503-674-2631.

Old-home aficionados invited to workshops

The Bosco-Milligan Foundation is hosting a two-part series for buyers interested in older
homes.
Part one, "So, You Want to Buy an Old House," is set for April 17, 9 to 11:30 a.m., at the
Multnomah County Building, 501 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd. Topics include resources,
research, inspections, financing, insurance and the updating of vintage homes.

Speakers include Dave Skilton, Oregon State Historic Preservation Office; Timm
McBride, Realty Trust Group; Herman Venable, Double Check Inspections; Don Lovell,
Flagstar Bank; Shannon Detroit, Chubb Insurance; and Cielo Lutino, City of Portland
Bureau of Planning.

The cost for part one is $14 to $17. To register, call 503-231-7264.

Part two, "So, You Went Ahead and Bought an Old House," is set for May 13.

******************
STATE CHANGES LOAN PROGRAM'S LIMITS

Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) has increased purchase-price and
household-income limits for its Residential Loan Program as of February.

New annual income limits differ per county: The limit in Benton County increased by
$1,600 to $67,400 per household; limits in Columbia, Clackamas, Multnomah, Yamhill
and Washington counties increased by $2,100 to $97,900; and limits in all other counties
increased by $2,300 to $58,600.

Home puurchase-price limits now range from $189,682 to $281,875.

The expanded limits are a result of new purchase-price limits published by the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS). The IRS last published new limits for the program in 1994.

Also known as the Oregon Bond Loan Program, the state-sponsored home-loan program
currently offers an interest rate of 4.5 percent for a 30-year fixed-rate loan.

To qualify, home prices must fall below the program's purchase price limits, and
households cannot earn more than the income limits.

In most counties, home buyers may not have owned and occupied a home for three years
prior to closing the program loan. This requirement is waived in Baker, Clatsop, Coos,
Crook, Harney, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Union, Wallowa and
Wheeler counties.

"More homes and households than ever before qualify for our program's record low rate,
putting homeownership within reach for more low- and moderate-income households,"
said Bob Repine, OHCS director.

For more information, call 877-788-2663, or visit www.oregonbond.us on the Web.
-- Joshua Sommer

******************

CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE
By Joshua Sommer, Special To The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,March 26, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 22
Friday, March 26, 2004

CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE

Bai Tong Thai Cuisine

Free is good. The free Tom Kha (coconut-curry-cilantro-lemon) soup with vegetables that
precedes lunch at Bai Tong is worth the cost of the rest of your meal.

The chow: Lunch specials that include Chicken Teriyaki Rice ($6.50) and Teriyaki Pad
Thai ($7.50) are your standard Thai fare. And most of the appetizers ($3.95 to $4.95) are
tasty, including Thai Spring Rolls ($3.95).

Real deals: Stick around for dessert (or save time by starting off with it) and try the
fabulous Purple Rain ice cream ($3). Did I mention the free soup?

Hangout factor: The collection of bamboo, tables and suits indicates this is primarily a
power lunch destination.

Liquids: Microbrews ($3), bottled beer ($2.50-$3) and scrumptious Thai ($1) and jasmine
($1.50) teas are a few of the beverages to lube your palate.

What's half-baked? This is the best Thai food on Macadam. However, this is the only
Thai food on Macadam. If you have time, there are better Thai restaurants near
downtown.

Inside tips: Try the curries ($6.50-$8.50), these are the landmark dishes here.

The numbers: 503-452-4396; 6141 S.W. Macadam Ave., #106.

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
*****************

NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS OFFER STUDENTS SNEAK PEEKS AT TWO
HOME SHOWS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,March 18, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, March 18, 2004

NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS OFFER STUDENTS SNEAK PEEKS AT TWO
HOME SHOWS

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA) will preview two of its
luxury home shows for students planning careers in building during Student Tour Days.

The tours will take place at the 2004 Northwest Natural Street of Dreams on South
Redland Road in Clackamas County, and the 2004 RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings
on Northeast 29th Avenue in Cornelius. They'll be conducted the second Friday of each
month, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., from now until the opening of each show.

The Street of New Beginnings is set for June 19 to July 11, and the Street of Dreams is
scheduled to run Aug. 7 to Sept. 6.

The HBA will provide one of the show's builders or a developer to help with each tour.

To make reservations, local schools and other student groups should call Teresa
Fitzgibbon at 503-684-1880.

Douglas Meadows garners green award

Douglas Meadows, an eight-unit townhome project near Southeast 127th Avenue and
Division Street, was recognized with the National Association of Home Builders'
(NAHB) 2004 Green Project of the Year award in the multi-family category for using
durable, sustainable materials.

Project builders Seabold Construction of Beaverton received the award at the NAHB's
2004 National Green Building Conference on March 15, in Austin, Texas.

The project was developed by Human Solutions and Sustainable Communities
Northwest.

Nonprofit program seeks qualified buyers

As part of its mutual self-help housing program, Yamhill County Development Corp., a
nonprofit group, is building homes in Amity for 10 low-income families.

It plans to begin another dozen homes in March.
Income-qualified participants in the program build their own homes with no money
down, no mortgage payments until completion of the home and payments based on
individual incomes.

The program has openings for participants. For more information, call Terry Larrabee,
503-434-5265.

Arbor Reserve open for sales in Beaverton

Sales have begun at Arbor Reserve, a mix of two- and three-story townhomes and single-
family homes.

The 290-home project by Arbor Custom Homes is at Northwest Bronson Road and 167th
Avenue in Beaverton. It features homes ranging from 1,600 to 1,912 square feet and
priced from $159,900 to $199,900.

A single-family model home is open; two more are slated to open in May. For more
information, call 503-531-8411.

Goodrich appointed to residential board

Mike Goodrich, vice president and general manager of Legend Homes Corvallis
Communities, was appointed to the State Residential Structures Board.

The board -- formed Jan.1 -- assists the Oregon State Department of Consumer and
Business Services' Building Codes Division in administering structural guidelines for
one- and two-family dwellings.

National association honors Legend Homes

NAHB presented two Best in American Living Awards (BALA) -- a platinum and a
regional -- to Legend Homes for its Stonewater at Orenco project in Hillsboro. The
awards recognized the project's new-urban approach and innovative design.

The BALA presentation was Jan. 18 at the NAHB convention in Las Vegas.

Change of dates for 2004 Parade of Homes

The Building Industry Association of Southwest Washington (BIASW) announced a
change of dates for the 2004 Parade of Homes. Originally scheduled to run in July, the
show is now set for Aug. 6 to 22 at Granite Highlands in Washougal, Wash.

A revised builder list includes Clark & Son Homes, Fantasy Homes by Vladimir,
Fieldstone Construction, Kimball Custom Homes, Philip Custom Homes, Quail Homes,
M.J. Olson Enterprise, Pac Rim Homes, A&M Homes, Elegant Living Concepts, Larry
Boitano Builders and Lynwood Homes.
Buena Vista begins building new projects

Buena Vista Custom Homes broke ground on its Firwood Crest project in Hillsboro. The
project features nine homes ranging from 2,078 to 2,116 square feet and priced from
$219,950 to $229,950.

The company also began a new 19-lot project on the corner of Southwest Miller Hill and
Gassner roads, near Cooper Mountain in Washington County. Plans call for homes from
2,400 to 3,500 square feet, costing $340,000 to $400,000.

For more information, call Mike Wiltshire, Prudential Northwest Properties, at 503-306-
9002.

Also, Buena Vista Custom Homes added Stacey Clark as an estimator.

The Embassy starts condominium sales

The historic Embassy building at Northwest 20th Avenue and Flanders Street has been
converted into 69 studio and one-bedroom condominiums that went on sale early this
month.

Ranging from 407 to 879 square feet and priced from $95,785 to $265,458, the condos
were developed by Robert Ball, developer of Marshall-Wells Lofts and The Avenue
Lofts.

Built in 1923, The Embassy is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and its
living spaces feature hardwood floors and walk-in closets. Some units have pivoting
walls that house wall beds.

For more information, call Judi Bost, Pearl Real Estate, 503-223-2255.

******************

PRODUCT PROFILE: INNOVATIVE FEATURES, NEW DESIGNS HELP
HOMEOWNERS PLAY IT SAFE
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,March 18, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 17
Thursday, March 18, 2004

PRODUCT PROFILE: INNOVATIVE FEATURES, NEW DESIGNS HELP
HOMEOWNERS PLAY IT SAFE
Expensive technology, valuables and items that may be dangerous to children -- these
things have increased the demand for safes and vaults in new homes.

Lucky for new-home buyers, modern design innovations have integrated safes rather
seamlessly into homes -- gone are the giant eyesores of past generations.

Two local companies specializing in sales and installation of in-home safes -- National
Security Safes and Allied Safe & Vault -- offer a range of sizes (2 to 50 cubic feet) and
prices ($100 for security boxes to $4,300).

Additionally, many of their products come with ingenious features that fit today's
residential needs, including data safes designed to withstand high temperatures to protect
computer storage media.

"The data safes and inserts are great for anyone who needs to protect anything related to
computer storage, film negatives and VHS tapes," said Darin Niemeyer of National
Security Safes.

For safe-owners who have only a few items that need an enhanced fire rating, there are
boxes called data inserts that fit into existing units.

Safe sales increase in winter because of hunting season and concerns about gun safety,
according to Niemeyer.

But safes aren't just for gun owners. These days, people are locking up paperwork, life
insurance information, personal checks, wedding albums, birth certificates and other
valuable or irreplaceable items.

At Allied and National, sales spiked in 1999 just prior to Y2K in part due to worries that
something catastrophic might happen to the technology industry, said both Rob Eaton,
Allied Safes, and Niemeyer. And sales have remained solid since then, with buyers
ranging from young people purchasing their first homes to retired couples who want to
secure belongings on their boats.

Think there's no room in your home for a safe? There are a surprising number of places
where they can be installed.

"You name it, I've seen people get really creative with where they put safes. Ceilings,
floors, walls, in the backs of fire places, behind shower walls . . . pretty much
everywhere," said Eaton.

"We've installed safes from the foundation to the attic and everywhere in-between," said
Niemeyer.
Not airtight, safes are meant to be vented. Anyone installing a safe in a garage, basement
or crawlspace should consider a safe-dehumidifier -- priced from $25 to $40 -- to keep
out moisture.

Safes and their contents are insurable against damage from, say, fire or water, through
homeowners insurance or separate policies offered by most insurance companies.

But what about theft or vandalism? Both Allied and National offer privacy guarantees to
buyers.

Allied requires all its employees to go through background checks, and the company
keeps no record of lock combinations.

For new home builders such as Steve Joy, Joy Construction, safes complete home offices.

Joy included safes in most of the homes in Joy Village in Woodburn; seven homes are
still available. "I started including them to finish off the offices. They look nice," said
Joy.

The safes add a classic elegance to home offices, where small vaults provide security for
family heirlooms, documents, data and other items.

RESOURCES

Rob Eaton, Allied Safe & Vault, 800-729-3925; www.alliedsafe.com

Darin Niemeyer, National Security Safes Northwest, 866-812-7233; 503-678-1241;
www.nationalsecuritysafes.com

Steve Joy, Joy Construction, 503-981-1999; www.joyconstruction.com

*******************

NOTEBOOK: ANNUAL LUXURY HOME SHOW JUMPS OVER URBAN GROWTH
BOUNDARY
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,February 19, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, February 19, 2004

NOTEBOOK: ANNUAL LUXURY HOME SHOW JUMPS OVER URBAN GROWTH
BOUNDARY
The 2004 Northwest Natural Street of Dreams is moving south. This year's showcase of
luxury homes will take place at Hidden Lake Estates in Redland, an unincorporated area
east of Oregon City.

The site is about two miles east of Oregon 213 off South Redland Road and about five
minutes from Interstate 205. It's the first Street of Dreams site outside Portland area's
urban growth boundary.

The annual tour is scheduled to run Aug. 7 to Sept. 6. It is sponsored by NW Natural, the
Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA), Builder's Appliance Supply
Co. (BASCO) and John L. Scott Real Estate.

Proceeds from a house built by Blazer Development will benefit the Doernbecher
Children's Foundation.

For more information, call 503-684-1880 or visit www.streetofdreamsusa.com.

New Arbor project unveiled in Hillsboro

A 628-home project in Hillsboro from Arbor Custom Homes -- Arbor Roses -- recently
held its grand opening.

Seven model homes are available to walk through the first phase of the six-phase project.
There are 94 lots in phase one.

Arbor Roses is next to Shute Park on Tualatin Valley Highway as it turns into Southeast
10th Avenue. The project features two- and three-bedroom designs that range from 1,400
to 2,200 square feet, with prices from $142,900 to $214,900.

Amenities include a clubhouse with a swimming pool, exercise facilities and gathering
rooms, and four parks.

For more information, call Natalie Peloquin at 503-680-0366.

D.R. Horton salesman wins gold at Nationals

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) recognized Brett Grantham from
the Portland office of D.R. Horton with a gold award for Rookie Sales Person of the
Year.

Winners in the Nationals, an NAHB competition for new-home sales, marketing and
communities, were announced at the NAHB annual conference in Las Vegas last month.

Gear up for spring at local garden shows
Two annual garden events -- The Portland Home & Garden Show, running through Feb.
22, and the Yard, Garden and Patio Show, Feb. 27 to 29 -- help eager gardeners get a
jump on spring.

Produced by O'Loughlin Trade Shows and sponsored by GMC and the HBA, the
Portland Home & Garden Show is at the Expo Center. Tickets cost $10.

The Yard, Garden & Patio Show, produced by the Oregon Association of Nurseries and
presented by ProGrass, is at the Oregon Convention Center, and tickets cost $10.

For more information, visit www.oloughlintradeshows.com and www.ygpshow.com.

D.R. Horton launches sales at Heron Ridge

With home designs from 1,800 to 4,100 square feet, a new D.R. Horton project -- Heron
Ridge -- in Sherwood opened sales in January.

On Southwest Roy Rogers Road, Heron Ridge has two model homes. Base prices for the
112-home project range from $219,900 to $383,900.

For more information, call 503-625-0481.

Building association installs 2004 officers

The Oregon Building Industry Association (OBIA) installed officers for 2004.

They are president Ernie Platt, Earnest Platt & Associates; vice-president Carlos
Reichenshammer, Reichenshammer Building and Design, Ashland; treasurer Drake
Butsch, First American Title Co.; secretary Jim Patrick, Dolphin Construction, Newport;
State Representative Barry Larson, Canterbury Construction Co., Clackamas; past
president Greg Conser, Conser Homes, Albany; and associate vice president Kelly
Atwood, Contractors Insurance Services, Lake Oswego.

Builders go for green at NorthWest Crossing

Beginning with phase five, NorthWest Crossing -- a mixed-use community in Bend -- is
requiring its builders to comply with Earth Advantage standards.

"We see the Earth Advantage program as a critical component in fulfilling our
commitment to sustainable building practices," said David Ford, general manager of
NorthWest Crossing.

To meet the standards, homes must use resource-efficient building materials, including
recycled materials; have improved indoor air quality with approved construction
materials, floor coverings, air-filtration systems and fresh-air integration; meet green-
building practices, including naturescaping, use less toxic outdoor wood, use water
efficiently and properly dispose of scrap materials; and achieve energy efficiency through
duct sealing, windows, heating systems, lighting, appliances, shade trees and other
naturescaping.

Renaissance Homes hires design director

Renaissance Homes named Sandie Hume-Tharp as its new director of design.

"For years Sandie has consulted with us on our . . . Street of Dreams homes, and we have
consistently won awards for Best of Show because of her design expertise and
creativity," said Randy Sebastian, president of Renaissance Homes.

Thirty-five lots left at Deer Creek project

After its recent grand opening, the final phase of D.R. Horton's Deer Creek project in
Camas has 35 lots still available.

The final phase has a total of 54 lots.

Many of the lots have views of the Columbia River.

Final-phase home designs at Deer Creek, which is on Prune Hill at Northwest 12th
Avenue, are 2,587 to 4,387 square feet. Prices range from $300,000 to $450,000.

For more information, call Steve Lane or Katrin Crum at 360-834-1500.

**************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK ADDITIONAL LOTS RELEASED AT BIG
MEADOW
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,January 22, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 09
Thursday, January 22, 2004

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK ADDITIONAL LOTS RELEASED AT BIG
MEADOW

Two more sections of the Big Meadow Community in Molalla are open for sale, with 39
of 63 lots still available.
Lot sizes range from 6,300 to 9,300 square feet, are priced from $143,900 to $223,950.
Three builders -- Roth Built Homes, Hilligoss Homes and B&D Homes -- have 21 home
plans from which to choose.

A model home and sales office is open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more
information, call 503-829-8567.

Remodelors Council honors area members

Members of the Remodelors Council of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan
Portland (HBA) were recognized with 2003 Remodeling Excellence (REX) awards and
National Association of Home Builders' Council Awards for Demonstrating Remodeling
Excellence (CADRE).

REX recipients were Lee and Lori Zajic, Northwest Renovations and Design, for major
remodel $250,000 to $500,000 and kitchen remodel $50,000 to $100,000; Rhonda
Knoche, Neil Kelly, for kitchen remodel under $50,000; Chris Berry, Berry Remodeling,
entry/porch/deck; and Jim Field, Progressive Builders Northwest, open category.

CADRE awards went to HBA Remodelors Council chairman, Tracy Hankins, Hankins
Construction, as outstanding council chair; and Paul Corso, Northwest Natural,
outstanding associate member.

Bridgewood Homes holds grand opening

On Jan. 11, Bridgewood Homes unveiled two model townhomes at a grand opening for
The Gardens on 15th Avenue at Southeast 13th Avenue and Southeast Umatilla Street.

The Gardens on 15th Avenue is a 37-home site with 17 of townhomes slotted to be
finished by spring. The development has four home plans, ranging from 1,170 to 2,700
square feet, and prices start in the $230,000s. For more information, call 503-239-7900,
or visit www.bridgewoodhomes.com.

Washington builder repeats winning streak

Kevin Wann, founder and president of Pacific Lifestyle Homes, received two 2003
Building Excellence Awards from the Building Industry Association of Southwest
Washington (BIASW). The awards were for new homes from $150,000 to $200,000 and
new homes from $200,000 to $300,000.

Wann received awards in the same categories in 2002.

**************

YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER -- AND QUICKLY BOOK WEDDING
RECEPTION SITE
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,January 15, 2004
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: GUIDE FOR BRIDES 2004, Page 11
Thursday, January 15, 2004

YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER -- AND QUICKLY BOOK WEDDING
RECEPTION SITE

Experts -- wedding planners, caterers and mothers, among others -- will tell you the first
thing to consider after getting engaged is the reception venue, as sites are numerous and
often booked months in advance.

Following is a round-up of area reception spots. To be considered for this list in the
summer edition of the Guide for Brides, submit items by March 13, 2004 to
joshuasommer@news.oregonian.com, or fax to 503-294-5185.
*********************

BUILDERS' ASSOCIATION SEEKS NOMINEES FOR GREEN HONORS
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,December 21, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H06
Sunday, December 21, 2003

BUILDERS' ASSOCIATION SEEKS NOMINEES FOR GREEN HONORS

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) is accepting entries for the 2004
National Green Building Awards. Winners will be announced at the National Green
Building Conference, March 14 to 16, 2004, in Austin, Texas.

Open to individuals, companies, home-builders associations and related organizations,
the awards honor outstanding environmental responsibility and resource-efficient
construction. Entries are due by Jan. 9.

Awards include the Green Advocate Award, for an individual who supports green
building and has a positive impact in the housing industry; Green Project of the Year, for
projects reflecting green design and construction methods in single-family, multifamily
and remodeling categories; Green Building Program of the Year, for programs set up by
builders associations, nonprofits or other agencies (new and established programs are
eligible); and Outstanding Green Product Award, for products advancing resource-
efficient home construction.
For more information, call 800-368-5242, Ext. 8228, or visit www.nahb.org.

-- Joshua Sommer

******************

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE WINE
DOWN ON 28TH
JOSHUA SOMMER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,December 19, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 21
Friday, December 19, 2003

DINING CHEAP EATS FEEDING FRENZIES WITH POCKET CHANGE WINE
DOWN ON 28TH

Cold water arrives in a clear wine bottle, which immediately sets the mood for your stay
in the trendy wine bar and restaurant.

Glancing around, you start recognizing faces and realize that it's the place everyone
trickles to when the other wine bars and restaurants on the avenue flick off the lights for
the night.

Head chef Aaron Pagnozzi served as an apprentice under Tim Collet from O'Connor's in
Multnomah Village for six years, and more recently was a chef at Vita Cafe.

The chow: Pagnozzi spins a bunch of scrumptious dishes, my favorite small plate being a
bowl of Thai steamers ($8). It's clams and mussels in a spicy ginger-cilantro broth, with
focaccia bread to mop up the broth once you've cleaned out the shells.

Real deals: Food items range from $3 to $14 and most dishes come in your choice of two
ample portions, depending on your appetite.

Hangout factor: Time doesn't seem to matter here. You'll soon realize that Wine Down, is
the sort of place where you'll need to plan on staying several hours just to talk, sip wine
and lounge near the fireplace.

Liquids: For beer lovers, Tuesdays and Sundays feature all tap beers for $2. Wine tasters
will enjoy Winedown Wednesdays, with $1 off all wine pours and $3 off all bottles. Also,
Sundays after 8 p.m. all open-bottle pours are half off.

What's half-baked? Because of the handful of tables and the popularity of the place, it
would be wise to make a reservation.
Inside tips: The best entree is a hazelnut-crusted salmon in Oregon raspberry beurre noir
sauce ($14). But the Walnut Blue Salad ($7 or $10), smoked salmon penne ($9 or $12)
and Mediterranean Shrimp Fettuccini ($10 or $13) are also tasty treats that won't sour
your mood by emptying your wallet.

The numbers: Monday through Saturday 3:30 p.m. till late, and Sunday 3:30 to 10 p.m.;
126 N.E. 28th Ave.; 503-236-9463

Joshua Sommer is a Portland freelance writer.
*****************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK PARTICIPATING BUILDERS TAPPED FOR
WASHINGTON PARADE OF HOMES
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,December 18, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 08
Thursday, December 18, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK PARTICIPATING BUILDERS TAPPED FOR
WASHINGTON PARADE OF HOMES

The Building Industry Association of Southwest Washington (BIASW) announced the
lineup of builders for its 2004 Parade of Homes, which runs July 9 to 25 at Granite
Highlands in Washougal, Wash.

The roster of builders increased from 10 to 13. The builders include Clark & Son Homes,
Fantasy Homes by Vladimir, Fieldstone Construction, Grams Construction, Philip
Custom Homes, Quail Homes, Scope & Associates, View Point Construction, M.J. Olson
Enterprises, Pac Rim Homes, A&M Homes, Elegant Living Concepts and Lynwood
Homes.

Attendance at the 2003 show was 21,000 -- double the number of visitors in 2002.

HUD grants earmarked for counseling services

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently awarded four
grants to fund counseling services for Oregon home buyers and owners.

Recipients are Open Door Counseling Social Service, Hillsboro, $50,000; Access Inc.,
Medford, $15,000; Portland Housing Center, Portland, $60,000; and Umpqua
Community Action Network, Roseburg, $40,000.
The counseling services help participants -- many of them first-time home buyers -- to
improve credit ratings, strengthen money-management skills and avoid predatory lenders.

For more information, visit www.hud.gov.

Developer wins silver, moves closer to gold

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) recognized the Portland office of
D.R. Horton with six silver awards for marketing and sales.

Silver award winners are finalists for gold awards in The Nationals, an NAHB
competition for new home sales and marketing professionals and communities. Winners
will be announced at the NAHB annual conference in Las Vegas in January 2004.

Individual recipients were Bruce Dunlap, marketing vice president, Marketing Director of
the Year; Larry Vinton, sales vice president, Sales Manager of the Year; and Brett
Grantham, Rookie Sales Person of the Year.

The office also earned awards for a black-and-white advertisement, as well as for Best
Design Center and Best Attached Home Plan Priced Under $350,000.

NAHB accepting 2004 Green award entries

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) is accepting entries for the 2004
National Green Building Awards, from March 14 to 16, in Austin, Texas.

Entries are due by January 9.

Entrants are eligible for one of the following awards: Green Advocate Award, for an
individual who supports green building and has a positive impact in the housing industry;
Green Project of the Year, for projects reflecting green design and construction methods
in single-family, multifamily and remodeling categories; Green Building Program of the
Year, for programs set up by builders associations, non-profits or other agencies (new
and established programs are eligible); and Outstanding Green Product Award, for
products advancing resource-efficient home construction.

For more information, call 800-368-5242 x8228, or visit www.nahb.org.

Lunchtime discussion covers permit process

The public is invited to attend a lunchtime presentation, "No Permits For That Project?
Learn How to Get Legal," on Jan. 9, 2004, noon to 1:30 p.m., at 1900 S.W. Fourth Ave.,
in Conference Room 2500-A.

Part of the City of Portland Bureau of Development Services' (BDS) Lunch-and-Learn
series, the program covers construction permits for residential projects -- when and why
permits are needed; how to find out if work has been permitted, before or after a home
sale; what happens to projects without permits; and the new BDS program to help
projects "get legal." Experts will be available to answer questions.

For details, call 503-823-7822.

****************

SUPERVISION AND INFORMED SHOPPING MAKE TOY SAFETY CHILD'S PLAY
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,December 7, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: THE 2003 OREGONIAN GIFT GUIDE QUICK HITS FOR
THE HOLIDAYS SOUTH ZONER SOUTHWEST ZONER PORTLAND ZONER, Page
11
Sunday, December 7, 2003

SUPERVISION AND INFORMED SHOPPING MAKE TOY SAFETY CHILD'S PLAY

We've all seen them -- consumer alerts warning of choking hazards, lead ingredients or
other potentially harmful elements in children's toys.

So, how do consumers keep the kids on their holiday lists safe?

The Oregon Department of Human Services' SAFE KIDS program Web site
(www.dhs.state.or.us/publichealth/safekids/index.cfm) offers the following pointers to
keep kids playing safe and smart.

Supervise children while they play to avoid injury. A toy intended for an older child may
be dangerous in the hands of a younger child.

Teach children to put toys away after playing. Safe storage prevents falls and other
injuries.

Check old and new toys regularly for unsafe wear, including sharp edges or small parts.
Make repairs immediately or throw away damaged toys.

Choose toys according to a child's age, interests and skill level. Look for well-made toys
and follow age and safety information on warning labels. Children under age 3 can choke
on small toys and toy parts.

"Safe storage and toy maintenance are crucial to ensure safe play. We encourage parents
and caregivers to teach children to put toys away after playing," said Heather Paul,
executive director of the National Safe Kids Campaign.
The Toy Industry Association (TIA) also has tips for toy safety.

Before shopping for toys, consider the child's age, interests and abilities. Be selective in
your purchases.

When shopping, read labels. Look for age ranges and safety warnings.

Be especially careful when choosing toys for children under three. Select toys that are
free of small pieces (or pieces that separate or can be broken off), are lightweight, have
no sharp edges or points and are nontoxic.

At home, carefully read instructions for assembly and use. Keep product literature in case
of future questions and complete warranty cards.

Always remove and discard all packaging from a toy before giving it to a baby or small
child.

Consider the home environment in which a child will play with a toy and the younger
children who may be there.

Remind caregivers, including grandparents, of play-related safety concerns.

******************

WHILE SEEING THE SIGHTS, CHECK ITEMS OFF GIFT LIST
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,December 7, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: THE 2003 OREGONIAN GIFT GUIDE QUICK HITS FOR
THE HOLIDAYS SOUTHWEST ZONER, Page 02
Sunday, December 7, 2003

WHILE SEEING THE SIGHTS, CHECK ITEMS OFF GIFT LIST

As family members gather in the Portland area for the holidays, the out-of-towners may
want to take in local spots of interest. Luckily, some terrific holiday gifts can be found
while seeing the sights.

Here's a list of area attractions that also feature gift shops.

Oregon College of Art and Craft: The college's Hoffman Gallery features gifts made by
national and local artists at a show that runs through Dec. 23 (the gallery closes at 3 p.m.
that day). On display is a plate with a pear theme by Nao Tojimbara for $68.


Hoffman Gallery, 8245 S.W. Barnes Road, 503-297-5544, Ext. 143; open Monday to
Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Evergreen Aviation Museum: Home to that famous flying boat, the Spruce Goose, the
museum has a gift store that caters to aviation buffs. Items include caps with an
embroidered image of Howard Hughes' plane, $15 to $18.

Evergreen Aviation Museum Gift Shop, 500 N.E. Capt. Michael King Smith Way,
McMinnville, 888-977-7823; open daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Southeast Metro

Museum of the Oregon Territory: At one time, the Oregon Territory stretched from
California to Alaska, and the museum is dedicated to its memory. The Heritage Gift Shop
features books about historical Clackamas County, $17 to $20; wagons, $10 to $32; local
Native American tribal stamps, $4.25; and ornaments with Oregon Trail and Lewis and
Clark themes, $2.50 to $3.95.

Heritage Gift Shop, 211 Tumwater Drive, Oregon City, 503-655-5574; open Monday to
Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; weekends, noon to 4 p.m.

End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center: The mission statement for the center
includes educating the public about the spirit of the people at the end of the Oregon Trail.
In that vein, the museum's gift shop -- the George Abernethy General Store -- carries a
variety of items, including handmade pioneer-style dolls, $17.95 and $23.95.

George Abernethy General Store, 1726 Washington St., Oregon City, 503-657-9336;
open Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m.

Portland

Oregon Maritime Center & Museum: The museum is aboard the sternwheeler Portland on
the Willamette River at the foot of Southwest Pine Street. The museum store features
nautical books, from children's to technical, priced between $4.95 and $30.

Oregon Maritime Center & Museum, 503-224-7724; open Friday through Sunday, 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.

Title Wave Used Bookstore: Title Wave is where the Multnomah County Library sends --
and sells -- books, DVDs, videos, CDs, magazines and other materials in good condition
that no longer reside in the library's collection. A fresh delivery arrives each day. Items
are priced as low as 25 cents and proceeds return to the library.
Title Wave, 216 N.E. Knott St., 503-988-5021; open Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.

Friends' Library Store, Multnomah County Library: The showplace Central Library store
has treats for readers and writers of all ages. A line of products (notebooks, journals and
tablets) with Clairefontaine French paper ranges from $3 to $17; bookends are priced
$25.95 to $120.

Friends' Library Store, 801 S.W. 10th Ave., 503-988-5911; open Tuesday to Saturday, 10
a.m. to 6 p.m.

Oregon Historical Society: The Historical Society's Museum Store carries adult and
children's books on the history of the Pacific Northwest, literature by Northwest authors,
and collectibles and games. The store also has several dolls based on historical characters
-- including Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Sacagawea and Lewis' dog, Seaman --
from $15 to $28.50; a set of Lewis, Clark and Sacagawea action figures is $20. The store
also carries sandblasted glass vases by Megas MacDonald of Eugene, $88.

Oregon Historical Society Museum Store, on the corner of Southwest Broadway and
Madison Street, 503-306-5230; open Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Oregon Sports Hall of Fame: Featuring artifacts of Oregon athletics, the museum also
sports the Victory Lap Gift Store, with products related to Oregon teams, sports heroes
and history. Basketball, football, baseball and hockey sports cards, many featuring
Oregon players, are popular and range from 5 cents to $20.

Victory Lap Gift Store, 321 S.W. Salmon, St., 503-227-7466; open Monday to Saturday,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Pittock Mansion: Built in 1914, the home is rich in Portland history. The gift shop
features gifts with Victorian themes, including dolls in period attire, $16.95 to $35.

Pittock Mansion Gift Shop, 3229 N.W. Pittock Drive, 503-823-3628; open daily from
noon to 4 p.m.

The World Forestry Center: A great place to learn about the importance of forests and
trees to a sustainable future, the center also has a Forest Store. Gift items include a line of
Myrtlewood products, including plates, bowls and serving dishes, $6 to $42.

Forest Store, 4033 S.W. Canyon Road, 503-228-1367, Ext. 113; open daily from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.

Oregon Zoo: The Oregon Zoo's gifts shop carries gifts with animal themes from around
the world. Animal backpacks and purses range from $17.99 to $24.99. Handmade
porcelain ornaments made specifically for the Zoo are $16.95.
Cascade Outfitters Gift Shop at the Oregon Zoo, 4001 S.W. Canyon Road, 503-525-
4220; open daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Portland Art Museum: The museum's gift store has a version of the disappearing ink trick
-- draw on a Buddha Board, $29.95, with water and watch the image evaporate. Also
consider Great Artists Finger Puppets, $19.95, for art lovers.

Portland Art Museum Shop, 1219 S.W. Park Ave., 503-276-4204; open Tuesday,
Wednesday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to
8 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

Portland Classical Chinese Garden: Visitors to the garden can stop by the gift shop for
items such as calligraphy sets, $12 to $22.50, and bamboo candles, $8.75 to $16.50 or a
set of three for $21.95.

Chinese Garden Store, Northwest Third Avenue and Everett Street; 503-228-8131, Ext.
1018; open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: Young and old alike will find something to
play with in OMSI's Science Store. For example, the Water Rocket Kit by Wild Goose,
$22.95, allows future scientists -- and scientists-at-heart -- to blast off again and again,
experimenting with different fuels. And a hand-cranked AM/FM radio plays for hours
after it's assembled, $29.95.

OMSI Science Store, 1945 S.E. Water Ave., 503-797-4626; open Tuesday to Sunday,
9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Japanese Garden: Looking for some special decorations? The gift store carries miniature
Origami Kimono Ornaments by Alyen Creations of Portland. The fabric kimonos are
priced at $19.95.

Japanese Garden Gift Shop, off of Southwest Kingston Drive opposite the Rose Test
Garden in Washington Park, 503-223-5055; open Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
Sunday, noon to 4 p.m.

Up north

Pearson Air Museum: Self-described as the oldest airfield in the West, the museum
exhibits a wide range of aircraft and has a hands-on children's center, as well as a gift
shop with Pearson aviation bears, $29.99, and flight jackets with glasses and scarves,
$150.

Pearson Air Museum Gift Shop, in the Vancouver National Historic Reserve, 1115 E.
Fifth St., Vancouver, 360-694-7026; open Tuesday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site: The Hudson's Bay Company's old headquarters is
a great place to tour.

If you go, stop by the gift shop to view items such as a teacup set, $20, and plate, $14.

Fort Vancouver Visitors Center Gift Shop, 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd., Vancouver, 360-
696-7655, Ext. 10; open daily, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

***************

NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS INSTATE OFFICERS, HONOR AWARD
WINNERS
By Joshua Sommer
OREGONIAN STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,November 20, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, November 20, 2003

NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS INSTATE OFFICERS, HONOR AWARD
WINNERS

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA) installed its new
president and seven board members on Nov. 15.

Tim Roth, J.T. Roth Construction, is president. Board members include builder directors
W. Richard (Rick) Lezniak, Blazer Development; Fred Gast, Polygon Northwest; Holly
Iburg, Newland Communities Northwest; and associate directors Jim Fisher, Jim Fisher
Roofing and Construction; and Terry Voss, Voss Framing. Remodelors Council directors
are Steve Heiteen, Steve Heiteen Construction; and Jeff Metke, Metke Remodeling &
Woodworking.

Additionally, Dave DeHarpport, Four D Construction, and Steve Frazier, Contract Home
Furnishings Mart, received HBA awards for 2003.

DeHarpport was awarded 2003 Builder of the Year Award for his service to the HBA and
the industry, and Frazier was named 2003 Associate of the Year for frequent and
generous sponsorship of HBA events.

Award recipients are selected by members of the HBA board of directors and committee
chairmen and vice-chairmen.

Land trust receives grant to benefit center
The Clackamas Community Land Trust (CCLT) received a $10,000 grant from the
Collins Foundation for its Homeownership Resource Center.

Combined with funding from the Paul G. Allen Foundation, the grant will be used to
renovate space to make room for the resource center. The center will serve as a classroom
for CCLT information sessions and first-time home-buyer workshops.

The CCLT office is at 2316 S.E. Willard St., Milwaukie. For more information, call 503-
654-1007.

Proposals requested for site's first phase

The Housing Authority of Portland (HAP) is seeking proposals from builders who want
to purchase 76 lots as part of phase one of the overhaul of Columbia Villa.

New Columbia, as the project has been named, is slated for construction from summer
2004 to summer 2005. HAP will demolish existing structures and install streets and
utilities prior to builder's construction.

For more information on the request for proposals, call Pamela Kambur at 503-802-8508.

Forest Grove project holds grand opening

A grand opening celebration for Ridge Point at Forest Gale Heights, a 31-lot project off
Gales Creek Road in Forest Grove, was held in October.

Co-developed by Kellwood Development and Spectrum Home Builders, the site will
feature homes by several builders. Average lot size is 11,000 square feet, and home
prices will range from $300,000 to $450,000.

The developer gave 21 acres to the City of Forest Grove to preserve as wetlands and
forest.

For more information, call 503-648-1169, Ext. 126, or visit www.ridgepointview.com.

Bannister Creek Park opens second phase

Reservations are open for a second phase in Bannister Creek Park, a project by Don
Morissette Homes, northwest of Cedar Mill in Washington County.

Phase two is off Northwest Saltzman and Laidlaw roads. It has 51 home sites ranging
from 5,000 to 8,000 square feet. Prices start in the $290,000s.

A model is open daily. For more information, call 503-690-6559.

Home sales under way at Hoodland Estates
DeCal Custom Homes held a grand opening for its 54-home Hoodland Estates project in
Gresham on Nov. 15. Homes range from $220,000 to $319,000.

To get to the site, go south on Southeast 282nd Avenue from Powell Boulevard, then
west on Southeast Chase Road.

For more information, call 503-481-7789 or visit www.decalcustomhomes.com.

Association publishes directory on the Web

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland is providing an online
membership directory for consumers looking for builders, remodelers or service
providers.

Launched Nov. 3, the directory lists construction professionals registered with the HBA.
It provides company names, contacts and phone numbers.

The site is at www.homebuildersportland.org. For more information, call Kevin Curry at
503-603-4508.

PHC offers four classes on managing property

The first of four training sessions for landlords and property managers, presented by the
Portland Housing Center (PHC), is Nov. 22, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., at the HBA, 15555
S.W. Bangy Road, Lake Oswego.

Topics include Oregon Landlord-Tenant law (including 2004 changes), working with
Section 8, and high- and low-tech strategies for marketing vacancies.

The session includes speakers Chris Erickson, The Oregonian; Bartholomew Martin and
Michael Havlik, Metro Multifamily Housing Association; and Diane Hess, Fair Housing
Council of Oregon.

The cost is $100 per person, $150 for couples, and includes breakfast, lunch and a
workbook.

Space is limited. To register, call 503-282-7744, Ext. 304.

Arbor Vineyards grows into final phase

Arbor Vineyards, an Arbor Custom Homes' development off Southwest Murphy Lane
and 209th Avenue in Beaverton, entered its final phase in November.
The phase features 225 lots and will include cottages ranging from 1,600 to 2,200 square
feet and chateau designs from 1,494 to 1,680 square feet. Base prices will range from the
$160,000s to the $200,000s.

For more information, call 503-649-7493.

Future remodelers receive scholarships

The winners of the 2003-2004 HBA Remodelors Council's Remodeling Industry
Scholarship Fund, a scholarship for students pursuing degrees related to remodeling
construction, were announced in October.

Scholarship recipients are Susan Edmonds, Mt. Hood Community College; Samuel
Jenkins, Clackamas Community College; and Ben Polas and Alex Freddi, Portland
Community College Rock Creek.

The scholarship equals a full year of tuition costs.

*****************

THERE GOES SUMMER SUN, AND HERE COMES WINTER FUN
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,October 26, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: THE 23RD ANNUAL HONDA SKI FEVER AND
SNOWBOARD SHOW, Page 02
Sunday, October 26, 2003

THERE GOES SUMMER SUN, AND HERE COMES WINTER FUN

Making the transition from summer to winter sports is always a little easier with new toys
to try out. The 23rd annual Honda SkiFever and Snowboard Show, presented by The
Oregonian, gives visitors the chance to get their hands on the latest gadgets for the 2003-
04 ski and snowboarding season.

For snow enthusiasts, the show -- running from Oct. 30 to Nov. 2 -- will make them feel
like kids in a candy store. It features discounted products and services; the Big Air &
Winter Fashion Show, with the Blazer Dancers; freestyle displays; and halfpipe and
grind-rail demonstrations by professional snowboarders, skiers and jibbers (skiers on
short skis with both ends upturned).

One of the greatest draws, however, may be the energy created by gathering hordes of
skiers and snowboarders in one place.
"The show starts the momentum for the new ski season, and hopefully the snow falls fast
enough to keep it going," said Dan Schindler, owner of Trade Shows West, which
produces the show. "The event propels us into the new season as a place where skiing
enthusiasts' optimism lands with everyone hoping for a good ski season."

Visitors to the show, which is at the Portland Expo Center, will receive two lift tickets to
Mt. Hood Ski Bowl and Timberline. Top ski and snowboard retailers, manufacturers, ski
resorts and more will fill more than 400 booths.

Growing from three to four days this year, the event is open 1 to 9 p.m. Thursday, noon
to 9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is
$9 for adults, $4.50 for kids (ages 6 to 12) and free for kids under 6 years old with a
paying adult.

Look for a free coupon that admits up to four kids, 12 and under, when accompanied by a
paying adult in the Oct. 28 and Oct. 30 issues of The Oregonian. Coupons for $1 off
regular admission to the show will run in the Oct. 26, 29 and 31 issues of The Oregonian.

Oregon Snowsports Industries Association will offer a coupon book for paid attendees.

Other attractions:

The Big Air Show, which features World Cup aerialists and skiers

A Jib Wall Demonstration, which is a new term for a large rail for street, course and
snowboard halfpipe riders, and a 15-foot wall

A learn-to-ski ramp at the Mt. Hood Ski Bowl booth, which is a portable, revolving ramp
available for anyone who would like to try the sport

The Timberline Snowtime Theater, near the main stage, featuring films of championship
skiers and snowboarders

The Blazer Dancers, who will present a fashion show featuring winter wear from
Columbia Sportswear and Betty Rides

The Widmer Brother's Boardrider Saloon is open for the 21-and-over crowd.

For more information, visit www.portlandskifever.com.

****************

AFTER SUMMER RENOVATIONS, OREGON RESORTS READY FOR FIRST
SNOWFALL
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,October 26, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: THE 23RD ANNUAL HONDA SKI FEVER AND
SNOWBOARD SHOW, Page 08
Sunday, October 26, 2003

AFTER SUMMER RENOVATIONS, OREGON RESORTS READY FOR FIRST
SNOWFALL

With the ski season drifting closer, Oregon's ski areas are unveiling additions and
attractions. Here's a roundup of the snow parks for the 2003-04 season.

Mt. Hood Meadows: In addition to lifts, snowcat access to an additional 1,700 vertical
feet and several pipes and terrain parks, the resort now has a 500-foot in-ground
SuperPipe with 17-foot walls and the Radio Disney Fun Room, a play area for kids age
six to 14, with Disney CDs, DVDs, games and Internet access.

The resort is offering up to six free day/night lift tickets to anyone staying midweek
(Sunday to Thursday) at Cooper Spur Mountain Resort.

Mt. Hood Meadows features a range of slopes from beginner to expert. Also, the
Children's Learning Center provides on-slope instruction with the Wonder Carpet Kids
Conveyor lift. The resort has a state-certified daycare for ages 6 weeks and up.

For more information, call 800-754-4663 or visit www.skihood.com.

Timberline Lodge and Ski Area: With more than 1,000 acres of ski terrain and fall-to-
summer room rates ranging from $85 to $240 (per night, double occupancy) at the lodge,
Timberline offers a great escape from the city.

The resort offers first-time instruction packages (starting at $49) to new skiers and
snowboarders and also has a snowskate park ($10 admission and snowskate rental), six
lifts and snowcat access to additional slopes on select days.

For more information, call 503-622-7979 or visit www.timberlinelodge.com.

Mt. Hood Skibowl: Billing themselves as the nation's largest night-ski area, Skibowl
features 34 lighted runs, including "Reynolds Run," which is Olympic certified. Skiers
and snowboarders looking for adventure can find a variety of obstacles at the resort's
halfpipe and terrain gardens.

The park has a Mogul Buster Ski School for children 4 to 13 years old. A snow play area
at Skibowl offers snow tubes, including the new Extreme Tube Hill, as an alternative to
skiing and boarding.
Other features include the resort's horse-drawn sleigh rides, a 2.5-mile dog sled ride,
snow bike rentals and a new High Adrenaline Zipline -- a harness attached to a line with
a 500 foot drop from Multorpor Lodge to the bottom of Skibowl.

For more information, call 800-754-2695 or visit www.skibowl.com.

Mt. Bachelor: Readers of Ski magazine ranked Mt. Bachelor near Bend number 28 out of
the top 30 resorts in North America in its 16th annual reader resort survey.

New to the resort this year is a system on its Web site that allows pass holders to track
their usage of the mountain, including the number of days spent on the mountain and
vertical feet skied. Also, new to the Air Chamber terrain park is an 8-foot Wallride and
Rainbow rail. These features complement the existing lifts, tubing, dog-sledding, cross-
country trails and snowshoeing.

For more information, call 800-829-2442 or visit www.mtbachelor.com.

Hoodoo Ski Area: This year the Autobahn comes to Hoodoo in the form of four 800-foot
runs designed specifically for tubes. The five-acre Hoodoo Autobahn Tubing Park is $15
for children 11 and younger and $20 for those 12 and up.

Hoodoo survived the summer fire season unscathed, and the snow season will open with
two new quad lifts, more than 800 acres of slope, a tubing slope and a Pizza Pub.
Overnight resorts in Sisters, Camp Sherman and Black Butte are short drives away.

For more information, call 541-822-3799 or visit www.hoodoo.com.

Ski Anthony Lakes: With 1,100 acres available by lift and 2,000 acres of powder
accessible by snowcat, Anthony Lakes, between La Grande and Baker City in Eastern
Oregon, opens again this year with Powder Tours -- half- and full-day snowcat tours
ranging from $75 to $150 per person for advanced skiers.

The ski area also has 40 kilometers of groomed Nordic trails and food services at the
Starbottle Saloon.

For more information, call 541-856-3277 or visit www.anthonylakes.com.

Mt. Ashland: The resort, halfway between Portland and San Francisco off I-5, opens once
more with a beginner lift that is free every day of the season and -- after years of outside
vendors providing food services -- Mt. Ashland has opened the Mountain Cafe.

In addition, the resort is offering overnight packages -- including lift tickets and lodging -
- starting at $45 per person. Mt. Ashland also has a halfpipe and terrain park.

Season-pass holders can purchase a daily Mt. Shasta Ski Park lift ticket for $10.
For more information, call 541-482-2897 or visit www.mtashland.com.

Willamette Pass: With a new six-person high-speed chair -- Willamette Pass offers 20
kilometers of groomed Nordic track and 1,563 vertical feet of slopes for skiers and
snowboarders.

Willamette Pass is halfway between Bend and Eugene, off Oregon State Highway 58.

For more information, call 541-484-5030 or visit www.willamettepass.com.

Cooper Spur Ski Area: As of last season, the resort on the north side of Mount Hood
celebrated 75 years in operation and added four new lifts -- a double chair and three rope
tows.

The terrain is 50 acres of ski slope and 10 kilometers of Nordic track.

On 775 acres of forestland, the resort has log cabins, lodge condo suites, hotel rooms and
a restaurant and lounge, as well as hot tubs and massage therapy rooms.

All-access passes are $25 and include lift tickets, tubing, and ski or snowboard rentals.
For more information, call 541-352-7803 or visit www.cooperspur.com.

********************

NOTEBOOK: WORKSHOP OFFERS TIPS, TOOLS NEW HOMEOWNERS CAN
USE
By Joshua Sommer, Staff Writer

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,October 16, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 09
Thursday, October 16, 2003

NOTEBOOK: WORKSHOP OFFERS TIPS, TOOLS NEW HOMEOWNERS CAN
USE

The Portland Housing Center (PHC) is presenting a class for new homeowners on Oct.
18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 3233 N.E. Sandy Blvd.

Sponsored by the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland and Portland
General Electric, "HomeOwner's Toolkit" features tips on managing and saving money,
carrying out routine maintenance and working with a contractor. Speakers include Kevin
Minkoff, certified public accountant; Ernest Hill, State Farm Insurance; and KEX-radio's
"Mr. Fix-It," Tracy Hankins.
The cost is $10 and includes a handbook. To register, call Michelle Puggarana, PHC's
HomeOwnership Trainer, at 503-282-7744, Ext. 106.

Legend unveils new look at FountainCourt

Legend Homes introduced three new home styles -- Colonial Revival, French Country
and Craftsman Revival -- at FountainCourt in Beaverton.

FountainCourt, a community of condominiums and townhomes off Southwest Barrows
Road, has units ranging from 1,400 to 2,000 square feet and priced from $160,000 to
$200,000. Its second phase of 28 units recently opened.

Model homes are open daily at noon. For more information, call 503-590-0849.

Sales have begun for the 31 lots in phase two of Legend Homes' Lake Forest community
in Tualatin. When completed, the project will have 102 single-family homes.

There are two model homes open for viewing and a third is scheduled to open soon.

Featuring three to five bedrooms, the homes will range from 2,216 to 2,924 square feet
and will be priced from $327,900 to $374,900.

The sales office is open every day at noon. For more information, call 503-885-0223 or
visit www.legendhomes.com.

Legend Homes Corvallis Communities is offering two Northwest cottage-style home
plans at its Willamette Landing project, 1249 Rivergreen Ave., near Corvallis.

The cottage sizes are from 1,282 to 1,387 square feet, with base prices from $167,900 to
$173,900. Willamette Landing ultimately will feature 456 homes in Craftsman,
traditional and the new Northwest cottage style.

For the sales office, call 541-738-0558.

Merlo Station enters stage three of project

A grand opening for phase three of Merlo Station townhomes was held at the project on
Southwest Gage Lane and 160th Avenue in Beaverton.

Developed by American Homes, the community features townhomes ranging from 1,045
to 1,245 square feet.

For a tour, prices and directions, call Lisa Bradburn of Windermere Baldwin Properties,
503-648-1169, Ext. 226.

Camas project enters final phase of sales
Deer Creek, a D.R. Horton project in Camas, Wash., on Prune Hill, has opened sales of
its final phase.

Featuring 54 homes ranging from 2,687 to 3,429 square feet and prices from $300,000 to
$400,000, the homes will be a mix of Craftsman and European styles.

For directions, call 360-834-1500.

Sales begin Oct. 19 at The Avenue Lofts

Real estate investor Robert Ball, who specializes in transforming historic buildings into
living spaces, announced that Pearl Real Estate will begin loft sales Oct. 19 for the
renovated Meier & Frank warehouse building at 1001 N.W. 14th Ave.

The Avenue Lofts will feature 170 lofts, eight townhouses, 17 two-story penthouses and
a 5,500-square-foot atrium cut in the center of the building from the roof to the third
floor. The warehouse was built in 1923.

Prices will start at $148,000 and top out at $1 million. For more information, call 503-
223-2255.

Class focuses on needs of aging homeowners

The Remodelors Council of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland
(HBA) is offering a Certified Aging-in-Place (CAPS) program.

The educational program -- designed by the National Association of Home Builders
Remodelors Council in conjunction with AARP -- is designed to help remodelers, home
builders, architects, designers, social workers and those working in the medical field meet
the market demands of middle-aged and older homeowners.

The course will be held Nov. 5 to 7, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. each day. CAPS will
teach technical, business-management and customer-service skills.

Cost for the course is $600 for HBA members and $700 for non-members. To register,
call Michelle Morain at 503-684-1880.

Web site gives tours of lots at The Estates

The Estates at Parrett Mountain (New Home Monthly, Sept. 18), a neighborhood of large
view lots in Sherwood, has a Web site where new-home shoppers can take virtual tours of
the building sites available for sale.
For a map of the 66-lot development, visit www.the-estates.com. The Web site also has
information on the history of the property and the surrounding community, as well as
directions to The Estates at Parrett Mountain.

*******************

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,October 16, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 12
CORRECTION: PUBLISHED CORRECTION RAN THURSDAY, 11/20/2003,
FOLLOWS:

Timber-frame house blends chips, clay

A Corbett house featured on Page 15 of the Oct. 16 issue of New Home Monthly
contained incorrect terminology. The walls of the timber-frame house were made of
leichtlehmbau (a blend of wood chips and clay), not cob (a blend of clay, sand and
straw), according to Katy Langstaff of Sustainable Systems Design, who was the
sustainability consultant on the project.

Cost of Sunslates

Also, some editions contained incorrect information in the Product Profile of sustainable
roofing systems. The story should have said the cost of Sunslates is $11,000 to $12,000
per 100 square feet.

Thursday, October 16, 2003

PRODUCT PROFILE: ECO-FRIENDLY REVOLUTION QUIETLY UNDER WAY
OVERHEAD

Advances in earth-friendly roofing systems have gone incognito. And that's just what
Oregon's green-loving homeowners have wanted: something low-profile yet sustainable.

Here are products from three companies that have made it up to the rooftops.

Uni-Solar's Standing Seam Photovoltaic System

Even if passersby took time to examine the blue metal roof on a home in Cornelius, it's
doubtful they'd realize a good chunk of it is a solar energy-producing phenom.

Cindy Leung and her husband, Jim Lewinson, had the product installed on their roof in
the spring of 2001 by Mr. Sun Solar. They say they appreciate the savings on electricity
costs but don't miss the clunky solar-collecting panels of the past.
"On a sunny day you can actually watch the meter running backwards," said Leung.
"That's energy that the panels are generating and the electric company is buying back."

Under Oregon's Net Metering Law, any excess power generated by a customer must be
credited back to the customer's account by the public utility that supplies power to the
home.

Uni-Solar's system offers two power ratings -- 64 and 128 watts -- depending on the
length of the panels (9.34 or 18 feet).

Sunslates

Homeowners without metal roofs need not dispair.

Sunslates are small, interlocking, slate-shaped solar panels made from photovoltaic
materials and suitable for pitched roofs. They are produced by Atlantis Energy Systems
(AES) in Sacramento, Calif.

Sunslates take the place of standard shingles or slates and can be integrated with an
existing roof.

Sunslates generate about 1kw per 100-square-feet of roof covered. The cost, if a
homeowner covers 300 square feet of roof with Sunslates, is $11,000 to $12,000 per 100
square feet. That may sound steep, but AES said the estimate is the cost after paying an
installer -- who does more than 85 percent of the work -- and an electrician, less any
rebates or tax breaks.

Oregon's Residential Energy Tax Credit, a one-time credit for energy-efficient upgrades
including photovoltaic systems, is $3 per peak watt the system produces, up to $1,500.
And the Energy Trust Group of Oregon offers solar customers cash incentives, as well.

Like Christmas lights that stay on if one bulb on the string burns out, the rest of the roof
will still function if a slate is damaged.

Individual broken slates can be replaced in about half an hour by a roofer.

Sunslates have met with success outside of Oregon. So, what keeps them from taking off
here? One of the biggest obstacles is getting local consumers past the idea that solar
electricity only works in the desert, according to Jon Miller, executive director of Oregon
Solar Energy Industries Association (OSEIA).

Skeptical consumers can use an online Clean Power Estimator from Uni-Solar to
determine just how effective a solar solution might be for their roof. The estimator is at
www.clean-power.com/unisolar/.
An example of how your roof might look with Sunslates installed is displayed in the
Earth Advantage National Center, 16280 S.W. Upper Boones Ferry Road.

AES suggests people who are interested in the product speak with Brent Wisniewski,
who installed the Sunslates system at Earth Advantage for Dryer Electric.

Ecoroofs

Another residential innovation known by several names has been a hit outside Oregon.
Ecoroofs -- also called green, living or garden roof systems (GRS) -- are plants, trees and
grasses with shallow roots growing in a light layer of soil that rests on a membrane on
flat or low-pitched roofs.

Portland-based Pioneer Roofers installs a product by IB Roof Systems of Eugene --
Chemguard Single-Ply Membrane, an Energy Star-rated system.

To promote ecoroofs, which help maintain a healthy watershed by reducing the amount
of stormwater runoff entering local streams and rivers, the City of
Portland/Environmental Services offers grants of up to $5,000 to anyone installing a
GRS.

"We focus only on products with the Energy-Star rating because of the harsh effects that
hotter roofs have on the environment and the damage they can do to the roof," said
Marshall Sturgill, owner of Pioneer Roofers.

"Cooler roofs make for a more energy-efficient roof," Sturgill said.

According to the companies that work with them, ecoroofs are appropriate for residential
and commercial buildings, in both new construction or retrofit projects.

****************

DINING CHEAP EATS MOMO BAR MAXIMO
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,October 3, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 14
Friday, October 3, 2003

DINING CHEAP EATS MOMO BAR MAXIMO

MoMo Bar Maximo
The little shop that once housed the British Tea Garden, half a block north of Multnomah
County Central Library, has a very different vibe as the hip MoMo Bar Maximo.

MoMo (named after a co-owner's dog) still sports the intimate patio that made the tea
garden unique, hidden behind the building, and it looks like it has been revamped to fit
more tables.

The place caters to a hefty dose of thirtysomething patrons who come to shoot pool and
plug the (too loud, at times) Starlink Internet-enabled jukebox (all the songs you could
ever hope for). However, the garden/patio in the back is quiet and a great hidden place to
take a date.

All menu items are less than $9, and most fall into the $5 to $7 range. The green chili
quesadilla or tomato basil sandwich ($6) are prime choices, but MoMo also has pastas
($7-$8), gourmet salads ($3-$8) and cheap appetizers.

MoMo has a good tap selection, full bar and a happy hour (food and drink) that stretches
from 4 to 7 p.m. Happy hour well drinks are $3, draft pints are $2.50, Pabst Blue Ribbon
beer is $2 and the happy hour food special changes daily.

725 S.W. 10th Ave.; 503-478-9600. Hours: 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays;
Sundays 3 p.m.-midnight.

-- Joshua Sommer
***************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
PLEDGES ANNUAL DONATION TO CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,September 18, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 10
Thursday, September 18, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK: HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
PLEDGES ANNUAL DONATION TO CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA) raised more than $7,700
for Doernbecher Children's Hospital Foundation at the 2003 Street of New Beginnings
home show.

The money is part of the Home Builders for Miracles project, a partnership set up in 1999
between the HBA and Doernbecher Children's Hospital Foundation to generate $500,000
for the hospital over the course of several years.
Of the donation, $5,780 came from Forest Cottage Homes and Chicago Title as part of
the proceeds from the sale of a home in the show.

Continuing in this effort, Blazer Development announced it will build the 2004 Street of
Dreams "Miracle House." Each year, proceeds from the sale of a Miracle House go to the
Home Builders for Miracles project.

For information about making a contribution to the 2004 project, call Tessa Lewis at 503-
220-8344.

Second building tour goes for the green

Twenty homes across Portland will open their doors on Sept. 20 to visitors who are green
with curiosity.

Presented by G/Rated, Metro and the Solar Energy Association of Oregon, the second
Build It Green! tour explores the process, materials and challenges of making a building
or remodeling project environmentally sound.

Tickets cost $20, or $10 for bicyclists and Tri-Met users. Tickets are available at
Environmental Building Supplies, 819 S.E. Taylor St.

Habitat set to finish 14 homes in 9 days

Portland Habitat for Humanity is pursuing the completion of 14 homes by Sept. 21 during
its first Blitz Build.

Volunteers began construction Sept. 13 on the homes, which are for homeless families in
need of housing.

For more information or to volunteer, call 503-287-9529.

LaPine OKs plans for new project

Pahlisch Homes of Bend will begin construction at a 518-acre project in LaPine in the
spring of next year.

The focus of the project, called Newberry Neighborhood, is to redirect development from
sensitive areas, especially those at risk of wildfire or encroachment on wildlife habitats.

The project consists of four neighborhoods. Neighborhood Two, a 98-acre portion, will
be the first section of the parcel to be developed.

The first phase includes 107 lots and homes from $90,000 to $200,000.
Sales now under way at D.R. Horton project

Sales for D.R. Horton's 112-home project on Heron Ridge in Sherwood have begun, with
model homes expected to open by February 2004.

The homes -- with plans from three bedrooms and 2.5 baths to five bedrooms and four
baths -- range from 1,800 to 4,100 square feet and are priced from the low $200,000s to
$400,000s. They have two- or three-car garages.

For more information, call 503-222-4151.

Fair celebrates, shows homes built by HOST

HOST Development is holding a street fair on Sept. 20 to support its Charleston Place
project in North Portland.

The Charleston Place Street Fair, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., will include free food and music, as
well as the opportunity for prospective home buyers to tour homes and meet with lenders.

The project is on North Charleston Street, south of Columbia Boulevard, in the St. Johns
neighborhood. The homes have two, three and four bedrooms, with prices from $126,000
to $156,000. All comply with PGE Earth Advantage standards.

For more information about HOST, visit www.hostdevelopment.com on the Web.

Big Meadow launches ninth phase of sales

Featuring three builders -- Hilligoss Homes, Roth Built and B&D Homes -- the ninth
phase of Big Meadow in Molalla is ready for sales, and 10 of the 45 lots are already
reserved.

Phase 8 sold out in six months.

The new phase features 21 different home plans, ranging from $140,000 to $200,000 and
homes with two to five bedrooms.

For directions and information, call Big Meadow Realty at 503-829-3646.

More new homes to top Mount Scott

Kensington Heights, a 107-home project under way by D.R. Horton on the top of Mount
Scott southeast of Portland, features larger-than-usual lots and views of Oswego Lake.

The 48.5-acre project, above the former Top O' Scott golf course, has lots that range from
6,500 to 14,000 square feet and home designs from 2,700 to 4,000 square feet.
Prices for the homes run from the high $300,000s to $500,000s, with sales projected to
begin in early 2004.

********************

DINING CHEAP EATS GREEN PAPAYA
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian<

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,September 5, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 11
Friday, September 5, 2003

DINING CHEAP EATS GREEN PAPAYA

Green Papaya

Diners in search of an alternative to ho-hum happy hour fare (you know, the ubiquitous
hamburgers, hot wings, Caesar salad) have a titillating chunk of heaven waiting for them
at Green Papaya, a new Vietnamese bistro downtown.

Open for only a month, it may not be on every bargain hunter's list, at least not yet.

Appetizers are $4 to $8 and entrees range from $9 to $18 and carry names like sugarcane
shrimp ($11), curry-laced chicken ($11) and caramelized Mekong fish ($11), but the
happy hour appetizer menu, in particular, is worth knowing.

From 4 to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, appetizers run just $2 and that, my friend, is
huge when you scan the menu. Try these morsels: coconut shrimp with chili sauce,
chicken satay with spicy peanut sauce, fresh shrimp or veggie spring rolls with peanut
sauce and -- a personal favorite -- cream cheese-stuffed won tons with cranberry dipping
sauce.

Other appetizers are pot stickers; honey-caramel-glazed chicken wings; crispy crab and
pork or shrimp rolls; and lychee salad.

1135 S.W. Morrison St.; 503-248-2112. Hours: 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 4.-10 p.m. daily.

-- Joshua Sommer
***************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK BALLOTS CAST, COUNTED AT 2003
STREET OF DREAMS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER\
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,August 21, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 08
Thursday, August 21, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK BALLOTS CAST, COUNTED AT 2003
STREET OF DREAMS

The most expensive house ever built for a Portland area Street of Dreams was sold last
week as the 2003 show ended.

An offer for Nature's Door, a $2.5 million house built by Renaissance Homes, was
accepted by Renaissance owner Randy Sebastian on Aug. 13, and later the same day,
another offer for the $1.2 million Cooper Summit home built by Haggart Construction
was accepted by builder Jeff Haggart.

The sale of the homes to two attendees on the same day was unprecedented, according to
David Tangvald, 2003 Street of Dreams chairman.

"We couldn't be more thrilled," said Tangvald. "Not only did the show's most expensive
home sell, but it is also the first time in the event's 28-year history that two homes have
sold on the same day. We have heard from attendees that they really are impressed with
the homes in this year's show, and I think these sales punctuate the fact that these are
livable, well-designed homes."

Sponsored by Northwest Natural, the 2003 Street of Dreams was held at Renaissance
Pointe on Cooper Mountain in Beaverton. The luxury home show was presented by
RE/MAX and BASCO and produced by the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan
Portland (HBA).

The HBA also announced winners for this year's Street of Dreams design competition.

The People's Choice awards resulted from ballots cast by attendees as they toured the
show. Realtors voted for their favorites on Realtor Day, sponsored by The Oregonian.
Professional awards were determined by industry judges. The winners follow:

People's Choice Awards

Best Landscaping and Best of Show: Nature's Door, Renaissance Custom Homes

Best Interior Design and Home Furnishings: Greystone Manor, Williamson Homes

Best Kitchen: Cooper Summit, Haggart Construction

Professional's Choice Awards:
Best Kitchen, Best of Show, Best Master Suite, Best Architectural Design, Best Interior
Design, and Best Home Furnishing: Nature's Door, Renaissance Custom Homes

Best Landscaping: Cooper Summit, Haggart Construction

Realtors' Choice Awards:

Best Master Suite, Best of Show, Best Interior Decorating and Best Home Furnishings:
Greystone Manor, Williamson Homes

Best Curb Appeal and Best Landscaping: Nature's Door, Renaissance Custom Homes

Best Kitchen: Cooper Summit, Haggart Construction

Best Architectural Design: Ambiance, CastleRock Homes

Location unveiled for 2004 Parade of Homes

Granite Highlands, in western Washougal, has been selected as the location of the
Building Industry Association of Southwest Washington's (BIASW) annual Parade of
Homes for 2004.

The announcement follows the success of the 2003 Parade of Homes, which concluded at
the end of July.

"I think everyone felt this was a tremendous success," said David Roewe, executive
director of the BIASW, regarding the show.

This year the home show saw an increase of 40 percent in attendance over the 2002
show. By the end of the event, five of the 11 homes had been sold, making it "one of the
most successful shows . . . from a builder's standpoint," said Jon Girod of Quail
Construction and chairman of the 2003 show.

The BIASW also annouced its show winners. The People's Choice Awards, including
Best Street Appeal, Best Architectural Design, Best Bathroom, Best Interior, Best Master
Suite, Best Kitchen, Best Floor Plan and Best Playhouse, were chosen by members of the
general public who attended.

The Chinook, presented by M.J. Olson Enterprises, received both the People's Choice and
the Industry Award for Best of Show, the annual event's top honors. The home featured
bold, rustic Northwest architecture and design. Seven judges with backgrounds in various
homebuilding trades evaluated the houses before the event's opening. The judges
assessed homes that incorporated the best designs in interior, architectural, master suite,
kitchen and landscaping.
M.J. Olson's home won the Industry Awards for Best Architectural Design, Best
Landscaping and Best of Show. The home also received four People's Choice awards for
Best Street Appeal, Best Architectural Design, Best Interior and Best of Show.

Among the other winners, Pacific Lifestyle Custom Homes' Morgan received People's
Choice awards for Best Bathroom, Best Kitchen and Best Floor Plan; S. Vilhauer
Company's Le Fidele won a People's Choice award for Best Master Suite, and received
three Industry awards including Best Interior Design, Best Master Suite, and Best
Kitchen; Shibui, by A&M Homes, tied with The Chinook for Best Architectural Design;
and Chicago Title was awarded Best Playhouse Design for its medieval castle.

2003 New Beginnings winners announced

RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings' 2003 winner results were announced by the Home
Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA) on Aug. 6.

Show attendees chose Galaxy by Christensen Construction as the winner of five People's
Choice Awards: Best of Show; Best Architectural Design; Best Interior Decorating; Best
Landscaping; and Best Kitchen.

On Realtor Day, sponsored by The Oregonian, Realtors voted on eight categories.
Realtor's Choice awards went to:

Northwest Passage: Best In Show, Best Landscaping, Best Interior Decorating, and Best
Kitchen, JLS Custom Homes

Best Curb Appeal: Buckingham Tudor, Brooke Lee Homes.

Best Master Suite: The Fireside, Four D Construction.

Best Architectural Design: Sage Crest, Don Morissette Homes.

Best Home Furnishings: Havencrest, Bruneau Construction.

The Fourth Annual RE/MAX Street of New Beginnings ran June 14 to July 6 and
featured homes from 10 different builders at prices from $279,000 to $379,000.

Green expo draws pros to Portland

Architects from eight states, Guam and Hong Kong are coming to Portland to take part in
the Green Building Expo -- part of the 2003 American Institute of Architects (AIA),
Northwest and Pacific Region Conference.

The green expo portion of the conference runs Aug. 22 and 23, 1:30 to 5 p.m., at the
Oregon Convention Center. Exhibitors include companies marketing green-building
products and services for homeowners, builders and contractors.
Admission is free. For more information, call AIA Portland at 503-223-8757 or visit
www.aiaportland.org.

Arbor announces the Crossing's new phase

Arbor Custom Homes has opened the second phase of sales at Arbor Crossing with 103
homes on Boeckman Road in Wilsonville.

Lot sizes range from 5,000 to 8,000 square feet; prices run from $259,900 to $389,900.
Twenty-three homes had been sold by early August.

The homes feature three to six-bedrooms and two to three baths, with floor plans from
2,200 to 3,400 square feet.

The development includes a central park with a play structure, basketball court and picnic
tables.

HBA awards $15,000 to PHC for program

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland awarded $15,000 to the
Portland Housing Center (PHC) to help home buyers in the center's financial fitness
program.

The grant will provide home buyers with one-on-one counseling on budgeting, credit
repair and overcoming obstacles to homeownership.

"We expect the grant to provide an invaluable resource for the community," said Peg
Malloy, PHC executive director. "Our goal is to increase homeownership, particularly for
those who have been left behind in home buying, such as minority groups, single women
and people with modest incomes."

**************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK CLACKAMAS COUNTY TO HOST 2004
STREET OF DREAMS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,July 24, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, July 24, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK CLACKAMAS COUNTY TO HOST 2004
STREET OF DREAMS
Hidden Lake Estates in Clackamas County has been chosen as the site of the 2004
Northwest Natural Street of Dreams.

The Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland (HBA), producers of the annual
show of luxury homes, noted the site features a 10-acre lake, large cedar and deciduous
trees, and a spring that flows year-round. Each lot is two acres.

The developer is the Ziegler Co., and dates are not yet set.

"We are thrilled to have Hidden Lake Estates as our location for the (show)," said
Stephanie Frisch, director of shows and promotions for the HBA.

Up to eight homes will be built for the 2004 show.

This year's Street of Dreams opened July 19 for a four-week run at Renaissance Pointe on
Cooper Mountain in Beaverton. For more information, call 503-684-1880, or visit
www.streetofdreamsusa.org

Tradespeople show students the ropes

High school students from Portland, Vancouver, and Clackamas and Cowlitz counties
were selected to participate in the Oregon Building Congress' Summer Construction
Academy, a program that introduces them to construction trades through classes and
tours.

"The program has had a profound effect on kids to keep them in school, gain interest in
math and focus on finishing school," said Richard O'Connor, executive director for
Oregon Building Congress.

More than 85 students were selected this year in the Portland metro and Southwest
Washington areas, where the program encourages minorities and women to participate.

Running from mid-July to August, the program allows students to experience the home-
building process firsthand from professionals in several trades (electrical, sheet metal and
carpentry) and from members of the HBA.

For more information, call 503-685-8336 or visit www.obcweb.com.

Course helps builders adapt to aging clients

The National Association of Home Builders' (NAHB) Remodelors Council, in
conjunction with the AARP, has designed an educational program to help remodelers to
meet market demands of middle-to-late-aged homeowners.
The certificate -- Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) -- stems from a May 2000
AARP study called "Fixing to Stay" in which homeowners age 45 and older said "they
would like to remain in their current residence for as long as possible," but are concerned
about "finding reliable contractors or handymen, should they need to modify their home."

A three-day course, CAPS will teach technical, business management and customer
service skills (See related story on this page.)

This fall, the HBA will hold the first CAPS program in Oregon, sponsored by Contract
Furnishing Mart. For more information, call 503-603-4514.

Alternative materials explored in classes

Straw. Clay. Sticks.

These are actual, not storybook, home-building materials, and representatives from
Econest Building Co. planned two workshops in Oregon to demonstrate their versatility.

Econest is based in Santa Fe, N.M., and specializes in earth, straw and timber structures.
Some of its homes have been featured in Fine Homebuilding and Natural Home
magazines.

"Strawclay Construction," will be held July 30 to Aug. 2 and covers techniques for
creating weatherproof walls that "breathe." Topics include clay harvesting, soil testing,
making clay slip (liquid clay with a batter-like consistency), mixing straw and clay, form-
work, loading and tamping.

The workshop is at 23777 S.E. Gold Rd., Eagle Creek -- the site of a home under
construction -- and runs from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The class fee is $400; lunch is provided.

Registration is required. To register, call 503-705-2933. For more information, visit
www.econest.com.

Hoyt Street garners three local awards

Three projects by Hoyt Street Properties were selected Top Projects of 2003 by the
Portland Daily Journal of Commerce.

Park Place Condominiums, Bridgeport Condominiums and Park XIII Apartments, all in
Portland's Pearl District, were winners. Each has a construction value of approximately
$10 million and started construction in 2002.

For more information, call 503-227-2000 or visit www.hoyt-streetproperties.com.

Dates set for remodel tour
Dates for the 2004 Tour of Remodeled Homes, produced by the Remodelors Council and
presented by PGE Earth Advantage, have been set for March 13 and 14, 2004.

The annual show will present 16 to 20 homes that incorporate dynamic and significant
home renovations in the Portland metro area.

For more information, call 503-684-1880.

River Canyon Estates holds grand opening

A 348-home project in Bend will hold a grand opening July 25.

D.R. Horton's $120-million River Canyon Estates, on the east bank of the Deschutes
River, includes home plans from 1,759 to 5,000-square-feet and price tags from $167,000
to $700,000.

Two model homes will be open, including the 2,700-square-foot Brighton and the 3,000-
square-foot Carmel. Both have four-bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a den and a three-car garage.

The project features a $1-million clubhouse with a gathering room, outdoor swimming
pool, kitchen and a weight room. The property also sports a four-acre park and several
smaller parks.

Model homes will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. For more information, call 541-
617-1019.

****************

DINING CHEAP EATS OCCASIONS RESTAURANT AND BALLROOM
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Friday,July 4, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: ARTS AND LIVING, Page 11
Friday, July 4, 2003

DINING CHEAP EATS OCCASIONS RESTAURANT AND BALLROOM

Occasions Restaurant and Ballroom

If you blink, you'll miss it. If you miss it, it would be a shame.

The name of the place is Occasions Restaurant and Ballroom, and the doorway is hidden
between a couple of shops in the booming Sellwood District and leads to a staircase that
takes you up to the restaurant.
Chef Matt Bahde did an eight-year stretch at the Brasserie Montmartre before moving to
Occasions, and co-chef Tim Dillion has worked at several resorts throughout the United
States and in Canada.

The building was a gentleman's club in the '20s and has a cozy interior with dark wood,
candles, twinkling lights and old photos of the area that have been enlarged. The
ballroom has 2,500 square feet of hardwood floor perfect for tango and swing dancing.


Occasions' menu melds an eclectic mix of American, French and Italian foods. Some
entrees are as little as $12. Check out the bacon-wrapped beef tenderloin, chased by
Almond Joy cake or coconut cream pie for dessert. Appetizers, such as addictive coconut
shrimp, are even gentler on the wallet, ranging from $5 to $10.

Right now, Occasions is a beer-and-wine-only establishment, though it plans to add a full
bar and a happy hour menu later this summer.

Occasions Restaurant and Ballroom is at 8132 S.E. 13th Ave.; 503-736-0179. Hours:
Lunch -- 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; dinner -- 5 p.m.-close.

-- Joshua Sommer
*****************

NOTEBOOK MERIT AWARD PUTS STONEWATER AT ORENCO IN THE
RUNNING FOR GOLD JOSHUA
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,June 19, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 06
Thursday, June 19, 2003

NOTEBOOK MERIT AWARD PUTS STONEWATER AT ORENCO IN THE
RUNNING FOR GOLD JOSHUA

Legend Homes is one of five finalists for a 2003 Gold Nugget Award, a national honor
presented by Western builders each year.

Stonewater earned an Award of Merit for Stonewater at Orenco, a neighborhood of
townhomes and condominiums in Hillsboro.

Designed by Mithun Architects of Seattle, Stonewater at Orenco was recognized in the
Best Community Site Plan 15 to 19 acres category of the competition, which is sponsored
by the Pacific Coast Builder's Conference (PCBC) and Builder Magazine.
Entries in the Gold Nugget awards come from builders and designers from 14 Western
states and Pacific Rim countries. The competition honors creative achievements in
architectural design and land-use planning for residential, commercial and industrial
projects.

Jim Chapman, president of Legend Homes, will accept the Award of Merit at the PCBC,
held June 19 to 22 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco.

The units at Stonewater at Orenco are arranged around courtyards, greenways and small
streets; they feature front porches and a variety of architectural styles. More than 17
percent of the site is designated for heritage trees, pocket parks and recreation areas.

For more information, call 503-648-0233 or go to www.legendhomes.com.

Play's not only thing to benefit from raffle

A charity raffle for designer playhouses will be held July 27 at the 2003 Riverview
Parade of Homes in Washougal, Wash.

Four playhouses have been designed, built and donated to the Playhouse Parade by Quail
Homes, Grams Construction, Parr Lumber and Chicago Title. All are on display at
Westfield Shoppingtown, formerly known as Vancouver Mall.

Proceeds from the playhouse raffle will be divided between the Washougal Athletic
Fields Project and the Vancouver School District Foundation.

Raffle tickets are $5 and are available from Nies Insurance at Westfield Shoppingtown.

The Riverview Parade of Homes, sponsored by the Building Industry Association of
Southwest Washington, runs July 11 to 27 at the River View neighborhood in
Washougal. For more information on the Playhouse Parade and the home show, visit
www.newhomesonparade.com.

Townhome model open at Murray Ridge

D.R. Horton has opened a model townhome at its new Murray Ridge neighborhood near
Southwest Scholls Ferry Road and Southwest 151st Avenue in Beaverton.

The homes at Murray Ridge range from 2,300 to 2,770 square feet and are priced from
$249,000 to $300,000.

The 2,772-square-foot model is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily except Wednesdays
(noon to 6 p.m.).

For more information, call 503-524-9349.
Here comes the sun -- and a workshop, too

Mr. Sun Solar, a solar-energy equipment supplier, begins a summer workshop series on
June 21 at its store at 3838 S.W. Macadam Ave.

The workshop, the first of three in a series, runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A classroom
session will be followed by an afternoon field trip.

The focus of the workshop will be passive and active solar systems with emphasis on
solar water heating and includes a briefing on pool and hot tub heating.

The instructor, John Patterson, is founder and president of Mr. Sun Solar and has
installed more than 1,200 systems.

The class is $75 and includes lunch.

For more information, call 503-222-2468 or visit www.mrsunsolar.com.

Renaissance to build at Clackamas project

Renaissance Homes has signed on to be the custom home builder for Eagle Landing, the
new neighborhood to be built at Top O' Scott Golf Course in Clackamas.

A $250-million renovation of the property will include a new golf center, a corporate and
retail park, upscale condominiums, apartments and custom single-family homes.

"Renaissance fits in perfectly with what we are trying to accomplish here," said Neil
Nedelisky, president of Show Timber, the company developing Eagle Landing. "The
quality of their work and their unique designs speak for themselves."

Renaissance, a three-time winner of the Street of Dreams Best of Show award, will build
75 custom homes at the project. The homes will range from 3,000 to 5,000 square feet
and be priced from $350,000 to $650,000.

Construction on the project will begin shortly after Top O' Scott closes after play on
Sunday, June 22. The new golf course is expected to be ready for play in spring of 2004.

Kim Whitman of Renaissance Homes said the company hopes to break ground by the end
of 2003.

For more information on Eagle Landing, call 503-469-4568.

Remodelors Council calls for tour entries
The Remodelors Council of the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Portland is
calling for entries for its 2004 Tour of Remodeled Homes.

Sponsored by PGE Earth Advantage, the tour dates will be March 13 and 14, 2004.
Official entry packets will be mailed beginning July 10.

For more information, call 503-684-1880.

*************

RE/MAX STEPS UP TO SPONSOR SHOWS<
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,June 19, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 23
Thursday, June 19, 2003

RE/MAX STEPS UP TO SPONSOR SHOWS<

For RE/MAX Equity Group, 2003 is a busy year.

RE/MAX Equity Group is title sponsor of three of the area's premiere summer home
show events: the Street of New Beginnings, Riverview Parade of Homes and Street of
Dreams.

When asked about the company's involvement in the shows, Jim Homolka, president of
RE/MAX Equity Group, said, "We've had a long history with the Street of Dreams and,
because we are leaders in the market, we feel that this is an important partnership
between builders and Realtors.

"Our involvement with the Street of New Beginnings comes because the show is geared
toward a broader spectrum of local home buyers due to their affordability."

The 2003 Street of New Beginnings runs June 14 to July 6; Clark County's 2003
Riverview Parade of Homes is July 11 to 27; and the 28th annual Street of Dreams is July
19 to Aug. 17.

For more information, visit www.equitygroup.com.

--Joshua Sommer

******************

SHOOTOUT SPONSORS FOCUS ON HELPING KIDS SUCCEED
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Monday,June 9, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: SCOTT THOMASON/NEIL LOMAX QUARTERBACK
SHOOTOUT, Page 05
Monday, June 9, 2003

SHOOTOUT SPONSORS FOCUS ON HELPING KIDS SUCCEED

Now in its 13th year in Portland, the Scott Thomason/Neil Lomax Quarterback Shootout
continues to flourish with the support of famous athletes, autograph-hungry fans and
sponsors looking to get in the game.

This year the sponsor roster has grown to more than 45 participants. So, what's the charm
of the Shootout that keeps attracting new sponsors? In a word: fun.

Prudential Northwest Properties, under the direction of president Bert Waugh, is one of
this year's new Shootout sponsors.

Waugh is a veteran of charitable organizations focused on benefiting youths, which is one
of the reasons why the Shootout piqued his interest. Proceeds from the Shootout are
donated to Young Life and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

"I've known Neil for a long time," Waugh said, "and I've played in his golf tournaments
in the past as a guest.

"My wife and I started a non-profit, Transitional Youth, in 1991 and I've watched what
Neil has done and I thought that this was a good time to get myself and the company
involved."

Waugh said he looks forward to playing in the 18-hole best-ball Pro-Am tournament
pairing celebrities with sponsors on Friday, June 13.

A camaraderie exists between organizers in the charitable business community.

"I've known Bert and what he's done in the community for several years," said Neil. "He
invited me to play in his charity golf tournament in a foursome with (former Trail
Blazers) Maurice Lucas, Larry Steele and Bert.

"So I invited Bert. I said, 'Bert, you want to be around some athletes? We've got to get
you involved in the Quarterback Shootout."
A chance to play along with celebrities in the Pro-Am is one of the attractive bonuses to
sponsoring the Shootout. Another is a chance to help young people through the Kids
Make Cents program by presenting sponsor Albertsons.

"It's a great chance to get involved with the charities that will be benefiting, and support
Albertsons," said John Memarian, customer business executive for Nabisco, a new
sponsor this year.

"Plus it's a chance to play some golf," Memarian added.

While the first-year sponsors breathe new life into the event, Lomax said the long-time
sponsors, like Thomason and Albertsons, are the backbone of the Shootout.

"We have the same sponsors who are so loyal and supportive of our event," Lomax said.
"We have so many true partners.

"Albertsons has been huge for us the last five or six years, with all their vendors and
manufacturers. It's just tremendous the support we've been getting from them. If we didn't
have Scott (Thomason) and Albertsons, we wouldn't be an event. No question about it."

Free tickets to the Shootout are available at Albertsons in the Portland area and
Southwest Washington.

With a variety of vendors operating during the Shootout, attendees will have access to a
wide variety of refreshments.

Dave Short of Breyer's ice cream has been involved with the Shootout for six years and
continues his support.

"People buy the ice cream every day and we need to give back," Short said, "and this is a
chance to do so, along with Albertsons.

"That's the essence -- a chance for the brand to give something back. Another reason is
what Neil is giving back to the community, working with charities that are giving back to
the kids. They make a real difference."
***************

ESPECIALLY LOW RATES AWAIT FIRST-TIME HOME BUYERS
By Joshua Sommers, The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,June 8, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: HOMES AND RENTALS, Page H06
Sunday, June 8, 2003

ESPECIALLY LOW RATES AWAIT FIRST-TIME HOME BUYERS
During June, Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is offering especially
low fixed-rate loans to low- and moderate-income households seeking to buy a first
home.

"Our 30-year fixed loan rate of 4.5 percent is the lowest we have ever offered since the
agency launched the program in 1978," said Bob Repine, director of OHCS.

OHCS's Residential Loan Program, known as the "Oregon Bond" program, helps eligible
home buyers secure below-market interest rates to finance their first houses. The rates are
made possible through the sale of tax-exempt mortgage revenue bonds issued by the
department. Although the department is calling June "Homeownership Month," the
program offers funding all year long at below-market rates.

In 2002, the program helped 1,160 families purchase homes in Oregon.

To qualify for the program, the borrower must meet the program's household income
limits and be a first-time home buyer (for most areas of the state).

Additionally, the property's sale price must not exceed the program's purchase-price
limits. The household income limits are $56,300 statewide; $65,300 for Benton County;
and $65,800 for Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah, Washington or Yamhill counties.

For more information, call 503-986-2015 or visit www.oregonbond.us on the Web.

-- Joshua Sommer
***************

COMPANY KEEPS CAR-LESS TREND IN MOTION
By Joshua Sommer
The Oregonian

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,June 1, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H05
Sunday, June 1, 2003

COMPANY KEEPS CAR-LESS TREND IN MOTION

Freedom from the car is frequently cited as a benefit of downtown life. But what if you
need to go where a bike or the bus can't take you?

Car-less Portland residents who need an alternative to public transportation or cycling
have an option that costs less than most drivers pay for automobile insurance.
Car sharing, an idea popular in Canada and throughout Europe for nearly a decade, made
its national debut when Dave Brook founded CarSharing Portland in 1998, which later
merged with Seattle-based Flexcar.

With Flexcar, members pay a one-time $25 fee and then an hourly or monthly rate --
depending on the member's needs -- and the company pays the rest: insurance, gas,
maintenance and parking for reserved spaces around the metropolitan area.

Members receive a smart card (like a debit card) and a code that allows them access to
any vehicle in the fleet. The cars can be reserved from one minute to a year in advance. If
a car's gas level drops below a quarter of a tank, the member uses a Flexcar credit card to
top off the tank. When a member is using one of the vehicles, the standard plan is $8 each
hour, which includes 10 free miles. Members pay nothing when they do not have a car
checked out.

Flexcar, a co-sponsor of the Portland Business Alliance's Downtown Tour, also offers
plans to accommodate more frequent use of its cars.

For instance, the basic Advantage Plan is $35 a month, with no annual fee and allows up
to five hours and 50 miles of vehicle use -- ideal for people who only need a car to run
errands after work or on weekends, or for those who don't want to bike to work during
Portland's occasional wet spells.

Most of the vehicles are near bus routes.

David Lawrence, a claims analyst for Regence Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and his wife
Stephanie use Flexcar exclusively. They are selling their regular car because the battery
went dead from lack of use.

"When you consider gas, insurance and maintenance, it is cheaper to use Flexcar in
Portland's metro area. You also don't have the worry of something happening to your own
personal car while parking downtown. And there's no cost for parking because of their
reserved parking spaces," Lawrence said.

The fleet includes sedans, such as Honda Civics and Saturns; gas/electric hybrid Toyota
Priuses; and special-use vehicles, such as Mazda pickup trucks and seven-passenger
Dodge minivans. The company even offers a Mazda Miata convertible.

For more information, call 503-328-3539 or visit www.flexcar.com.

-- Joshua Sommer
*****************

DEVELOPMENTS OPEN DOORS TO RENTERS, BUYERS -- AND PETS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Sunday,June 1, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: BEST LOCAL HOMES & RENTALS, Page H01
Sunday, June 1, 2003

DEVELOPMENTS OPEN DOORS TO RENTERS, BUYERS -- AND PETS

The Portland Business Alliance is throwing its second annual downtown open house, and
anyone interested in living in the heart of the city is invited.

From noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 1, more than 30 condos and apartment complexes
throughout Portland's central city will be open to the public for tours. Apartments and
properties for sale are included in this tour of new and pre-owned projects. The tour is co-
sponsored by the Oregonian, OregonLive.com, Flexcar and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage.

Since 1995, more than 50 residential buildings -- mostly downtown -- have been
completed in the central city area, according to the Portland Development Commission,
with several due for completion by the end of the year.

Maps and property listings for the event will be available in The Oregonian; and from
Downtown Sidewalk Ambassadors who wear distinctive black and green jackets. The
Ambassadors will be stationed at Northwest 1st Avenue and Davis Street (the Old Town
Chinatown Max stop) and at 1330 S.W. 3rd Ave.

Properties participating this year are listed below, along with a note on properties that
allow pets. For specific pet and deposit requirements, check with individual properties.

OWNERSHIP UNITS

Bridgeport Condominiums, 1130 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-2000;
www.hoytstreetproperties.com.Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

Legends Condominiums, 1132 S.W. 19th Ave.; 503-223-7941. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats
are allowed.

Marshall-Wells Lofts, 1001 N.W. 14th Ave.; 503-223-2255; www.marshall-wells.com.
Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

McCormick Pier, 600 N.W. Naito Parkway; 503-228-7437: www.rivercondos.com. Pet
Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

The Mosaic, 1400 S.W. 11th Ave.; 503-936-0332; www.mosaiccondos.com. Pet Policy:
Pets are allowed.

Park Place, 922 N.W. 11th Ave.; 503-227-2000.
Streetcar Lofts, 1030 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-2000; www.hoytstreetproperties.com. Pet
Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

RENTAL UNITS

735 St. Clair, 735 S.W. St. Clair St.; 503-478-9926. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are
allowed.

Bel Aire, 2139 W. Burnside St.; 503-226-3799. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

Collins Circle Apartments, 1704 S.W. Jefferson St.; 503-525-2324;
www.collinscircle.com. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are allowed.

Fifth Avenue Place, 314 N.W. Fifth Ave.; 503-243-3311. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats are
allowed.

Gallery Park Apartments, 1436 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-222-0274. Pet Policy: Dogs and cats
are allowed.

Hamilton West, 1511 S.W. 12th Ave.; 503-525-0500

Ione Plaza, 1717 Park Avenue; 503-228-9573

Kafoury Commons, 1240 S.W. Columbia St.; 503-226-0600.

Kearney Plaza, 930 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-5624; www.hoytstreetproperties.com. Pet
Policy: Cats are allowed.

King Towers, 901 S.W. King Ave.; 503-223-1458

Lovejoy Station, 1040 N.W. 10th Ave.; 503-220-2500. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Museum Place Lofts & Townhouses, 1030 S.W. Jefferson St.; 503-295-0303;
www.museum-place.com. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Oakwood At The Essex House, 1330 S.W. Third Ave.; 503-226-2443;
www.oakwood.com. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Ongford Apartments, 1417 S.W. 10th Ave.; 503-223-6603

Pacific Tower, 333 N.W. Fourth Ave.; 503-224-9393. Pet Policy: Small dogs and cats are
allowed.

Park Plaza, 1969 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-227-7485. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.
Pearl Court, 920 N.W. Kearney St.; 503-222-1999.

Portland Center Apartments, 200 S.W. Harrison St.; 503-224-3050;
www.equityapartments.com. Pet Policy: Small dogs and cats are allowed.

Portland Towers, 950 S.W. 21st Ave.; 503-228-9651. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Regency Apartments, 1410 S.W. Broadway; 503-224-2308. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

RiverPlace Square, 0308 S.W. Montgomery St.; 503-228-1800;
www.riverplacesquare.com. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Rose Plaza, 2199 N.W. Everett St.; 503-222-6080. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Royal Arms Apartments, 1829 N.W. Lovejoy St.; 503-222-2430. Pet Policy: Cats are
allowed.

Sovereign Hotel, 710 S.W. Madison St.; 503-248-0021

University Park Apartments, 1500 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-222-9300;
www.universityparkapartments.com. Pet Policy: Small dogs and cats are allowed.

Village At Lovejoy Fountain, 245 S.W. Lincoln St.; 503-223-5314;
www.villageatlovejoy.com.

Westover Tower, 930 N.W. 25th Place; 503-227-2181. Pet Policy: Cats are allowed.

Yards At Union Station, 945 N.W. Naito Parkway; 503-478-1695. Pet Policy: Cats are
allowed.
***************

EVEN FOR CAR-LESS DOWNTOWNERS, SOMETIMES ONLY AN AUTO WILL
DO
By Joshua Sommer
Staff writer

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,May 15, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 07
Thursday, May 15, 2003

EVEN FOR CAR-LESS DOWNTOWNERS, SOMETIMES ONLY AN AUTO WILL
DO

Freedom from the car is frequently cited as a benefit of downtown life. But what if you
need to go where a bike or the bus can't take you?
Car-less Portland residents who need an alternative to public transportation or cycling
have an option that costs less than most drivers pay for automobile insurance.

Car sharing, an idea popular in Canada and throughout Europe for nearly a decade, made
its national debut when Dave Brook founded CarSharing Portland in 1998, which later
merged with Seattle-based Flexcar.

With Flexcar, members pay a one-time $25 fee and then an hourly or monthly rate --
depending on the member's needs -- and the company pays the rest: insurance, gas,
maintenance and parking for reserved spaces around the metropolitan area.

Members receive a smart card (like a debit card) and a code that allows them access to
any vehicle in the fleet. The cars can be reserved from one minute to a year in advance. If
a car's gas level drops below a quarter of a tank, the member uses a Flexcar credit card to
top off the tank. When a member is using one of the vehicles, the standard plan is $8 each
hour, which includes 10 free miles. Members pay nothing when they do not have a car
checked out.

Flexcar also offers plans to accommodate more frequent use of its cars.

For instance, the basic Advantage Plan is $35 a month, with no annual fee and allows up
to five hours and 50 miles of vehicle use -- ideal for people who only need a car to run
errands after work or on weekends, or for those who don't want to bike to work during
Portland's occasional wet spells.

Most of the vehicles are near bus routes.

David Lawrence, a claims analyst for Regence Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and his wife
Stephanie use Flexcar exclusively. They are selling their regular car because the battery
went dead from lack of use.

"When you consider gas, insurance and maintenance, it is cheaper to use Flexcar in
Portland's metro area. You also don't have the worry of something happening to your own
personal car while parking downtown. And there's no cost for parking because of their
reserved parking spaces," said David.

The fleet includes sedans, such as Honda Civics and Saturns; gas/electric hybrid Toyota
Priuses; and special-use vehicles, such as Mazda pickup trucks and seven-passenger
Dodge minivans. The company even offers a Mazda Miata convertible.

For more information, call 503-328-3539 or visit www.flexcar.com.

--Joshua Sommer
***************
NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK AGENCY REVIEWS LOAN-ELIGIBLE
BOUNDARIES
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,May 15, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 18
Thursday, May 15, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK AGENCY REVIEWS LOAN-ELIGIBLE
BOUNDARIES

The Oregon Rural Development Service of the federal Department of Agriculture has
announced it is reviewing the rural boundary maps it uses to award housing loans and
grants in eligible areas.

This review will affect 11 Oregon cities that the USDA had previously considered rural,
including McMinnville, Woodburn, Salem, Corvallis, Albany, Bend, Roseburg, Coos
Bay/North Bend, Medford/Central Point, Klamath Falls and areas surrounding Portland.

The proposed map is available at area Rural Development Service offices. For more
information, call 1-866-923-5626 or go to www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/index.htm on the
web.

D.R. Horton homes open in Newberg

Sales of 147 home sites are under way at the Oaks at Springbrook in Newberg.

Built by D.R. Horton, the three-bedroom, 2.5-bath homes will range from 1,896 to 2,829
square feet. Prices run $190,000 to $250,000, and model homes are expected to be open
in late June.

For information, call 503-516-2948.

Mortgage company offers green incentive

M&T Mortgage will apply a credit to builders who construct Earth Advantage-certified
homes.

The credit is meant to offset all or a portion of the certification fee that Earth Advantage
charges builders on a per-unit basis, and it is applied from loan fees and interest due at
the time of the construction loan payoff. To qualify, the home must receive certification.

For more information, call 503-603-1733.
Morello Townhouses go on sale in Hillsboro

Sales have opened on Morello Townhouses at Orenco Station in Hillsboro, with
construction due to be completed by October.

Built by Costa Pacific Homes, the townhouses range from 1,369 to 1,597 square feet and
feature exterior brick veneer, hardwood floors, recessed lighting, gas fireplaces and high-
speed Internet wiring. Three multi-story floor plans are available. Prices range from the
$230,000s to the $270,000s.

New home buyers receive a free, one-year Tri-Met pass. For more information, call 503-
640-1230.

NAHB award calls for design entries

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and Professional Builder magazine
are accepting entries for the 2003 Best in American Living Awards (BALA), which
honors the best in residential architecture and interior design.

Builders, developers, architects, land planners and those working through cooperative
public/private efforts that expand homeownership opportunities may enter.

For information on judging criteria and all other questions, call 800-368-5242, ext. 8343
or www.housingzone.com.

Green building tour seeking participants

The second annual "Build it Green" home tour is seeking green homes for this year's
showcase of innovative building and remodeling techniques that minimize damage to the
environment.

The tour takes place Sept. 20, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and qualifying homes must be
located in the Portland metro area and demonstrate sustainable features.

For more information, call 503-823-7109 or go to www.green-rated.org.

Renaissance names chief operating officer

Tim Breedlove has been selected as chief operating officer for Renaissance Homes. He
has been chief financial officer for the company for the past 3 1/2 years.
*****************

MORE THAN 30 DOWNTOWN RESIDENCES OPEN DOORS TO PROSPECTIVE
OCCUPANTS
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER
Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,May 15, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 07
Thursday, May 15, 2003

MORE THAN 30 DOWNTOWN RESIDENCES OPEN DOORS TO PROSPECTIVE
OCCUPANTS

The Portland Business Alliance is throwing its second annual downtown open house, and
anyone interested in living in the heart of the city is invited.

From noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 1, more than 30 condominiums and apartment
buildings throughout Portland's central city will be open to the public for tours.
Apartments and properties for sale are included in this free tour of new and pre-owned
projects.

Since 1995, more than 50 residential buildings -- mostly downtown -- have been
completed in the central city area, according to the Portland Development Commission.
Several are due for completion by the end of the year.

Free maps will be printed in the June 1 edition of The Oregonian and also will be
available from Downtown Sidewalk Ambassadors (wearing black and green jackets) or
online at www.portlandalliance.com.

Following is a list of properties participating in this year's tour.

UNITS FOR SALE

Bridgeport Condominiums, 1130 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-2000;
www.hoytstreetproperties.com

Legends Condominiums, 1132 S.W. 19th Ave.; 503-223-7941

Marshall-Wells Lofts, 1001 N.W. 14th Ave.; 503-223-2255; www.marshall-wells.com

McCormick Pier, 600 N.W. Naito Parkway; 503-228-7437: www.rivercondos.com

Mosaic, 1400 S.W. 11th Ave.; 503-936-0332; www.mosaiccondos.com

Streetcar Lofts, 1030 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-2000; www.hoytstreetproperties.com

RENTAL UNITS

735 St. Clair, 735 S.W. St. Clair St.; 503-478-9926
Bel Aire, 2139 W. Burnside St.; 503-226-3799

Collins Circle Apartments, 1704 S.W. Jefferson St.; 503-525-2324;
www.collinscircle.com

Fifth Avenue Place, 314 N.W. Fifth Ave.; 503-243-3311

Gallery Park Apartments, 1436 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-222-0274

Hamilton West, 1511 S.W. 12th Ave.; 503-525-0500

Kafoury Commons, 1240 S.W. Columbia St.; 503-226-0600

Kearney Plaza, 930 N.W. 12th Ave.; 503-227-5624; www.hoytstreetproperties.com

King Towers, 901 S.W. King Ave.; 503-223-1458

Lovejoy Station, 1040 N.W. 10th Ave.; 503-220-2500

Museum Place Lofts & Townhouses, 1030 S.W. Jefferson St.; 503-295-0303;
www.museum-place.com

Oakwood At The Essex House, 1330 S.W. Third Ave.; 503-226-2443;
www.oakwood.com

Ongford Apartments, 1417 S.W. 10th Ave.; 503-223-6603

Pacific Tower, 333 N.W. Fourth Ave.; 503-224-9393

Park Plaza, 1969 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-227-7485

Pearl Court, 920 N.W. Kearney St.; 503-222-1999

Portland Center Apartments, 200 S.W. Harrison St.; 503-224-3050;
www.equityapartments.com

Portland Towers, 950 S.W. 21st Ave.; 503-228-9651

Regency Apartments, 1410 S.W. Broadway; 503-224-2308

RiverPlace Square, 0308 S.W. Montgomery St.; 503-228-1800;
www.riverplacesquare.com

Rose Plaza, 2199 N.W. Everett St.; 503-222-6080

Royal Arms Apartments, 1829 N.W. Lovejoy St.; 503-222-2430
Sovereign Hotel, 710 S.W. Madison St.; 503-248-0021

University Park Apartments, 1500 S.W. Park Ave.; 503-222-9300;
www.universityparkapartments.com

Village At Lovejoy Fountain, 245 S.W. Lincoln St.; 503-223-5314;
www.villageatlovejoy.com

Westover Tower, 930 N.W. 25th Place; 503-227-2181

Yards At Union Station, 945 N.W. Naito Parkway; 503-478-1695
*****************

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK -- COHO CONSTRUCTION LAUDED FOR
GREEN BUILDING PROJECT
By Joshua Sommer
STAFF WRITER

Source: THE OREGONIAN
Thursday,April 17, 2003
Edition: SUNRISE, Section: NEW HOME MONTHLY, Page 17
Thursday, April 17, 2003

NEW HOME MONTHLY NOTEBOOK -- COHO CONSTRUCTION LAUDED FOR
GREEN BUILDING PROJECT

Coho Construction Services, a Portland-based builder, won an award for Green Project of
the Year at the fifth annual National Green Building Conference in Baltimore, March 31.

The project (New Home Monthly, Sept. 19, 2002), a house built at 4057 N.E. 14th Ave.
in Portland, showcased the use of a number of environmentally friendly materials and
building techniques, including Rastra block wall forms; a metal roof; a rainwater
collection and filtration system for potable water; salvaged wood; recycled doors, marble
counters and sinks; sustainably harvested white oak cabinets; radiant heating under
cement floors; bamboo flooring; high-efficiency appliances; heat exchanger; and Aglaia
natural wood stain.

Judges for this year's awards cited Coho Construction for outstanding, comprehensive
green building philosophy.

For more information about the project, call Coho Construction at 503-233-4197.

Ten beneficiaries set for Midsummer gala
Northwest Housing Alternatives (NHA) is one of 10 charitable organizations benefiting
from the 2003 Street of Dreams fund-raiser, A Midsummer Night's Dream.

The gala is set for July 17 at Renaissance Point on Cooper Mountain, the site of this
year's annual showcase of luxury homes.

In celebration of the benefit's 20th anniversary, the theme is the "Roaring '20s."
Participants are invited to dress in period garb, preview the show homes and have dinner
with jazz music and dancing.

The other nine charitable organizations that will receive a portion of the event proceeds
are Candlelighters for Children with Cancer; Community Vision; Habitat for Humanity;
HOST Development; Kruse Way-Lake Oswego Rotary; Northwest Medical Teams;
Portland Housing Center; Raphael House; and Women for Children Friends of
Doernbecher.

Tickets are $100. For more information, call the Home Builders Association of
Metropolitan Portland at 503-684-1880, or visit www.homebuildersportland.com.

Home-repair loans available in rural areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's rural development program has allotted $850,000
in housing-repair loans and grants for low-income homeowners living in non-urban areas
of Oregon.

The housing repair program is designed to improve living standards by funding repairs to
roofs, wiring, plumbing heating systems storm windows and weatherization. Loans are
available for up to $20,000 with a maximum repayment period of 20 years. The annual
interest rate is 1 percent.

Under the program, applicants can receive assistance of up to $7,500 with only a
promissory note. Homeowners 62 years of age or older may qualify for a grant in cases
where an individual lacks the finances to repay a loan.

For more information, call 866-923-5626, or visit www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/504.htm.

				
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